Beyond Social Media: from tools to trust

ERIC WEAVER AD CLUB NOVEMBER 2008

Since our last chat…
  On average, one in four of you has a new employer.   Bloggers are regularly cited in the media.   Facebook (124MM users) has surpassed MySpace (114MM)   Brands have taken to social sites
  Starbucks, Dove, AllState, Virgin America, Comcast, H&R Block

  The Obama campaign has proven that social networking has incredible power.
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Forrester’s Technographic Model

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IN THE LAST YEAR: " Fewer nonparticipants," creators the same, and " far more spectators
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So what was initially a way to connect with friends and others with shared interests...
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…has become much more impactful.
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LAST YEAR:" seventhhighest Google result for “Comcast” was a sleeping technician
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THIS YEAR: customer service via Twitter

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LAST YEAR

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THIS YEAR:" soliciting operational ideas

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THIS YEAR:" online community for social good

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So I should be advertising on social sites…?
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Let’s look at consumers.
  Attention-deficit   Fragmented by niche interests   Feeling time-starved
  Girl Scouts merit badge   Cell phone in the john

  Distrustful of advertising   Spoiled by customization and media options   “Snack-media” consumers
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Power has shifted.
  SEARCH lets consumers find people, products, information and media of interest & relevance   EXPRESSION through blogs, podcasts, opinion sites, online communities   SHARING items of value or interest – globally
  Items they (we) love…. and hate
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THE REALITY: To get what they want, consumers generally don’t need marketing, advertising or PR.

!

Working toward his goal, he was confronted by a daunting array of skyscrapers, interstitials, video pre-rolls and pop-unders.
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NEW SKOOL: a Sphere of OLD SKOOL: the Pyramidof Cross-Talk Influence

This means the days of “controlled voice” are over.

Opinion-Forming Elite

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With so many voices, who do you believe?
People turn to peers for recommendations They also do this when:
  Risk is higher   More choices to review and filter   They have less time to research

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Social endorsement trumps marketing

60%

believe what “a person like me” says about an organization (up LEAST CREDIBLE: corporate or from 51% in 2007) product advertising (22% of ages 25-34)… hey, that’s us!
SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer
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Endorsement isn’t just influential. " It’s widely shared.

56% of those aged 35-64 and 63% aged

25-34 were “likely to share their opinions and experiences about companies they trust or distrust on the web.”*
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*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 

Ultimately, social endorsement drives trust.

78% of those surveyed

aged 35-64 and 83% aged 25-34 were “likely to trust what they have seen, read or heard about a company if someone they know has already mentioned it to them.”*
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*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 

And trust drives preference.

88%
of opinion elites choose to buy from companies they trust. 85% refuse to buy from companies they distrust.*

The boFom line:  Trust drives transac.ons. 

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*SOURCE: 2008 Edelman Trust Barometer 

Build trust through Social Marketing.

The use of peer-to-peer engagement, dialogue and connective tools to help your offering be found, be relevant, be authentic and be promoted.
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1. Be found.
 Optimize presence and content for search  Place it in many relevant venues, fully tagged and described (“social media breadcrumbs”)
  Podcasts on Utterz, videos on YouTube, bookmarks on Delicious, valuable updates on Twitter

 Join multiple communities - wherever your brand makes sense  Be in the end zone
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2. Be relevant.
 Listen and engage  Participate only in communities where your offering would be of direct value  Join as a person and member, not as an advertiser  Avoid the urge to push message
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3. Be authentic.
 Avoid glitz and high production values  Demonstrate transparency and honesty  Update frequently with less-than-perfect content, rather than less frequently with highly vetted material

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4. Be promoted.
 Make content easily shared  Provide content or functionality with true value rather than self-interest  Don’t fight time starvation: keep content short and sweet.

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Which tools to use?
BLOGGING
        Product manager insights CEO media/investor relations Special offers Event buzz

AUDIO (podcasts)
   

Company storytelling Thought leadership Event planning Product development Shared learnings Distributed work-in-progress Brand awareness Community/CSR discussion Community building Feedback/testing/trials

MICROBLOGGING (Twitter) VIDEO (one-off virals or recurring podcasts)
          Product how-to’s Personality pieces Company storytelling Humor Content distribution/sharing

WIKIS
               

SOCIAL & TOPICAL NETWORKS

WIDGETS

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And a final note: consider your “lens”
Boomers/Tweeners   Trained in formalities   Don’t offend anyone   Be the most acceptable to the largest number of people   Privacy highly valued   Interested in tech functionality but often overwhelmed by speed of change
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Gen X/Millenials   Formalities ignored   More interested in finding those with like minds than worrying about turning off others   Less privacy means more ability to be found   Digital natives – tech is ubiquitous and easy

Power has shifted.
  EMPOWER CUSTOMERS TO BECOME ADVOCATES   EXTEND YOUR BRAND WITHOUT HIGH COST   YOUR CONTENT APPEARS IN MORE PLACES
  Lives on your sites, on enthusiasts’ sites, on cell phones, PSPs

  INCREASE GOOGLE RANKINGS   BE FOUND WHERE YOUR CUSTOMERS WANT TO GO   LEVERAGE THE EXISTING TRUST BETWEEN PEOPLE rather than trying to buy it
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THANK YOU.
facebook.ericweaver.com branddialogue.com twitter.com/weave

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