step-by-step e kend projects

Philip and

Kate Haxell

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_. I 23 step-by-step weekend projects Philip and Kate Haxell CICO BOOKS London .

electronic. No part of this manuscript may be reproduced. stored in or introduced into a retrieval system. Designs and Patents Act 1988.Contents Perfect Planters Chunky Bamboo Planter Auricula Plant Theatre Decorated Planter Wall -hanging Pot Holders Hanging Basket Ladder For Ann. Colin. without the prior written permission of the copyright holder. 10987654321 A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library ISBN 1 903116 46 5 (hardback) Editor: Kate Haxell Photographer: Lucinda Symons Stylist: Denise Brock Designer: Roger Daniels Printed and bound in Singapore by Tien Wah Press 7 8 11 16 18 20 Relaxing in the Garden Garden Chair Draughts Table Building Block Chair & Table Barbecue Table Loveseat 23 24 31 34 40 46 . John and Michael First published in Great Britain in 2002 by Cico Books 32 Great Sutton Street London EC1V ONB Text copyright© Philip and Kate Haxell 2002 Photographs copyright© Cico Books 2002 Illustrations copyright © Cico Books 2002 The right of Philip and Kate Haxe ll to be identified as the authors of this work has been asserted by them in accordance with the Copyright. or transmitted in any form or by any means. photocopying. Jackie . recording or otherwise. All rights reserved. mechanical.

The Potting Shed Tool Rack Tool Caddy Hanging Shelves Potting Bench 53 55 58 62 67 A Rustic Retreat Picket Bench Herb Table 73 75 81 Seat for a Child's Swing 82 Oriental Arbour Willow Screen 86 92 Finishing Touches Yin.Yang Bird Table Sundial Boot Scraper Drinks Tray 95 96 100 104 106 Finishing Techniques Template Techniques Toolbox Templates Safety and Measurements 112 114 116 Techniques Core Techniques Further Techniques 108 108 110 Materials and Glossary Acknowledgements 127 128 .

If you are unsure of . just care and attention in cutting and fixing. perfect for beginners to woodworking. and horrified at the price we had to pay for items at the top end. Hence this book. Some of the furniture projects have a lot of steps. we started looking at garden furniture. we were disappointed in the design and quality on offer at the cheaper end of the market. We had already made furniture for inside our home and decided to do the same for our garden. There is a wide range of projects in this book. Garden centres and DIY shops are now full of furniture and ornaments for the garden and there is a wide range of weatherproof paints and stains available with which you can personalize your fences and benches.we also decorate them. However. relax in them .but don't be put off. from very simple ones. work in them. which is full of interesting and original projects. Read the steps through carefully and consult the comprehensive techniques section at the back of the book before you start a project. to more involved pieces. No project requires any special woodworking skills. we eat in them. some of which will enhance your own garden. whether it is a rustic cottage plot or an urban city yard.Introduction For so many of us our gardens are now an extension of our homes. Keen to turn our own new garden into an outdoor room. play in them.

So. It is a good idea to borrow or hire an expensive tool before you buy to make sure that you are happy using it. have a look at the Toolbox on page 116 and just buy the tools you need to get started. You should re-varnish it each year and store it in a shed or basement during the winter months. You don't need lots of expensive equipment to make these projects. PHILIP AND KATE HAXELL . but. you can finish them to complement your own garden and planting schemes. you can invest in more equipment as you need it. Always follow the safety instructions that accompany a tool carefullytaking risks or cutting corners can lead to trouble. get making and soon you will be able to relax in your garden and enjoy the fruits of your labours. and hopefully become increasingly enthusiastic. of course. Always use the best weatherproof paints and stains you can get. and remember that any softwood furniture is not completely hardy. simply practice it first on an offcut of wood before embarking on the actual piece. As you progress. We have made suggestions as to decorating the projects.a technique.

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attractive centrepieces to complement the flowers that you fill them with. Decorate these practical. .Perfect Planters Planters and decorative pots add character and depth to garden spaces.

I - . this planter will hold a range of small plants in a stylish display. plant it with herbs to make a miniature kitchen garden.8 Perfect Planters Chunky Bamboo Planter Original and so simple to make.._. Alternatively. YOU WILL NEED Thick bamboo • 1 length: 1000mm (39in) • 1 length: 800mm (32in) • 1 length: 600mm (24in) • 1 length: 400mm (16in) • 1 length: 200mm (8in) • Tape measure • Crosscut saw • Chisel • Mallet • Drill • 4mm (Vain) drill bit Thick copper wire • 2 lengths: 600mm (24in) • 1 length: 500mm (20in) • 1 length : 400mm (16in) • 1 length : 300mm (12in) • Pin-nosed pliers - . . •' --- -- ~ ...

opposite sides of the 1OOOmm (39in) length of bamboo. thread the wires through the holes in the 600mm (24in) length of bamboo. using progressively shorter lengths of wire. Look through the hole on one side and feed the wire through the hole on the other side. page 108). TIP Using a pair of pin-nosed pliers. Bend over one end of the second 600mm (24in) length of wire and thread it through the next pairs of holes up in both lengths of bamboo. Always working from the base up. continue to drill pairs of holes in the other lengths of bamboo . Wear safety glasses so that the wire doesn 't poke you in the eye. until the two pieces are wired together through all the holes. as the lengths of bamboo get shorter. the second pair 100mm (4in) further up and then a pair every 200mm (Sin) until you have five pairs of holes. Stand the 800mm (32in) length of bamboo next to the 1000mm (39in) length and thread the straight end of the wire through the lowest holes. then thread the other end through the lowest pair of aligning holes in the 1OOOmm (39in) length of bamboo (see tip above). TIP To feed the wire through the holes. Working from the bottom up. drill aligning holes in (32in) length of bam_ boo in the same way. Continue until all the pieces of bamboo are wired together. 4 Wire the lengths of bamboo together. there will be fewer pairs of holes in each length. then toward you and through the nearer hole. you can chip it away with a chisel and mallet (see Further Techniques. position the bamboo with a light behind it. . 2 Using a 4mm (Vain) drill bit (see Core 3 Drill holes in the 800mm Techniques. twist the ends of the wire into small curls for a stylish finishing touch. If a membrane runs too near the top. page 112) to create enough depth.Chunky Bamboo Planter 9 a EJ The internal membranes of th e bamboo wi ll hold earth for pl ants. Obviously. Continue. The first pair of holes should be 50mm (2in) up from the base. Push them up tightly against each other and bend over the free ends of the wire (see tip above) . Bend over 50mm (2in) of one end of the 600mm (24in) length of wire at right angles.

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• 1 piece: 750x800x 12mm (291/2 X 311/2 X 1J2in) Shelves Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 890x670x12mm (35 X 261/2 X 1J2in) Birch ply • 1 piece: 955 x 100 x 4mm (371/2 X 4 X 1/sin) • 1 piece: 800 x 100 x 4mm (311J2x4x%in) • 1 piece: 500x100x4mm (191/2 X 4 X 1/sin) • 1 piece: 350 x 75x4mm (141/2 x 2 7/s x 1/sin) Quadrant 2 On the EJ • 32: 25mm (1 in) • Screwdriver • Pinning gun • 16mm (%in) pins • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Tenon saw • Masking tape • Filler • Primer • Waterproof paint • Paintbrush 750mm (291J2in) side of both triangles. On the next two lines cut 100 x 4mm (4 x Vain) slots in the same way. Paint it to tone with the flowers you choose. this can be achieved by jigsawing 75mm (27/sin) down the line and then jigsawing down again. measure and mark vertical pencil lines at 115mm (41J2in). At the top of the longest line cut a slot 75 x 4mm (27fs x Vain). y • 2 lengths: 76 x 12mm (3 x 1J2in) Half-round dowel • 2 lengths: 1110x12mm (43% x 1J2in) . YOU WILL NEED Sides Waterproof plywood 1 • Shelf templates on page 118 • Jigsaw • Tape measure • Pencil • Drill • 4. page 108).11 Auricula Plant Theatre Whether you stand it in a conservatory or in the garden. right next to the first line. Extend the pencil lines up to meet the sloping side. cut the side piece of plywood diagonally into two triangles. this planter provides the perfect auditorium for a colourful display. 280mm (11 in) and 475mm (187/sin) from the 800mm (311f2in) side.5mm (3/16in) drill bit • Countersink bit • Wood glue Screws Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques.

parallel to and 6mm (%in) and 12mm (V2in) in from the edge. at right angles to the slot. pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. page 114) in the arrangement shown above. On the line from the lowest slot. Draw a line along the 750mm (291/2in) side of both triangles. draw a horizontal line from the bottom of each slot. -/ On the line from the top slot. page 109) a 4.12 Perfect Planters 3 On both triangles. Predrill and countersink five 4. draw two lines. with one hole 50mm (2in) from each end and two holes evenly spaced between them. with one hole 50mm (2in) from each end and three more evenly spaced between them . pre-drill and countersink five 4. with one hole 50mm (2in) from each end and one hole evenly spaced between them. . pre-drill and countersink four 4. countersunk-side down. with one hole 70mm (2%in) from each end and three more evenly spaced between them.. pre-drill and / countersink three 4.5mm (3!16in) holes. 4 Lay out the two triangles. Using a jigsaw. On the li ne from the middle slot. The remainder of this step is worked on the upper line only of these pairs of lines.(%in-) wide strip off the triangle on the left. with the two 800mm (31V2in) sides butted together. 5 Enlarge the shelf templates by 400 % and transfer them onto the waterproof plywood (see Template Techniques. Draw a parallel line 6mm (%in) above each horizontal line to give three pairs of parallel lines. On the triangle on the right.5mm (3!16in) hole 50mm (2in) from each end. cut out the shapes. Working on these 800mm (311J2in) sides and using a jigsaw.5mm (3/16) holes. On the 6mm (%in) line. Make sure that you countersink the holes on the outside face of each triangle. extending across to the 800mm (311J2in) side of the triangle. 6mm (%in) up from the edge. cut a 12 mm.5mm (3!16in) holes.5mm (3/16) holes. .

Auricula Plant Theatre 13 6 Glue and screw (see Core Techniques. . Glue and screw the larger triangle to the sm aller one. Stand the triangle up so that . Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the triangle into the edge of the shelf. page 109) the largest shelf to the bottom of the smaller triangle. lapping the back edge of the larger triangle over -he back edge of the smaller one. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the larger :riangle into the edge of the sm aller one and into edge of he bottom shelf. aligning the back edge of the triangle with the corner of the shelf. do this carefully to avoid splitting the wood .rests on the shelf.

glue and pin the birch ply to the length of quadrant. 10 Glue and pin (see Further Techniques . page 11 Glue and pin the longest piece of birch 112) a length of quadrant to each side of the bottom shelf.14 Perfect Planters 8 Glue and screw the second largest shelf in 9 Glue and screw the remaining two shelves in position above the bottom one. . They will be far more flexible when wet. The front edges of the top three shelves should all align with the relevant slots. with one flat face aligned with the front edge of the shelf and the other against the side of the plant theatre . Start in the middle and work out to one side and then the other. Align the shelf with the lower pencilled line and drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the triangles into the edge of the shelf. ply to the front edge of the bottom shelf. position in the same way. At each end. TIP Leave the pieces of ply to soak in a bath of cold water the night before you want to use them.

central point.Auricula Plant Theatre 15 13 When the glue is dry (approximately 30 minutes). Gently press the middle of the ply until it touches the edge of the shelf. 2 Spread glue in the slots at each end of the next shelf up . . using a tenon saw (see Core Techniques . cut off the excess birch ply sticking out of the slots. Following the line of the lower side. Mark a vertical line on the dowel at the top of the triangle and. page 108) . Repeat on the other triangle. cut along it. 15 4 At the top of the triangle. then paint it with two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniques. Glue and pin the ply to the fro nt of the shelf as before. using strips of masking tape to hold the dowel in place while the glue dries . page 114). Pin the remaining two pieces of ply to the upper shelves in the same way. sand the whole plant theatre and prime it. up above the other. Glue both pieces on. Slide the ends of the secondlongest piece of birch ply into the slots. sand (see Finishing Techniques. Fill all screw holes. page 114) the protruding point down to make one smooth. using a tenon saw. one point sticks Hold a length of half-round dowel in place along the front edge of a triangle.

5mm (3/1Gin) drill bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure Screws • 2 pieces: 600 x 250 x 18mm (24 X 10 X%in) • 2 pieces: 250 x 250 x 18mm (10x10x%in) Timber • 40: 40mm (15fain) • Screwdriver • Hammer Nails • 8 pieces: 250 x 50 x 18mm (10 X 2 X%in) Legs Timber • 16: 25mm (1 in) • Pencil • 20mm (% in) spade bit • 4 pieces: 900 x 45 x 45mm (36x1%x1%in) 1 Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. page 109) four 4 . Trough Pine board • Drill • 4. Position the holes 1Omm (3/sin) in from the edge. driving screws through the predrilled holes into the edges of the short pieces.16 Perfect Planters Decorated Planter Why not make your own planter to show off a display of herbs or your favourite plants? Simple to make. Rails Timber • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Waterproof paint • Paintbrush • 2 pieces: 250 x 20 x 45mm (10 X% X 1%in) • 2 pieces : 600 x 20 x 45mm (24x% x 1%in) . Overlap the long pieces of pine board over the edges of the short pieces and glue and screw them (see Core Techniques.5mm (3/16) holes in the short sides of each long piece of pine board. it can also be personalized easily by drilling a row of decorative holes or adding bands of mosaic tiles. with one hole 30mm (1 %in) from each end and two evenly spaced between them . page 109) together.

holes in each end of each side of the trough. Fill all screw holes. drill (see Further Techniques. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the sides. page 109) a 25mm (1 in) nail into it through 2 Pre-drill and countersink two 4.5mm (3!16in) the sides. 30mm (1 %in) from the ends. Paint the planter a soft green or blue before gluing tiles in contrasting colours along the top and bottom edges. or to add new colours to your garden. Fasten a long rail between the legs. page 111) a row of evenly spaced holes along each side for decoration. Space the remaining six slats evenly along the trough and nail them in place as well.17 EJ 3 Place one of the 250 x 50mm (1 0 x 2in) slats against the legs. Add more decorative strips of mosaic to contrast with new planting ideas. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes at the marked points. with the glued sides touching the trough and the top of the leg 25mm (1 in) below the top of the trough . On the short side. 5 Measure and mark a line 50mm (2in) down from the top edge. Nail another slat to the other end in the same way. Starting 60mm (2%in) from each end and using a 20mm (%in) spade bit. .5mm (3!1Gin) hole planter with mosaic tiles. position one hole 35mm (11f2in) and one hole 21 Omm (8%in) from the top. Fasten the short rails between the legs in the same way. and hammer (see Core Techniques. Place a leg in each corner of the trough. right around the trough. then paint it with two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniques. TIP Instead of drilling holes. Measure and mark 150mm (6 in) up from the bottom of each leg. flush with the base of the trough. Spread glue over the top 200mm (8in) of two sides of each leg. in each end of each rail. On the long sides. Position the holes centrally 20mm (%in) from each end . you can create a summer look by decorating the 4 Pre-drill and countersink a 4. position one hole 40mm (15/sin) and one hole 215mm (81f2in) from the top. sand the planter and prime. page 114).

18 Perfect Planters Float flowers up your walls with these clever pot holders. They may seem unsupported.. but they are in fact completely sturdy.Gin) and 2mm (1J. as well as being simple to make. Wall-hangi ng Pot Holders YOU WILL NEED _ __ Timber • 1 piece: 360x210x18mm (14%x8%x%in) • 1 piece: 360 x 10 x 18mm (14%x%x%in) • Template on page 119 • Jigsaw Drill • 4.- "' ~ .5mm (3/.Gin) drill bits • Tape measure • Pencil • Tenon saw • Masking tape • Countersink bit Screws • 2: 16mm (%in) • Screwdriver • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Exterior woodstain • Paintbrush ·· .

. through the holes marked on the template. page the cutting edge. 114). draw a line on the underside of the holder. page 114). . before you do step 1 and cut out the two shapes together. as marked on the template . J'IPTo hang the holder. To do this. Stain th e holder with exterior woodstain (see Finishing Techniques. screw two pieces of timber together. 19 a Cut a rebate along the back edge of the holder. J'IP If you want to make more than one pot holder.. Using a tenon saw (see Core Techniques. Unscrew the piece of ti mber and pre-drill and countersink two 4.~ . Using a jigsaw and drill. page 109) two 4.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in the holder. with one hole 70mm (2%in) from each end. page 108). 18mm (%in) from the edge. cut out the inner hole first (see Further Techniques . 1Omm (3/ain) from Enlarge the template by 133% and transfer it onto the large piece of timber (see Temp late Techniques. Use wall plugs on a masonry wall. Fit the holder over the timber and screw through the pre-drilled holes . making sure that you do not cut deeper than the tape .. 4 saw and cut along the line on the back edge of the holder. screw through the holes in the rebate timber into the wall . Drive a screw through each hole. cut away the excess wood outside the marked curves. The two sawn lines must meet so that the rebate is cut out. Pre-drill and countersink 5 Fit the small piece of timber into the rebate (see Core Techniques .. Using a tenon saw. and drill two 2mm (V16in) pilot holes down through the pre-drilled holes in the holder into the timber. the n the outer shape. saw along the line on the underside of the holder. Countersink on the side without the rebate . The co untersinking must be on the curved front. Stick a length of masking tape to the blade of a tenon saw.5mm (3/1Gin) holes through it on the narrow edge. Screw the timber back into the rebate and sand it to follow the curve. Draw around the curve of the holder onto the piece of timber in the rebate. Discard the offcut. page 11 0). Wall-hanging Pot Holders . 1Omm (%in) from the base. Draw another line on the back edge.

24. Measure 300. NOTE: This ladder is designed only as a plant holder.5mm (3/16in) drill bit • Wood glue • Mallet Screws • 8: 30mm (1% in) 1 Paint the long poles with exterior • Screwdriver • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Exterior varnish woodstain (see Finishing Techniques.20 Perfect Planters Hanging Basket Ladder Create extra space in your garden by making a ladder for hanging baskets and pots. which will show off your smaller plants and allow them to be moved easily in and out of the shade. YOU WILL Dowel • 2 lengths: 1600x60mm (63 x2%in) • 4 lengths: 400 x 20mm (16 x %in) • Exterior woodstain • Paintbrush • Tape measure • Pencil • Masking tape • Drill • 20mm (%in) spade bit • 4.900 and 1200mm (12. 36 and 48in) from one end of each long pole and mark the points by wrapping a piece of masking tape around each of the poles. . page 114). it is not for climbing.600.

page 114) . sand. (See Finishing Techniques. Spread glue around the other ends of the short poles and fit the other long dowel on top of them . page 109) these holes on the outside of the dowels . page 111) for the treads through the masking tape: it is important that the holes are exactly in line with each other or the ladder will be misshapen. 3 With one dowel still firmly clamped. page 11 0). so wrap a piece of masking tape around the bit 30mm (1 %in) from the point and drill until you reach the tape (see Further Techniques. Countersink (see Core Techniques. The holes should not go right through the dowel. Use a mallet to knock the ladder firmly together. Seal the rungs with two coats of exterior varnish. then touch up the filler with woodstain . page 109) around one end of each of the short poles and push them into the drilled holes. page 109) through each of the pre-drilled holes into the ends of the short poles.5mm (3!1Gin) drill bit.Hanging Basket Ladder 21 ::Z Clamp the long dowels firmly and. drill holes (see Further Techniques. Fill all screw holes. using a 20mm (%in) spade bit. Using a 4. drill from the bottom of each 20mm (%in) hole right through the dowel. D 4 Drive a screw (see Core Techniques. spread a little glue (see Core Techniques.

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Relaxing in the Garden Elegant furniture will enhance your garden and turn a sunny corner into a comfortable summer retreat. .

• Stunning to look at and so comfortable to sit in. . so follow the templates accurately and it will all slot together.Garden Chair . The legs are simply duplicated shapes... this chair is also deceptively easy to make. 1 .

seat.Garden Chair 25 YOU WLLL Legs Timber NEED----~~-_. Screws • 14: 30mm (1 %in) • 2: 35mm (11f2in) • 9: 50mm (2in) • Screwdriver • Pinning gun • 16mm (%in) pins • Clamps • Filler • Exterior wood stain or varnish • Paintbrush 2 Using a chisel and EJ mallet (see Further Techniques . To speed up the process of cutting out the legs. using a tenon saw (see Core Techniques . • 2 pieces: 1150 x 140 x 4mm (45% x 51/2 x Vain) • 2 pieces: 1130 x 140 x 4mm (441/2 x 51/2 x Vain) • Leg. the one within the shaded area of the template. . page 114). page 108) . mark the lines on the wood in pencil and. but do not sand into the notches. page 115).(%in-) wide chisel • Mallet • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Drill • 4. cut along these marked lines . page 112) . a • 7 pieces: 955 x 140 x 18mm (371/2 x 51/2 x %in) • 2 pieces: 585 x 140 x 18mm (23% x 51f2 x %in) Seat Timber • 4 pieces: 600 x 145 x 18mm (23% x 5% x %in) • 2 pieces: 395 x 45 x 18mm (151f2 x 1% x %in) Arms Timber • 2 pieces: 210 x 70 x 18mm (8% x 2% x %in) Rails Birch ply 1 Enlarge the full leg template by The timber is too thick to screw the pieces together and cut out identical legs in the normal way. Cut out the notches marked on the template at either end of each leg and just one central notch. To cut a notch . cut the template out in thin MDF and then use a router with a templateprofiler bit to cut out the pieces (see Template Techniques. Sand (see Finishing Techniques .5mm (3/1Gin) and 2mm (1.t1Gin) drill bits • Countersink bit • Wood glue Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques . chisel out the wood between the two sawn lines. page 108) . cut out five full legs. page 113) the legs smooth. 500 % and transfer it onto five of the long pieces of leg timber (see Template Techniques. arm and rail templates on page 120 • Jigsaw • Pencil • Tenon saw • 18mm.

and two short legs . Sand all the legs as before. page 114). including the marked batten positions (see Template Techniques. cut out the seat shape . Cut down the full leg template to the shaded area to make the short leg template and transfer it onto the two short pieces of leg timber. as marked .5mm (3/16) holes through all of the central notches on all legs. page 109). Cut out the notches at either end and both of the central notches . planks together (see Core Techniques. 4 Lay the four large pieces of seat timber side-by-side . The countersinking must be on the un-notched side of each leg. .5mm (3!16in) holes in the Enlarge the seat template by 500% and transfer it onto the timber.26 Relaxing in the Garden 3 Transfer the template onto the remaining IJ two long pieces of leg timber. When the glue is dry. notching the edges as marked on the template . but do not sand into the notches. page 109) the battens to the seat. driving 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes . ensuring that the template aligns. Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. in the same way as the legs were notched . page 109) 4. Glue and screw (see Core Techniques . Sand the edges smooth. cut out two short legs with the two marked notches. cut out two more full legs . You will have a total of seven full legsfive with a single central notch and two with double central notches . Glue the edges of the two seat battens either side of the joins between the planks. Using a jigsaw. as shown. Usi ng a jigsaw. 5 Pre-drill and countersink six 4.

cut out the arms. page 115). Using a jigsaw. cut out the shape. Spread some wood glue inside the lower notch and slide one into each of the next notches on either side of the seat. Cut out the shape as before and remove the pins. Drive a 50mm (2in) screw through the pre-drilled hole in each leg into the edge of the seat. Using a jigsaw. including the vertical lines.Gin) hole. Enlarge the arm template by 500 % and transfer it onto t he timber. and pre-drill and countersink a 4. Drive a 50mm (2in) screw through the pre-drilled hole in each leg into the edge of the seat. 8 Lay out the five identical full legs. making sure that they are the right way up. and then remove the pins. . again that they are all the right way up . making sure 9 Lay out the two identical full legs. Sand the edges smooth and unscrew the pieces of timber to give two identical shapes.the central back notch and the two on either side of it. Using a pinning gun (see Further Techniques. page 112). as marked on the template. 7 Enlarge the top rail template by 500 %. Working one at a time . as shown. Enlarge the bottom rail template by 500 %. Pin the two longer pieces of rail ply together and transfer the template onto them. as shown. spread some wood glue inside the central notches.5mm (3/. Slide the notches in the legs into the five notches in the back of the seat. pin the two longer pieces of rail ply together at either end and transfer the template onto them .·- - - - 27 Screw the two pieces of arm timber together (see Template Techniques.

upper notch on the outer two full legs and. Working on one side of the chair at a time. 12 Spread some glue in the top notch of the centre back leg. Drive a 50mm (2in) screw through the pre-drilled hole in each leg into the edge of the seat.28 e ax ng in the Garden 10 Spread some wood glue inside the notch in 11 Fit the narrow end of each arm into the the two short legs and slide each one into the remaining notches on either side of the seat. -. work round. 13 Turn the chair upside down and attach one of the bottom rail pieces in the same way. spread some glue in the notch and replace the arm. at the top and bottom. Using a pinning gun and 16mm (%in) pins. Drive a 30mm (1 %in) screw through the pre-drilled and piloted hole in the leg and a 35mm (11f2in) screw down through the predrilled hole in the arm into the short leg. ~~ ~ . positioning the pre-drilled hole in the front of the arm centrally over the short leg. using a 2mm (1J. drill a pilot hole through the pre-drilled hole in the leg into the arm. Remove the arm . .. use four evenly spaced pins to hold the ply firmly in position. gluing and pinning each vertical line on the ply to each leg in turn with two pins. -- .Gin) drill bit. Take the top rail piece of ply with the marked vertical lines and position the middle line centrally in the notch. into the leg. . fire two pins through the ply. On the two outer legs. ~ .

wood coloured varn ish.Garden Chair 29 14 Spread wood glue over the inner surface of the bottom rail. Sand th e chair thoroughly and fi ll all screw and pin holes. then paint the timber with an exterior wood stain or varn ish 15 Clamp (see Core Techniques . . and clamp it while it dries . page 109) the (see Finishing Techniques. 16 Using a tenon saw. pin the rail to the legs.approximately 30 minutes . Again starting in the middle. firing two pins through both layers of ply into the timber and four pins into each end leg. Lay the second bottom rail piece over the first one . this chair was painted with cherry. page 112): two layers of the rail together to hold the wood firmly in place while the glue dries. turn the chair rightway up and glue and pin the second top rail piece to the top rail in the same way as the bottom rail. When this is dry. cut off any excess plywood where it protrudes beyond t he final leg.

.

2 Screw one long EJ piece of timber to each side of a half frame . Drive 35mm (1V2in) screws through the pre-drilled holes. to make a half frame. as shown . and the other hole 15mm (5fsin) up from the bottom edge and 35mm (1 V2in) from the end. or a book and sunglasses. 15mm (5fsin) from the edges. . page 109) one short piece to the ends of two square pieces of leg timber.5mm (3!16in) drill bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure • Pencil Screws • 16: 35mm (11f2in) • 8 : 25mm (1 in) • Screwdriver • Jigsaw • Pinning gun • 16mm (5fsin) pins • Steel ruler • Heavy-duty knife Square-ended . so that the screws do not collide . Position one hole in a corner. You will need to turn these long pieces of timber upside down before screwing them on. Screw (see Core Techniques . The lid lifts off to store draughts and chess pieces.31 Draughts Table YOU WILL NEED _ _ _--' Frame Timber • 2 pieces: 395 x 70 x 18mm (151f2 X 2% X %in) • 2 pieces: 430 x 70 x 18mm (17x2%x%in) • 4 pieces: 450 x 45 x 45mm (17%x1%x1%in) Add an extra dimension to a drinks table by chequering the top to turn it into a games table.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in each end of the narrow pieces of frame timber. driving 35mm (1 V2in) screws through the pre-drilled holes. lapping the ends over the timber of the half frame . stiff artist's brush • Coloured varn ish • Filler 120-grit sandpaper Sanding block • Clear gloss exterior varnish • Paintbrush page 109) two 4. Base Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 430 x 430 x 6mm (17 x 17x %in) Drill • 4 . Top Light wood veneered MDF • 1 piece: 480x480x12mm (19x19x1f2in) Timber battens • 4 pieces: 220 x 18 x 18mm (8%x%x%in) 1 Pre-drill and D countersink (see Core Techniques. so that the two holes form a diagonal.

J Slot the remaining half frame between the open ends of the long pieces of timber and screw in place. upside a down. with one 70mm (2%in) from each end . Position the batten centrally along the frame and drive a 25mm (1 in) screw through the pre-drilled holes into the table top . cut out the squares .32 Relaxing in the Garden D 4 Place the frame . Using a jigsaw (see Core -echniques. Screw a batten to the top piece. page 112) it to the bottom edge of the frame . Pre-drill and countersink two 4. Further Techniques. centrally on the square top piece. Position the holes centrally. 5 Screw the other three battens in place in the same way.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in each top timber batten . page 108). 6 easu re and mark a 45mm (1%in) square within 7 Slot the base between the legs and pin (see eac corn er of the plywood base . . to make a complete frame . as before. butting it up to one side of the frame.

page 112). fill and sand all screw holes and then seal the whole table with two coats of clear gloss exterior varnish (see Finishing Techniques. fairly stiff artist's brush. TIP Make your own draughts pieces by slicing a wooden pole.-- -- Draughts Tanf= 33 Using a pencil and steel ruler. paint alternate squares with coloured varnish. divide the table . 10 Using a square-ended. sanding and painting with coloured and clear varnish. top into 60mm (23fsin) squares.eight across and eight down to give 64 squares. cut lightly along the pencilled lines : the cuts will help to stop the coloured varnish bleeding across into adjacent squares. When the coloured varnish is dry. . being careful not to spread the varnish onto adjacent squares. 9 With a h~avy-duty knife and a steel ruler.

designed especially for them. which also provides useful storage for garden toys. Once you have built the cube.34 Relaxing in the Garden Building Block Chair & Table Children will love this fun furniture.5mm (3f1Gin) drill bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure • Pencil • Wood glue Screws • 116: 20mm (%in) • Screwdriver • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Emulsion paints • Paintbrush • Sticky motifs • Waterproof varnish . YOU WILL NEED Sides Waterproof plywood ---------~~---' • 2 pieces: 600 x 579 x 9mm (23% x 22% x %in) Base Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 600 x 600 x 12mm (23% x 23% x %in) Desk Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 582 x 579 x 9mm (227/a x 22% x %in) • 1 piece: 600 x 600 x 9mm (23% x 23% x %in) Quadrant • 2 lengths: 579 x 20mm (22% x %in) • 2 lengths: 535 x 20mm (21% x %in) • 2 lengths: 500 x 20mm (19% x %in) • 2 lengths: 260 x 20mm (10% x %in) Chair Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 582 x 579 x 9mm (227/a x 22% x %in) • 1 piece: 582 x 330 x 9mm (227/a x 13 x %in) Quadrant • 2 lengths: 579 x 20mm (22% x %in) • 2 lengths: 535 x 20mm (21% x %in) • 2 lengths: 265 x 20mm (1 01f2X %in) • 2 lengths: 300 x 20mm (12 x %in) • Side and base templates on page 121 • Jigsaw • Drill • 4. get them to help decorate it by painting on their favourite motifs.

Building Block Chair & Table 35 .

36 Relaxing in the Garden EJ 2 Enlarge the base template by 500 % and transfer it onto the base piece of plywood. page 108). .5mm ( 3/1Gin) holes. Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. 1 Enlarge the side template by 500 % and transfer it onto each of the side pieces of plywood (see Template Techniques. page 114). Pre-drill and countersink 4. 4 Glue and screw one of the larger side pieces to each of the 579mm (22%in) sides of the desk back. with one hole 40mm (15fsin) from each corner an d t wo more evenly spaced between them. Position the holes 6mm (%in) in from th e edges. as marked on the template. 3 Pre-drill and countersink 4. page 109) 4. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. cut out the shapes . as marked on the template. cut out the shapes. page 109) a 579mm (22%in) length of quadrant to each of the 579mm (22%in) sides and a 535mm (21%in) length to the other two sides. Using a jigsaw. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood side pieces.5mm (3/1Gin) holes.5mm (3/1Gin) holes on all four sides of the 582 x 579mm (22% x 22%in) desk-back piece of plywood. Glue and screw (see Core Techniques. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes .

Screw the desk top to the sides and back of the desk.Building Block Chair & Table Th e building block also provides temporary storage for toys.5mm (3/1Gin) holes along three sides of the 600x600mm (23% x 235fsin) desk-top piece of plywood. . driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood. Position the holes 18mm (%in) in from the edges. with one hole 120mm (4%in) from each corner and two more evenly spaced between them. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood. 37 5 Glue and screw a 500mm (19%in) length of quadrant to each of the long edges of the sides. Glue and screw a 260mm (1 O%in) length of quadrant to each of the short edges of the sides. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes . Pre-drill and countersink 4. though it will not ke ep them dry.

of quadrant to each of the short. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes 280mm (11 in) from the base.. - -···-. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood . the tongue to the sides and back of the desk. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood side pieces..-. 10 Glue and screw one of the smaller side 11 Glue and screw a 265mm (10V2in) length pieces to each of the 579mm (22%in) sides of the chair back.38 Relaxing in the Garden 9 Pre-drill and countersink 4. Position one hole 40mm (15fsin) from each side with two more evenly spaced between them. with one hole 40mm (15fsin) from each corner and two more evenly spaced between them. Using the method shown in step 3. driving screws 8 Glue and screw the bottom section with through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood. Drive screws through the predrilled holes in the plywood side pieces. glue and screw a 579mm (22%in) length of quadrant to each of the 579mm (22%in) sides and a 535mm (21 %in) length to the other side. Position the holes 6mm (%in) in from the edges.Gin) holes on two 579mm (22%in) sides and one 582mm (227fsin) side (the base) of the 582 x 579mm (22% x 22%in) chair-back piece of plywood. Glue and screw the remaining length of 535mm (21%in) quadrant to the plywood. straight edges of the sides and a 300mm (12in) length of quadrant to the pre-drilled holes across the middle.~~----=------ .5mm (3/. Predrill and countersink holes on this line. Measure 280mm (11 in) from the base and mark a line across the wood.-::-. - -~ ~--=------.

page 114). On the long side. to the sides and back of the chair. Stand an offcut of quadrant on the back corners of the seat and draw round it. Either enlarge some favourite motifs and paint them in emulsion paints.Building Block Chair & Table 39 13 Pre-drill and countersink 4. with one hole 60mm (21J2in) from each end and two more evenly spaced between them. or get a sign-writing shop (look in a local phone book) to cut sticky vinyl shapes. 12 Glue and screw the remaining bottom piece with one hole between them.5mm (3!16in) holes on one long side and two short sides of the 582 x 330mm (227/s x 13in) seat piece. 15 Fill all screw holes and sand all the edges and corners to curves (see Finishing Techniques. Apply these to the cube. cut out the curved notch . Prime and then paint the chair and table with emulsion paint (see Finishing Techniques. position the holes at the same distances from the edge and ends. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood. . On the top of the chair. cutting them along the lines where the cube splits . seat to the quadrant that is positioned halfway up the ch air. sand the quadrant down to follow the slope (see inset). and then seal the whole cube with two coats of waterproof varnish . page 114). To add 14 Glue and screw the motifs. fit the table and chair together to make a cube and apply the decoration to each face . driving screws hrough the pre-drilled holes in the plywood . Using a jigsaw. position the holes 8mm (5/16in) in from the edges. On the short sides.

40 Relaxing in the Garden Barbecue Table .

. 2 Using a jigsaw.... The top can be scrubbed down and has plenty of room for food preparation.. cut the tongue off another floorboard.. This table has a built-in caddy at each end to hold bottles of sauces. ... page 108). YOU WILL NEED Top Tongue-and-groove floorboards • 4 pieces: 1030x125x22mm (40112 x 5 x 7/ain) Timber battens • 3 pieces: 365 x 45 x 18mm (141f2x1%x%in) Caddies Waterproof plywood • 2 pieces: 455x110x12mm (177/a x 4% x % in ) • 4 pieces: 122 x237 x 12mm (4 7/a x 9% x %in) • 2 pieces: 480x 145 x4mm (19x5%x%in) • Dri ll • 4. napkins and cutlery and a large shelf for plates and glasses.5mm (3/1Gin) dri ll bit • Countersin k bit • Tape measure • Pencil Screws • 44: 35mm (11f2in) • 8: 30mm (1 %in) • 12: 20mm (%in) • Screwdriver • Pinning gun • 16mm (%in) pins • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer Legs Waterproof plywood • 2 pieces: 455x240x12mm (17 7/a x 9% x 1f2in) Timber • 4 pieces: 800 x 45 x 45mm (311f2X 1% x 1%in) Shelf Timber • 2 pieces: 930 x 45 x 18mm (36%x1%x%in) Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 365 x 840 x 12mm (14 1 x 33% x V2in) /2 • Side and caddy partition templates on page 122 • Jigsaw • Wood glue Sides Waterproof plywood • 2 pieces: 1220x240x12mm (48 X 9% X 1J2in) • Satinwood paint • Paintbrush • Tung or Danish oil Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques.. - -- Barbecue Table 41 A perfect piece of furniture for keen patio cooks. cut the groove off one of the floorboards..

5mm (3/. one 150mm (6in) in from each side . page 109) six 4. Glue and screw (see Core Techniques. one hole 90mm (35fsin) from each side and one in the middle. Fit the tongues into the grooves. page 109) the underside of the table top. Position the battens centrally across the four pieces of board.. position two more holes 40mm (15fsin) down from the edge. 4 Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques.42 Relaxing in the Garden D . page 109) the battens to the 3 Glue (see Core Techniques.. 162mm (6V2in). position four holes 40mm (15fsin) up from the edge. 75mm (27Jsin).. Glue and screw one piece of leg timber to each short side of each piece of plywood. On one long (bottom) edge.. with two holes 22mm (7/sin) and two 150mm (6in) in from each side.. 201 mm (Sin).-__:___~ ---~-- . so that the outer edges are the tongue-less and groove-less edges. one 22mm (7Jsin) in from each side.:::.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in each of the timber battens. ---~ ~~-~--- . position three holes 1Omm (3fsin) down from the edge. Position two more holes 130mm (5'Vain) up from the same long edge. four pieces of board together to make the table top . 304mm (12'Vain) and 338mm (13%in) from one end. Drive 35mm (1 V2in) screws through the two corresponding pre-drilled holes to make a pair of end legs. . 5 Pre-drill and countersink 4.. driving 35mm (1 V2in) screws through the pre-drilled holes. aligning the ends of the timber with the top edge of the plywood. with one batten 47mm (F/sin) from each end and the third one in the middle: the pre-drilled holes should sit either side of the joins between the boards.Gin) holes in both pieces of leg plywood.. Position the holes 37mm (1 V2in).-- . On the same long edge. -··---- -~. On the opposite long (top) edge...

driving 35mm (1 %in) screws through the three corresponding predrilled holes in the plywood. page 115).5mm (3/1Gin) holes. are also brilliant for barbecues. Hang them near your cooking station and they will hold all your condiments and spices within easy reach. the end legs over each of the outer battens on the underside. page 114). Enlarge the side template by 666 % and transfer it onto the plywood (see Template Techniques. cut out the two sides.~ --------------- Barbecue Table 43 TIP The hanging shelves made for the potting shed (see page 62). Glue and screw the end legs to the battens. 7 Screw the two side pieces of plywood together (see Template Techniques. . Unscrew to give two identical shapes. Using a jigsaw. as marked on the template. Pre-drill and 6 Lay the table top face down and fit one of countersink 4.

. Unscrew to give two identical shapes. Position the holes 45mm (1 %in) down from one long (top) edge.44 Relaxing in the Garden 8 Glue and screw the sides to the leg timbers. driving 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes in the sides into the edges of the caddy-front pieces.5mm (3!16in) holes in both 10 Screw two of the 122 x 237mm (4 7/sin) 455 x 11 Omm (1 77/s x 43fsin) caddy-front pieces of plywood. Cut the side template down to the shaded section to make the caddy-partition template and transfer it onto the plywood. driving 35mm (1 %in) screws through the predrilled holes. . ~- I . caddy partition pieces of plywood together. - --~ - . Cut out two partitions . Glue and screw the caddy fronts between the ends of the side pieces . ll 9 Pre-drill and countersink two 4.. Repeat with the other two caddy-partition pieces . with one hole 150mm (6in) in from each side.

then paint it with satinwood paint (see Finishing Techniques. and making sure that the square ends of the partitions are flush w ith the base of the fronts and end legs. Oil the table top with tung oil or Danish oil. driving 35mm (11/2in) screws through the pre-drilled holes into the legs . firing the pins into the edges of the fronts. Fill all screw and pin holes. end legs and partitions. Prime everything but the table top with acrylic primer. 13 Pre-drill and countersink a 4. 12 Pin (see Further Techniques. page 112). Drive 20mm (%in) screws through the pre-drilled holes into the edges of all of the partitions. . firing pins into the rails. Measure and mark 300mm (12in) from the base of each leg. page 112) one 480 x 145mm (19 x 5%in) piece of plywood to the base of each of the caddies. aligning each piece with the predrilled holes in the f ronts and end legs. Glue and screw the shelf timbers between the legs at the marked points. and pin in place.5mm (3/1Gin) 4 Fit the shelf piece of plywood onto the rails hole 25mm (1 in) from each end of both timber shelf pieces.Barbecue Table 45 Slide two partitions into each caddy. then sand all surfaces.

it really isn't that complicated to make and the end result is well worth the work.Loveseat This elegantly curving loveseat proves that woodwork doesn't have to be square. Don't be put off by the number of steps in this project. .

At the end with the hole 9mm (%in) from it. 3 Pre -drill and countersink (see Core 3 4 Take one piece of dowel Techniques. page 112) a in one piece of timber and two pieces of dowel. draw. Repeat with the two remaining pieces of plywood. the notch will make an L-shape in the end of the timber. page 115). countersunk face down.(1 in-) wide chisel • Mallet • 33mm (Plain) hole saw • Tenon saw • Wood glue Screws • 21: 50mm (2in) • 30: 30mm (1 % in) • Screwdriver • Pinning gun • 16mm (Sfain) pins • Paintbrush • Water • Heavy-duty knife • Filler • Primer • Waterproof paint D EJ 1 Screw two pieces of waterproof 2 Cut the seat template down to the plywood together (see Template Techniques. page 108) . each one centred over a drilled hole.5mm (3/1Gin) dril l bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure • Pencil • 24mm. Unscrew to give two identical shapes. with the hole that is 9mm (3/sin) from an end. Screw two of the remaining pieces of waterproof plywood together. cut out the seat shape and sand the edges smooth (see Finishing Techniques. using a jigsaw. cut three 18 x 18mm (% x %in) notches in the piece of timber.Loveseat 47 YOU WILL NEED Waterproof plywood • 6 pieces: 800 x 580 x 18mm (31112 X 23 X %in) Timber • 2 pieces: 750 x 50 x 18mm (29112 X 2 X %in) Dowel • 4 lengths: 750 x 33mm (29112 x 1%in) Birch ply • 2 pieces: 2440 x 298 x 4mm (96x11%x%in) • 2 pieces: 2440 x 18 x 4mm (96x%x%) • Seat and rail templates on page 122 • Jigsaw • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Drill • 4. Enlarge the seat shaded section to make the rail template.5mm ( !1Gin) holes and clamp it to the workbench. 4mm (1/sin) deep and 298mm (12in) long. page 112). as shown . template by 400 % and transfer it onto the wood (see Template Techniques. Set one seat aside. Using a chisel and mallet (see Further Techniques . Position the first hole 52mm (21fsin) from one end. . Transfer the rail template onto the wood and. cut out the rail shapes and sand the edges smooth. page 114). Unscrew to give two identical shapes. then chisel out (see Further Techniques. Starting at this end. page 113). the next 460mm (18in) from the same end and the third hole 9mm (3/sin) from the other end. then set these rails aside. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. to the left of the screw hole. nearest you. page 109) three 4. groove 15mm (5/sin) wide.

.. page 108).... 5( e v - -- -- ... cut a crescent at one end of both rails and the seat. as shown. . . .... • • • • • • . ll 6 Using a tenon saw (see 7 Using a 33mm (P/sin) hole 8 Lay one of the rails flat on the workbench: 1 Core Techniques.• • • • • • • *' ._~---- - . as marked on the template..-.... pi cut away one side of the drilled hole on both rails and the seat... as marked on the template.... ... saw.. Take the dowel that you have not cut a groove in and spread glue (see Core Techniques... ' . . .~~ ~---- ~ __ ·..... .. ....... . . Ill ••• . .. ........... page 109) around the end with the hole 9mm (%in) from the top . . this will be the top of the chair. page 111 )...48 Rela xing in the Garden • • • ••• • •• • •••• •••• ' • • . cut a hole in the centre back of two rails and the seat. I 5 Using a 33mm (P/sin) hole saw (see Further Techniques...--·.

Do not glue this as it is a temporary strut to support the project firmly while it is being assembled. Slot this into the crescent-shaped hole. with one edge of the groove aligned with the outer edge of the rail . Drive a 50mm (2in) screw (see Core Techniques. piece of timber to the other side of the rail with a 50mm (2in) screw. . Drive 50mm (2in) screws through the dowels and the notched timber into the seat. page 109) through the pre-drilled the grooved piece of dowel. Drive in a 50mm (2in) screw. as shown. Ease the seat up a little.Loveseat 49 9 Slot this length of dowel into the centre back 10 Spread glue around the pre-drilled end of hole in the rail. spread some glue on the dowels and push the seat back down into position. as before. hole into the plywood rail. as before . with the pre-drilled hole facing outwards. I 12 Slot the seat over the legs and push it ---11 Screw the pre-drilled end of the notched down carefully until the edge of the seat fits into the central notch in the timber and the pre-drilled holes align with the centre of the edge of the seat.

Place the pins approximately 30mm (1 %in) apart. Screw it in place. Glue and screw.:_ - ~ . Fit the short edge of one end of a piece of birch ply into the groove and pin it (see Further Techniques. 15 Bend the ply over the glued edges of the rail and the seat. m 14 Spread glue along the outer edges of the upper rail and seat and along the inside of the groove in the dowel. - -·- - ··-· ·---~~ . fitting it into the notch in the timber and aligning it with the predrilled holes . 16 Glue and pin a narrow piece of birch ply around the bottom rail in the same way.. Then. You will find it easier if you get a friend to help you with this and the next steps..- ~ __. leaving the loose end of the ply free. ____ . as it can be tricky to handle the ply by yourself._. though on the tighter parts of the curve they may need to be more frequent.50 Relaxing in the Garden 13 Slot the second rail over the legs. The edges of the ply should align with the outer edges of the rail and seat.. as before . -~:: __ . Unscrew the length of notched timber and move it to the inside of the curve . page 112) in place along this edge . Pin the ply right around to the far end of the rail and seat. lay the seat down with the grooved dowel flat on the floor. pinning it in place as you go.

Push the chairs up against one another so that the curves fit tightly together. paint it over the ply on the outside of both chairs. 17 Stand the chairs upside down and facing in opposite directions. Score down several times until you have cut right through . pinning it in place along the edges as you go. gluing and pinning them in the same way. the notches you cut in step 6 and the cut ends of the ply. timber and birch ply. Dilute some glue with water. Sand the whole loveseat. 18 Paint some diluted glue between the ply bottom rails where they touch -then bend each narrow piece around the bottom rail next to it.Loveseat 51 Making the second seat Make up the second seat in exactly the same way. Fill all screw and pin holes. Unscrew and remove the notched timbers. right along to the ends of the loose flaps of ply.5mm (3/1Gin) holes through the top and bottom rails and the seat. . 20 Pre-drill two 4. 19 Cut off any excess ply by using a heavy- duty knife to score down the edges of the pieces at the points where they meet the legs and arms of the chairs. using a · paintbrush.one part glue to three parts water. following steps 3-16 and using the remaining seat. Drive in 50mm (2in) screws. then prime and paint it with two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniques. so that the glued side touches the back of the chair next to it. as marked on the template .and. rails. Bend each flap around the back of the chair next to it. dowels. page 112).

.

but there is no reason why it shouldn't be good looking as well as practical to use. .The Potting Shed Every garden needs storage for tools and flower pots.

55

Tool Rack
Adapt a traditional Shaker-style peg rail to mal<e this tool rack. The shelf above provides storage and the tool caddy (see page 58), which will hold all your small garden tools, hangs tidily alongside your spade, fork, rake and broom.
YOU WILL NEED
Brackets
Timber

-~------'

• 3 pieces: 145 x 200 x 18mm (5%x8x%in) • 3 pieces: 420 x 45 x 18mm (161f2x1%x%in) • 3 pieces: 170x45x18mm (6% x 1% x%in)

Shelf
Timber

1

Screw the three large

II

• 3 pieces: 1425 x 45 x 18mm (57 X 1% X %in)
Spacers

pieces of bracket timber together (see Template
Techniques, page 115)

• 2: 18mm (%in)

Peg rail
Timber

Enlarge the template by 400% and transfer it onto the timber (see Template
Techniques , page 114).

• 1 piece: 1425x70x18mm (57 X 2% X %in)
Dowel

• 8 lengths: 140 x 25mm (5112 x 1 in) • Template on page 123 • Jigsaw • Drill • 4.5mm (3116in) drill bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure

Using a jigsaw (see Core
Techniques, page 108), cut

out the bracket supports. Unscrew to give three identical shapes.

2

Pre-drill and countersink

EJ

• Pencil • Wood glue
Screws

(see Core Techniques, page 109) three 4.5mm (3!16in) holes in the three long pieces of bracket timber. Mark the centre line and position one hole on the line 35mm (1 V2in), one hole 110mm (4%in) and one hole 300mm (12in) from the top . Glue and screw (see Core Techniques , page 109) one piece to the back of each bracket support, driving a 35mm (1 V2in) screw through the top hole and a 30mm (1 in) screw through the middle hole.

• 6: 30mm (1 %in) • 18: 35mm (11f2in) • Screwdriver • 25mm (1 in) spade bit • Mallet • Try square • Fill er • Sanding block • 120-grit sandpaper • Exterior woodstain • Paintbrush

56 The Potting Shed

D

3

Pre-drill and countersink two 4.5mm (3/,Gin)

4

Pre-drill 4.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in the three shelf

holes in the three short pieces of bracket timber. Mark the centre line down each piece and position one hole on the line 9mm (3/sin) and one hole 115mm (41/2in) from the top. Glue and screw one piece to the top of each of the bracket supports, driving a 35mm (1112in) screw through the first hole and a 30mm (1 %in) screw through the second hole.

rail s. Mark the centre line down each piece and position one hole on the line 1OOmm (4in) from each end and one in the middle . Lay the brackets on their backs and align them with the pre-drilled holes in one of the shelf pieces . Drive a 35mm (11!2in) screw through each of the pre-drilled holes into the top of each bracket.

5

Place an

18mm (%in) spacer on each end of the rail and lay another rail on its side on top of the first one . Drive in screws as before .

6

Remove the spacers and use them to position

the third rail. Drive in screws as before.

page 112). drill eight holes through the peg rail piece of timber. with the ends of the brackets protruding 65mm (2%in) below the peg rail.Tool Rack 57 7 Using a 25mm (1 in) spade bit (see Further Techniques. Drive a 35mm (1 V2in) screw through each of the pre-drilled 8 Run a little glue (see Core holes in the bracket into the backboard . Mark the centre line down the piece and position one hole 1OOmm (4in) from each end and the remaining six holes 175mm (?in) apart. ll 9 Lay the peg rail ll peg-side down on the floor and position the brackets and shelf above it. page 111 ). Use a try square to check that the dowels are at true right angles to the backboard. . Techniques. Fill all screw holes and sand the tool rack. NOTE: these measurements give the positio n of the centre of each hole. then paint it with exterior woodstain (see Finishing Techniques . page 109) around one end of each length of dowel and hammer it into a hole with a mallet.

58 Th e Potting Shed Tool Caddy .

. as marked on the template.(%in-) wide chisel • Mallet • Wood glue Screws • 8: 40mm (1 %in) • Screwdriver • Pinning gun • 16mm (%in) pins • Damp cloth • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Exterior woodstain • Paintbrush 1 Screw the two square pieces of timber together (see Template Techniques.5mm (3/1Gin) drill bit • Countersink bit • Tape measure • Pencil • Tenon a saw • 18mm. Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. Enlarge the template by 400% and transfer it onto the timber (see Template Techniques . it also fits on the end of the potting bench (see page 67). page 115). as marked on the template .Gin) holes. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques .5mm (3/. with a 25mm (1 in) spade bit (see Further Techniques. page 114).Tool Cado 59 This is an excellent little piece of equipment that Timber • 2 pieces: 210x210x18mm (8%x8%x%in) • 3 pieces: 105 x 355 x 18mm (41/sx 14%x%in) • 2 pieces: 105x160x18mm (41/s X 6% X %in) will hold all your small tools and paraphernalia as you work around the garden. page 111 ). page 108). Dowel • 1 length: 440 x 25mm (171!2 x 1 in) Plywood • 1 piece: 190 x 390 x 4mm (71f2 X 15% X 1/sin) • Template on page 123 • Jigsaw • Drill • 25mm (1 in) spade bit • 4. As well as hanging on the tool rack (see page 55). Unscrew to give two identical shapes. page 109) 4. cut out the end pieces and drill the hole.

60 The Potting Shed D 3 Chisel out the wood (see Further Techniques. mark pencil lines 53mm (23/1Gin) long. as shown . 4 Slot the short pieces into the long piece. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the end piece . to make the tool caddy dividers. page 109) one long side piece to an end piece. measure and 53 x 18mm (2 3/16 x %in) slots. page 108) . parallel line 127mm (5in) from either end. 5 Glue and screw (see Core Techniques. Position one line 109mm (4%in) from either end and a second . Saw and chisel an identical slot in the middle of each of the two short pieces of timber. . Using a tenon saw (see Core Techniques. page 112) between the sawn lines to make two 2 On one long piece of timber. saw along the marked lines .

of the caddy. page 114).Tool Caddy 61 6 Position the [I dividers against the end and side pieces. 8 Pin (see Further Techniques. Fill all screw holes and sand the tool caddy. Wipe away any excess glue with a damp cloth. 7 Screw the other end piece in place. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes in the end. Position the dowel centrally. then paint it with exterior woodstain (see Finishing Techniques. as before. page 109). making sure that it is tight against the dividers. Glue and screw the second side piece to the end piece. Push the dowel back into place. page 112) the 9 Thread the length of dowel through the drilled holes in the ends piece of plywood to the base of the caddy. then pull it back slightly and spread a little glue around it (see Core Techniques. Pin through the plywood into the sides and ends. .

Hang them inside or outside the potting shed to store pots and saucers or to display plants.62 The Potting Shed Hanging Shelves These shelves are the simplest project in this book... page 108) a 6mm (%in) hole in each corner of each piece of timber. The holes in the two back corners are 20mm (%in) from each edge : the holes in the two front corners are 20mm (%in) from the front edge and 26mm (1 in) from the side edge .~­ Timber • 3 pieces : 500 x 140 x 18mm (191/2 X 51/2 X %in) Dowel • 1 length: 500x35mm (191/2 x 1V2in) Cord • 2 lengths: 2m x 6mm (78x%in) r-. and yet they are so useful. Drill (see Core Techniques. D YOU WI L L N------. Hung next to the barbecue table {see page 40) they will hold tools and condiments for creative cooking.(%in-) wide chisel • Mallet • Exterior woodstain • Paintbrush with sandpaper and chamfer the edges (see Finishing Techniques. page 114). .5mm (3/1Gin) drill bits 1 Round off the corners of the pieces of timber • Countersink bit • Masking tape • Tenon saw • 12mm. • • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Tape measure • Pencil • Drill • 6mm (%in) and 4.

.

6mm (%in) deep. 4 Tie a knot in one end of each length of cord and put tape around the other end to prevent it fraying . chisel out the wood between the sawn lines to make a 12mm. page 112). Thread the taped end of each length through one of the back holes in a piece of timber and pull it through up to the knot. with one hole 80mm (3Vain) from each end. Mark a pencil line round the dowel 17mm (%) in from each end and a second pencil line 29mm (1 Vain) from each end. . 6mm (%in) from the cutting edge and saw (see Core Techniques. page 108) around all the pencil lines. Put a piece of tape along the blade of a tenon saw.(V2in-) wide trench. page 109) two 4. Stain all the pieces of timber and the length of dowel with 2 Pre-drill and countersink (see Core exterior woodstain. ensuring that you do not cut deeper than the tape . Techniques.64 The Potting Shed 3 Using a chisel and mallet (see Further Techniques.5mm (3/lGin) holes in the length of dowel.

The spacing between the knots must be accurate or the finished shelves will not hang straight. Measure. moving to the inner edge at the front. knotting below each one. adjust the knots until the shelves are level. . Tie knots in the cords so that the pencil marks sit exactly at the top of the knots. use wall plugs. Thread the cords down through the front holes in the top shelf and tie knots so that the marks sit exactly at th e top of the knots. At the back of the shelves the cord runs around the outer edge of the trench. 6 Measure up the cords 600mm (24in) from the 7 Loop each 600mm (24in) of cord around the top of the top shelf and make pencil marks. Thread the cords through the front holes in the other shelves. drive appropriate screws through the pre-drilled holes in the dowel into the wall you want to hang them from. If you are hanging the shelves from a masonry wall.Han(jing Shelves 65 5 Measure 200mm (8in) up the cord from the top of the shelf and mark the point with a pencil. trench in each end of the dowel. knot the cords and thread them through the top shelf in the same way. Thread the lengths of cord through the back holes in the second shelf. This will form the hanging loops. To hang the shelves.

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in any arrangement.L Top EEDc .5mm (3/1Gin) holes along both long sides.. so once your bedding plants have hardened off. around the garden to plant them out. side leg and top leg templates on page 123 • Drill • 1OOmm (4in) and 80mm (3Vain) hole saws • 4. with all the plants.5mm (3/1Gi n) and 6. (These size holes will accommodate standard flower pots.) Pre-drill and co untersink (see Core Techniques. ..- Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 720 x 350 x 12mm (28% x 13% x V2 in) • 2 pieces: 720x 100x 12mm (28% x 4 x V2in) Bench This neat bench is clever and simple to make. Legs and frame Waterproof plywood • 2 pieces: 820x326x12mm (32% x 12% x V2 in) • 2 pieces: 820x280x12mm (32% x 11 x V2 in) • 2 pieces: 350 x 163 x 12mm (13% X 61/2 X 1/2in) Dowel • 2 lengths: 1305 x 20mm (511/2 x %in) • 2 lengths: 1095 x 20mm (42%x%in) • 16 lengths: 40 x 6. page 109) five 4.5mm (1%x%in) • End leg. Position the holes 6mm (%in) in from the edge.5mm (%in) drill bits • Countersink bit • Tape measure • Pencil • Wood glu e a Screws • 44: 30mm (1 %in) • 4: 35mm (1 V2in) 1 Using hole saws (see Further Techniques. with one hole 30mm (1 %in) from each end and three more evenly spaced between them . cut out five 1OOmm (4in) and seve n 80mm (3Vsin) holes in the large top piece to make the bench top . but you can drill any size holes.67 Potting OU WU. The top lifts off. page • Screwdriver • Jigsaw • 20mm (%in) spade bit • Damp cloth • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Waterproof paint • Paintbrush 111 ). you can carry the top.

.68 The Potting Shed EJ D 2 Glue and screw (see Core Techniques. Using a 20mm (%in) spade bit (see Further Techniques. transfer it onto the plywood again. with one hole 50mm (2in) from the top . then turn the template around. as marked . cut out one pair of side legs. page 108). page 114). cut out the end legs. page 115). as shown. Position the holes 6mm (%in) in from the edge. and cut out the other pair of side legs. page 111 ). another 30mm (1 %in) from the bottom and three more evenly spaced between them . drill the four holes. Using a jigsaw. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. Pre-drill and countersink on both sides five 4. Unscrew to give four identical shapes. Cut the end leg template down to the shaded section to make the side leg template and transfer it once onto the plywood. Unscrew to give two identical shapes. 4 Screw the two second largest pieces of leg plywood together. page 109) the two long top pieces to the long sides of the top.5mm (3/1Gin) holes along the long straight side. Carefully drive 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes in the bench top into the edges of the sides. 3 Screw the two largest pieces of leg plywood together (see Template Techniques. Enlarge the end leg template by 400% and transfer it onto the plywood (see Template Techniques.

ll 7 Glue and screw the leg top to the top of the assembled leg.5mm (%in) doV''" 1 pegs. as before. 6 Glue and screw one side leg to each edge of an end leg. Drive 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes in the side legs into the edge of the end leg: do this carefully to avoid splitting the plywood.Potting Bench 69 5 Screw the two smallest pieces of leg plywood together. one hole 60mm (2%in) from each corner and another in the middle. Enlarge the leg top template by 400 % and transfer it onto the plywood. Drill similar holes in both short lengths of dowel. Unscrew to give two identical shapes .Gin) and 36mm (1V2in) from each end. on the long straight side. lengths of dowel to receive the 6. Drive 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes in the leg top into the edges of the end leg and side legs . Make up the other leg in the same way. cut out the leg tops. . Position one hole 122mm (4 7/sin) from each end and a second hole 141 mm (5V2in) from each end. Using a jigsaw.5mm (3/1Gin) holes along both short sides and the long straight side of the leg tops. with one hole 30mm (1 %in) from each corner on the short sides and. Position the holes 6mm (%in) in from the edges. positioning them 17mm (1Y. Pre-drill and countersink 4.

then pull the dowel back slightly. 10 Spread a little wood glue m around the middle of a peg and push it through the drilled hole in the dowel. Thread and peg the other long length of dowel through the other pair of top holes in the same way. Spread a little wood glue around the areas that will be inside the plywood and push the dowel back in. Turn the dowel so that the holes in it are at right angles to the floor and ensure that one hole is on each side of the end leg. Mark the position with a light pencil mark. Wipe away any excess glue with a damp cloth. Spread glue on one end of another peg and push it into the hole on the inside of the leg (see inset) . Wipe away any excess glue with a damp cloth.70 The Potting Shed 9 Stand the legs upside down on the floor and lay the bench top upside down between them . . Thread a long length of dowel through corresponding holes in the tops of the end legs. leaving a gap of 10mm (%in) between the ends of the top and the legs.

Position one hole on each side of each leg top. 12 Pre-drill and countersink a 4. Fill all screw holes and sand the potting bench. 25mm (1 in) from the edge.5mm (3/lGin) hole down through the leg tops into the dowels . page 114). .Potting Bench 71 1 Thread and peg the two short lengths of dowel through the holes in the other ends of the legs in the same way. Drive a 35mm (1V2in) screw down through each hole . then paint it with acrylic primer and two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniques.

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A Rustic Retreat
Whether you live deep in the country or in the heart of a city, bring a touch of rural charm to your garden with these traditionally styled projects.

Picket Bench
This New England-style bench, simply made f rom slats of timber, will find a home in the smallest garden. Paint it in a soft colour to complement your summer planting scheme.

1

Measure down 35mm

(15fsin) on each side of one end of each of the nine pieces of back timber. Draw a diagonal line from each measured point to the top centre. Using a jigsaw (see Core
Techniques , page 108), cut along the

lines to make a pointed picket.

EJ

YOU WJLL NEED
Back
Timber
• 9 pieces: 1290 x 70 x 18mm (51 x2%x%in) • 3 pieces: 950 x 45 x18mm (37%x1%x%in)

Spacers
• 3: 45x18mm (1%x%in)

Braces
• 4 pieces: 397 x 45 x 18mm (151f2x1%x%in) • 2 pieces: 500 x 70 x 18mm (191f2 X 2% X %in) • Tape measure • Pencil • Jigsaw • Drill • 4.5mm (3/1Gin) drill bit • Countersink bit

Spacers
• 1: 70x70x18mm (2% X 2% X %in) • 1: 45x18mm (1%x%in) • 1: 290 x 70 x 18mm (111f2x2%x%in) Front

2

Pre-drill and countersink (see Core

Techniques, page 109) nine 4.5mm (3116in) holes

in each of the the three back rails. Position the holes centrally, with one hole 35mm (11f2in) from each end, one hole 125mm (5in) from each end and the remaining five holes every 115mm (41f2in). Lay the first picket flat, with the square spacer aligned with the square end. Lay one rail on the picket with the small spacer, lying on its 18mm (%in) side, aligned with both the side of the picket and the end of the rail. Drive a screw (see Core
Techniques, page 109)

Timber
• 9 pieces: 450 x 70 x18mm (17%x2%x%in) • 2 pieces: 950 x 45 x 18mm (37% X 1% X %in)

Screws
• 101: 30mm (1 %in) • Screwdriver • Clamps

TIP
Draw a cross on the surface of each of the spacers so that you do not confuse them with the pieces of timber needed to make the bench.

Seat
Timber
• 3 pieces: 357 x 45 x 18mm (14%x1%x%in) • 4 pieces: 950 x 70 x 18mm (37% X 2% X %in)

• Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Waterproof paint • Paintbrush

through the pre-drilled hole. Remove all of the spacers.

drive 6 Turn the bench-back over and align the long spacer with the top another screw into each rail . Drive in an extra screw on the second and seventh pickets. as before. as before. Screw the picket in place. . Lay the third rail below it and screw it to each of the pickets in turn . Drive a screw through the pre-drilled hole .76 A Rustic Retreat j 3 Position the long spacer above the rail. to set the picket in the right position on the rails. at an angle to the first one. to set the the second rail above this. with the small spacer aligned with both the side of the picket and the end of the rail . Continue until all nine pickets are screwed to the two rails . as before. to stop the pickets twisting on the rails. Lay 4 Use the small spacer. 5 On the second and seventh pickets. of a picket point. width between the first and second pickets. Use the square and the long spacers. lying on its 45mm (1 %in) side.

using the same measurements. At the front. but position them 27mm (1 Vain) from the edge. as shown. 9 Fix a rail across the other end of the slats in the same way. Position the holes centrally with one hole 35mm (1 1f2in) and one hole 140mm (51f2in) from each end. driving screws through the pre-drilled holes. then measure the distance between the two rails and fix another rail centrally. drill and countersink four 4. drill the holes the same distances apart. Pre-drill and countersink five 4. the other end of the rail will stop 36mm (1 1f2in) from the side of the last slat. using the 18mm (%in) side of the spacers to set the distances between one end of the rail and the side of the slats and the side of the rail and end of the slats. On the back slat. Lay the slats out. position the holes 9mm (%in) in from the edge with one 1OOmm (4in) from each end and three more evenly spaced between them .5mm (3/lGin) holes in each of the two outer slats. This side of the seat will be the back of the bench. Pre- way as the back.Picket Bench 77 7 Make up the front of the bench in the same 8 Make up the slatted bench seat using the same principles. Lay one rail across the ends of the slats. . using the 45mm (1%in) side of a spacer to set the distance between them. On the front slat. Use the square spacer to establish the position of the bottom rail and align the top rail with the top of the slats.5mm (3/JGin) holes in the three rails. Screw the rail to the slats.

~. . \. ..78 A Rustic Retreat 10 Lay the bench-back down with the side with two rails uppermost. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the seat into the rail. ' . Clamp in place.- 11 .. Stand the bench '• upright and position the front under the front edge of the seat. Drive screws through the pre-drilled holes in the seat into the front. ·:f:...· -.~.· .:. Position the seat so that the back slat sits over the higher of the two rails. ..

- 14 Glue and screw one diagonal brace across each end of the bench. page 112) . behind the horizontal braces. 13 On the long braces. Glu e and screw two braces across each end of the bench .Picket Bench 79 12 Pre-drill and countersink two 4. At the other end. measure and mark a parallel line .5mm (3/1Gin) holes in each end of each short brace piece. measure along 50mm (2in) on one side and draw a diagonal line across to the opposite corner. cut along the lines . Using a jigsaw. Fill any screw holes and sand the bench. so that they run in opposite directions at each end. then prime and paint it with two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniques. Align the braces with the ends of the rails and drive screws through the pre-drilled holes into the end-grain of the rails. Position one hole 1Omm (3fsin) from each corner. as shown.

.80 A Rustic Retreat YOU WILL NEED _ _ _.5mm (3!1Gin) drill bit Screws • 32 : 25mm (1 in) • Screwdriver • Jigsaw • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Waterproof paint • Paintbrush .. Table top Timber • 6 pieces : 950 x 94 x 18mm (37%x3%x%in) Battens Timber • 2 pieces : 480 x 100 x 50mm (19x4x2in) • 2 pieces: 260 x 100 x 50mm (10%x4x2in) • Ceramic pot with 400mm (15%in) diameter rim • Wood glue • Hammer • Nail • String • Pencil • Tape measure • Mitre block • Tenon saw • Drill • 4...

cut around the outer circle. Lay them within the two circles as shown. EJ 2 Mitre the ends (see Furth er Techniques. cut 5 Using a jigsaw (see Core again mark t wo circles. out the inner circle (see Further Techniques. The central hole. • 3 Turn the table top over and 4 Usi ng a drill and jigsaw. Techniques. Sand the table top then prim e and paint it with two coats of waterproof paint (see Finishing Techniqu es. Drill (see Core Techniqu es. creates a living piece of furniture that will change with the passing seasons. so th at th ey cover as many of the timbers as possible . Mark the same outer edge of 450mm (17%in) and a smaller inner circle of 370mm (14%i n) for the central hole. Hammer a nail into the centre of the timbers and tie one end of a length of string to it. o. Thi s allows the table top to rest on the pot. page 108).Herb Tc. page 110). . ~ :: -~ Herb Table Make the most of your favourite corner of the a • 1 garden with a table top that sits on top of a large pot. page 108) 4. Butt up and glue (see Core Techniques.5mm (3 !1Gin) holes and drive two screws through the battens into each piece of timber. page 109) th e six pieces of timber to hold them wh il e you mark the circles.in this case 400mm (15%in). through which the plants can grow. page 113). Draw an inner circle the size of the radiu s of your pot. page 11 0) of the battens across the 100m (4in) faces. Tie a pencil to the string 450mm (17%in) from the nai l and draw a circle for the outside of the table top.

82 A Rustic Retreat Seat for a Child's Swing Based on the design of a traditional spoke-bad< chair. this sturdy swing seat is far more pleasing to the eye than its plastic counterparts. YOU WILL NEED Seat Plywood • Countersink bit • Jigsaw • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • 12mm (1f2in) and 25mm (1 in) spade bits • Wood glue • Mallet Screws • 1 piece: 550x300x 12mm (21 1 X 12 X 1 /2 /2in) Timber • 1 piece: 550 x 250 x 18mm (211/2 X 9% X %in) • 1 piece : 550 x 50 x 18mm (211f2x2x%in) Rail Timber • 11: 25mm (1 in) • 12: 30mm (1%in) • Screwdriver • Exterior varnish • Paintbrush • 2 lengths: 17mm(%-in-) wide plasticcoated steel chain made of 4mm. consult the Guidelines produced by RoSPA. .rospa. For installation. Children must be supervised at all times while using the seat. or refer to the Safety Standards produced by the Stationery Office.uk. document number EN71 . available at their website at www.5mm (3/1Gin) drill bit NOTE: This seat is not suitable for children under the age of three .co .(1/sin-) thick wire with welded links cut to length for installation • 2 pieces: 550x250x18mm (211/2 X 9% X %in) Dowel • 8 lengths: 200 x 25mm (8 x 1 in) • Templates on page 124 • Drill • 4.

page 109) the eleven 4.5mm (3/1Gin) holes on the bottom of the plywood . . driving 25mm (1 in) screws through the pre-drilled holes. the same size as the piece of plywood. page 109).5mm (3/1Gin) holes drilled in the last step as the centre points. 1 Enlarge the seat template by 400 % and page 113). .. page on the template with crosses and the four 18mm (%in) holes marked with stars. Check that the holes will receive the pieces of 25mm (1 in) dowel and sand the insides of the holes a little (see 3 Pre-drill the eight 4. Position the point of the 25mm (1 in) spade bit in the 4. 4 • Drill 25mm (1 in) holes • (see Further Techniques . Sand the edges smooth (see Finishing Techniques. when butted together. Ensure that the two pieces of seat timber are. Pre-drill and countersink EJ (see Core Techniques. Cut out the seat shape with a jigsaw. Unscrew the timber and plywood and countersink the newly drilled 4.5mm (3/1Gin) holes marked Finishing Techniques.5mm (3/1Gin) hole and drill right through . page 114).5mm (3/1Gin) holes marked on the template with circles. transfer it onto the seat plywood (see Template Techniques .Seat for a Child's Swing 83 II 2 Butt up the two pieces of timber and screw them to the plywood (see Core Techniques. 114) if they are too tight. page 111) in the timber only. using the 4. D • . Drill through both layers of wood.

Cut out the rails separately. Check that the holes will receive the pieces of 25mm (1 in) dowel and sand the insides a little if they are too tight. difficult. driving 30mm (1 %in) screws through the holes used in step 7./ / - 6 Cut the seat template down to the shaded area to make the rail template and transfer it onto the two pieces of rail timber. marked on the template with screws through the pre-drilled holes. Glue the wood makes cutting the curve . Turn the arms over and drill the four 18mm (%in) holes marked on the template with stars. re-drill the five 4. In one of the rails. Unscrew the rails. Sand the edges so that they are identical. page 109) the timber to the plywood. 7 Screw the rails together. Glue and screw the rails back together.5mm (3/1Gin) holes marked on the template with circles. . you will find that the thickness of 5 Glue the two pieces of timber together. if you screw the pieces of timber together and then try and cut them. crosses. in the rail in which you pre-drilled the holes in step 6. Drill right through both layers of timber.84 A Rustic Retreat / • . driving 25mm (1 in) screws through the holes used in step 2. driving 30mm (1 %in) 8 Drill the eight 25mm (1 in) holes. 0 and screw (see Core Techniques.

cut to fit your chosen method of installation . . page 114). Take it through the front hole in the seat. 11 Turn the swing upside down and drive a 12 Paint the swing with two coats of exterior varnish (see 30mm (1 %in) screw through the pre-drilled holes in the plywood into each piece of dowel. Finishing Technique s. Repeat on the other side with the other piece of chain. Tap the rail down with a mallet if necessary. and through the back hole in the rail. Use a try square to check that they are at right angles. down through the front hole in one side of the rail.Seat for a Child's Swing 85 9 Spread a little glue around one end of each 10 Spread a little glue around the free end of length of dowel and push them into the 25mm (1 in) holes in the seat. so that one piece of dowel is located in each 25mm (1 in) hole in the underside of the rail. Thread a length of chain. Hammer them home with a mallet if necessary. up through the back hole in the seat. each dowel and push the rail down onto them.

YOU WILL NEED Roof Rough-sawn. but you will need a friend's help when setting it up. it is not difficult to construct. pressuretreated timber • 4 pieces : 1800 x 75 x75 mm (70x3x3in) • End beam and roof support templates on page 124 • Jigsaw • Drill . pressuretreated timber • 4 pieces: 1500x100x45mm (59 X 4 X 1%in) • 4 pieces: 1335 x 45 x 18mm (521/2 X 1% X %in) • 4 pieces : 640 x 45 x 18mm (25%x1%x%in) • 4 pieces : 165 x 45 x 18mm (61/2 X 1% X %in) Waterproof plywood • 1 piece: 2000x 1100x 18mm (78 X 43 X %in) Split bamboo fencing • 1 length : 1800x5000mm (70 x 195in) • 4 single strips: 1800mm (70in) • 1Omm (3/ain) and 4. Although this is a substantial project.86 A Rustic Retreat Oriental Arb Create a shady retreat in the sunniest of gardens with this classical arbour.5mm (3/1Gin) drill bits • Tape measure • Try square • Mitre block • Tenon saw Screws • 20 : 35mm (1 V2in) • 8: 40mm (1 V2in) • 4: 50mm (2in) • Screwdriver • Combined woodstain and preservative • Sledgehammer • Spirit level Coach bolts with nuts and washers • 4: 140x10mm (SV2x%in) • 1Omm (3/ain) spanner • Paintbrush • Marker pen • Secateurs • Staple gun • 1Omm (3/ain) staples Fence post holders • 4: 75 x 75mm (3 x 3in) Posts Rough-sawn.

but you will need to make more cuts. Enlarge the roof support template by 666% twice. cut out the roof supports. they will take up the minimum of timber. page 114) Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. . Drill (see Core Techniques. Lay the top of the post 25mm (1 in) below the edge of the rail and butt it up to the side of the housing. 40mm (15Jsin) from one end. cut across the bottom of the housing and remove the last chunk of timber. Two of the rails will have housings on the curled (bottom) side and two will have housings on the flat (top) side. page 108) . Transfer this twice onto the piece of plywood. Drill down through the drilled hole in the post and right through the rail. cut out the shaded housings marked on the template on two of the timbers. page 108) a 1Omm (%in) hole through the centre of each timber post. as these housings are deeper than the others. follow the unshaded area to cut out the housings. Using a jigsaw. then cut a curve from the outer end of the left-hand slot to the inner end of the right-hand slot and remove the chunk of timber. Cut another curve from as high as possible on the right-hand side to the inner end of the left-hand side and remove the chunk of timber. so that one comes down from the top and the other goes up from the bottom. If you lay the templates on the wood in the arrangement shown. Cut the two vertical slots first. Cut out the housings marked on the template in the centre. Flip one over and tape the two together to make a symmetrical template . Cut out the housings marked on the template at the ends of the supports using the method described in step 1. Enlarge the end beam template by 666% and transfer it onto each end of the four longest pieces of roof timber (see Template Techniques. Lay the drilled end of the post against one of the rails that has the housing cut from the top.Oriental Arbour 87 On the other two roof timbers. Use a try square to check that the angle between the post and the rail is 90' . cut out the curled ends. Use the same method. Using a jigsaw. Repeat at the other end of the rail with another post and at both ends of the other rail with the housing cut from the top. Finally.

Lay the other two between them so that the housings slot into each other to form a square. It is important that this is a true square. coming down from the top. as before. 8 Mitre (see Further Techniques .88 A Rustic Retreat From this step on it is best to make 5 Lay out the rails so that those with the the arbour outside as it is quite large and may well not fit through a door once it has been put together. . Slot the housings in the ends across the square joints in the frames. housing in the first roof support. 6 Take the roof support with the housing drilled holes have the housing facing up . page 11 0) each end of the four second longest pieces of roof timber across the 45mm (1%in) width. so check by measuring the diagonals: they should be the same. slotting the end housings across the square joints.5mm (3/lGin) hole in each end. Position one hole 25mm (1 in) from the point at one end and one 50mm (2in) from the point at the other end. Predrill a 4. at right- 7 Slot the other roof support into the central angles to the mitre .

one on each side and alternating the drilled ends so that the screws do not collide . as before. 13 Lift the whole roof top off the square frame and paint it with a combined woodstain and preservative (see Finishing Techniques.Oriental Arbour 89 10 Mitre and pre-drill each m end of the four next-longest pieces of roof timber. as in step 10. Stagger the holes. moving it up until it fits across the width. position the hole 15mm (%in) from the point and 15mm (%in) down the mitred face. Fit them between the roof supports and screw in place. 9 Lay the mitred pieces between the ends of the 11 Lay a piece between the roof supports. At one end. . Drive 35mm (11f2in) screws (see Core Techniques. 15mm (%in) from the point and 35mm (11f2in) down the mitred face . page 114). page 109) through the holes 25mm (1 in) from the end and 50mm (2in) screws through the holes 50mm (2in) from the end. and drive a 35mm (11!2in) screw through each predrilled hole. Mitre each end of the shortest pieces of roof timber and drill holes. but across the 18mm (%in) width . as in step 11. roof supports. at the other end.

.90 A Rustic Retreat 15 Staple the bamboo to the timber frame. Using a marker pen. leaving the binding wire protruding. Push the binding wire tails up between the pieces of bamboo and wrap them round the binding wires to hold the fold in place . Using secateurs. Do not 14 Cut the split bamboo fencing into four cut the binding wiresleave them protruding. stapling across the binding wires and through the pieces of bamboo into all of the roof timbers. draw the outlines approximately 30mm (1 %in) over-size. Lay one length over one side of the roof. trim the bamboo so that the edge aligns with the centre of the roof support. each 1200mm (47in) long. Remove two single strips of bamboo from one end of each length. 16 Using secateurs. cut out the outlines (do not use your best secateurs as this will blunt them). 17 Lay one length of bamboo over the remaining three sides of the roof in turn. leave 100mm (4in) of the binding wire protruding from the edge. Make sure that one of the binding wires runs up the centre of the length of bamboo. staple and cut them in the same way. Fold the last two lengths of bamboo under and align the edge of them with the edge of the timber rail. Repeat on the remaining three corners. this will be the bottom edge. Twist the free lengths of wire tightly together over the piece of bamboo to hold it in place. 18 Lay a single piece of bamboo over the corner join between two trimmed edges . Lay a cut section against one side of the roof and put in a couple of staples to hold it in position. so that once the bamboo is cut to size this wire will hold the smallest lengths in place. these ends will be used to tie the lengths of bamboo together along the edges of the roof. with two strips hanging over the rail at the bottom. roughly draw the outline of the roof onto the bamboo. Fold. When cutting the bamboo to size. lengths.

as in step 5. Push the bolts through the holes drilled in step 3 and use washers and nuts to fasten them tightly. in exactly the right spot. Hammer them down until just the square section shows above the ground. check that the beams are completely horizontal. as shown. Using a sledgehammer. Using a spirit level. to make a square frame. Lay out the roof beams in a square. . slotting the housings in the ends of the roof supports across the square joints in the frame. making sure that the drilled holes in the tops all face front to back. tight to each corner. The posts should go right down to the bottom of the holders. lay a piece of flat wood over the top of them and hammer onto that. 23 Lift the roof onto the frame.Oriental Arbour 91 TIP To avoid buckling the edges of the post holders. Using a spirit level. check that they are truly upright. In each corner drive a 40mm (1%in) screw the top between the outside of two opposite pairs of posts . Choose a completely flat piece of ground in your garden to set up the arbour. you may have to hammer them home with the sledgehammer. down through the lowest roof beam into the rail that it is resting on. as in step 5. 20 Push the posts into the post holders. hammer a fence post holder into the ground. 22 Slot the remaining two beams into the housings. Remove the beams . as in step 7.

page 11 0) the ends of ground and slot the legs of the screen into them. spacing six holes evenly between the two end ones. . use it to hide an unattractive compost bin or an untidy corner of the garden. EJ The easiest way to erect your screen is to use fencing posts. Use a trysquare to check that the corners are 90°. the two short lengths of D-section timber. Hammer them into the 2 Mitre (see Further Techniques.92 A Rustic Retreat Willow Screen Extremely simple to make. Paint all timber with coloured exterior varnish: we used medium oak . Alternatively. Mitre.5mm (3/1Gin) holes. this screen will provide welcome shade and protection from the wind. 1 Pre-drill and countersink (see Core a -~­ Techniques. pre-drill and countersink the two long lengths of D-section timber in the same way.5mm (%in) holes in the long pieces of timber. level with the holes. as with the oriental arbour. Position the three middle holes centrally and the two end ones toward one edge to keep clear of the mitre. Pre-drill and countersink five 4. Position the holes centrally with one hole 22mm (?fsin) from one end and one hole 170mm (6%in) from the other end. 3 Lay the length of willow fencing over the timber frame . page 86. Lay out the four pieces of timber with the two short pieces between the longer pieces. with one hole 35mm (1 V2in) from each end and three more evenly spaced between them. Drive a 1OOmm (4in) screw through each of the pre-drilled holes into the ends of the short pieces of timber. page 109) four 6. The willow should lap over the width of the timber by approximately two-thirds all round .

as before. Fill all screw holes and apply a second coat of varnish to the visible timber. ensuring that the mitred corner fits neatly into the mitre on the short length. . then adjust the willow so that the screws are going down between two withes (bands). and screw in place.Willow Screen 93 • 2 pieces: 1650 x 45 x 45mm (65 x 1% x 1%in ) 2 pieces: 710 x 45 x 45mm (27% x 1% x 1% in) Willow fencing • 1 length: 680 x 1470mm (26% x 58in) 0-section timber 21engths : 800x50mm (31%x2in) 2 lengths: 1500 x 50mm (59 x 2in) Tape measure • Pencil Drill • 6.5mm (3/16in) bits Screws • 4 100x6mm (4x%in) 26: 30mm (1 %in) • Screwdriver • Mitre block • Tenon saw • Exterior varnish Fence post holders • 2: 45x45mm (1%x1%in) 4 Lay a short length of D-section over the willow across Lay a long length of D-section along one side of the frame. Drive the screws through the D-section first. the bottom of the frame. Attach the other side length and then the top length in the same way. aligning the lower edges of the timber and D-section.5mm (%in) and 4. Drive 30mm (1 %in) screws through the pre-drilled holes into the timber.

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Finishing Touches It is the details that make the difference and these final projects will help to turn your garden into the ultimate retreat. .

. page 111 ).not including the rim -and mark and cut a hole the right size with a hole saw or a jigsaw (see Further Techniques. 1 2 Choose a bowl for the water dish: this can be any size -as long as it fits into the larger piece of the table.but it must have a rim. :Ja e 14). es arked on the template with a 32mm (1%in) . e sa v (see Further Techniques. as well as spreading good karma. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. Drill the smaller . . providing food and water for the wildlife. YOU WILL NEED _ _ Timber • 32mm (1%in) hole saw • 6.5mm (%in) and 2mm (1f1Gin) drill bits • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Exterior woodstain • Wire bird feeder Screw • 2 pieces: 215x315x 18mm (81/2 X 121/2 X %in) Dowel • 1 length: 1800x32mm (70x 1%in) • 4 lengths: 70 x 6....5mm (2%x%in) • Templates on page 126 • Jigsaw • Drill • 1: 20mm (%in) • Screwdriver EJ 1 :~e Enlarge the templates by 400% and transfer on to the timber (see Template Techniques. Measure the diameter of the bowl .96 F nishing Touches Yin-Yang Bird Table The symbol of perfect balance is used in this colourful yet practical bird table. page 110). cut out the shapes. aaoe '08).

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When drilling dowel. . always clamp it firmly before you start and drill carefully to avoid splitting the wood. 5 Slide the 32mm (1 %in) hole in the larger piece of the bird table over the top of the dowel and push it down to touch the pegs. drill two parallel holes through the dowel. Using a 6.98 Finishing Touches D 3 Measure and mark pencil lines around the long length of dowel.5mm (%in) drill bit (see Core Techniques. 18mm (%in) apart. page 108). 4 Push a short dowel peg through each of the lower holes in the long length of dowel. 35mm (11hin) and 85mm (3%in) from one end. Sand and then stain all the pieces of the bird table with exterior woodstain. on each marked line.

Take the top off the feeder and drive a screw through the hole in the bottom into the pilot hole.Yin. Adjust the two parts of the table so that when they are seen from above they make the Yin-Yang symbol. Drill a 2mm (1f1Gin) pilot hole in the centre of the top of the long piece of dowel. then slide the other piece of the table down onto the pegs. but if there isn't one then drill a hole. 7 Bird feeders are available from pet shops and most already have a hole in the bottom.Yang Bird Table 99 a 6 Push the remaining two pegs through the remaining holes in the long length of dowel. . Push the bird table into the grou nd and fit the water dish in place.

your garden is full of marguerites or roses. YOU WILL NEED Face Plywood ------~--- • 1 piece : 395 x 395 x 9mm (15112 x 15112 x %in) • 1 piece: 140x55x9mm (51f2x2%x%in) Birch ply • 1 piece: 170 x 140 x 1. just change the colour scheme to suit. pointer holder.Sundial Sunflowers were the inspiration for this cottage garden sundial. If. pointer and leaf templates on page 125 • Jigsaw • Drill • 4 .(3/sin-) and 25mm.5mm (30 x 4 x 1 AGin) Dowel • 11ength: 800x25mm (311f2x1in) • Face.5mm (3/1Gin) drill bit and 25mm (1 in) spade bit • Heavy-duty knife • Ruler • Pencil • Emulsion paints • 1Omm. however.(1 in-) wide paintbrushes • Fine artist's paintbrush • Waterproof varnish Screw • 1: 40mm (15fsin) • Wood glue • Pinning gun • 16mm (5fsin) pins .5mm (6% x 51!2 x 1f1Gin) Stem Birch ply • 1 piece: 760 x 100 x 1.

page 108) . . page 114).Sundial 101 a 1 Enlarge the face template by 300 % and transfer it onto the square piece of plywood (see Template Te chniques . cut out the two identical shapes .5mm (3/lGin) hole in the centre. Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques. Using a jigsaw. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. as marked on the template . cut out the face . EJ 2 Cut down the face template to the shaded section to make the pointer holder template and transfer it onto the small piece of plywood . page 109) a 4.

(%in-) wide paintbrush and paint the entire face of the sundial in limeyellow emulsion. . page 111). Start each brush stroke in the centre and drag outwards. Carefully paint a fine dark green line over each yellow line . Draw a straight pencil line between the two touching holes. When all the paint is dry. Following the template. Using a 25mm (1 in) spade bit (see Further Techniques. Cut out the shape with a heavy-duty knife by scoring lightly around the shape and then more deeply until the ply separates. seal it with two coats of waterproof varnish. Lightly connect the marks to establish the time lines. When the paint is dry. Using a 10mm. While this is still wet. paint over each pencil line in egg-yellow emulsion and leave to dry. use a 1Omm. as shown. Brush over the face.(%in-) wide paintbrush. Sand and then paint all the pieces (see below). paint the Roman numerals onto the sundial. and. drag a little lime-yellow emulsion through it. as before . lay the template on the surface and make a pencil mark at each end of the time lines marked on the template . following the original brush strokes. paint the leaf and stem with watered-down dark-green emulsion and wipe away any excess paint. using a heavy-duty knife. cut away the excess ply on both sides to make an oval shape.102 Finishing Touches D 4 3 Enlarge the pointer template by 300 % and Enlarge the leaf template by 300 % and transfer it onto the stem piece of birch ply. drag a little lemonyellow and egg-yellow emulsion through it. Cut out the shape with a heavy-duty knife. While it is still wet. drill the three holes marked on the template. Using a fine artist's paintbrush. transfer it onto the face piece of birch ply. with a dry brush to blend the colours together. TIP To achieve the sunflower effect.

/ . with the lower end of the pointer 47mm (17fsin) up from the bottom of the face. 8 Pin (see Further Techniques . /"' ~ I / 5 Drive a screw (see Core Techniques. 109) down through the pre-drilled hole in the face into the top of the dowel.. then bend the leaf and slip the round hole onto the dowel. page 112) the pointer holder to the face of the sundial. D m \. \~ ~ \ "' . The ends of the pointer should both protrude an equal amount.~ "')i Ji\ I Glue (see Core Techniques. ~ sII ~ \\ ~~/ . page 6 Slide the oval hole in the leaf onto the dowel. page 109) the wider side of the pointer between the two halves of the pointer holder.Sundial 103 D 1 . ./ //r. Slide the leaf a little way up the dowel.

. where it belongs..Boot Scraper YOU WILL NEED .5mm (3!16in) and 2mm (1f16in) drill bits Screws • 27: 30mm (1 %in) • 2: 15mm (%in) • 4: 35mm (11f2in) • Screwdriver • 120-grit sandpaper • Waterproof wood wax • 4.Timber • 7 pieces: 750 x 45 x 18mm (291f2 X 1% X %in) • 3 pieces: 400 x 45 x 18mm (15% x 1% x%in) • Jigsaw • Drill • 4 . . This boot scraper has a metal scraper plate and boot brushes to keep the mud outside..5mm (3116in) metal-cutting drill bit Spacer • 2: 18mm (%in) Angle iron • 1 length: 180 x 25mm (7% x 1 in) Brushes 2 broom heads • Penci l An easy-to-make and practical project for all gardeners everywhere.

. 4 Choose one side and one end of the mat to work from for the next two steps . page 108). In the fourth slat. .e~:. drill two 2mm (1f16in) holes . Drive a 30mm (1 %in) screw through each pre-drilled hole into a slat. with one 110mm (4%in) and one 340mm (13%in) from the end. Sand the mat and then wax it with waterproof wood wax (see Finishing Techniques . Drive 15mm (%in) screws through the holes in the angle iron into the holes in the slat.t. 1 Mark a curve on one corner of each drive in another screw. Position the holes centrally. Position the holes centrally. with one 90mm (3%in) and one 360mm (14%in) from the ends of the slats.?. with one 20mm (%in) from each end . 5 Turn the mat over. Make up a slatted mat.5mm (3/1Gin) holes in each of the three short timber cross pieces. Position the holes centrally. Lay the short pieces across the slats with one 70mm (2%in) from each end and one positioned centrally between them . 3 Using a 4. page 113).~. page 109) seven 4. Position the holes centrally. end of two of the long timber slats . B O? 2 Pre-drill and countersink (see Core Techniques .a.. On the second and sixth slats. In the second and fifth slats. cut out the curves.5mm (3!16in) holes . . aligning the ends and using the 18mm (%in) spacers to separate them.. . Drive 35mm (11f2in) screws through the predrilled holes into the broom heads .5mm (3!16in) metal-cutting drill bit. with one 30mm (1 %in) from each end and five spaced evenly between them . . !. .?.. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. with the -~ v curved slats on the outer edges . to prevent the mat twisting. . drill two holes in one side of the angle iron. spacing them evenly between the pre-drilled holes and aligning the ends. Position the broom heads across the slats under the mat. pre-drill and countersink two 4. The pre-drilled holes ~ should align with the centre of each slat. at an angle to the first one. ~-C. Lay the ~ slats out.

The paint will protect the tray from odd showers of rain. The curved bottom of this tray is specially designed to create steady 'feet'.5mm (1j16in) drill bit • 30mm (1%in) hole saw • Pencil • Ruler • Wood glu e Panel pins • 8 : 22mm (%in) • Hammer • Filler • 120-grit sandpaper • Sanding block • Primer • Satinwood paint • Paintbrush • 2 pieces : 520 x 160 x 9mm (20% X 6% X %in) • 2 pieces: 310x160x9mm (12%x6%x%in) Quadrant • 2 lengths: 227 x 12 mm (8 7/s x 1f2in) Plywood • 1 piece : 240 x 364 x 2mm (91/2 X 141/2 X 1f16in) • End and side templates on page 126 • Pinning gun • 16mm (5fsin pins • Jigsaw TIP the grass and spill your drinks. .Drinks Tray Little is more welcome than a long cool drink on a hot summer's day. so the tray will not tip on YOU WILL NEED MDF ~~-­ • Drill • 1. but as it is made from MDF it should not live outdoors permanently.

using a jigsaw. page 114).5mm CV16in) holes. you can see exactly where the pins are. which should be transferred onto both pieces . with one flat side 18mm (%in) below the handle holes. page 111) . cut out the shapes. as marked. 5 Run a TIP When hammering in panel pins. Enlarge the side template by 400% and transfer it onto the MDF (see Template Techniques.Drinks Tray 107 1 Pin the two EJ long pieces of MDF together (see Template Techniques. then prime and paint it with two coats of satinwood paint (see Finishing Techniques. aligning the free edge of each end with the remaining pencil lines on the sides . saw (see Further Techniques . cut out the shapes. Using a jigsaw (see Core Techniques. including the dashed lines. then pre-drill the 1. . as marked. Using a jigsaw. 2 Pin the two short pieces of 3 Using a 30mm (1 %in) hole MDF together. page 109) along the pencil line on one end of a side piece and 4 Pin a length of quadrant to butt an end piece up to it. Hammer panel pins through the pre-drilled holes in the sides into the edge of the end piece. fill the pin holes and sand the tray. Pull out the pins to give two identical shapes. cut along the lines to make handle holes. 6 Glue and pin 7 Run a line of glue along the two 'L' shapes together in the same way. page 108). each length of quadrant and fit the plywood base on top of them . Draw straight pencil lines between them and. drill the two holes. Then. Enlarge the end template by 400 % and transfer it onto the MDF. Pull out the pins to give two identical shapes. page 115). line of glue (see Core Techniques . When the glue is dry (approximately 30 minutes). Repeat the process with the other side and end pieces to make two 'L' shapes. first hammer them through the pre-drilled holes so that the tips just protrude on the far side of the wood. when you present the edge of the joining piece up to them. page 112). each end piece.

and if you go off course for any reason.Core Techniques These are the basic techniques that you will need to master to complete almost every project in this book. panic. so that you are not drilling at an angle. Practice them on scrap pieces of wood until you are confident of your ability. ensure that this sits on the centre of the cross before you start to drill.practice will really pay dividends here. for 1 Cutting with a crosscut saw example). to key the bit into . Hold the drill perpendicular to the surface. don't Because a crosscut saw is long and does not have strengthening along the top . The blade will be more stable and you will find it easier to cut accurately. Minor mistakes can be 2 Cutting with a tenon saw smoothed away with sandpaper. Start slowly. the blade should always be sharp .and to take your time. Draw the saw across the wood once or twice to create a small notch 4 Drilling a hole Mark the exact centre of the hole that you want to drill with a pencil cross . For the best results. If the bit has a point. Simply guide the blade along the line that you have drawn. before you start cutting. 3 Cutting with a jigsaw The key to accurate cutting is to make sure that the surface is firmly secured (in a workbench. stop and restart in the right direction. you have to take care that the blade does not flex while you are sawing.

screwing and clamping Follow the instruction s on the glue that you buy. then push the countersink bit into it to 7 Nailing two pieces of wood together Check that you have the right nails: Too short and they will not be secure. of screw: it should be long enough to 5 Countersinking a screw fit through the top layer and at least half the bottom layer of wood . The nail should be hammered in straight.. and then put your weight behind it to drill through the wood. unless stated otherwise . wipe away any glue that has squeezed out from the join. create a hole with sloped sides into which the screw fits. ' .and left-hand pieces with the countersinking on the outer faces .(Vain-) thick countersink screws with cross heads. as some will vary. Check that you have the correct size the hole. Do this on surfaces where it is important that screw holes are not visible . 109 6 Screwing two pieces of wood together 8 Gluing. .s. In this book we have used 4mm. b) If you are not screwing the two pieces together immediately. Using a damp cloth. before it has a chance to harden . Push and then screw the pieces of wood together.Core fecf1r:Jqu e. take care to work on opposite faces of the timber to produce right. with its head below the surface of the wood. Pre-drill a hole (as in 4). a) Apply glue to one or both of the sides to be joined (this may depend on the type of glue). . use clamps to firmly secure them while the glue dries . When countersinking side pieces for a project.. too long and they will come through the other side of the wood .

or making a pilot hole for a fine drill bit. if you are right-h anded. Fit the blade of the jigsaw into the hole and cut out the circle . As with the core techniques. drill a hole inside its edge at the top right. 5 Taping a drill bit If you wish to drill into wood t o a specified depth . and a good starting point. if you have never attempted a particular technique before. slot the blade of the saw through the two notches that are diagonally opposite one another. Find and 1 Cutting a straight line in a mitre block Mitre blocks are an invaluable way of ensuri ng that a straight line is real ly straight. simply measure along the bit from the point to your required depth. 3 Cutting out an internal circle After drawing the circle . cutting from right to left in an anti-clockwise direction. drill the hole at the top left and cut clockwise . Simply lay the piece of wood together. mark the exact centre of the hole that you want to make with a pencil cross. in the block . but this time. slot a tenon saw through the parallel notches on either side and saw down through the wood. do practice it before embarking on the project you have chosen.110 Techniques Further Techniques Many of the projects in this book require some of these further techniques. 4 Using a bradawl Th is tool ensures accuracy. then firmly dig in the pointed end of the bradawl into th e centre of the cross . If you are left-handed. Clamping a mitre block in a workbench gives it extra stability and makes the work easier. w hether you are fixing screws or nai ls. Use the same principle as cutting straight lines . then wrap the area 2 Cutting a mitre in a mitre block Mitred edges are cut at 45' so they form neat corners when joined . rather than all the way through .

stop just as the point of long bit in the hole and finish drilling from this side. Drill slowly. Drill through the wood. so don't apply a lot of pressure when drilling. Turn the wood over. Turn the wood over. particularly on softwood such as pine. place the point of the bit in the hole and finish drilling from this side. For a neat finish. Move the trysquare along by the required amount and draw another line . Place the point of the spade bit exactly in the centre of the cross and drill through the wood. To prevent this from happening. Simply rest the top of the trysurfaces can sometimes damage the wood . simply slot a thin offcut of wood or MDF between the surface and the jaws of the clamp . 9 Clamping and protecting surfaces Clamping is a very effective method of holding joints firmly while glue dries. 7 Drilling with a hole saw Again .you will hear the drill slow right down if you are pressing too hard . stop just as the long bit appears on the other side of the wood .and back off intermittently to allow the cutter to cool down . For a neat finish. . and stop when the tape is flush with the surface of the wood. metal ( 8 Using a try-square to mark parallel lines This tool makes drawing parallel lines simple. You will find it easier to clamp the wood before you start as the friction from the saw can cause it to spin around . square over the top edge of the piece that you are working on. place the point of the 10 Cutting thin dowels With very narrow dowels. as you will have reached the correct depth . but the clamp's hard. 6 Drilling with a spade bit Mark the position of the hole with a pencil cross. the bit appears on the other side of the wood . Roll the dowel under the blade until it cuts in two.Further Techniques 111 beyond with masking tape. at the marked point. and draw a pencil line along the metal edge . Always remove the cut-out piece of wood from the saw before cutting another hole . mark the area you want to cut and hold a sharp heavy-duty knife blade over the mark . make a pencil cross and place the long bit in the centre of the hole saw exactly on it. A hole saw will become blunt if it gets too hot.

try to choose a chisel that is exactly the right width for the neatest. Clamp the wood or dowel you are going to chisel firmly in place before you start. space the pins approximately 50mm (2in) apart. it is better to overfill and sand the bump back later. We have used 16mm (%in) pinswhich come on a strip. If you try to smooth it flat. 1 Filling a countersunk screw head With slightly thicker dowels. which can contract as it dries. the chisel. sanding and preparing the surfaces before you paint. . until you reach the end point. and easiest. leaving you with a dent in the surface. finish. If you are filling a deep hole. Use a filler knife to smooth the filler into the countersink . 12 Pinning two pieces of wood together Use this tool to fasten thin ply or quadrant to thicker wood. If you are cutting a notch. Place the 11 Using a chisel and mallet pinning gun exactly where you want the pin to go and squeeze the handle a) The countersunk screw head sits with its head a little way below the surface of the wood.Techniques_ Finishing Techniques out large pieces in one go. so that more is taken off the top than the bottom. We use this instead of traditional hard to fire the pin through the wood. so if the wood splits wh ile you are working it should stop there. you will find that the knife drags the filler out slightly.112 . chisel off small sections from one side.throughout this book . yo u will only damage the ch isel's handle . rather like staples. at an angle. Turn the wood over and finish chiselling from the other side. use the same method to score the wood . spend time filling. then snap it in two and sand to finish . If you are pinning ply to a curved timber. A handmade project can be badly let down by a poor finish. Do not try to cut pushing the ply down with one hand and firing the pins in with the other. as shown. Always chisel away from yourself. wood filler. Do not be tempted to use a hammer instead of a mallet to drive b) Fill the countersink with car-body filler. Start by chiselling a deep li ne at the end point. To give your work a professional look.it will make all the difference.

once the edge is smooth. on a large surface . almost 2 Punching a nail For a neat finish. Fill the hole as you would for a countersunk screw head . Wet-and-dry paper is used between b) When the filler is dry. c) When dry. particularly of plywood. making it Hold the punch perpendicular to the nail and drive it down using a hammer. then. There are several types of block. Use a filler knife to spread but give them a final. Always finish with a coat of paint or varnish. If you are filling a corner. 3 Filling and sanding an edge 5 Sanding a flat surface A sanding block is the only way to remove dents and scratches from flat . with water-based paint or varnish completely smooth and removing any trapped dust or flecks of wood and paint. rough grades are used first. Keep the block parallel to the surface you are sanding and. the original hole will be almost undetectable when painted. additional rub down with 240-grit if they are going to be stained or just varnished. which would cause it to swell slightly. 4 Sealing an edge If you are going to paint the wood polishing the surface . leaving a depression or crack around the filled hole or join . If you use sandpaper without a block . In general. Sandpaper comes in different grades. coats of paint or varnish. This will prevent the wood around the filler from absorbing water from the paint. followed by finer ones to give a completely smooth finish . We sand pieces smooth with 120-grit sandpaper if they are to be painted. as shown. surfaces. If you do this well. it tends to follow the depression. as the action of sanding will affect the finished colour. although they all do basically the same job . simply sand the filler with 120-grit sandpaper. enlarging it rather than removing material from either side to flatten it. move it in small circles to avoid making dents in the wood. however (unless you are distressing a surface) . sand the edges with 120-grit sandpaper and the filler will stay in the splinters and joins .Finishing Techniques 113 car-body filler over the sawn edges. giving a smooth surface . is often rough. use a nail punch to drive the head of the nail or pin down below the surface of the wood. paint it with shellac sanding sealer first. make sure that the filler covers the join as well. a) The sawn edge of wood.

cut them out 8 Sanding the inside of a circle However. If you do this. the bigger templates will need to be enlarged onto several sheets of paper that must then be taped together. Cut out the templates with scissors. no matter how well you seal it. For larger shapes. have a very brown tinge and will really affect some paint colours. Use the same principle as before. For screw holes. You should revarnish it each year and store it in a shed or basement during the winter. Transferring a template onto wood 9 Painting and staining Always choose a suitable paint for the surface and the treatment it is The easiest way to do this is to use spray paper glue (available from stationery and art shops) to stick the 7 Sanding a corner going to receive. you may find it clearer to draw around the template and remove it before cutting out the wood. no softwood furniture is completely hardy. will tend to chip and don't hold paint or varnish very well. Wrap a length of dowel or pencil in sandpaper to easily work it around the inside diameter of the cut circle. Remove the template and draw a cross over your mark. However. insides of holes drilled with a spade bit or hole saw. this is what we have done throughout this book. Use the same principle to sand the .114 Techniques Template Techniques 6 Sanding a rounded edge Many of the projects in this bool< have templates. This is easier if the timber is clamped in place. Sharp corners. but this time angle the sanding block so that it removes the edge of the 1 wood. then you also have to transfer any marks on the template onto the wood . especially on low-level items such as benches. Enlarge them on a photocopier by the given percentages. It is also a good safety precaution to remove corners. push a pencil through the cross within the circle and mark the wood . always seal it with at least two coats of waterproof varnish. as some exterior varnishes Use the same principle to remove the corners of a piece of wood as well. Do test the varnish on an offcut before painting the whole project. For outdoor furniture use waterproof paints or exterior stains where possible and if you do use emulsion . and edges.

Template Techniques 115 of the template with scissors. as described in 2 and 3. or mark the timber. rout around the template. cut around the outer lines on the template. drive the screws through those to avoid making unnecessary holes. we have shown the cut-out piece surrounded by the offcuts to show you the best way to cut out the pieces . then unscrew the pieces of timber to give two identical shapes. but they can be hired from tool shops. the cross within the circle. b) Screw or pin the MDF template to the wood . cut out the shape roughly. you can stick the template onto one of the pieces of wood and then screw the two pieces together. cutting close to the pencil lines. A router is an expensive piece of equipment to buy. Lay the template on the wood first and note any marks . as described in 1. Place the template on the wood and ~ out neatly. Using a router with a template profiling bit. where this applies in a project. then go back and cut it Screwing two bits of wood together identical shapes. If there are pre-drilled holes marked on the template. On large pieces you may find it easier to cut out the shape roughly first. Any screw holes can be filled when finishing the project. placing the point of the bit on . avoiding screwing too close to the outline . using the technique described in 2. Transfer the 0 a) Firstly cut out the template in thin MDF. but not within them . 3 Drilling holes marked on the template the shapes and drill any holes. Either drill through the paper and wood. Use 30mm (1 %in) screws to fasten the pieces of wood together. This is a very useful technique when you want to cut two identical shapes. lay the template on the wood and draw around the shapes. template onto the wood and cut out draw around it in pencil. and sand the edges smooth. or around your drawn lines. Sand the edges if necessary. positioning it exactly on the drawn lines. Cut out curved shapes in sections. This bit has a free-spinning wheel that runs along the MDF and a straight cutting edge below that cuts the timber to the same line as the template. 5 Using a router This is an invaluable technique if you need to produce a number of exactly 4 2 Cutting out shapes Using a jigsaw. Remove the template. If you prefer. Using a jigsaw.

Before you begin a project. ~ Jigsaw Mitre block Crosscut saw . there's nothing more frustrating than having to stop halfway through a step because you don't have the necessary piece of equipment. they will last longer and perform well. tal<e care of your tools.116 Techniques Toolbox This is a good basic tool l<it.. Spirit level Heavy-duty knife Retractable tape measure Stee l safety ruler Pencil Try square - Scissors . checl< to mal<e sure that you have all the tools required. though you don't need everything shown here for every project in this bool<. If you l<eep them clean and free from dust.. These boxes are inexpensive and can be found in a variety of sizes. Finally. Invest in a decent-sized toolbox to store everything in. · .

and sanding block ~I Nail punch Flat paintbrush 7 Artist's brush . !. including wet-and-dry.Toolbox 117 Staple gun Countersink bit ll Hole saw _.! C I Se lection of nails a nd sc rews I Spade bit Pin hammer Straight bit ~t't 'I~ l ': Claw hammer " Mitre clamp G-clamp .:. t! Chisel Filler knife ~ I Pliers Flat-head screwdriver Cross-head screwdriver Bradawl Wood adhesive Sandpaper in several grades...

. The shaded areas denote subtemplates within the full template or areas to be cut away. page 11. . as not all photocopiers enlarge completely accurately.118 Templates The percentages given beside each template indicate the percentage by which it must be enlarged to make it the correct size.Alignment guides . It is vital to double check these measurements on your enlarged template...Centre lines for guidance only Auricula Plant Theatre. Note: each of the four shelves extends from a curved front edge back to the right-angled corner...- ·--------------.. Measurements are also given to help you check that your enlarged template is the correct size . G The marks on the templates follow the following key: Holes to be drilled or pre-drilled Marks to be transferred Areas to be cut away or cut out to form another template . Shelf template... Enlarge by 400%....-....-..-.... These are also specified in the project text.....-.--+ ..-647mm (251f2in).. -.....

+---- - - - -- -- - - - - - - 185mm (7%in),- --

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Templates 119

Wall-hanging Pot Holder, page 18. Enlarge by 133%.

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340mm (13%in )

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Templates

Seat template.

Garden Chair, page 24. Enlarge by 500 % .

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Top rail template.

Full leg and short leg (shaded section) templates.
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Bottom rail template.

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Building Block Chair & Table, page 34. Enlarge by 500 % .

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~--------------------------600mm ---------------------------+

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page 40.-- .-.. Enlarge by 400 % . Loveseat..-- - - . 400mm (15%in) .------.... ..-.122 Temp lates Barbecue Table..... Side and caddy partition (shaded section) templates. -. Enlarge by 666 % .---1220mm (48in).. Seat and rail (shaded section) templates........ page 46.

+ + Tool Caddy. G ® 0 ® ® 4-- .. 195mm (7%in) I . page 67 .. 4-.. Enlarge by 400%. page 55...---. ® 0 0 0 350m m (13%i n) 8 0 ® 8 0 + -163mm (61f2i n)________.-.. .---. page 67..Templates 123 Tool Rack. I . Potting Bench...-197mm (7 7/ain). Top leg template. Enlarge by 400% . Enlarge by 400%. page 58. Enlarge by 400%.-.. 820mm (32%in) Potting Bench.-326mm (12%i n). End leg and side leg (shaded section) templates.

. page 82 .-- Oriental Arbour.-- . Roof support template (one half only) . + + + 0 + + + 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 0 0 * -520mm (20 % in )...-----+ . Enlarge by 400 % .. -. page 86. .......-875mm (34 V2i n)- . Seat and rail (shaded section) templates..-... Enlarge by 666 %. End beam template...... -.124 Temp lates Seat for a Child's Swing.-...------+ ..

330mm (13in) 760mm (30in) Face and pointer holder (shaded section) templates . -- .-160mm (63/ain).Templates 125 Sundial. .----* ffi Leaf template. . Enlarge by 300%. page 100.. The arrangement of numerals shown on the sundial face must be copied exactly in order for your sundial to tell the right time. . Pointer template.

simply stop. If in doubt. • Electrical cables can be dangerous.270mm (105/sin ). and start again.roll up your sleeves to work .- . • Keep tools clean and make sure that you use sharp blades and drill bits. page 106.---* especially true where extension cords are concerned. • Use adhesives carefully. . and work in a well-ventilated room if possible . • Tie long hair back and remove all loose jewellery. • Never leave a power tool running unattended. • Don't be discouraged by these safety pointers. . glue for the materials that you are working with ..-- - .----- .126 Templates Yin-Yang Bird Table. they are here to help you . Most accidents are preventable nine times out of ten. • When using power tools. SAFETY It goes without saying that safety is a key issue. decide to use either metric or imperial measurements and stick to them . It is never worth the risk of taking shortcuts where safety is concerned. Enlarge by 400%. ' worth following . Don 't switch between measurement systems as. • Wear gloves when handling wire or sharp edges . so keep your eyes open and be careful not to trip over them . Make sure that your clothes don't hang loosely.------. although every effort has been made to ensure consistency. ask someone from your local DIY shop . Follow the instructions on the package and make sure that you select the proper Drinks Tray. Enlarge by 400%. so these safety precautions are 500mm 2 (191f in ) e End template. follow the manufacturer's instructions carefully. • Always wear a mask and goggles when cutting wood or MDF. page 96. Side template. If you feel that you are making a mistake or going off course. ···· ······ ···· ········ ····· ··· --. MEASUREMENTS When starting a project. relax. read them through once or twice before you begin. Always turn it off. even if it's only going to be for a moment. • Secure items firmly when cutting or drilling. This is f-. the finished project may be affected. Always follow these basic rules and use your common sense .

Chamfer A small 45-degree bevel planed along the edge of a piece of Waterproof plywood A strong and rigid board made up from layers of wood bonded together with the layers running at rightangles to one another and with waterproof glue. Bevel Any angle. thinner layers of wood. Grain The direction or alignment o' -~ - the fi bres in a piece o' . For the projects in this book it is essential that the maximum bend is along the length of the cut shape. which is easily available from DIY shops. Groove A narrm·. Dowel A short. To check if a piece is bowed. However. as the timber will not lie flat on the floor. though this can be more expensive and not so readily available . lay it on a Suppliers All the tools and materials used in this book can be bought from DIY shops. to fit such a piece of wood. We have used this material extensively throughout this book as it does not break down in wet conditions. Batten A strip of wood. like the piece shown here. End grain The irregular surface of wood that is exposed after cutting across the fibres. .·:ooo. Any bowing should be easy to see.. The dust from cutting MDF can be irritating. Better-quality wood to make it less sharp. It is perfect for making curves and several layers can be glued-up to hold a curve. Choose timber carefully: avoid pieces that are bowed or split. Take care when cutting birch ply. Dry assembling Fitting together or assembling workpieces without fixing or gluing them. to plane such a bevel. chan'le a piece o eo 'ec:on o"' e gra. to drill such a hole. flat floor and turn it over on to each side in turn. Timber The timber used throughout this book is pine.n: to cu: sucn a cnarrJe Hardwood \Vooci mar comes 'ro deciduous .27 Materials Glossary Birch ply This is a thin. used to prevent rusting in outd oor projects. making them more stable. cut on a piece of wood or found on a tool blade. so always wear a mask and work in a well-ventilated area. often used to describe wood attached to a wall for holding a component in place. but it is not waterproof. CJi: aw~. Consult your local phone book for outlets near you. Its smooth surface is perfect for paint finishes. broad -leaved trees. to check for an accurate fit and that all angles are true before final fixing. boards are made up from more. it does have a tendency to fray on cut edges and so it does need filling. sanding and painting to look its best. other than a ri ght angle. Try to buy well-seasoned timber. as most pieces will bend more along the length of the board than across the width. very flexible board made from several layers of birch wood bonded together. Galvanized Screws or nai ls covered w ith a protecti ve layer of zinc. round length of wood that is fitted into holes in two pieces of wood to hold them together. to cut such an angle . garden centres or timber merchants .not necessarily harder than softwood. MDF MDF is easy to work with and is relatively inexpensive. Countersink A hole drilled into wood to allow the entire head of a screw or bolt to end up below the surface. Cross grain Grain that does not follow the main grain direction.

to smooth perfectly flat with a plane. eg. access to materials and time off. Pilot hole A small hole drilled into wood that acts as a guide for the thread of a screw. a true right angle is perfectly accurate. The dimensions given. to make such a board . usually thin. Jane McCallum.. Laminate A flat surface made by bonding different layers together. melamine. surface and provide a base for subsequent coats . Thanks a lot to Cindy Richards and Georgina Harris for commissioning us in the first place and for their continued support. etc. Holly Jolliffe for sterling assisting and constant good humour. chair seat. or sander. and Alan. either hardwood or softwood. to cut such a joint.'Y. especially when more than one identical piece is required . Thanks also to his crew for helpful suggestions and lots of encouragement. Template A pattern or shape . Thanks also to Steve Gott and Denise Brock for designing and making the projects on pages 16. are for the wood before it was planed. With the grain Working wood along the direction or alignment of the fibres . Denise Brock for her impeccable styling and Roger Daniels for making these pages look so good. Planed all round (PAR) A length of wood or plank that has had all four sides planed before being sold. Carol and Andrea Winslade for generously allowing us to photograph in their gardens and for their unswerving hospitality in the face of a horde. that has a shaped profile . without which we couldn't have done this book. often home-made. Thanks to Roger Oates Design (01531-632718) for lending the Fagotin Chestnut chair and table seen with the Willow Screen on page 92. used as a guide for accurate marking on wood or man-made boards. so a PAR length will be smaller than these. paper.often faced with hardwood or softwood veneer. usually 45 degrees. Jules and Andy Knight. Enormous thanks to Andy Knight for space. True Describes when something is exact. Marine or waterproof plywood A plywood made with water-resistant hardwood layers and strong glue. usually rectangular. or thin board.128 Gloss~. that is cut into a piece of wood to allow a mating piece to be inserted there. step or groove . Offcut A piece of scrap wood left over after a workpiece has been cut. however. Tongue-and-groove A joint in which a thin tongue of wood on one piece of wood is fitted into a matching groove on another. Slat A narrow. used for exterior projects and those where moisture and condensation may occur. such as plastic. chisel. Acknowledgements Philip and Kate would like to thank John Symons. produced by binding wood dust together with glue. usually drawn on card . Rebate A recess. smooth-surfaced man-made board .. Medium-density fibreboard (MDF) A versatile . Mitre A corner joint for which two pieces of wood are cut with bevels of equal angles . Moulding A length of wood. designed to seal the . which brings out the best in us and our work. Softwood Wood that comes from coniferous trees -this is not necessarily softer than hardwood. for holding a piece of work in position and enabling repeated working to be done . John Samuels and John Wells. length of wood used as part of an identical series to form a fence . Jig A device. A special thanks to Lucinda Symons for her fantastic photography. Primer The first coat of paint on bare wood. 20 and 81. Workpiece A piece of wood or project that is unfinished and still being worked on .mainly used in doors and wall panels . Plywood A strong man-made board produced by gluing thin layers of board together. etc . Planed two sides (P2S) A length of wood or plank that has had two opposing sides planed.

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along with design tips and advice on how to achieve a professional-looking finish. ISBN 1-903116-46-5 .hanCimade garde furniture simP. • Toolbox and technique sections. • All the materials and tools needed are listed.Ie • 23 weekend projects that will add colour and comfort to your garden. safety tips and an extended glossary explain all you need to know for trouble-free working and beautiful results. illustrated with full-colour photographs. patio or outdoor space. • Detailed step-by-step instructions. show every stage from start to finish of each project.