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CHRIST UNIVERSITY

BA Vocational Undergraduate Department of Communication and Media Studies Course Description


The Communication and Media Studies course (earlier known as Functional English) is a three-year vocational course aimed at equipping students with spoken and written skills that will enable them to communicate effectively. The course is geared towards meeting the demands of the job market and improving the young graduates employability. So the stress is on practical work and hands-ontraining in a variety of authentic situations, rather than classroom theory and notes. In the first semester, the two core foundation papers- Applied Phonetics and Communication Skills and Basic Writing Skills- have been designed to help students hone their interpersonal skills. By the end of the semester, the students should be able to understand the elements of English Phonetics and be able to read and speak English with confidence, fluency and accuracy in a range of situations. They should also be able to improve their capacity to write with clarity and competence, manipulating the language to produce stylistic variations, constructing logical, coherent and cohesive texts. In semester two, the paper on Software Applications for Print Media & the Web will introduce students to the basic computer skills needed for page layout, graphic design and web design. Students will also be offered a choice between two electives- Print Journalism and Basic Photography. While Elective One - Print Journalism will focus on training students to write for the print media, Elective two, i.e. Basic Photography, will introduce students to basic principles of photography. During the summer vacation, all semester two students will be required to complete a month-long internship at any newspaper or magazine and submit a detailed project report under a prescribed format. The aim of this compulsory internship is to supplement classroom learning and give students first-hand experience of the nitty-gritty of working for the print media. Audio & Video Editing Software, a core paper in the third semester, will provide students with hands-on training in editing radio programmes, short films, creating trailers and compositing software. The electives offered in this semester are: Elective 1.Radio and Elective 2. Applied Theatre. Elective 1. Radio will help students develop an appreciation of the special nature of radio as a medium and introduce them to scriptwriting, presentation and production techniques. The aim of introducing Applied Theatre as the second elective is to give students first-hand experience of the skills, marketing tools and application patterns of theatre in the context of emerging markets. Papers that will be offered in semester four are Creative Writing (Core) and elective papers titled Television Studies & Introduction to Film and Basic Animation. The Creative Writing paper will attempt to help students focus their latent creative abilities, improve their ability to develop an argument and help integrate visual sources in their writing. The elective Television Studies & Introduction to Film will introduce students to the creative elements video broadcasting and film Syllabus 2009 1

appreciation. This knowledge will be applied when the students make short films. Basic Animation will provide basic hands on training to students in Animation software. At the end of the second year, students will be required to do a second internship in a field of their choice and provide a detailed report of the same. The purpose of Media and Society, a core paper in the fifth semester, is to help students understand the role of media in society and to enable them to become more effective media watchers, consumers, and practitioners. Elective FUE 532- will be an advanced level of Applied Theatre Studies. Under Advertising, students will evaluate advertisements, marketing campaigns and learn the basics of writing advertising copy. In the final semester, the paper on Public Relations will give students an insight into this specialized field with a focus on job opportunities. Students will also have the option of working on a dissertation on any aspect of the media or choosing the elective New Media & Communication. Objectives To sharpen and strengthen communication skills namely speaking, reading, writing and listening abilities To hone interpersonal skills To train students to write with clarity and competence. To facilitate the development of mass communication skills. To train students to write creatively and effectively for the print and broadcast media. To provide students with practical training in the mass media to prepare them for the job market. To equip students with portfolios that will improve their employability.

Syllabus 2009

COURSE STRUCTURE
I Semester
SUB CODE FUE 131 FUE 132 SUBJECT TITLE Applied Phonetics & Communication Skills Writing Skills HOURS 4 4 MARKS 100 100 CREDIT 3 3

II Semester
SUB CODE FUE 231 FUE 232Elective FUE 233Elective SUBJECT TITLE Software applications for Print Media & the Web Print Media Basic Photography HOURS 4 4 4 MARKS 100 100 100 CREDIT 3 3 3

III Semester
SUB CODE FUE 331 FUE 332Elective FUE 333Elective SUBJECT TITLE Audio & Video Editing Software Radio Applied Theatre- Basic Course HOURS 4 4 4 MARKS 100 100 100 CREDIT 3 3 3

IV Semester
SUB CODE FUE 431 FUE 432 FUE 433 SUBJECT TITLE Creative Writing Television Studies & Film Appreciation Animation HOURS 4 4 4 MARKS 100 100 100 CREDIT 3 3 3

V Semester
SUB CODE FUE 531 FUE 532 FUE 533 SUBJECT TITLE Media & Society Applied Theatre-Advanced Course Advertising HOURS 4 4 4 MARKS 100 100 100 CREDIT 3 3 3

VI Semester
SUB CODE FUE 631 FUE 632 FUE 633 SUBJECT TITLE Public Relations New Media & Communication Dissertation HOURS 5 5 4 MARKS 100 100 100 CREDIT 4 4 3

Syllabus 2009

Applied Phonetics and Communication Skills


Course: BA Paper: Applied Phonetics and Communciation Skills 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: I Code: FUE 131 Hours: 60

In the changing socio-economic scenario, English has emerged as the global language of business and communication. This has created numerous employment opportunities in varied fields both globally and locally, especially in electronic media. To facilitate this, the students will be trained in effective verbal communication with reference to emerging trends in radio and TV, in public speaking and platform roles with reference to event management. Objectives

To introduce students to RP, American and other pronunciations and help them critically reflect on them with reference to the use of English in India in Mass Communication and interpersonal communication. To help students speak fluently in English, and develop their verbal communication skills To develop public speaking skills To introduce participants to a theoretical framework of theatre and its parameters Phonetics 12 Hours

Module I

Spelling and Pronunciation; English Consonants and Vowels; The Syllable; Morphemes; Assimilation and Elision; Word Accent, Rhythm and Intonation; Accents: US, UK and Australian; English in India: Mother tongue influence on English in India - Pronunciation, syntax, tags etc Module II Oral Communication 14 Hours

Fundamentals of Communication; Non-verbal Communication; Listening; Interpersonal skills; Negotiation; Interviewing; Group Communication; Making Presentations; Multicultural Communication Skills Module III Public Speaking 15 Hours

Public Speaking and Platform Roles - Public Speaking The four stages, flourishes (use of anecdotes, humour, proverbs, quotes etc); Types of Speeches: Inaugural, Valedictory, Welcome, Vote of Thanks, Chief Guest's Speech, Presidential Remarks, Condolence Speech, Felicitation Speech, Congratulatory Speech, Keynote Address, Convocation Address, Panel Discussion.; Platform Speeches: President, Master of Ceremony, Moderator, Compere, Commentator, Announcer, Anchor Person, Panel Interview. Platform Roles: Protocols and conventions of stage programmes Intellectual Assemblies: Intellectual assemblies and artists' assemblies; Conference, Seminar; Symposia, Panel Discussion, Workshop, Training, Convention, Rally Syllabus 2009 4

Module IV

Voice Training

15 Hours

Bilingualism, multilingualism, and language mixing (code switching): Recent trends, effectiveness and advantages; Voice culture, voice and speech modulation; Telephonic Conversation; Group Discussion; Situational Conversations; News reading for Radio and TV; Dialogue in Theatre, Radio, TV and cinema; Anchoring Module V 4 Hours

Defining and re-defining theatre, Simple steps to do an effective play, Basic team-work , evolving a script, Introduction to Applied Theatre Practicals Production of one-act plays. (To be staged in the third week of July) A 500-word introspective report on theatre and its influence on self, performing team and society Practical training in all the aspects mentioned in Part A and Part B Microphone training Books for reference Bagchi, Subrato. 'Choral Behaviour and Group Think'. Times of India 24 Feb 2006, pp17. Balasubramanian, T. A Textbook of English Phonetics for Indian Students. Rpt. Delhi: Macmillan India, 2001. Ball, Martin J and Joan Rabilly. Phonetics: The Science of Speech, London: Arnold, 1999. Eckhouse, Barry Competitive Communication: A Rhetoric for Modern Business. Oxford: OUP 1999. Goodale,. Malcolm. Professional Presentations, CUP, 2005 Jones, Daniel. English Pronouncing Dictionary. 16 Ed. London: CUP, 2003. Kishore, BR and DS Paul. Group Discussion and Interviews. New Delhi: Vee Kumar, 2000. Krishnaswamy, N, Burde, Archana S. 'The English Empire and the Politics of World Englishes' in N Krishnaswamy, and Archana S Burde,. The Politics of Indians' English. New Delhi: OUP, 1998. Krishnaswamy, N, Burde, Archana S. The Politics of Indians' English. New Delhi: OUP, 1998. McCarthy, Michael, Felicily O'Dell. English Idioms in Use. CUP 2004 rpt Syllabus 2009 5

McCarthy, Michael, Felicily O'Dell.English Phrasal Verbs in Use. CUP 2004 rpt Miculka, Jean. Speaking for Success, Ohio: South-Western Educational Publishing, 1999. Mortimer, Collin. Elements of Pronunciation: Intensive Practice for Intermediate and more Advanced Students. CUP,1985. O'Connor, J.D. Better English Pronunciation, London: Roach, Peter. English Phonetics and Phonology: A Self-contained Comprehension Pronunciation Course. CUP, 200. Testing Pattern:

Students will have to write a theory paper for both the mid and the end semester examination. Two practical exams: Mid semester based on Group discussion.; and end semester exam based on staging platform events Five-minute speeches - CIA 1 Written Assignment of about 1000 words on current developments in the topics under discussion - CIA II

End Semester Examination Module Sec A 20 marks Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Module 4 Section A Section B Section C Section DTotal 20 10 10 10 Sec B 10 marks Sec C 10 marks Sec D 10 marks

Phonetics (No choice given) 10 x1 = 10 marks (1 out of 3) 10 x1 = 10 marks (1out of 3) 10 x1 = 10 marks (1 out of 3)

50 marks

Syllabus 2009

Writing Skills
Course: BA Paper: Basic Writing Skills 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: I Code: FUE 132 Hours: 60

Writing is a skill that has to be acquired through hard work. It requires a lot of thinking, planning, revising, and research. Acquiring effective writing skills in the first year of college will pave the path for success, not just in college but also for life. Writing with clarity, unity and cohesion is an essential skill to be developed in college. This paper will help the students to learn the mechanics of writing through practice tasks. Communication in a work place depends on clear, effective written word. This paper will introduce students to a wide range of writing exercises that closely reflect the world of work. It will help the students to observe, plan and organize in order to communicate effectively in business situations. Objectives to develop connection between reading, thinking and writing to use writing as a way to explore an idea, concept to develop the ability to read their own writing critically to make the students conversant with conventions of writing that clarify and enhance meaning to compose variety of correspondence for specific purposes to write clearly, persuasively, ethically and to a deadline to use current available technology to streamline and maximize the effectiveness of written and verbal reports and to facilitate research to find and organize material appropriate to audience, purpose, and situation to develop clear, complete, and accurate written and spoken messages to recognize communication barriers and how to remove them Paper Content Module I Rhetoric of Writing: Writer; Purpose; Audience; Tone; Context Module II The Writing Process: Planning; Drafting; Revising 2 hours 5 hours

Module III 15 hours Research: The Purpose of Research; Basic Skills of Researching; Collecting Information from People; Collecting Published Information; Documentation - MLA style, APA style, Chicago Manual Style Module IV 8 hours Designing Pages: Design for Readers; Elements of Page Design; Basic Design Guidelines Syllabus 2009 7

Module V Using Visual Aids Creating and Discussing Visual Aids Using: Tables; Line graphs; Bar graphs; Pie charts; Flow charts Using illustrations: Photographs; Drawings; Guidelines Module VI

10 hours

20 hours

Reports and Proposals - Memorandums; Informal Reports - IMRD Reports, Progress Reports Formal Reports; Recommendation Reports; Feasibility Reports; Oral Reports; Proposals Practical Component Practical will focus on making the students solve the writing assignments, on the concepts taught in theory, in class. All the assignments during the semester will have different level of difficulty and involve research using various sources like the library, talking to people, internet etc. The students will complete research before coming to the class and solve the assignments in class. The solved assignments will become part of a portfolio. The portfolio will contain all the solved assignments and a review of the portfolio written by the student. While reviewing the portfolio students will discuss what they have learnt, the problems they encountered etc. After the evaluation of the portfolio students will face a viva. Books for Reference Allen, Robert. Punctuation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002 Alverez, Joseph A. Elements of Composition. Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1985 Billingham, Jo. Editing and Revising Text Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002 Langan, John. English skills with Readings USA: Tata McGraw-Hill, 1988 Riordan, Daniel G., Pauley, Steven E. Technical Report Writing Today. New Delhi: Bizantra, 2004 Robtaille, Julie and Connelly, Robert. Writers Resources: From Paragraph to Essay. USA: Thomson & Heinle, 2003 Rosa, Alfred, and Eschholz, Paul. The Writers Brief Handbook. New York:Macmillan Publishing Company, 1994 Scarry, Sandra and Scarry, John.Writers Workplace with Readings. New York: Harcourt Brace College Publishers, 1999 Sealy, John. Writing Reports. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002 Skwire, David and Wiener, S. Harvey. Students Book of College English: Rhetoric, Readings, Handbook. Massachusetts: Allyn & Bacon, 1999 Testing Pattern Mid-semester and end-semester exams will focus on students ability to write from a readers perspective, creating page design templates, analyzing graphs, creating graphs and writing short reports.

Syllabus 2009

CIA 2: Students can choose one magazine/web site/ a days TV programs on any channel of their choice. Write an article of 4-5 pages analyzing the magazine/web site/ TV program. Analysis will focus on rhetoric of writing. CIA 3: students can choose a topic of their choice; make an oral presentation in class. Using audiovisual aids is mandatory. Mid semester Exam Module Section A 5 marks Module I 1 Module II 1 Module III 1 Module IV 1 Section A 5 x 4 = 20 Section B 10 x 3 = 30 Total 50 End Semester Exam Module Section A 3 marks Module IV 2 Module V 2 Module VI 1 Section A 2 x 5 = 10 Section B 10 x 4 = 40 Total 50 Section B 10 marks 2 2 Section B 10 marks 2 1

Syllabus 2009

Software applications for Print Media & the Web


Course: BA Paper: Software applications for Print Media & the Web 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: II Code: FUE 231 Hours: 60

This paper will introduce students to computer hardware and software technology. It seeks to familiarize students with software like Adobe Photoshop, Adobe In design and Adobe Dream Weaver. Their practical work will include hands on training with Graphic designing, Page layout and Web designing. This knowledge will be applied when the students design brochures, posters, websites and lab journals. Objectives To introduce the students to Graphic Designing and Page Layout software To help students become familiar with the aesthetics of layout designing, graphic designing and web designing.

Module 1 : Introduction 10 Hours Introduction to computer history, software and hardware, Devices: input, output, primary and secondary storage device. Computer networking and Internet issues: LAN, MAN, CAN, MAN, advantages and disadvantages of networking and the Internet. World Wide Web (WWW) and Basics of Internet. Module 2 : Graphic Designing 20 Hours Introduction to Photoshop, Photo editing , colour and tone correction, Image size, Selection , Grid and Guides, Masks , Channel , Painting and Editing Layers, Filters, Actions , Automation , Preparing Images For Print and Web Working with 3D layers. Module 3 : Layout Designing 7 hours Adobe In design: Layout designing, working with text and graphics , column alignment , column guide, auto flow , indexing , importing text , images . Publishing books , Multilayer newsletters, Documents , Creation of E-books , E-Brochure, Exporting content for web. Module 4: Website Development 8 Hours Introduction Work Flow , Property window , site concept saving , Adding Images and Multimedia (Graphics, Flash , animation) content , Planning Layout, Using frames , Multiple WebPages , DHTML, Layers , Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Tables , Organizing Uploading a project using library , sharing project , Editing Practical Component Module 2 : Creating Poster , brochure, Magazine covers, Retouching and Image Manipulations Module 3.: Publishing Newsletters , Creating Newspaper layouts , Book Publishing . Syllabus 2009 10

Module 4: Creating a full fledged Website Reference Books: Introduction to computers Peter Norton Tata McGraw hill 2005 Edition Adobe Photoshop CS3 Bible , Laurie Ulrich Fuller and Robert C Fuller Adobe Photoshop CS3 for windows and Macintosh(Visual quick start guide) , Elaine weinmann & Peterl lourekas Adobe Indesign Classroom in a book Adobe Creative team Dreamweaver CS3 in Simple Steps Kogent Solutions Inc- Dreamtech Press 2008 Internal Assignment CIA I - Graphic Design Assignment [ Poster / Brochure / CD cover / Magazine cover ] [One A3 Hardcopy submission ) . CIA II - Group Project Group of 5-7 students , have to publish one newsletter CIA III - student have to develop a complete website based on the topic given

Exam Pattern
Students have to write a theory paper for both the mid and end semester examination Mid Semester Examination : 50 Marks Paper Module Section A Section B Section C Module I 5 2 1 Module II 3 2 1 Module III 2 1 Section A 10 X 2 = 20 Marks ( All question compulsory ) Section B 4 X 5 = 20 Marks ( Answer any 4 out of 5) Section C 10 X 1 = 10 Marks ( Answer any 1 out of 2) End Semester Examination : 100 Marks Paper Module Module I Module II Module III Module IV Section A 3 3 2 2 Section B 1 2 1 2 Section C 2 2 1 2

Section A 10 X 2 = 20 Marks All question compulsory ) Section B 6 X 5 Course: BA Syllabus 2009 = 30 Marks (answer 5 out of 6) Section C 10 X 5 = 50 Marks (answer 5 out 1 of Print 7) Elective-

Media
Semester: II 11

Paper: Print Media 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits

Code: FUE 232 Hours: 60

This semester will focus on training students to write for the print media. Students will learn how to write reports, features, reviews, editorial and other print formats. They will also be given practice in editing and rewriting newspaper copy. This knowledge will be applied and tested in assignments that will go to build up their portfolios. Upon completion of this paper, students will employ the writing techniques they have acquired in an internship with the print media. Objectives To provide students with an in-depth understanding of the the Nature of News and the Process of Reporting. To acquaint them with the Techniques of Writing Simple but Polished News Stories. To emphasize the essentials of the Human Interest story and the Depth Report. To help students develop Creativity in Writing and the Imaginative Approaches to Features, Profiles and Interview Stories. To prepare students to undertake Opinion Writing. To help students gain an understanding of the Mechanics of Editing.

Methodology The methodology will focus on giving students: In-depth understanding of the fundamentals using the newspaper as an up-to-date text. Copious examples from many sources to illustrate the essentials. Examples to stimulate classroom discussion and individual analysis. Writing exercises to inculcate the basic mechanics of newspaper writing. Paper content Module I Introduction to the Print Medium A brief history of the Press in India. Major Newspaper organizations. Organizational set-up of a newspaper. Contemporary trends in Print Journalism. Ethical and legal considerations. Introduction to News writing 8 hours News- Definition, types; News values; Techniques of Newsgathering. Responsibilities of a Reporter. Sources of News; Types of Newspaper articles, Analysis of Newspapers Module II 4 hours Report writing Headlines; Lead; Body of a story. Inverted pyramid structure. Hour glass structure. Featurized news report. Human Interest, Colour story. Specialist reporting. Module III Creativity in Writing Syllabus 2009 6 hours 12

Features; Interviews; Profiles; Middles, Columns Module V Opinion Writing Editorials; Reviews (Book, Movie, Music album); Letters to the Editor Module VI Editing Grammar; Punctuation; Tight Writing, Rewriting. Module VII Current Affairs Practical Exercises 30 hours 5 hours

5 hours

1 - Classroom Exercises Using current newspapers as source material, students may be required to: i. ii. Clip stories and analyse the structure employed in each case. Frame questions for prospective sources of information for a news story.

2. Field Work Applying the yardsticks of newsworthiness, students may be asked to report events on campus and the city, conduct interviews and write feature stories. 3. Production of the Departments Lab journal- Blueprint 4. Project Work - On-the-job-project report on internship at a newspaper/magazine office to be written according to the prescribed format. 5. Portfolio assessment- Reports, Features, Interviews, Profiles, Columns , Books for Reference Agarwal, Vir Bala and V. S. Gupta Handbook of Journalism and Mass Communication. Concept Pub. Co. New Delhi. 2001. DAbreo, Desmond. The Mass Media and You. Better Yourself Books. Mumbai. 1994 Ed. Hakemulder, Jan R., Fay A.C. de Jonge and P.P. Singh. News Reporting and Editing. Anmol Publications Pvt. Ltd. New Delhi. 2002. Mencher, Melvin. News Reporting and Writing. 7th ed., Madison, WI., . McGraw-Hill Companies, 1997. Syllabus 2009 13

Neal, James M. and Suzanne S. Brown. Newswriting and Reporting. Surjeet Publications. Delhi.1997. Parthasarathy, Rangaswami. Here is the News! Reporting for the Media. Sterling Publications. New Delhi. 1994. Srampickal, Jacob. Communication and Media in India Today. Media House. New Delhi. 1998.

Testing Pattern
As per the norm for Communicative English, evaluation for this paper will be both formative (ongoing evaluation) and summative (final examination) Students will be tested on their ability to write different types of newspaper articles, creatively and competently. Practical component: Assessment of lab journal + viva Portfolio Assessment is part of Internal Assessment and the broad issue is a focus on skills. Mid-semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Section A 10 marks 1 3 Section B 5 marks 1 1

Written Assignment Group Presentation

End Semester Exam- Portfolio Assessment

Elective 2 Basic Photography


Course: BA Paper: Basic Photography 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Syllabus 2009 Semester: II Code: FUE 233 Hours: 60 14

This paper seeks to help students have a better understanding of the principles of Photography. The students will be exposed to the aesthetics of lighting and composition and technicalities of photography. Their practical work will include hands on training with the still camera. This knowledge will be applied when the students take photographs on various themes. Objectives composition To introduce the students to various types of cameras. To help the students understand the aesthetics of lighting and To help familiarize students with Photo-Journalism

Paper content Module I 15 hrs. Human Eye and camera. Basics of Camera (aperture, shutter speed, focal length, f-stop, depth of field etc.) Camera operations. Types of camera. Types of Lenses. Visual perception Module II 15 hrs. Understanding lighting: indoor and outdoor, Exposing and Focusing. Types of lighting, Natural and Artificial Lights, Controlling lights, Exposure Meters, Differential focus, filters, Flashes, Designing with light. Module III 10 hrs. Types of Film: sensitivity, Temperature, Speed etc, Reversal Films, Manipulation of Color and Light. Black and white and color photography- negatives, color materials, processing and printing Module IV 10 hrs. Some basic principles, Aesthetics, Basics of Photo-Journalism, Photo features, Photo essays, Writing captions, Visual story telling, Photography for advertising-consumer and industrial. Planning a shoot-studio, location, set props and casting. Module V 10 hrs. Digital Photography. Digital cameras, DSLR. Advantages and disadvantages of DSLR. Practical Component Assignments in landscape and portrait photography. Books for Reference Evening, Martin. Adobe Photoshop CS for photographers, Focal Press, 2005 Keene, Martin Practical Photojournalism, 2nd Edition, Focal Press, 1995 Parish, Fred S. Photojournalism- An Introduction, Wadsworth, 2002 Parker, W. Oren R., Wolf, Craig and Block, Dick. Scene design and stage lighting, Thomson, 2004 Pandey, Ashish. Acaemic dictionary of photography, Isha Books, 2005. Warren, Bruce Photography 2nd Edition, Delmar Testing Pattern: Portfolio Assessment. Syllabus 2009 15

Written Assignment (about 1000 words) CIA 1 Students will be assessed on the photographs they produce. CIA II

Mid Semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Section A Section B Section C Section A 2 2 Section B 1 2 Section C 1 1

5 x 3 = 15 marks (3 out of 4) 10 x 2 = 20 marks (2 out of 3) 15 x 1 = 15 marks (1 out of 2) Total 50 marks

End Semester Examination- Portfolio Assessment

Audio and Video Editing Software


Course: BA Paper: Audio and Video Editing Software 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Syllabus 2009 Semester: III Code: FUE 331 Hours: 60 16

This paper introduces students to audio & video editing software like Sony Sound Forge , Adobe Sound Booth , Acid Express , Adobe Premiere , Final cut Pro. Their practical work includes hands on training in editing radio programmes, television programmes/short film , creating trailers and compositing software. Module 1 : Audio Editing 15 Hours Introduction to Digital Audio , Concepts of Digital audio editing , Introduction to SoundForge, Recording sound with different sources, Editing , Mixing , removing noise, applying filters .creating special effects , attaching/ detaching Videos. Exporting sound Mp3, au, wav. Usage of Acid Express, Frooty loops. Module 2 : Video Editing 15 hours Introduction to Video, Linear video Editing , Non Linear Video Editing ,Concepts of Video broadcast, Introduction to Adobe premiere Pro, importing Video , timeline controls, Transitions, Adding , editing tracks , adding sound , adding effects, rough-cut of videos , Rendering and exporting videos to AVI , DVD formats. Streaming Video . Module 3: Concepts of Compositing Project Work Student in a group of 5 have to do a project , consist of video and Audio content . For example : Documentary for TV , Advertisement , Program for Radio etc Practical Component Assessment will be based on the assignment submitted after each module Reference Books Sound Forge Power Scott Garrigus AdobePremiere CS3 Visual Quickpro Guide Antonym Bolante AdobePremiere CS3 classroom in a book , Adobe creative Team 10 hours 5 hours

Exam Pattern
Students have to write a theory paper for both the mid and end semester examination Mid Semester Examination : 50 Marks Paper Module Section A Section B Section C Module I 6 3 2 Module II 4 2 Section A 10 X 2 = 20 Marks ( All question compulsory ) Section B 4 X 5 = 20 Marks ( Answer any 4 out of 5) Section C 10 X 1 = 10 Marks ( Answer any 1 out of 2) End Semester Examination : 100 Marks Paper Syllabus 2009 17

Module Module I Module II Module III

Section A 4 4 2

Section B 2 2 2

Section C 3 3 1

Section A 10 X 2 = 20 Marks All question compulsory ) Section B 6 X 5 = 30 Marks (answer 5 out of 6) Section C 10 X 5 = 50 Marks (answer 5 out of 7)

Elective 1- Radio
Course: BA Paper: Radio 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: III Code: FUE 332 Hours: 60

This paper will introduce students to the specialized skills required to write scripts, conduct interviews and present programmes for different radio formats including news, plays, documentaries, talks and interviews.

Syllabus 2009

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Objectives At the end of this semester, students should have grasped the following aspects of writing for radio:

Fundamentals of Communicating through the Electronic media. The Nature of Broadcast News, Narration, Music Announcing and Sports Performance. Techniques of Writing Simple but Polished News Stories. Voice and Articulation Improvement. Interviewing Techniques. Production Practices. Description of Equipment, Studio Dynamics.

Methodology The methodology will focus on providing students with: An in-depth understanding of the fundamentals using live and recorded radio programmes as texts. Key points to be illustrated with examples from actual radio programmes. Examples to stimulate classroom discussion and individual analysis. Writing exercises to inculcate the basic mechanics of writing for the radio Checklists to evaluate their understanding of concepts and assess their competence as presenters. Practice Exercises to improve broadcast performance. Paper content Module I (10 hours) Introduction to Radio Radio as a medium of Communication- Advantages & disadvantages Components of a Radio Programme Words, Music, Sound Effects, Silence Types of radio programmes Organizational set up of a radio station Station Image, scheduling and audience research Studio set up- microphones, mixer, editing software. Module II. History of Radio in India Community Radio Amateur Radio Internet Radio Satellite Radio (5 hours)

Syllabus 2009

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Module III

(30 hours)

Principles of writing for radio News- Structure of a news bulletin. Reporting. Writing radio news reports. Presenting radio news. Interviews- News interviews. Vox pops. Celebrity interviews. Preparation, Conducting an interview. Radio Talk- Scripting & Presenting. Radio feature/documentary-Planning and research, Scripting, Compilation Radio discussion- Formats. Role of Moderator, participants. Planning the radio discussion. Radio drama- Structure. Format. Scripting. Special Audience programmes- Types. Formats. ( 10 hours)

Module IV

Music Programmes- Types. Presentation styles. DJ Scripts. Special programming. Module V (5 hours)

Radio Commercials- Advantages of advertising on radio. Formats. Copywriting. Public Service Announcements- Purpose. Types. Students will carry out the following practical exercises aimed at helping them to connect broadcast theory with practical skills. The objective is to enhance their understanding and performance of different types of broadcast material. i. ii. iii. iv. v. Record, log and analyse radio programmes Use Checklists to help them evaluate their understanding of concepts and proficiency in Skills. Frame questions for prospective sources of information for a radio programme Practice Exercises to help students improve their broadcast performance by allowing them to apply and practice the principles they have learnt. Field Work involves the production of radio programmes, incorporating as many formats as possible. 20

Syllabus 2009

Books for Reference Agarwal, Vir Bala and V. S. Gupta Handbook of Journalism and Mass Communication. Concept Pub. Co. New Delhi. 20001 De Jonge, Fay A.C, Hakemulder and others. Radio and Television Journalism. Delhi. Anmol Puublications. 1998. Hyde, Stuart W. Television and radio Announcing. New Delhi. Kanishka Publications. 1998. Parthasarathy, Rangaswami. Here is the News! Reporting for the Media. Sterling Publications. New Delhi. 1994 Srampickal, Jacob. Communication and Media in India Today. Media House. New Delhi. 1998. White, Ted. Broadcast News Writing, Reporting, and Producing. 2nd ed., Boston., Focal Press, 1996. Testing Pattern Evaluation for Communicative English is both formative (ongoing evaluation) and summative (final examination) Students will be tested on their ability to write effectively for the various radio formats Practical component- The students will be assessed on the radio programmes they produce. Portfolio Assessment is part of Internal Assessment and the broad issue is a focus on skills. Mid Semester Exam Mid-semester Exam Module Sec A 15 marks Sec B 10marks 1 1

Module 1 Module 2 2 - Written Assignment - Group Presentation

End Semester Exam- Portfolio Assessment

Elective II Applied Theatre Basic Course


Course: BA Paper: Applied Theatre Basic Course 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: III Code: FUE 333 Hours: 60

Syllabus 2009

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The changing scenario of the media has re-defined the term theatre. From being a medium of selfindulgence and creative expression, the key phrase in today's evolved atmosphere is application. Applied Theatre is emerging as an evolved tool of expression across various sectors ranging from education to corporate learning. Applied Theatre is unique to each environment. Knowledge, skill and logistics of the environment frame the parameters of an effective Applied Theatre experience. The aim of introducing this module is to give participants a first-hand experience of the skills, marketing tools and application patterns in the context of emerging markets. Objectives

To make students experience the basic skills of theatre Identifying and marketing to a niche segment Application of skills in the niche market

Paper Content Module 1 Basic Applied Theatre - Skills 20 hours

Use of Body-Mind-Voice in Theatre, Stage positions and composition, movement, blocking, basic understanding of lights, sound, scripting, costumes, sets and props, direction,characterization, creating thematic presentations. Designing applied theatre sessions, models of learning, implementation of designed sessions in controlled environments - micro sessions, Peer and faculty observation and evaluation Module 2 Basic Applied Theatre - Marketing 20 hours

Identifying markets and market needs, clients, creating marketing tools, identifying relevant themes, customization, targets, sales and closure. Module 3 Basic Applied Theatre - Implementation 20 hours

Tailor-making sessions for client needs, understanding environment dynamics, creating conducive environments, feedback mechanisms, closure written and visual documents, project report. Assessment Assessment of Module 1 CIA 1 20 marks Assessment of Module 2 CIA 2 - 20 marks CIA 3 20 marks End Semester evaluation through report submission 40 marks

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Creative Writing
Course: BA Paper: Creative Writing 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Objectives Syllabus 2009 23 Semester: IV Code: FUE 431 Hours: 60

to introduce the students to various genres of creative writing work with demanding creative works and learn to interpret, incorporate the techniques of writing in ones own writing to use writing as way to explore an idea or concept, to connect and analyse their relevance and to develop their own points of view to develop persoanlised writing process that emphasizes creativity and differentiates revision and editing to develop the ability to write for a variety of audiences, purposes and in a variety of genres

Course learning outcome: At the end of the semester students would submit a portfolio of their writing. They will be aware of aspects of form, imagination and creative process. Level of Knowledge: basic knowledge of writing skills Module I Short Story Plot Theme Character Setting Conflict Point of view Module II Play script one act play Character Setting Dialogue 8 hours

8 hours

Module III Travel writing 5 hours Finding Sense of place Avoiding clichd expressions and experiences Module IV Writing for Children 5 hours Importance of Illustration Balance between illustration and text Finding appropriate vocabulary and voice Module V Free Verse 5 hours Difference between blank verse and free verse Examples discussion

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Skill Development Assignments 30 hours Each module will have analysis of relevant writings Free writing Developing a character Writing a short story narrative Writing short story with dialogue Converting a myth/fable/folk tale into a play script Writing free verse/travel writing/short story for children Total hours: 60 hours Testing Pattern: CIA I one minor exercise from short story module that would enhance one particular skill Mid Sem Exam script of one act play CIA III Travel Writing exercise End Sem Exam For Theory Individual Portfolio o The work in this course culminates in the presentation of a final portfolio writing in any genre of the students choice 5 short stories, one novella, 5 poems, two play scripts etc. periodical reports about the progress of the final portfolio should be given to the instructor. o The portfolio will contain the drafts and revised drafts written during the semester. Inability to get all the drafts will bring down the grade. Evaluation criteria of the portfolio: o Creativity; originality; ability to experiment with the selected form of writing; understanding of the form o Language grammar, spelling, punctuation o Improvement during the semester o Neatness of the portfolio For Practicals: Practical hours will be utilized to write and discuss the difficulties faced by the students while writing. The class will be divided into different groups; the groups will collect writing done during the semester, will edit the writing and publish an anthology. Evaluation criteria of the anthology: o o o o Editing skills grammar, spelling, punctuation, organization of the selected writing Presentation quality of the paper, pictures to enhance the writing etc. Creativity, originality of the writing The anthology will be considered as team work; each member of the group will face a viva. The questions will be asked on participation, involvement and learning experiences of 25

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individual student. Hence, every member of the group should actively participate in the task of bringing out the anthology. Books for Reference Abbs, Peter, Richardson, John. The Forms of Narrative: A Practical Study Guide for English. Cambridge: CUP, 1990 Bauman. M. Garrett. Ideas and Details: A Guide to College Writing. USA: Wadsworth, 2004 Bishop, Wendy. Working Words: The Process of Creative Writing. California: Mayfield Publishing Company, 1992 Newman, Jenny, Cusick, Edmund and Tourette, Aileen La. The Writers Workbook. London: Arnold, 2004

Elective: Television Studies and Film Appreciation


Course: BA Paper: Television Studies and Film Appreciation 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: IV Code: FUE 333 Hours: 60

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This paper seeks to familiarize students with key concepts in television and film studies. The students will be introduced to video broadcasting where they will learn how to write and present scripts for different types of television programmes. This knowledge will be applied when the students make short films or documentaries. Objectives At the end of this semester, students should have grasped the following Fundamentals of Communicating through the Electronic media. The main features of film language and grammar Fundamentals of Writing for Video Production Practices.

Methodology
An in-depth treatment of the fundamentals to be achieved using television programmes and films as texts. Key points to be illustrated with examples from many sources. Examples to stimulate classroom discussion and individual analysis. Writing exercises to inculcate the basic mechanics of writing for video Use of Checklists to help students evaluate their understanding of concepts and competence in skills. Practical exercises in television production.

Paper Content Module I hours Introduction to Film & Television Growth & Development of TV in India . TV Forms and conventions; Genre, Format, Scheduling. Main features of Film and TV language and grammar (framing, types of shot, camera movement, editing, use of sound, lighting, narrative, etc) Film History, Genres; Key concepts in Film studies, Analysis of Films Module II The Production process Pre-production: From idea to shooting script; Research and planning of location, appointments, interviews, lights, sfx etc.; Production proposal, treatment, script outline, screenplay; Shot breakdown including visuals, narration/dialogue, SFX and floor plan with characters, camera movements and important set designs; Budget: planning, estimate, resources and expenditure Production: shooting; Camera movements, angles, shots; Lenses and their uses; Lighting, Sound 30 hours 15

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Post-production, Logging; Editing techniques; 10 hours Module III hours 15

Documentary-Types, Scripting, Production; Television news: Reporting, Presenting, Scripting, Production. TV Commercials- Types, Scripting, Production Practical Component Students will be required to make short films or documentaries. Books for Reference Bignell, Jonathan and Jeremy Orlebar. The Television Handbook. Oxon:Routledge, 2005. Casey, Bernadette, Neil Casey, Ben Calvert, Liam French & Justin Lewis. Key concepts in Television Studies. London:Routledge, 2004 De Jonge, Fay A.C, Hakemulder et al. Radio and Television Journalism. Delhi. Anmol Publications. 1998. Hyde, Stuart W. Television and radio Announcing. New Delhi: Kanishka Publications. 1998. Kohli, Vanita. The Indian Media Business. New Delhi: Response Books, 2003 White, Ted. Broadcast News Writing, Reporting, and Producing. 2nd ed., Boston:Focal Press, 1996. Testing Pattern Continuous Internal Assessment - Mid-semester Exam- Students to be tested on theory learnt in class - Written Assignment - Group Presentation Mid Semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Section A 15 marks 1 1 Section B 10 marks 1 1

End Semester Portfolio Assessment

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Elective II Animation

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Media & Society


Course: BA Paper: Television Studies and Film Appreciation 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: V Code: FUE 531 Hours: 60

Objectives To introduce the students to concepts, concerns, critical debates in Media Studies To enable students to critically perceive and engage with production, signification and negotiation of meanings in media Level of Knowledge: Working knowledge of media Module I Perspectives on Media Texts Semiotics: Signs, Codes, and Cultures Hermeneutics: Interpretation and Understanding Rhetoric: Language, Situation, Purpose Narratology: The Forms and Functions of Stories 20 Hrs

Understanding Media in Contexts 20 Hrs Asa Briggs and Peter Burke: Introduction, A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet. Fiona Anderson: Fashion Style, Identity and Meaning Fiona Carson: Feminist Debate and Fine art Practices Claire Pajaczkowska: Issues in Feminist Design Richard Howell: Ideology Marshall McLuhan. Medium is the Message Nishant Shah: Playblog: Pornography, Performance and Cyberspace Ashis Nandy: Indian Popular Cinema as a Slum's Eye View of Politics Deborah Stevenson: Imagining the City: Movies, Maps and Cyberspace Media Regulation Lawrence Liang: Philosophical Foundations of Free Speech Lawrence Liang: Hate Speech and the Philosophy of Language Lawrence Liang: Obscenity, Decency and Morality Shohini Ghosh: TV Censorship in India. Monika Mehta: What Is Behind Film Censorship? 20 Hrs

Testing Pattern CIA II, III written submission or Multiple Choice Questions Mid semester exam will be a research paper on an idea from the modules covered. End-semester:Five questions carrying 20 marks to be answered out of minimum eight. Select Bibliography Syllabus 2009 30

Briggs, Asa, and Peter Burke. A Social History of the Media: From Gutenberg to the Internet. Malden: Blackwell, 2001. Carson, Fiona and Claire Pajaczkowska. eds. Feminist Visual Culture. London: Routledge, 2003. Gripsrud, Jostein. Understanding Media Culture. London: Hodder Arnold, 2002 Howell, Richard. Visual Culture. Cambridge: Polity, 2003. Rampley, Matthew. ed. Exploring Visual Culture: Definitions, Concepts, Contexts. Edingburg: Edinburg University Press, 2005. Wayne, Mike. Marxism and Media Studies: Key Concepts and Contemporary Trends. London: Pluto Press, 2003.

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Elective I- Advertising
Course: BA Paper: Advertising 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: V Code: FUE 532 Hours: 60

This paper seeks to familiarize students with key concepts in advertising. The students will the study persuasive techniques used by advertisers and learn how to write effective copy for different types of advertisements such as television commercials, radio spots, mailers, print advertisements, etc. They will also be trained to analyse, interpret and comment on different advertisements. Objectives At the end of this semester, students should have grasped the following Key concepts in advertising Persuasive techniques of advertising. Copy writing techniques Methodology An in-depth treatment of the fundamentals to be achieved using actual advertisements as texts. Key points to be illustrated with examples from many sources. Examples to stimulate classroom discussion and individual analysis. Writing exercises to inculcate the basic mechanics of copywriting for the different media Use of Checklists to help students evaluate their understanding of concepts and competence in skills. Paper Content Module I Introduction to Advertising 15 hours

Brief History of Advertising in India; Introduction to Advertising Concepts; Persuasive Techniques; Types of Advertising; Media of Advertising; Synergy between Marketing and Advertising. Marketing concepts, marketing process, marketing tools , marketing communication process). Representation and Stereotyping in Advertising; Role and purpose of advertising agencies Module II 25 hours

Advertising research and strategy Consumer behaviour, Relationship between Advertising Strategy and Consumer Behaviour, Key elements in an Advertising Plan, Advertising research, tools of Advertising Research, Syllabus 2009

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Module III Copy writing skills The Creative Brief; Language in advertising, Principles of Layout and Design. Writing copy for Print advertisements, TV commercials, Radio Commercials, Mailers, Outdoor Advertising, Internet and New media. Books for Reference Bly, Robert W. The Copywriters Handbook. New York:Henry Holt and Company. 1985 Brierley, Sean. The Advertising Handbook London: Routledge, 2002 Meeske, Milan D. Copywriting for the Electronic Media- A Practical Guide Belmont, USA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2003 Ogilvy, David. Ogilvy on Advertising. New York:Vintage Books, 1985 Valladares, June A. The Craft of Copywriting New Delhi: Response Books, 2000

Practical Component Creating an ad campaign. Testing Pattern Mid-semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Section A 15 marks 2 Section B 10 2

35 hours

Written Assignment Group Presentation

End Semester Question Paper Format Module Module 1 Module 2 Section A Section B 10 marks (4 5 marks of 6) (2 of 3) 1 2 5 1

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Ad campaign- Assign a product and students are expected to create a campaign and the campaign should have a client brief, a creative brief , creative strategy, a Print ad and TVC. Books For Reference : 1. Bly, Robert W. The Copywriter's Handbook. New York:Henry Holt and Company. 1985 2. Brierley, Sean. The Advertising Handbook London: Routledge, 2002 3. Meeske, Milan D. Copywriting for the Electronic Media- A Practical Guide Belmont, USA: Thomson Wadsworth, 2003 4. Ogilvy, David. Ogilvy on Advertising. New York:Vintage Books, 1985 5. Valladares, June A. The Craft of Copywriting New Delhi: Response Books, 2000 6. William F.Arens Contemporary Advertising . Irwin McGraw- Hill

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Elective 2- Applied Theatre Advanced Course


Course: BA Paper: Applied Theatre Advanced Course 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Objective/s

Semester:V Code: FUE 533 Hours: 60

Introduce participants to the advanced level of creating a play Create and implement steps to market the created production. Showcase performance across venues 20 hours

Module 1 Advanced Applied Theatre - Skills

Identifying a theme, creating a script, social audit of the script, casting, stage management, blocking and direction, costumes, light and sound, sets and props, showcase the presentation for an invited audience and create a scalable version of the production Module 2 Advanced Applied Theatre - Marketing 20 hours

Budgeting, marketing shows across venues, identifying sponsors and revenue streams print, radio, TV, Web and new media Module 3 Advanced Applied Theatre Implementation Showcasing a minimum of 10 performances Assessment Assessment of Module 1 CIA 1 20 marks Assessment of Module 2 CIA 2 - 20 marks CIA 3 20 marks End Semester evaluation through report submission 40 marks End Semester evaluation through report submission 40 marks Books for Reference 20 hours

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Applied Theatre: Bewilderment And Beyond - James Thompson The Applied Theatre Reader Tim Prentki , Sheila Preston Interactive and Improvisational Drama: Varieties of Applied Theatre and performance Adam Blatner The Actor's ways and means Michael Redgrave\ An Actor Prepares Constantin Stanislavsky Improv Keith Johnstone Theatre on the edge: New Visions, New Voices Mel Gussow

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Public Relations
Course: BA Paper: Public Relations 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: VI Code: FUE 631 Hours: 60

This paper introduces the students to the field of Public Relations and Corporate Communications. The students will be taught the functioning of PR departments and the job of a PRO. Students will be given an insight into this specialized field with a focus on the job opportunities. Objectives To lay the foundation of Public Relations practice To train the students in media relations To introduce the concept of Corporate Communication To familiarize the students with concepts like propaganda, public opinion, advertising, and public relations Paper Content Module I 15 hrs. Public relations - definition, nature and scope; Evolution of PR; Corporate Communication; Qualifications of a PRO Levels- basic cum working knowledge Module II 15 hrs. Difference between propaganda, publicity, public opinion, advertising and PR; Organization of a PR Department; Stages of PR Levels- working knowledge Module III 10 hrs. Types of Corporate PR: employee relations, share holder relations, distributor-dealer relations, community relations, consumer relations Levels- working knowledge Module IV Media relations: newspapers, magazines, radio, TV Levels- working knowledge Module V Syllabus 2009 10 hrs.

10 hrs. 37

PR consultants : PR professional organizations; Codes and ethics in PR Case Studies: ICICI, Pepsi, Coke (PR crisis management) Levels- working knowledge Total Hours: 60 Practical Component 15 hrs. Students have to submit a report on any one effective PR campaign, or Crisis Management, or on any latest trends in PR and present it with the help of audio-visual aids like Microsoft powerpoint etc. 1. Presentation- group and individual 2. Group discussion 3. Case study and analysis 4. Quiz 5. Workshop Books for reference: Public Relations. Balan, K. R.. Sultan Chand & Sons, 2003. Effective Public Relations in Public and Private Sector. Banik, G. C . Jaico Publishing House, Mumbai, 2004. Practical Public Relations. Sam Black. Universal Bookstall. Effective Public Relations. Scott M. Cutlip, Allen H. Center, Glen M. Broom. Pearson Education, 2005 Corporate Communications. Joseph Fernandez. Sage Publications, New Delhi, 2004. Gregory Anne, Public Relations in Practice, New Delhi, Crest Publishing House, 2002. Lesley, Philip, Handbook of Public Relations and Communications, Mumbai, Jaico Publishing, 2002 Moor H. Frazier & Frank B. Kalupa, Public Relations, Surjeet Publications, 2004. Testing Pattern: Mid semester and End semester exams will be a theory paper. The objective of the theory papers is to test whether the student has understood the various theoretical concepts and the functioning of the PR department. Mid Semester Exam No practical component needed- theory exam should suffice Module Section A Section B 5 marks 10 marks (3 of 5) (2 of 3) Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 2 2 1 1 1 1

Section C 15 marks (1 of 2) 1 1 Total 50 marks

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End Semester Exam Module Section A 5 marks (3 of 5) 1 1 1 1 1 Section B 10 marks (2 of 3) Section C 15 marks (1 of 2) 1 1 1 1 1 Total 50 marks The CIA2 will be based on written assignments. The CIA3 will be evaluated based on objective test. Practical component Students will be tested on the research work submitted and their ability to make effective presentations using Audio-visual aids like Microsoft Power point etc. Students will choose their own topic and submit the research work within 3 weeks and present it.

Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Module 4 Module 5

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Elective- New Media & Communication


Course: BA Paper: New Media & Communication 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: VI Code: FUE 631 Hours: 60

This paper introduces to the students the field of New Media and its various features. Objectives To introduce to the students the fundamentals of new media technology To have a theoretical understanding of new media Module 1 15 hours Introduction to New Media. What is new media. What is old media? Difference between new and old media. Rise of Internet. Level- basic knowledge Module 2 15 hours Globalization and communication. How has globalization influenced the growth of new media? Level- basic knowledge Module 3 10 hours

What is digital divide? New media contribution to this digital divide. New media influence on politics, economy and societies. Level- Working knowledge Module 4 15 hours Cyber journalism and cyber culture. Web sites, E-newspapers, internet tv, internet radio, cell phones and sms, blogs, social network sites. Level- basic knowledge Module 5 Wiki. New media terminologies. Level- basic knowledge Total Hours: 60 Books: 1. Media Communication. James Watson 2. Journalism Online. Mike Ward 3. Writing for the Information Age. Bruce Ross Larsen Testing Pattern: Mid semester and End semester examinations will be theory papers to evaluate the theoretical understanding of the students. 5 hours

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Mid semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 End semester Exam Module Module 1 Module 2 Module 3 Module 4 Module 5

Section A 5 marks (5 of 7) 3 2 2 Section A 5 marks (8 of 10) 3 2 2 2 1

Section B 10 marks (1 of 2) 1 1 Section B 10 marks (3 of 4) 1 1 1 1

Section C 15 marks (1 of 2) 1 1 Total Marks: 50 Section C 15 marks (2 of 3) 1 1 1 Total Marks: 100

CIA 2 will be based on written assignments. CIA 3 will be evaluated based on student presentation.

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Elective II- Dissertation


Course: BA Paper: Disseration 4 hours/ week/ 100 marks/3 credits Semester: VI Code: FUE 633 Hours: 60

In this semester, students will have the option of working on a dissertation on any aspect of the media The students will give a written proposal to the co-ordinator in the tenth week of the third semester. The proposal may be in the following format: Tentative title Introduction Reasons for the choice of the research area Objective Methodology Limitations, if any A brief bibliography

The coordinator in consultation with the HOD will assign guides to the students before the end of the third semester. The student may also indicate the names of supervisors they prefer. However, the coordinator in consultation with the HOD will allot the students to members of the faculty in consultation with them. If the proposal demands and the coordinator feels the need for a supervisor outside the department, coordinator may assign guides from other departments in consultation with them. The coordinator will try to align the student dissertation areas to the research interest of the faculty members. Christ PU teachers may also be considered, in case found competent and willing. The thesis, which is in not less than 60 pages and in the prescribed format should be submitted to the coordinator in the prescribed format in the penultimate week of the fourth semester. The evaluation and viva should be completed within a month from the last working day of the semester. The thesis will be evaluated by external member and by the guide out of 100 each and the average of both the evaluations should be awarded out of 100. If there is a difference of more than 20 marks, a third evaluation should be conducted by both the evaluators together. The viva should be conducted out of 50 each and average of the two should be taken. Only the supervisor and the external evaluator shall evaluate the thesis. The external member should have valid research experience, namely, MPhil or PhD or equivalent qualification, or should have undertaken research project from reputed organisations in social sciences or humanities, or should have research publications preferably in refereed journals.

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Examiners for practicals


Fr. Saji Naureen Aziz Manjula B. Rajesh PrasathMalati Ramachandra 9341224360Eva Bell 23682421

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