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Phrasal Verbs and other multi-word verbs
Phrasal verbs are part of a large group of verbs called "multi-word verbs". m Phrasal verbs and other multi-word verbs are an important part of the English language. Multi-word verbs, including phrasal verbs, are very common, especially in spoken English. A multi-word verb is a verb like "pick up", "turn on" or "get on with". For convenience, many people refer to all multi-word verbs as phrasal verbs. These verbs consist of a basic verb + another word or words. The other word(s) can be prepositions and/or adverbs. The two or three words that make up multi-word verbs form a short "phrase" - which is why these verbs are often all called "phrasal verbs". The important thing to remember is that a multi-word verb is still a verb. "Get" is a verb. "Get up", is also a verb, a different verb. "Get" and "get up" are two different verbs. They do not have the same meaning. So you should treat each multi-word verb as a separate verb, and learn it like any other verb. There are three types of multi-word verbs, including phrasal verbs: phrasal verbs; prepositional verbs; phrasal-prepositional verbs..

Analyse the table:
SINGLE-WORD VERB

look

direct your eyes in a certain direction search for something someone look in the direction something or someone or of

You must look before you leap.

MULTIWORD VERBS

prepositional verbs

look for look at

I lost my keys. I must look for them. I was looking at him when he smiled. You can look up my number in the telephone directory. Who is looking after the baby? I look forward to meeting you.

phrasal verbs

look up

look after phrasal-prepositional verbs look forward to

search for and find information in a reference book take care of anticipate with pleasure

PHRASAL VERBS
Phrasal verbs are made of verb + adverb Phrasal verbs can be: • intransitive (no direct object) • transitive (direct object) Here are some examples of phrasal verbs: phrasal verbs meaning examples direct object intransitive phrasal verbs transitive phrasal verbs get up break down put off turn down rise from bed cease to function postpone refuse I don't like to get up. He was late because his carbroke down. We will have to put off They turned down the meeting. my offer.

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SEPARABLE PHRASAL VERBS
When phrasal verbs are transitive (that is, they have a direct object), we can usually separate the two parts. For example, "turn down" is a separable phrasal verb. We can say: "turn down my offer" or "turn my offer down". Look at this table: transitive phrasal separable verbs are They They turned turned my offer down down. my offer.

However, if the direct object is a pronoun, we have no choice. We must separate the phrasal verb and insert the pronoun between the two parts. Look at this example with the separable phrasal verb "switch on":
direct object pronouns must go between the two parts of transitive phrasal verbs John John John John switched switched switched switched on on. on. on it. This is not possible. the radio. These are all possible.

the radio it

Separable or inseparable phrasal verbs? Some dictionaries tell you when phrasal verbs are separable. If a dictionary writes "look (something) up", you know that the phrasal verb "look up" is separable, and you can say "look something up" and "look up something". It's a good idea to write "something/somebody" as appropriate in your vocabulary book when you learn a new phrasal verb, like this: • • • get up break down put something/somebody off

• turn sthg/sby down This tells you whether the verb needs a direct object (and where to put it).

PREPOSITIONAL VERBS
Prepositional verbs are made of: verb + preposition Because a preposition always has an object, all prepositional verbs have direct objects, so all the prepositional verbs are transitive. Here are some examples of prepositional verbs:
EXAMPLES PREPOSITIONAL VERBS MEANING

direct object believe in look after talk about wait for
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have faith in the existence of take care of discuss await

I believe in He is looking after Did you talk about John is waiting for

God. the dog. me? Mary.
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Prepositional verbs cannot be separated. That means that we cannot put the direct object between the two parts. For example, we must say "look after the baby". We cannot say "look the baby after": Who is looking after the baby? prepositional verbs are inseparable Who is looking the baby after? This is not possible. This is possible.

It is a good idea to write "something/somebody" in your vocabulary book when you learn a new prepositional verb, like this: • believe in something/somebody • look after sthg/sby This reminds you that this verb needs a direct object (and where to put it).

PHRASAL-PREPOSITIONAL VERBS
Phrasal-prepositional verbs are a small group of multi-word verbs made from a verb plus another word or words.. Phrasal-prepositional verbs are made of: verb + adverb + preposition Look at these examples of phrasal-prepositional verbs: phrasal-prepositional verbs meaning examples direct object get on with put up with look forward to run out of have a friendly relationship with tolerate anticipate with pleasure use up, exhaust He doesn't get on with I won't put up with I look forward to We have run out of his wife. your attitude. seeing you. eggs.

Because phrasal-prepositional verbs end with a preposition, there is always a direct object. And, like prepositional verbs, phrasal-prepositional verbs cannot be separated. Look at these examples: phrasal-prepositional verbs are inseparable We We ran out of ran out of fuel. it.

It is a good idea to write "something/somebody" in your vocabulary book when you learn a new phrasalprepositional verb, like this: • get on with somebody • put up with sthg/sby • run out of something This reminds you that this verb needs a direct object (and where to put it). Source: englishclub.com On the next page you can learn more about the prepositional verbs. Try to match each verb to the preposition, and then, using a dictionary, try to explain the meaning they convey (or translate them into Portuguese). Use the prepositions from each box placed above to fill in the table. Note that there may be more than one possibility.
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from

at

of

for

to

in

Verb
1) Abstain 2) Approve 3) Aim 4) Ask 5) Attend 6) Benefit 7) Believe

Preposition

Meaning

into

to

with

on

Verb
8) Bump 9) Belong 10) Begin 11) Chat 12) Comment 13) Concentrate 14) Cope

Preposition

Meaning

of

with

about

from

on

in

Verb
15) Consist 16) Deal 17) Depart 18) Experiment 19) Fail 20) Fill 21) Forget

Preposition

Meaning

of

with

about

from

on

in

Verb
15) Consist 16) Deal 17) Depart 18) Experiment 19) Fail 20) Fill 21) Forget

Preposition

Meaning

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at

on

to

about

for

Verb
22) Glance 23) Hear 24) Hope 25) Insist 26) Look 27) Mention

Preposition

Meaning

about

to

with

from

in

for

Verb
28) Occur 29) Prepare 30) Prevent 31) Provide 32) Succeed 33) Worry

Preposition

Meaning

Source: On-line Reloaded, Porto Editora

Now you have to memorise them, but not all at once!!!! You should do it in phases… ☺

G☺☺D W☺RK!!!!

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