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Ovid
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 dailytarheel.com Volume 121, Issue 13
Ocials continue trash talks
dth/kathleen doyle
Chapel Hill will soon begin transporting its solid waste to Durham in preparation for the June closure of the Orange County Landfill.
By Gayatri Surendranathan
Senior Writer
Within the next few weeks, Chapel Hills
solid waste will no longer be in Rogers
Roads backyard.
As the June closure of the Orange
County Landfill approaches, the town is
preparing to ship its waste to the Durham
Waste Industries transfer station.
But the transition will come at a cost
almost $700,000 more annually.
The landfill was built in the historically
black and low-income Rogers Road neigh-
borhood in 1972 with the promise that it
would close after 10 years.
Now, after decades of complaints from
Rogers Road residents about the negative
effects of the landfill, local officials are tak-
ing the next, temporary step toward a solid
waste solution.
A Chapel Hill transfer station?
Chapel Hill already spends $3.5 mil-
lion annually on collecting and disposing
garbage.
The extra $700,000 cost would go
toward buying new, better trucks and
the cost of gas, as the Durham Waste
Industries transfer station is further away
than the Rogers Road landfill for most of
the town.
Chapel Hill Town Council member Jim
Ward said the extra cost would likely be
shouldered by taxpayers.
We dont know yet if the extra money is
available in the existing budget or if it will
require a tax increase, Ward said. Were
currently in the process of doing research
to sort out those issues.
Both Ward and Chapel Hill Town
Council member Lee Storrow emphasized
the temporary nature of the plan.
This will be what we do for the next three
or four years as we decide what the best
option is moving forward, Storrow said.
He said the town is considering collabo-
rating with Carrboro to build a transfer sta-
tion in Chapel Hill.
According to consultants estimates,
a Chapel Hill-Carrboro transfer station
would cost about $2.8 million to build.
Theres community interest in that
plan, and a few months ago council mem-
bers visited a transfer station in Asheboro
because they produce about the same
amount of waste that we do, Storrow
said.
A landfills June closure has
governments calculating costs.
See WASTE TRANSFER, Page 4
Leimenstoll vetoes funding bill
ACTIONS ON THE BILL
Feb. 25 The bill passed favorably
through Student Congress rules and judi-
ciary committee.
March 5 The bill passed by the full
Student Congress with a close vote of
17-16.
March 19 Student Body President
Will Leimenstoll vetoed the bill.
Alumnus to lead probe in Russia
READ FEDYUKINS DISSERTATION
The dissertation, entitled Learning to be
nobles, can be seen at bit.ly/Y2a9yt.
Tar Heels
shift focus
to next win
By Kelly Parsons
Senior Writer
The North Carolina mens basketball team
might have let its third straight ACC Tournament
championship game slip through its fingers Sunday,
but the Tar Heels didnt have time to sulk at the
Greensboro Coliseum. They had the next step in
mind.
The team rushed back to Chapel Hill following
the 87-77 loss and made it to coach Roy Williams
house in time to watch the NCAA Tournament
selection show, during which it learned of UNCs No.
8 seed in the South region.
I dont mind telling you, I was stunned, Williams
said about his reaction Tuesday. When I saw the
North Carolina in the number eight, I was stunned.
Then it took me a couple seconds to say, Hey, thats
us. Thats not somebody else, thats us.
The seed, which is tied for North Carolinas lowest
ever, means the Tar Heels (24-10) will open tourna-
ment play Friday in Kansas City, Mo., against ninth-
By Jordan Bailey
Staff Writer
Student Body President Will Leimenstoll
vetoed Tuesday a controversial bill about
ammunition funding, saying it was passed
without substantial debate.
The bill, which was passed 17-16 in
Student Congress earlier this month, would
have made it more difficult for student
organizations to receive money for ammu-
nition. Members of the Tar Heel Rifle and
Pistol Club said the bill unfairly targeted
their organization.
Leimenstoll said the bill was voted on
prematurely after a motion was granted to
vote without debate denying attendees
the opportunity to voice their opinions.
My reason was not because I think that
student fees should go toward ammuni-
tion, he said. I decided to veto because
I didnt feel that everyone who wanted to
have a say in the matter had the opportu-
nity to have their voice heard.
Leimenstoll said members of the Tar
Heel Rifle and Pistol Club, as well as people
from the shooting range the organization
uses in Raleigh, attended the meeting with
plans to participate in the debate.
There will be a vote to override the veto
at the full Student Congress meeting next
week, but per the Student Code, there will
be no discussion before the vote.
Austin Root, author and sponsor of the
bill, said he doesnt think the two-thirds
majority to override the veto will be reached.
But he said he is planning to file a
motion at next Tuesdays meeting to recon-
sider the bill. If approved, the bill would be
presented again at that meeting, and dis-
cussion would be allowed.
Root, along with several other members of
Student Congress, has filed two related com-
plaints with Student Congress ethics com-
mittee against Speaker Pro Tempore Connor
Brady. The complaints were discussed at the
committees meeting Tuesday night.
One complaint claimed that Brady, who
was presiding at the meeting when the bill
was passed, mishandled the procedure of
the meeting by allowing a majority vote,
instead of the required two-thirds vote, to
end debate on the bill, Root said.
But Brady said neither he nor the 35
representatives in the room, including Root
and the parliamentarian, knew that he was
dth file/kevin hu
P.J. Hairston had 28 points in the Tar Heels 87-77 loss
to Miami in Sundays ACC Tournament championship.
acting improperly at the time.
Rep. Root felt that he could tarnish my
reputation and try to save a bill that he
knew would be vetoed, Brady said.
Ultimately I think its trumped-up
charges that I look forward to defending
myself on, he said before the meeting.
The complaint was dismissed at the eth-
ics committee meeting Tuesday.
Root said the second complaint regards
a private conversation that he and Brady
had on Facebook in October.
He said Brady shared that discussion with
persons outside of the conversation, and
By Kendra Benner
Staff Writer
A UNC graduate will help lead a pla-
giarism investigation in his native Russia
that could target top officials including
President Vladimir Putin.
In February, Russian
Prime Minister Dmitry
Medvedev announced
the investigation of
academic dishonesty in
Russian higher educa-
tion, which will be led by
Igor Fedyukin.
Fedyukin, a UNC doc-
toral graduate, started
serving as Russias deputy
minister of education and
science in June 2012.
Plagiarism has been
a widespread problem
in Russia since the
Soviet Union fell in the 1990s, said Donald
Raleigh, a UNC professor of Russian his-
tory. The probe is the first of its kind in
Russian history, Raleigh said.
In Russia, Ph.D. candidates often pay
ghost writers to complete their disserta-
tions or copy previously published work,
and Russian public officials largely ignore
the practice, Raleigh said.
Fedyukin came to UNC in the late 1990s
and earned his Ph.D. in history in 2009. He
could not be reached for comment.
When Fedyukin graduated and returned
to Russia, he sought to share new ideas
from the U.S. with his colleagues and
encourage higher standards in Russian
academia, said Jay Smith, a UNC history
professor who helped review Fedyukins
dissertation along with Raleigh.
I think that, like many people who study
abroad, Igor saw himself as someone who
could bridge two worlds, he said. The
idea was that he would put his American
Ph.D. to use in Russia and help reform the
country.
Before Medvedev announced the inves-
tigation, Fedyukin and other academics
had conducted a review of dissertations at a
Moscow university, Raleigh said.
They found numerous instances of pla-
giarism, illuminating the size of the prob-
lem, he said.
Whats behind what Igor is doing is
really to improve Russias academic stand-
ing, Raleigh said. Thats his job, to shake
things up, to make things better.
The academic probe raises the question
A UNC graduate was selected to
investigate possible plagiarism.
See NCAA, Page 4
See AMMUNITION, Page 4
No. 8 UNC will take on No. 9 Villanova
in game one of the NCAA Tournament.
of whether Putin will be formally accused
of plagiarism.
A 2006 Brookings Institution report
found that more than 16 pages of Putins
dissertation were copied from a Russian
translation of an American business text-
book but it remains to be seen whether
the investigation will implicate Putin.
Its a common pattern in Russian politi-
cal culture to announce campaigns against
corruption, but the problem is so deeply
rooted with high-level officials that are
involved, and there are low-level scapegoats
who feel the brunt of the campaign, said
Jeff Jones, an associate history professor at
UNC-Greensboro who also helped review
Fedyukins dissertation.
Regardless of who is targeted, those who
know Fedyukin said he will likely use the
talents he cultivated at UNC to continue to
cause a stir in Russian academia.
Hes likely to get some political push-
back, Smith said. But hes articulate, hes
strong-willed he ll survive the turmoil.
Contact the desk editor at
state@dailytarheel.com.
Igor Fedyukin
is a unC doctoral
graduate serving
as Russias deputy
minister of educa-
tion and science.
The veto on the ammunition
bill will be revisited next week.
NOTED. Bemoan the grossness of the
eighth floor of Davis all you want, but at
least the goings-on up there dont involve
two teenagers getting it on in the open
while another teenager records a video on
a Samsung Galaxy (an important detail).
Three Florida teens were caught this
week doing the above. Lovely.
QUOTED. Adults would be more than six
times more likely to engage in problem
drinking if they did not attend college.
Penn State researchers found that
enrollment might prevent future drinking
problems for some demographics. Every
college student is now free to misinterpret
this as an endorsement of Jell-O shots.
P
andemonium! Lululemon, the designer workout clothing
maker (because cheap sweats are for plebeians) has made a
shocking announcement: A recent batch of black yoga pants
was made too sheer. (And, as we all can all figure out, down-
ward dog plus see-through pants might compromise the serenity of yoga.)
Because 17 percent of the pants were affected, a recall was in order, and
now horror of horrors there may just be a yoga pants shortage.
Everywhere, people are fainting at the news: that girl at the SRC
who dresses up for workouts but never really works out and, especially,
unoriginal bros who send in kvetches about the virtues of yoga pants.
Hang in there, you guys. We can make it through this together.
End of the world as we know it
From staf and wire reports
DAILY
DOSE
Someone broke and
entered vehicles at 1083
Burning Tree Drive at 5:27
p.m. Monday, according to
Chapel Hill police reports.
The person stole bubble
gum, valued at $5, Fruit
Roll-Ups, valued at $10, and
a Polaroid digital camera,
valued at $150, reports state.
Someone heard gunshots
at 2701 Homestead Road at
11:18 p.m. Monday, according
to Chapel Hill police reports.
Someone broke and
entered a vehicle at 140 BPW
Club Road between 6:30
p.m. Thursday and 11:47 a.m.
Friday, according to Carrboro
police reports.
The victim said the back
right window of his Jeep
was broken. No items were
missing, reports state.
Someone damaged prop-
erty at 104 N.C. Highway 54 at
9:40 a.m. Friday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
The victim said he locked
the rear door to the building
at 9 p.m. Thursday. When he
came to unlock the same rear
door at 9 a.m Friday, the key
would not work, reports state.
The victim said he noticed
a sticker that said 24hr door
repair and believes someone
tampered with the lock and
then put the sticker on the
door, reports state.
Someone stole a wallet
at 1401 W. Main St. between
1:55 p.m. and 2:10 p.m.
Saturday, according to
Carrboro police reports.
Someone damaged
property at 101 Cobb St. at
3:30 p.m. Saturday, according
to Carrboro police reports.
A window on the west
side of the residence was
broken. Most of the glass
from the window was outside,
suggesting it had been broken
from the inside, reports state.
POLICE LOG
News Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 2
puzzle playtime
D
icki Dodson and her 17-month-old daugh-
ter Ansley complete a colorful flower
puzzle on Tuesday afternoon at the Kidzu
Childrens Museum on West Franklin Street. The
museum is open Tuesday through Sunday.
dth/justin pryor
COrrECtIOns
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printed on that page. Corrections also are noted in the online versions of our stories.
Contact Managing Editor Elise Young at managing.editor@dailytarheel.com with issues about this policy.
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tOday
commencement information
Day: Seniors graduating in May
2013 can drop by to get the
information they need to know
about Commencement.
Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
location: Student Union
charlotte ONeal spoken word
and music performance: a for-
mer member of the Kansas City
Black Panther Party, Mama C
integrates jazz, blues and gospel
into her music and poetry, with
african and hip-hop beats.
Time: 4 p.m.
location: ackland art Museum
international cofee hour: This
months hosts: the graduate
School, the Preparing Inter-
national Teaching assistants
Program, and the graduate and
Professional Student federation.
Time: 5 p.m.
location: EspressOasis, fedEx
global Education Center
choosing a major workshop:
Freshmen and sophomores are
invited to this Career Services
workshop about planning the
best path forward.
Time: 4 p.m.
location: Hanes Hall
Kurt Elling performance:
jazz vocalist Elling performs in
Chapel Hill. Student tickets and
single tickets start at $10.
Time: 7:30 p.m.
location: Memorial Hall
lucy michelle and the velvet
lapelles concert: also featuring
Radars Clowns of Sedation. all
ages. $8 to $10.
Time: Doors open 8:30 p.m.,
show begins 9 p.m.
location: Local 506
To make a calendar submission,
email calendar@dailytarheel.
com. Please include the date of
the event in the subject line, and
attach a photo if you wish. Events
will be published in the newspaper
on either the day or the day before
they take place.
COMMUnIty CaLEndar
tHUrsday
parenthetical girls concert:
The pop group is joined by Cas-
sis Orange. all ages. $8 to $9.
Time: Doors open 8:30 p.m.,
show begins 9 p.m.
location: Local 506
Ackland Film Forum: In Pariah,
17-year-old alike lives with her
parents and sister in Brooklyn,
quietly but frmly embracing her
identity as a lesbian. Students
free with valid university or high
school ID. $4 for others.
Time: 7 p.m.
location: Varsity Theatre
Pay UNC tuition and study for a
semester in England or Australia
By studying as an exchange student at one of UNCs many partner universities abroad,
youll earn credit towards your UNC degree while having an experience of a lifetime!
Applications are still being accepted for many Fall 2013 programs in England and Australia.
Applications for most Spring 2014 programs open on July 1 and are due in September.
For program details and to apply, visit http://studyabroad.unc.edu
By McKenzie Coey
Staff Writer
Visual artist, musician and poet
Charlotte ONeal, also known as Mama
C, will perform a spoken-word and
music performance today, channeling
memories of the time she spent on two
continents as a human rights activist.
The performer left her hometown of
Kansas City for Tanzania at age 19, after
her husband, Pete ONeal, was exiled
because of his role in the citys Black
Panther Party.
Brother Petes exile could have been
something of a hell for both him and us
but it turned into a blessing, she said,
reflecting on her home in Tanzania.
She refers to everyone as brother or
sister a sign of respect and equality.
Mama C was also a member of Kansas
Citys Black Panther Party in the late
1960s and early 1970s before she and her
husband left for Tanzania.
She has since been committed to
social issues, said Joanne Hershfield,
chairwoman of UNCs womens and gen-
der studies department.
Hershfield directed and produced a
documentary called Mama C: Urban
Warrior in the African Bush.
News Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 3
City brief
Chapel Hill police, UNC Department of Public
Safety hold prescription drop-off event today
People with outdated and unused medications will
have the chance to safely dispose of them today at
University Mall. Between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., the Chapel
Hill Police Department and UNC Department of Public
Safety will host a disposal event in the malls parking lot
at 201 S. Estes Drive.
Police will accept both prescription and over-the-
counter medications in solid and liquid forms.
Campus brief
Commencement Information Day will be in
the Great Hall today for graduating seniors
A number of campus departments and groups will be
in the Great Hall of the Student Union today from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. to provide information to seniors graduat-
ing in May.
Information will be available to help seniors complete
pre-graduation activities, including purchasing caps and
gowns and donating to the senior class gift.
From staff and wire reports
inBRIEF
By Meredith Burns
Staff Writer
The Republican Party is feeling pressure after its
national committee released a critical self-analysis of
Novembers election losses Monday and UNCs con-
servative leaders support the modifications, which aim
to broaden the partys appeal.
The reports authors found the party to be perceived
as largely out of touch with the public and called for a
more modern message for the party in federal elections.
It pretty much says we need to be a more open and
inclusive party, said Peter McClelland, who was elected
chairman of the UNC College Republicans Monday.
The party needs to include more voters who share the
same values of fiscal conservatism and limited govern-
ment, but might have different stances on social issues,
foreign policy and immigration, he said.
They need to have that spot at the table. Even if the
whole party does not shift, they need to have a spot at
the table, McClelland said. We need to play on the sim-
ilarities we do have with others instead of saying, Were
different, were not going to change, and were not going
to let you in because of that.
One focus of the report is the youth vote. Last year,
Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney lost
voters younger than 30 by 5 million votes.
Lauren Friedmann, a math and economics double
major, said she sees a gap between the Republican Party
and her college peers, especially with social issues like
gay marriage and access to contraception.
There seems to be a great disconnect between their
current beliefs and messages, and what weve been feel-
ing and pushing for, she said.
One way to persuade more people to vote Republican
especially youth is for the party to embrace the lib-
ertarian ideals of protecting civil liberties and maintain-
ing free markets, said Everett Lozzi, a senior and state
chairman of Young Americans for Liberty.
Steven Greene, political science professor at N.C.
State University, said he thinks reaching out to more
groups is a smart move for the party.
They are going to be the ones who move into posi-
tions of political power, he said. They need to bring
more voters in and convince everyone theyre not just
the party of angry, old, white men.
Peter Vogel, president of the UNC Young Democrats,
said that, though the report lacks calls for substantive
policy changes, the party should broaden its scope.
Its good for the country when both parties compete
for these voting blocks because electoral competition
ensures that each party will tailor their polices to win
votes, Vogel said.
Greene said the Republican message will take time to
change and will only come when the partys survival is
threatened.
Reports dont change things elections do.
Contact the desk editor at
state@dailytarheel.com.
The partys national committee wants to
make changes to appeal to more voters.
FUNDRAISING PARTICIPATION
11 percent
from class of 2012 this time last year
17 percent
from class of 2013
48 percent
participation goal for class of 2013
$20.13
desired gift for class of 2013
COMMENCEMENT INFO DAY
Time: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Location: Great Hall of the Student
Union
Buy announcements, class rings, frames,
caps and gowns, and more.
GOP aims
to improve
inclusivity
By Mary Frances Buoyer
Staff Writer
The class of 2013 is on the right track
to overcome its predecessors fundraising
shortcomings, senior class organizers said.
Simon Scholl, chairman of the senior
campaign, said this years campaign is on
track to meet the goal set by the class of
2011 which had the highest ever partici-
pation of students donating heading into
todays Commencement Information Day.
The class of 2012 fell short of its goal of
48 percent.
This years senior campaign has
exceeded last years participation, with
17 percent of seniors contributing to the
senior class gift so far, in comparison with
last years 11 percent at this time.
Campaign leaders have made their goal
48 percent participation with an average
gift of $20.13.
I am confident that we ll meet the
48 percent goal and hope we can even
be the first class to break 50 percent
participation, Scholl said.
Senior Class President Tim Palmer said
he is hoping to make the event a milestone
in fundraising for the senior class gift.
All of our senior marshals will be
dth/katie Bailey
Charlotte ONeal, known as Mama C, will perform spoken-word and music with African cultural influences at the Ackland today.
MaMa sees artistry
ATTEND THE PERFORMANCE
Time: 4 p.m. today
Location: Ackland Art Museum
Info: http://bit.ly/Xov0pM
present collecting gifts to the campaign
and we are hoping a large number of
seniors will decide to donate, he said.
Scholl said his team hopes to finish up
the month similar to the class of 2011,
which went into April with 25 percent
participation.
He said once they reach 25 percent,
they only need 800 more seniors to
participate to meet their goal.
Senior Class Vice President Nora
Chan said she believes the success of the
campaign is attributed to an increase in
fundraising events.
These events have served as
benchmarks for our fundraising, she said.
Scholl said the most successful event
was Beat Duke Week.
The campaign established a
competition with Duke to see which
senior class could capture the highest
percentage of students giving to the
campaign before the second basketball
game against Duke.
We found the event to be very
successful and we collected a little over
200 gifts in four collection days in the
Pit, Scholl said.
Scholl said campaign leaders are
not discouraged by the campaigns
shortcomings of 2012.
Palmer said this years goal was set
high to encourage a culture of giving back
among seniors.
I think its important to give because
UNCs continued success benefits every
graduate, and Carolinas standing is a
reflection on all Tar Heels, he said.
Contact the desk editor at
university@dailytarheel.com.
The class of 2013 may set a
fundraising milestone.
Hershfield said the film is about
how Mama C expresses African culture
through art.
The two were introduced two years
ago at a meeting in Raleigh at which
Mama C was the speaker.
I was so inspired by her story that I
decided I wanted to make a film about
her, said Hershfield, who traveled to
Tanzania in 2011 to shoot the film.
Mama Cs performance will touch on
subjects about women, such as African-
American women coming to terms with
who they are, Hershfield said.
A lot of her poems and music she
writes really address issues that per-
tain to women in terms of identity and
health, Hershfield said.
Mama C said her work exhibits influ-
ences of the blues, jazz and gospel that
Kansas City was famous for during her
childhood.
She said she has always been an artis-
tic person.
Im inspired by just about everything,
she said. Whether it is a dream, whether
its the wind, or whether its a wrinkle in
my cloth.
Her husband, Pete ONeal, founded
Tanzanias United African Alliance
Community Center in 1991 to promote
ties between Tanzanian and American
cultures.
The couple also created the Leaders
of Tomorrow Childrens Home, which is
under the umbrella of the community
center. They currently provide care for
22 children between the ages of 5 and
15.
Hershfield presented a screening
of her documentary on Tuesday night
at the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for
Black Culture and History, and ONeal
attended, said Joshua Miller, a Ph.D.
candidate who assisted Hershfield in
planning the screening and todays per-
formance.
Mama C said she thinks everyone is
an artist.
All you need to do is open up your
soul, let it all run out, and try to keep up
with it, she said.
Contact the desk editor at
arts@dailytarheel.com.
Seils wins Carrboro seat, but turnout disappoints
Artist, activist to give spoken-word performance
By Jenny Surane
Assistant City Editor
Damon Seils is the newest
member of the Carrboro Board of
Aldermen after Tuesdays special
election drew 261 voters a 1.7 per-
cent turnout.
Seils ran uncontested in Tuesdays
election, which cost the town about
$11,000.
Workers at the polls said they
were disappointed with Tuesdays
voter turnout, but they expected it.
Poll worker Helen Figueroa, who
worked at the north Carrboro pre-
cinct, said her precinct usually sees
about 30 percent of voters in non-
presidential elections.
But this weeks special election
drew just more than 1 percent of
voters to the precinct.
I dont think there was enough
advertising in this particular elec-
tion, Figueroa said.
In general, we have good voter
turnout, but with only one candidate
its different, she said.
Tracy Reams, director of the
Orange County Board of Elections,
said Tuesdays election was the first
of its kind, so its difficult to deter-
mine the cause of low voter turnout.
Weve never had an election
where there was only one contest
and only one candidate running,
she said. We dont have any election
that we can compare this to.
Jake Gardner, who has worked at
the north Carrboro precinct since
1980, said Tuesdays election was
the lowest voter turnout he had
ever seen.
Gardner said he thought the fact
that Seils ran uncontested led many
eligible voters to stay home.
You wouldnt have expected any-
thing different, he said.
Gardner said he feels the special
election might not have been the
best option for an uncontested race.
The issue here is not who is run-
ning but rather if this is a necessary
situation or not, he said. Theres a
fair amount of money involved.
Tuesdays election could be the
last of its kind for Carrboro.
Sen. Ellie Kinnaird, D-Orange
and a former Carrboro mayor, has
introduced a bill to the N.C. General
Assembly that would give the board
alternatives, such as appointments,
to fill future vacancies.
Seils received 88 percent of the
vote Tuesday, with write-in votes
accounting for the remaining 12
percent.
Seils said despite the fact that he
ran uncontested he took the election
seriously.
He said he spent just less than
$1,000 on campaign materials and
went door-to-door in almost every
neighborhood in Carrboro to talk to
people about his platform.
Seils said he is eager to start his
term as alderman.
The first thing Im going to want
to do is get appointed to committees
along the lines of the issues I care
about, he said.
Seils celebrated his victory at
the Looking Glass Cafe in Carrboro
after the polls closed at 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday.
Im ready to hit the ground run-
ning, he said.
Contact the desk editor at
city@dailytarheel.com.
dth/justin pryor
Tuesdays special election drew only
about 1.7 percent of eligible voters.
More seniors contribute to gift
Only 261 people voted in
the election, 1.7 percent
of Carrboro voters.
From Page One Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 4
Ward said it might be a
year or more before the new
transfer station is finalized,
and the town hopes to work
with Carrboro and Orange
County in the process.
County cutting costs
Though Chapel Hill,
Carrboro and Orange County
have separate waste manage-
ment programs, all waste cur-
rently ends up in the Orange
County Landfill.
Orange County
Commissioner Earl McKee
said the county plans to
ship its trash to the Durham
Waste Disposal and Recycling
Center starting in June.
The Durham station is
designed for a higher capac-
ity than it is currently being
used for, so they were willing
to work with us on an agree-
ment, McKee said.
The tipping fee at the
Durham station is $42.50 per
ton $14.50 less than the fee
at the Orange County Landfill.
But gas and other expenses
would put the total cost
for waste disposal at about
$130,000 more than what the
county currently pays annually.
Gayle Wilson, county solid
waste management director,
said the distance from all but
WASTE TRANSFER
from page 1
ultimately Michael Braxton,
a representative, received the
email and shared it with the
entire Student Congress via its
listserv, saying the conversa-
tion showed that the bill was
discriminatory.
Root said the conversa-
tion didnt pertain to the bill
specifically but to his views on
funding for ammunition.
Accusing me of discrimi-
nation is the most ridicu-
lous thing Ive ever heard in
my life, he said. The purpose
of sending it out was to slan-
der my name because the
conversation was presenting
me in a negative light.
But Brady said Root never
told him not to share the
conversation, and that he was
within his rights to share it
with whomever he wanted.
He chose to file an eth-
AMMUNITION
from page 1
seeded Villanova (20-13).
Should North Carolina
get past the Wildcats, it will
likely play top-seeded Kansas,
a team Williams coached for
15 years before taking the job
at his alma mater. That game
would be played 40 miles from
the Jayhawks home turf.
In 2008, UNC lost to the
Jayhawks 84-66 in the Final
Four. Last year, Kansas ended
UNCs tournament run in the
Elite Eight 80-67.
Williams said he was con-
fused by his teams draw but
the only thing he can do now
is focus on the task at hand.
You say, Wow, Williams
said, describing the potential
matchup with Kansas. But
Im thinking about Villanova.
It was a surprise being No.
8. It was a little surprise going
to play in Kansas City. But
if you start thinking about
playing Kansas in Kansas
City, you forget about the
biggest duty, and thats to win
a game to even get there.
Dexter Strickland and P.J.
Hairston stared blankly when
asked what they knew about
their upcoming opponent.
Theyre from Philly,
Hairston muttered.
Members of the UNC coach-
ing staff have been looking
at tape of Villanovas season,
NCAA
from page 1
When I saw the North Carolina in the
number eight, I was stunned.
Roy Williams,
UNC basketball coach
during which the Wildcats beat
top-seeded Louisville.
Strickland echoed his
coachs thoughts about the
eight-seed, adding that he was
disappointed with the draw.
Still, the fourth-year senior
has been through two other
NCAA tournament trips with
the Tar Heels. So no matter the
opponent or its seed, he knows
exactly where his mind will be.
You dont realize until
youre actually playing and
youre down and you say to
yourself, This is going to be
the last game of the season.
That thought gets you to play
even harder, Strickland said.
I would just tell (the young
guys), Just go down there,
play to your full potential, give
it your all, lose yourself out
there on the floor. Because it
might be your last game.
Contact the desk editor at
sports@dailytarheel.com.
Were changing
the methodology
by which we handle
garbage.
Gayle Wilson,
solid waste management director
one of the countys five solid
waste convenience centers to
the Durham station is greater
than the distance to the land-
fill.
But he said ongoing reno-
vations to all five convenience
centers are aimed at reducing
overall costs.
Were changing the meth-
odology by which we handle
garbage, Wilson said. One
part of the process is install-
ing trash compactors, which
allow you to more efficiently
haul large amounts of waste.
Orange County Manager
Frank Clifton said that for
Orange County residents, not
much will change in terms of
solid waste disposal come June.
People who get curbside
pick-up will see that keep
happening, people who go
to convenience centers will
keep doing that, he said. But
of course, waste disposal is
an ongoing problem for the
county.
Contact the desk editor at
city@dailytarheel.com.
ics complaint because the
truth was revealed about his
discriminatory legislation,
Brady said. Its also unfor-
tunate that Rep. Root would
decide to put that in writing
in the first place.
The ethics committee
voted to censure Brady, and
the motion will be voted on
by the full Student Congress
next Tuesday.
Staff Writer Sam Schaefer
contributed reporting
Contact the desk editor at
state@dailytarheel.com.
Connor
Brady has
come under
fire for how
he handled
Student
Congress vote
on the bill.
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Native North America, Daniel Cobb. HS, NA, US
AMST 269 Mating and Marriage in American Culture (3), Timothy
Marr. CI, HS, US
ANTH 206 American Indian Societies (3), Valerie Lambert. SS, US
ANTH 423 Written in Bone: CSI and the Science of Death
Investigation from Skeletal Remains (3), Dale Hutchinson. PL
ART 251 Art and Architecture in the Age of Caliphs (7 th 12th
Centuries CE) (3), Glaire Anderson. VP, BN, WB
ART 272 Northern European Art: Van Eyck to Bruegel (3). Tatiana
String.
ART 551 Introduction to Museum Studies (3), Lyneise Williams . VP,
NA, EE
CHIN 464 The City in Modern Chinese Literature and Film (3), Robin
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CLAR 242 Archaeology of Egypt (3) Victor Martinez. BN, HS, WB
COMM 422 Family Communication (3), Kumarini Silva. GL, US
COMM 523 Communication and Leadership (3), Patricia Parker.
DRAM 290 Special Studies On Camera Acting: Integrating Breath
and Voice (3), John Patrick.
DRAM 292 Corner of the Sky: The American Musical (3), Gregory
Kable. VP
DRAM 300 Directing (3) Julie Fishell. CI
ECON 468 Principles of Soviet and Post-Soviet Economic Systems (3),
Steven Rosefielde.
ENGL 366 Literature and the Other Arts (3), Laurie Langbauer. CI, LA
ENST 369 Energy and the Environment: A Coastal Perspective (3),
Lindsay Dubbs. PL, EE
EXSS 188 Emergency Care of Injuries and Illness (3), Meredith
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EXSS 273 Research in Exercise and Sport Science (3), Jason Mihalik. QI
GLBL 390 Current Topics in Global Studies: Rethinking Globalization:
Global Social Movements and Local Alternatives (3), Michal
Osterweil.
HIST 277 (ASIA//PWAD 277) The Conflict over Israel/Palestine (3),
Sarah Shields. BN, HS
HIST 434 Medieval England (3), Marcus Bull.
ITAL 241 Italian Renaissance Literature in Translation (3), Ennio Rao .
LA, WB
JOMC 376 Sports Marketing and Advertising (3), John Sweeney .
MASC 220 (ENST 220) North Carolina Estuaries: Environmental
Processes and Problems (3), Marc Alperin . Includes one full week at
the Institute of Marine Sciences (IMS) in Morehead City. Separate program
fee and application required. EE, PL
PLAN 590 Special Topics Seminar: Introduction to Real Estate
Finance, Investment and Development (3), Emil Malizia.
PLCY 101 (PWAD 101) Making Public Policy (3), Daniel Gitterman. NA,
SS
POLI 100 Introduction to Government in the United States (3), Jason
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POLI 150 (PWAD 150) International Relations and World Politics (3),
Mark Crescenzi . GL, SS
POLI 202 The U.S. Supreme Court (3), Isaac Unah . SS
POLI 217 (WMST 217) Women and Politics (3), Pamela Conover . SS, US
POLI 469 (PWAD/RUES 469) Conflict and Intervention in the Former
Yugoslavia (3), Robert Jenkins. GL, SS
PSYC 245 Abnormal Psychology (3), F. Charles Wiss. PL
PSYC 490 Current Topics in Psychology: Childhood Maltreatment,
Trauma, and Trauma-Focused Treatment (3), Deborah Jones.
PSYC 503 African American Psychology (3) Enrique Neblett.
RELI 125 Heaven and Hell (3), Randall Styers. PH
RELI 162 Introduction to Catholicism (3) Evyatar Marienberg. NA
RELI 283 (ASIA 300) The Buddhist Tradition: India, Nepal and Tibet
(3), Lauren Leve . BN, CI
RELI 321 Topics in Religion and Culture (3), Jonathan Boyarin.
SOCI 252 Data Analysis in Sociological Research (3), Francois Nielsen.
QI
SPAN 255 Conversation I (3), Malgorzata Lee . Prerequisite for 255: SPAN
204, 212 or 402. CI
SPAN 293 Spanish Service Learning (1). Available to students enrolled in
SPAN 255 or SPAN 310. EE
SPAN 310 Conversation II (3), Malgorzata Lee . Prerequisite for 310: SPAN
250, 255 or 260.
SPAN 362 The Quest for Identity in Contemporary Spain (3), Samuel
Amago . LA, NA
Earn 3 credits in 3 weeks in Maymester. Registration begins in March.
Check out the listing below for courses, professors and Gen Ed requirements. Find a complete course description at summer.unc.edu.
May 14-May 31, 2013
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Sports Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 5
Tar Heels spring
back from losses
By Daniel Wilco
Staff Writer
The North Carolina soft-
ball teams spring break may
have been unconventional,
but players did have one thing
in common with some of their
peers they got burned.
After being outscored
31-15 in a 1-4 week, UNC
needed a break, and defeat-
ing North Carolina Central
in five innings twice at home
Tuesday night was the perfect
opportunity for the Tar Heels
to spring back into action.
We had a rough spring
break, and games like these
are good for confidence and
kind of tweaking everything
before we go into bigger
weekends like this weekend
against FSU, senior Haleigh
Dickey said.
UNC started both games
out with swift strikes on
offense. The Tar Heels scored
five runs in the first two
innings of the first game, a
9-0 rout of the Eagles.
In the second games
slightly more contested 10-2
win, North Carolina was still
able to bring nine runs across
the plate in the first two
innings.
Dickey said the quick
pace the Tar Heels had at the
onset of the games offered a
good opportunity for depth
development.
Scoring early in the games
gives everyone a chance to
get in the game, Dickey said.
Coach (Donna Papa) is very
good at substituting people in,
giving people chances, and it
just makes it more fun for the
whole team to be involved.
All but two of the 23 play-
ers on the teams roster saw
action during the double-
softball: unc 9, nccu 0; unc 10, nccu 2
dth file/Kira GurGanus
Senior Haleigh Dickey hit at two-run homer in the first game of
the Tar Heels two wins against N.C. Central on Tuesday.
header, and the team man-
aged 19 runs on 20 hits from
43 at-bats.
But the games didnt just
offer experience for more
players than usual.
This just totally is good for
confidence, Dickey said. We
need it every now and then to
just go out there and be able
to cream somebody.
Sophomore Kati Causey,
who was three-for-three with
two RBIs in the second game,
said confidence gained against
weaker opponents could play
a key role in matchups with
stronger teams.
We just have to work
on keeping our confidence
up and making sure we can
maintain our focus when we
have tougher competition,
Causey said.
The Tar Heels are unde-
feated at home, and Papa
viewed the quick stop back
in Chapel Hill before a road
trip to Tallahassee, Fla., to
face Florida State as a good
time for UNC to get collected
between tougher opponents.
We have a comfort zone
at home and we tend to play
well at home, Papa said. It
gives us a lot of energy going
into the weekend.
For Papa, the momentum
was a product of improved
performance by the Tar Heels
in their homestand.
I think we did a better job
today with being more patient
and looking for more pitches,
Papa said.
The Tar Heels have three
games against FSU this week-
end and are looking to capi-
talize on their recent strong
performances at home.
But Papa realizes that the
Tar Heels cant let their suc-
cess go to their heads.
Anything can happen,
Papa said. You just have to
have the right mindset and
be able to really go out there
and fight for every at-bat and
every out.
Contact the desk editor at
sports@dailytarheel.com.
uncs softball team
beat n.c. central
twice tuesday night.
The Douglass Hunt Lecture of the Carolina Seminars,
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News Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 6
BASEBALL: North CAroLiNA 16, priNCEtoN 0
By Carlos Collazo
Staff Writer
North Carolina baseball
players Michael Russell and
Mike Zolk do a lot of things
together.
They live together, they hit
in the lineup together, they
turn double plays together
and they start rallies together.
Zolk and Russell win base-
ball games together.
They might not get the rec-
ognition or shining stat sheets
that Colin Moran, Skye Bolt,
Cody Stubbs and today
Trent Thornton get, but
they contribute to those play-
ers success in their own ways.
Trent Thornton led No.1
North Carolina (19-1) to a
16-0 win against Princeton
(1-11), with Russell and Zolk
right behind him.
The freshman right-hander
threw seven innings, with
seven strikeouts to one walk,
and forced many ground balls
off of Princetons bats.
Zolk and Russell were con-
sistently ready to turn those
ground balls into outs.
The duo teamed up for a
double play in the seventh in
Thorntons final inning. Zolk,
who has a quick exchange at
second base while rolling the
double play, did particularly
well defensively.
I really take pride in my
defense more than anything
else, Zolk said. Making that
routine play is most impor-
tant to me.
In practice, working on
defense is really important to
me, rather than just hitting.
Lately, Russell has also had
a greater influence on the
offensive side of the game.
Russell, who has success-
fully stolen bases in seven of
his eight attempts this season,
got on base in front of Zolk
against Princeton to allow him
to drive in the teams first run.
Michael can run a little bit,
and (in) the last couple games
has been swinging the bat real-
ly well, coach Mike Fox said.
Russell has been playing
well lately despite suffering
from turf toe, an injury for
which he received a cortisone
shot on Monday. Because of
his recent success, Russell has
edged out freshman Landon
Lassiter for the starting job at
shortstop.
And if Zolk can continue
his elevated play at second
base, he could end up getting
a starting gig as well.
We finally turned a double
play tonight two, Fox said.
We were sitting on eight for
a while, and I was wondering
Tar Heels blank Princeton
NUrSiNG ADMiSSioNS
16
more students admitted
104
admits to BSN program
56
admits to ABSN program
By Sarah Headley
Staff Writer
After state budget cuts
forced the UNC School of
Nursing to cut its class size by
25 percent two years ago, the
number of admitted students
is now starting to increase.
With the release of admis-
sions decisions March 7, the
school accepted 16 more
students than last year, split
evenly between two under-
graduate programs.
Out of 396 applicants,
26.3 percent or 104 stu-
dents were admitted into
the Bachelor of Science in
Nursing program. The accel-
erated program accepted 17.8
percent, or 56 students, out of
315 applicants.
Beverly Foster, director of
the undergraduate program,
said the school has been
working to combat negative
effects of the budget cuts
since 2011.
She said acceptance levels
often rise and fall with the
demand for nurses and status
of the economy.
I think it is a positive sign
that the campus budgetary
climate has eased sufficiently
to accommodate 16 more
students in the coming year,
she said.
Amy Burdette, associate
director for admissions in
the school, said she does not
anticipate more budget cuts.
But this years incoming
class, though larger than last
year, is still smaller than it
was before the cuts.
Foster said the smaller
class sizes are frustrating for
the admissions committee as
well as the students.
Its difficult for students,
and its painful for faculty to
have to make those decisions,
she said.
Right now we have a
wonderful supply of qualified
students. One of the most
painful things that the faculty
dth/brookelyn riley
Trent Thornton threw seven
innings Tuesday and gave up
five hits, all of them singles.
when we were going to get to
double-digit double plays.
(Zolk)s really been playing
well at second base and turns
a double play as well as any-
body we have had in a while,
so it was good to see us get
some ground balls. (Russell
and Zolk) have been playing
well up the middle for us.
Russell said he feels right
at home at shortstop, espe-
cially when Zolk is playing
beside him.
We have really good
chemistry, Russell said. We
live together so we communi-
cate real well, we are always
talking in between plays and
we are always on the same
page with each other, so I am
real comfortable with him.
Players like Moran, Bolt
and Stubbs will get most of
the credit offensively, espe-
cially after games like this one
where they combined for sev-
en hits, seven RBIs, and seven
runs, but Russell and Zolk are
there as well, quietly helping
them out together.
Contact the desk editor at
sports@dailytarheel.com.
does on the admissions com-
mittee is make choices.
Sophomore Katie Lowe
was one of the students
admitted this year.
I was just really nervous
because everyone that applies
and goes here works hard
enough and is qualified, she
said. I feel very privileged
and blessed to be a part of the
program.
But for students who were
not admitted, Foster said
there are other options.
If a door has been closed
one time, its no reason to
believe that it will always be
closed, Foster said. There
are things that can be done.
She said applicants who
were disappointed should
consider what they can do to
improve their applications for
the next cycle.
The other thing to do is to
consider that there are many
other nursing programs that
are right within driving dis-
tance of Chapel Hill that are
accredited and good quality.
But while the budget cuts
are leading to reduced class
sizes, Foster said the quality of
the program will remain intact.
We will not take in more
students than we have
resources to manage, Foster
said.
Were not going to expand
capriciously without adequate
resources to do that.
Contact the desk editor at
university@dailytarheel.com.
Acceptances to
nursing school
begin to increase
DTH ONLINE: Go
online to read more
about Thorntons
performance.
News Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 7
By Edmond Harrison
Staff Writer
Jazz piano and composition
professor Stephen Anderson
said playing the piano
was mandatory during his
upbringing, but as an adult he
is driven by a love of music.
Anderson released a new
album this month, titled
Believe, with his jazz combo,
the Stephen Anderson Trio.
Believe is the third album
from the trio, consisting of
bassist Jeffry Eckels, drum-
mer Ross Pedersen and pia-
nist Anderson and guest
artist Joel Frahm on the tenor
saxophone.
For this album Anderson
said he tried to write in a
more free and loose style.
I didnt worry about track
order or sound Id wake up
in the morning with a little
ditty in my head and just start
writing, Anderson said.
A big part of composing is
just getting your head in the
right space These tunes just
fell from the sky. To me, it was
kind of a miracle project.
LEARN ABOUT THE CD
For more info about
Believe, visit bit.ly/9I0PfU.
clearly informed by classical
influences, Dickey said.
Anderson said his love for
making music wont stop any
time soon.
By the time I die, I would
like to write 10 symphonies,
10 pieces for wind ensemble
and 10 or so pieces for jazz
courtesy of steven BromBerg
Stephen Anderson, a jazz piano and composition professor at
the University, released a new album this month titled Believe.
Nathan Huvard, whose
jazz combo is coached by
Anderson, said Andersons
modified approach delivered
a raw result.
Its definitely a very
emotionally driven album,
Huvard said.
Anderson said he has been
cultivating his compositional
prowess for most of his life.
As the son of the
neighborhood piano teacher,
piano lessons were required
in the Anderson household.
My mom forced us all to
play piano, Anderson said.
The rule was you couldnt
quit piano until you could
play the hymns in church.
From a young age Anderson
said he started writing original
music and would give cas-
sette recordings of his work to
friends and family.
He said his early influences
included the popular rock
groups, but quickly gravitated
towards a diverse interest of
jazz and classical artists such
as Bela Bartok, McCoy Tyner
and Bill Evans and others.
Wed listen to Mozart and
John Denver at dinnertime as
a family, he said.
Stewart Engart, a junior
composition major who
studies under Anderson, said
Andersons influence has
helped him view composition
in new ways.
The way Dr. Anderson
synthesizes together different
sounds and styles makes his
writing truly unique and
engaging.
Other recent pieces by
Anderson include a concerto
for piano and orchestra
titled Dysfunctional, which
was performed by the UNC
Symphony Orchestra, and
Edge, which was performed
by the UNC Wind Ensemble.
The sound of his pieces
is very Americana, said
Ryan Dickey, a Kenan Music
Scholar who plays the eupho-
nium and studies jazz piano
under Anderson.
He draws very much from
the American blues and jazz
tradition, and yet hes also
UNC music professor debuts third album
Library director returns to town
By Paige Ladisic
Staff Writer
Susan Brown said she
is more than happy to be
returning to a town and a
library she has always loved.
Chapel Hill Town Manager
Roger Stancil announced on
Monday Browns appointment
as the new director of the
Chapel Hill Public Library.
Brown, who received her
masters degree in library sci-
ence from UNC, is now the
marketing director for the
Lawrence Public Library in
Lawrence, Kan.
She said she works to find
creative partnerships and
solutions to the underfunding
problems that libraries often
face. Brown has previously
worked at libraries in Raleigh
and Virginia.
Brown said she will offi-
cially start the job on May 20,
and she is thrilled to return to
Chapel Hill.
Its a town that I love, and
its also a town that loves its
library, she said.
Brown will return to a
newly expanded Chapel
Hill Public Library, which is
scheduled to reopen in April.
But due to budget con-
straints, the library will oper-
ate on reduced hours.
Both Brown and her
husband attended graduate
school at UNC, and she said
moving back to the area is
a great opportunity both
professionally and person-
ally.
Chapel Hill Town Council
member Jim Ward, who is
the liaison to the Library
Board of Trustees, said he
thought it was important to
hire a director who helps the
library become a library of
the future.
Susan Brown
will be the
new director
of the chapel
Hill Public
Library. Brown
is a unc
alumna.
Its not just a place to
shelve books, its a community
meeting place, Ward said.
Ward said he hopes Brown
can help turn the Chapel Hill
Public Library into that place
for residents.
We need someone who
can articulate that vision, he
said.
And he said the town of
Chapel Hill was rigorous in
the process of selecting the
director, using two rounds of
selection to make the deci-
sion.
Candidates for the direc-
tor position were reviewed by
town and library staff as well
as librarians from other com-
munities, according to a press
release.
Assessors also included
representatives from the
Library Board of Trustees, the
Chapel Hill Public Library
Foundation and Friends
of the Chapel Hill Public
Library.
The selection team placed
a high value on candidates
who would engage the com-
munity and embrace the digi-
tal age of the library.
Brown said she is looking
forward to working with the
town to set future priorities
and goals for the library.
I am so thrilled to have
this opportunity to come back
to Chapel Hill, she said.
Contact the desk editor at
city@dailytarheel.com.
band, he said.
Contact the desk editor at
arts@dailytarheel.com.
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PRODUCTION ONLY
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Success Academy 2013
Youre Invited To Meet Our Team!
Who: Success Academy Charter Schools Talent Team
When: There will be two great opportunities to talk to our recruiters on
March 26th:
9-11 am at the Education Job Fair in the Great Hall
6 pm at our information session at the UNC Career Service Center
What: Join Success Academy Charter Schools Talent team at the
Education Job Fair in the Great Hall to learn more about opportunities
available in our schools across New York City. The team will also be
hosting an information session in the evening at 6 pm at the UNC
Career Service Center. There will be an opportunity to schedule in
person interviews.
Are you ready to transform education for good? Learn more and
apply today at SuccessCareers.org.
EOE
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 8
NOTICE TO ALL DTH CUSTOMERS
Deadlines are NOON one business day prior
to publication for classifed ads. We publish
Monday thru Friday when classes are in session.
A university holiday is a DTH holiday too (i.e.
this affects deadlines). We reserve the right to
reject, edit, or reclassify any ad. Acceptance
of ad copy or prepayment does not imply
agreement to publish an ad. You may stop your
ad at any time, but NO REFUNDS or credits for
stopped ads will be provided. No advertising
for housing or employment, in accordance with
federal law, can state a preference based on
sex, race, creed, color, religion, national origin,
handicap, marital status.
OCD SUPPORT GROUP
FOR PARENTS
SUPPORT GROUP FOR PARENTS of Children &
Adolescents with OCD & OC Spectrum Disor-
ders. Meetings are held every 3rd Thursday of
the month 7-9pm. The next meeting will be on
Mar. 21. Family Parlor Room, United Church of
CH. Call Kathleen 919-402-1039 for more info.
CHEAP TUx $89 TO OwN!
Undergrad special just $89 to purchase a
complete tuxedo. Formalwear Outlet 415
Millstone Drive in Hillsborough. 10 minutes
from campus. 919-644-8243.
Child Care Wanted
ExPERiENCED BABYSiTTER NEEDED im-
mediately M/W 2:30-6pm for 2 fun,
imaginative boys 7 and 11. We live close to
campus. Sitter must have own transportation
and be willing to drive to activities.
Excellent driving record, non-smoker and
references required. $10/hr +mileage. Email
sallyvtaylor@gmail.com.
NANNY NEEDED AUGUST, SEPTEMBER full-
time, M-F. infant care needed in our home.
Outstanding experience, clean criminal and
driving record and 3 exceptional references. We
dont want someone to bring their child to our
house. Degree in education or similar desired.
No smoking. liza.makowski@post.harvard.edu.
BABYSiTTER FOR 7 YEAR-OlD GiRl Babysitter
needed for sweet 7 year-old girl (daughter
of English prof) in Chapel Hill (very close to
UNC campus). 3 days/wk, 2:40-4:30pm (or
5:30pm). $300/mo. Please call Florence Dore,
919-672-2149.
NEEDED: PART-TiME NANNY to assist
in caring for 3 month-old, weekdays
9-11am, 3 days/wk. Required to
travel with mom to run errands and
perform light housework. Good
references and previous experience
caring for infants mandatory. $10/hr.
carolina.hurant@gmail.com.
CHAPEl Hill FAMilY SEEKS child care
M-Th afternoons from 2:30-5:30pm and
occasionally until 6pm. Applicant needs
own car, clear driving record, provide
references. Responsibilities: Driving to
activities, errands, oversight of children.
$13/hr. donna.benjamin1031@gmail.com.
For Rent
FAIR HOUSING
All REAl ESTATE AND RENTAl advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal
to advertise any preference, limitation, or
discrimination based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status, or national
origin, or an intention to make any such
preference, limitation, or discrimination. This
newspaper will not knowingly accept any
advertising which is in violation of the law. Our
readers are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised in this newspaper are available on
an equal opportunity basis in accordance with
the law. To complain of discrimination, call
the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development housing discrimination hotline:
1-800-669-9777.
lOvElY 3BR/2B HOME ON WOODED lot. lots
of windows, Convenient to i-40 this open foor
plan features freplace, hardwood foors thru
house, large deck. Pets negotiable with fee.
$1,390/mo. Contact Fran Holland Properties:
fhollandprop@gmail.com, 919-968-4545.
$400/MO. PER BEDROOM in legal
6BR/5BA townhouse. 4 buslines, minutes
to UNC, hardwood foors, W/D, extra
storage, free parking, non-smoking.
spbell48@gmail.com, 919-933-0983.
UNivERSiTY COMMONS 4BR/4BA: 2 desirable
top level units available on 6/1/13 and 8/1/13.
Free bus. All utilities included. Only $1,600/mo.
for whole unit or $425 per suite. cchang_1234@
yahoo.com. 919-968-1461. 480-322-6215.
VILLAGE GREEN
2BR/2.5BA located 220 Elizabeth Street near
Franklin Street and UNC. Pool, tennis, busline.
Quiet, beautiful complex. W/D in unit. Walk to
campus. $950/mo. 12 month lease available
7/1. Email SMFC@att.net, 828-734-1535.
UNivERSiTY COMMONS 4BR/4BA.
$1,600/mo. includes: UTiliTiES walk
in closet, internet, furnished living and
dining. J, D lines. Available 8-1-2013.
919-923-0630. For application, email:
NolAloha@nc.rr.com.
CONvENiENT TO lAW AND MEDiCAl schools.
Grad or prof students. 3BR/1.5BA ranch in
quiet Glen lennox neighborhood. large yard,
carport, hardwood foors, bus nearby. East
CHH, Culbreth, Glenwood, $1,390/mo. (pets
negotiable). Contact Fran Holland Properties,
fhollandprop@gmail.com.
SUBlETER NEEDED: For rent: Furnished
bedroom, private bathroom. $400/mo.
+utilities. 2 undergrads looking for 3rd
roommate. Easy access to multiple buslines.
Email: matthew.love29@gmail.com.
SOUTHERN villAGE FURNiSHED 1BR
apartment! Perfect for grad, med student.
Full kitchen, W/D, large rooms, big windows,
private deck. Great neighborhood. Walk, bus
to UNC. $950/mo. includes utilities, wireless.
Available 4/1/13. No smoking, no pets.
lb107@duke.edu.
4BR/4BA UNivERSiTY COMMONS condo.
New carpet and paint, $1,400/mo. All utilities
and internet included. On busline. Contact
Fran Holland Properties at fhollandprop@
gmail.com. 919-968-4545.
CHANCEllOR SQUARE. 2BR/2BA townhouse.
Walk to campus. Full kitchen. Carpeted. W/D.
Parking fee included. $1,320/mo for two. Years
lease from mid-August. 919-929-6072.
5BR/2BA CONDO in triplex. 611 Hillsborough
Street. Completely remodeled, hardwoods,
tile throughout, new appliances, W/D, near
bus stop, $2,625/mo. Available August 2013.
704-277-1648 or uncrents@carolina.rr.com.
FUllY FURNiSHED 2BR TOWNHOME in Oaks
Condos available for short and long term lease.
Different terms for different time periods. Great
location, close to Friday Center, on busline.
Bring your suitcase and move in. Email Fran
Holland Properties at fhollandprop@gmail.com
or call 919-968-4545.
EASY ACCESS TO Chapel Hill, Burlington
and GSO! 2,476 square feet, 4BR/2BA,
2 car garage, quiet cul de sac in Autumn
Trace subdivision near Highway 54 and
Highway 119. All appliances included
plus water up to $50/mo. $1,499/mo.
919-475-4490.
UNivERSiTY COMMONS $1,600/MO
includes utilities. Walk in closet,
internet, furnished living and dining J, D
lines Available 8-1-2013. 919-923-0630,
application: email:NolAloha@nc.rr.com.
For Sale
GUlF SHRiMP iN CHAPEl Hill: i bring
premium quality shrimp and seafood of
exceptional quality to the Pittsboro, Chapel
Hill area. www.louisianaFreshShrimp.com.
BOOKS: Hysteria Molt echoes the great writers
in Clumsy Hearts, a slightly misguided romance.
They may never forgive her for it. Some people
cannot take a joke. Available via Amazon.com.
Help Wanted
YOUTH BASEBAll UMPiRES: Town of Carrboro.
Needed March thru June for games played M-F
evenings and Saturday days for ages 6-15.
Training provided, umpiring experience and/or
baseball knowledge preferred. 4-10 games/wk.
Pay rate: $16-$24/game. Open until flled. For
more info call 918-7364. For an application visit
www.townofcarrboro.org. EOE.
TElEMARKETER WANTED. insurance offce
seeking competent, experienced telemar-
keter. $10-$12/hr. 15 hrs/wk. Please send
resume to asterw1@nationwide.com or call
919-913-0202 ext. 1101.www.aai4u.com.
COMPUTER SCiENCE iS SEEKiNG a student
to work part-time 5-10 hours/wk starting
now and continuing through fall and spring,
summer optional. Experience with computers
desired. Training provided. interested?
Contact bill_hays@unc.edu. 919-627-1765.
PART-TiME lEASiNG POSiTiON available in
local property management offce. Ability to
work a Saturday or 2 every month. $11/hr, no
experience required. Please submit resume to
Justin@ticonproperties.com.
NC MOUNTAiN SUMMER CAMPS with
commitment to CHRiST seek staff. Whitewater
paddling, rock climbing, mountain biking,
caving, cooks, more. TwoFunCamps.com. See
video. Kahdalea, Chosatonga. 828-884-6834.
YARD WORKER NEEDED: Must be strong (able
to lift 60 pounds), experienced and have own
transportation. $13/hr. 919-929-4220.
RESEARCH ASSiSTANT NEEDED for Duke
Clinical Research Study. Duties include
physiological monitoring, data entry and
data processing. Bachelors degree required.
Please send resume and cover letter to
lauren.egger@duke.edu.
THE CHAPEl Hill-CARRBORO YMCA is seeking
a self starter to fulfll a maintenance position.
We are looking for someone with the ability
to follow directions and to take the initiative
when maintenance issues arise. The position
will be on a variable schedule with morning
and evening hours based on need. Days will
typically be M-F with occasional weekends, but
availability to respond to situations 24 hours a
day is a plus. $10-$12/hr based on experience.
Experience in light plumbing, carpentry,
vehicle repair, and HvAC systems preferred.
Applications can be found on our website,
www.chcymca.org; or you can apply at the
Chapel Hill branch at 980 MlK Blvd. Send
applications to nchan@chcymca.org or turn in
at the Y. EOE.
EDiTOR WANTED: NC publisher seeks editor.
Develop, edit manuscripts written by self
publishers. Part-time, paid per project.
Responsible individual who can creatively
rewrite, develop manuscripts. PO Box 3581,
Chapel Hill, NC 27515.
THE CAROliNA ClUB. Part-time receptionist:
The ideal candidate possesses a friendly, out-
going personality, positive attitude, strong
focus on customer service, outstanding
communication skills, attention to detail,
the ability to multitask, work independently
and strong computer skills. General hours
will be Tuesday thru Saturday evenings with
occasional Sundays and weekday mornings, in a
professional, upscale setting within the George
Watts Hill Alumni Center on the UNC Campus.
Email cover letter and resume to elizabeth.
cheek@ourclub.com. No phone calls. EOE.
PAiD ACCOUNTiNG iNTERNSHiP: University
Directories is seeking a student for a summer
accounting internship. Candidates must have
numbers or fnance inclination, possess strong
communication skills, be profcient in Excel,
detail oriented, able to work independently.
Apply to Mary: myow@ucampusmedia.com.
ExECUTIVE
ADMINISTRATIVE ASST.
10-15 hrs/wk, small offce in Southern village,
health, education research. Familiarity with
Quickbooks, Quicken, bookkeeping. Must
know spreadsheets, internet research skills,
able to provide friendly online customer service.
Attention to detail, excellent written, spoken
English required. Exp or BA preferred. Apply
online at www.ClinicalTools.com only.
RAlEiGH lAW FiRM seeking graduate to work
minimum 1 year in full-time courier position
beginning in May. Reliable vehicle required.
Email resume to law@jordanprice.com.
SOCCER ASSiSTANT REFEREES needed. We
will train you, provided you have played at
least 2 years. $25-$30 per game. Email Soccer
Experience to ROB@OCASl.ORG.
GYMNASTiCS iNSTRUCTOR: Chapel Hill
Gymnastics has part-time positions avail-
able for energetic, enthusiastic instructors.
Applicants with knowledge of gymnastic
terminology and progression skills preferred,
but will train right candidate. Send a resume
to margie@chapelhillgymnastics.com.
Internships
PAiD iNTERNSHiP: University Directories is
seeking students for client relations summer
internship. Candidates must be energetic, driven
and possess strong communication skills. visit
www.universitydirectories.com for info or apply
to Calin at cnanney@ucampusmedia.com.
Lost & Found
lOST: KEYS. Near UNC hospital. Chevy keys,
key fob, string of colored plastic beads, bottle
opener, Kinetix card. PlEASE email or call:
collini4519@bellsouth.net, 919-260-0490.
Misc. Wanted
ExCEPTiONAl EGG DONOR NEEDED: $15,000
compensation +all expenses paid. Graduate
from university or attending. Outstanding
SAT, ACT and/or GRE scores. Please help.
f.sherman@nccrm.com. 919-233-1680 ext. 121
EGG DONOR
OF KOREAN DESCENT
Help us start a family! $3,000 compensation for
anonymous donation. Please call UNC Fertility
Program 919-908-0000 and refer to this ad.
www.uncfertility.org/become-egg-donor.
Roommates
ROOM FOR RENT: Female looking for a
roommate in 2BR/1BA apartment. Furnished
minus bedroom. Close to campus. $375/mo.
+utilities. usmanova@live.unc.edu.
Sublets
CALDwELL STREET HOUSE
in need of 2 subleters for June thru July 2013.
Duplex style. Walk to campus. Near bus
stop. Full kitchen and laundry room. Parking
space included. $575/mo. +utilities. Contact
lizcrampton18@gmail.com, 503-508-7137.
MILL CREEK APARTMENT
on Martin luther King Jr. Blvd. in need of a
subleter for Fall 2013. Townhouse style.
Walk to campus. Near bus stop. Full kitchen.
WD. Parking space included. Rent: $475/mo.
+utilities. Contact kmreilly@live.unc.edu,
978-609-6247.
SUMMER STAFF: The Duke Faculty Club is
seeking motivated, energetic and dependable
camp counselors, lifeguards and swim coaches
for Summer 2013. Great pay and fantastic
work environment! Go to facultyclub.duke.edu
for details.
SUMMER STAFF: THE ARTSCENTER Carrboro,
seeks staff for ArtsCamp from June thru
August. Hiring 1 full-time manager and 2
part-time assistants. For information visit
www.artscenterlive.org/about-tac/employ-
ment-opportunities.
SUMMER LEASING
SUPERSTAR!
Join our wonderful team at the Evergreens
at Mt. Moriah this summer as a leasing
professional. Must be energetic, able to multi
task, excellent with customer service and sales,
dependable and able to work some weekends.
$10/hr, full-time, with amazing commission
potential. Email your resume to natalie@
evergreensnc.com or call 919-489-8788.
SUMMER DAY CAMP STAFF: Carrboro
Kinderventures and Enrichment Camps.
(director, supervisors, counselors and inclu-
sion specialist). Pay rates: $9.80-$12.80/hr
depending on position. 20-40 hrs/wk depending
on camp, camp session and position.
Experience working with youth and/or
children with special needs, valid drivers
license and FA/CPR cert. preferred. Must have
strong people, organizational and planning
skills. Must be available June 3 thru August 9.
Open until flled. For more info, call 918-7364.
For an application visit our website at
www.townofcarrboro.org. EOE.
Announcements For Rent Help Wanted Announcements
(c) 2013 TRiBUNE MEDiA SERviCES, iNC.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8 -- Go for perfection w/ the
help of friends or family. Youre inspired
& are inspiring. Private conversations
help. Research provides illumination.
Get the facts to the right person.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is an 9 -- Focus on completing old
projects over the next few weeks.
invest in your own success & in new
alliances. Narrowing down to what you
love makes it easy to stick to a budget.
Make money.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is an 8 -- Consider an option that
seems beyond reach. Work for money
without worrying about it. Balance work
w/ social time. Everyone wants your at-
tention; schedule for ease. Your efforts
go farther, & playtimes extra nice.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is an 8 -- Trust yourself & your in-
tuition. Get the work done. The timing
couldnt be better. Make wise use of
your turbo boost, then recharge before
revving back up. Get this party started.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is an 8 -- Get deep into a research
project. indulge your curiosity, and make
a discovery. Put off procrastination.
Discuss all ideas & work out the practical
details in a plan for action.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7 -- You can make do w/ what
you have. Cleaning your space leads to
new discoveries (or rediscoveries), &
to major improvements. Your teams
coming to the rescue. Avoid gossip at
work. Music is a wise investment now.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 9 -- Express your affection, &
listen for others love. Have high stan-
dards, but be fexible. Some things arent
as imagined. Be careful around sharp
objects. A blissful moment is possible.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7 -- Make great plans for the
future & get moving. Theres plenty of
work for the next month. The pace may
get intense. Play an ace youve held onto.
Delegate when you can. Use your team.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8 -- Seek inspiration this
month. Delve into mystery. Talk it over,
& secrets get revealed. launch a new
venture. Negotiations could hit rough
waters w/ unstable conditions. listen
more than you talk, & follow through.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7 -- This month is about family.
Set fnancial priorities to support this.
An expert can help. Something you try
doesnt work. Devise a new plan which
may take several tries. Set up success.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is an 8 -- Youre especially focused
and keen this month, and your studies,
research and writing thrive. Keep your
eyes on the prize. listen carefully. Secrets
are revealed. Unexpected costs are likely
now. The old way can still work.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is an 8 -- A solution isnt far. Get
the word out about what you see. Be
cautious w/ commitments. You could
make a lot of money in the next month.
This prompts action. Compromise works.
HOROSCOPES
To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.
If March 20th is Your Birthday...
The Spring Equinox symbolizes new beginnings.
launch your great endeavor around May 25; an
eclipse shines attention on your work. Communica-
tion is key until summer, when home & family take
focus. Monitor finances, debt, insurance & savings.
Release personal limitations. You can have it all.
BR = Bedroom BA = Bath mo = month hr = hour wk = week W/D = washer/dryer OBO = or best offer AC = air conditioning w/ = with LR = living room

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EXTRAS: Box: $1/day Bold: $3/day
To Place a Line Classified Ad Log onto
www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252
DTH offce is open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
Help Wanted
414305
LOW-COST BIRTH CONTROL
Recruiting healthy local
women aged 18-35 for a
long-acting birth control
study. Women should
want an IUD, have no
plans to move, and be in
a monogamous relationship
for six months or more.
JOIN US TODAY!
CALL: 919-260-4791
EMAIL: M360_Study@UNC.EDU
DEADLINE IS MARCH 22!
The DTH is seeking four students to serve on the 11-
member board that will convene to select the next
editor of the paper.
These students will join the other members in reviewing
the applications for editor, interviewing the applicants,
and choosing the next editor on April 6. Any UNC
student not working on the DTH staff may apply.
Applications are due March 22. Select Editor Selection
from the About menu at dailytarheel.com to access the
application form.
Applicants must be available from 6-7 p.m. Thursday,
April 4 and from 10:00 a.m. to as late as 3:00 p.m.
Saturday, April 6. (Meals are served).
The Daily Tar Heel
Choose the Next
DTH Editor
Announcements
Help Wanted
Child Care Wanted
Summer Jobs
New Hope Camp
& Conference Center
is looking for
SUMMER CAMP
LIFEGUARDS
for our summer program.
Lifeguards needed everyday
from June 3rd-Aug. 9th.
We also offer Lifeguard training.
Check out our website!
newhopeccc.org 919-942-4716
HAVE FUN THIS SUMMER!
SCIENCE CAMP COUNSELORS
Morehead Planetarium & Science Center.
Summer weekday hours, competitive pay. Lead
K-8 students in science experiments, educational
activities and games. Undergrad science or
education majors preferred (but not required).
Training provided. Employment info:
www.moreheadplanetarium.org Interviewing now!
Misc. Wanted


Robert H. Smith, Atty At Law
312 W. Franklin Street 967-2200 chapelhilltrafficlaw.com
FREE
CONSULTATION
Carolina graduate, expert in traffic and
criminal cases for students for over 20 years.
SPEEDING DWI CRIMINAL
* All Immigration Matters *
Brenman Law Firm, PLLC Visas-us.com
Llsu 8renmun NC 8ourd CerLlfled SeclullsL
Work vlsus Creen Curds ClLlzenshl
ReJuceJ Consu/t lee j or 0NC locu/ty 5tuJents
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The Complete Car Care Experts
919-493-2300
5116 S. Hwy 55, Durham, NC
Julia W. Burns, MD
Adult, Child & Adolescent Psychiatrist
109 Conner Dr., Building III, Suite 203
919-428-8461 juliaburnsmd.com
Tar Heel Born & Bred!
CLOSE TO CAMPUS at CARRBORO PLAZA ~ 919.918.7161
PASSPORT PHOTOSMOVING SUPPLIES
COLOR/BW PRINTING, NOTARY PUBLIC,
LAMINATING, BINDING, MAILBOX SERVICES, FAX,
STAMPS, PACKAGING, INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING !
T IME T O G O T AXI
chapelhilltaxiservice.com 919-407-9747
STUDENT & SENIOR
DISCOUNTS!
Closest Chiropractor to Campus!
Voted BEST in the Triangle by Readers of the Independent!
Keeping UNC Athletes, Students & Staff Well Adjusted www.ncchiropractic.net
Dr. Chas Gaertner, DC
NC Chiropractic
212 W. Rosemary St.
929-3552
UNC Community
SERVICE DIRECTORY
PACK IT! SHIP IT!
Up to 30% OFF Boxes 15% OFF Shipping w/Student ID
UPS FedEx DHL Postal Services
1202 Raleigh Rd. (Glenwood Square) 968-1181
WE RECYCLE
STYROFOAM
PEANUTS!
GRE, GMAT, LSAT, SAT Prep Courses
In partnership with select programs of UNC, Duke, Campbell, and
FSU, PrepSuccess has helped thousands of students prepare for
entrance exams. Early Bird rates are only $420 to $504 for 30 -
42 hour courses. GRE PREP begins May 4th at UNC-CH.
Attend classes in person or Live Online. To visit a class or to
learn more, go to prepsuccess.com or call 919-791-0810.
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News Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 9
Mama C takes UNC
Charlotte ONeal, who
has lived in Tanzania, per-
forms today at UNC. See
pg. 3 for story.
New library director
The next director of the
Chapel Hill Library said
shes thrilled to come back
to town. See pg. 7 for story.
Senior class fundraiser
The senior campaign
already has 17 percent par-
ticipation, better than last
year. See pg. 3 for story.
In Thursdays paper
A report on the use of
drones in N.C. sheriff s
departments, and a pro-
posed law to curb it.
games
Solution to
Tuesdays puzzle
Complete the grid
so each row, column
and 3-by-3 box (in
bold borders) contains
every digit 1 to 9.
2013 The Mepham Group. All rights reserved.
Level: 1 2 3 4
(C)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved. Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACross
1 Beavers projects
5 Eat on the run, as a
sandwich
9 Dainty drinks
13 Thick-furred dog
15 Opera that premiered in
Cairo in 1871
16 Make ribbing with
needles
17 Ski lodge mugful
18 Febreze target
19 Wine bucket, e.g.
20 Shot from the side
23 Bygone full-size Ford
24 Federal air marshals
org.
25 __ Nashville: country
music label
26 Cosmetics mogul Mary
Kay
29 Physics particles
32 Celeb with all the
answers
34 End of Alis memorable
boast
37 Green Hornets driver
38 Habit wearer
39 Sack lead-in
42 Diners cell app
47 Like cheerleaders
49 __ majesty: high
treason
50 Scheming
51 Legal ending
52 Lambs pop
54 Billys bleat
56 Makeshift radio
antenna
62 Valentines Day deity
63 Modelland author
Banks
64 Scrabbles blank pair
66 Respond to hilarity
67 A likely story
68 Bridge bid, briefly
69 Netflix rentals
70 So-so grades
71 Agts. who might use the
starts of 20-, 34-, 42-
and 56-Across
Down
1 Gallantry-in-combat
mil. award
2 Per
3 Very small: Pref.
4 Island seating
5 Brits joint
6 Hitchhikers hope
7 Get a pound pooch, say
8 Coffeehouse specialist
9 Satirical miniature
10 Officeholders
11 Fillmores successor
12 Bolt in the buff
14 Full-figured
21 Superstar search show,
to fans
22 Atkins no-no
26 Pose
27 RR stop
28 Get lost
30 Simone of jazz
31 Hard head?
33 __ mouse!
35 Bleak film genre
36 Suffix with differ or
defer
40 Pioneering ISP
41 Meddle
43 Jardin du Luxembourg,
par exemple
44 Utterly confused
45 West Point inits.
46 Primitive shelter
47 Wanted poster offer
48 Foundation author
53 It could happen
55 Gerontologists concern
57 Gets the wrong total, say
58 Branch locale
59 Small business owners
figurative array
60 Ne or Na
61 Artist Magritte
65 George W., to George
H.W.
mct/maurizio BramBatti
Pope Francis waves to the crowd from the Popemobile dur-
ing his inauguration mass at St. Peters Square on Tuesday at the
Vatican. Many world leaders flew in for the inauguration.
On the wire: national and world news
Francis formally steps
into role as pope
VATICAN CITY (MCT)
Before crowned heads, gov-
ernment leaders and masses
of the faithful, Pope Francis
formally took office Tuesday
as head of the Roman Catholic
Church in a ceremony replete
with pageantry and symbols
from ancient Christendom.
Organizers expected hun-
dreds of thousands of people
to crowd into Vatican City
and the surrounding streets
for the ceremony.
Let us never forget that
authentic power is service
and that the pope, too, when
exercising power, must enter
ever more fully into that
service which has its radiant
culmination on the cross, the
bespectacled pontiff said, his
voice ringing through loud-
speakers set up in the square.
Marines killed in Nevada
training explosion
LOS ANGELES (MCT)
Seven Marines were killed
during a training exercise at
a U.S. Army depot in western
Nevada, Marine Corps offi-
cials said Tuesday.
The explosion shortly
before 10 p.m. Monday at
Hawthorne Army Depot also
injured several others from the
2nd Marine Division at Camp
Lejeune, N.C., according to
a statement released to the
Los Angeles Times by Marine
Capt. Binford R. Strickland.
At least eight injured were
in Renown Medical Center in
Reno, Nev., where they were
listed in conditions from seri-
ous to fair, a spokeswoman
told the Times.
The cause of the incident
was still under investigation,
according to the statement.
Fugitive warlord in
Congo turns himself in
JOHANNESBURG
(MCT) In his seven years
on the run from international
justice, Congolese warlord
Bosco Ntaganda became a
symbol of the International
Criminal Courts impotence.
Now the court, which lacks
a police force to arrest those
it has indicted, will have an
unexpected opportunity to
demonstrate its relevance in
Ntagandas case.
The warlord who launched
last years rebellion in Eastern
Congo, shocked everyone
when he walked into the U.S.
Embassy in the Rwandan
capital of Kigali on Monday
and asked to be handed over
to the ICC to stand trial.
Nicknamed The
Terminator because of his
reputation for ruthless blood-
letting, and indicted for war
crimes including killings,
rapes, attacks on civilians,
sexual slavery and recruitment
of child soldiers, Ntaganda had
nevertheless been frequently
spotted around Goma, the larg-
est city in eastern Democratic
Republic of Congo.
Hunger strikes growing
in Guantanamo Bay
GUANTANAMO BAY
NAVY BASE, Cuba (MCT)
Navy medical staff were
treating two captives suffering
dehydration in the prison camp
hospital at Guantanamo as the
military disclosed Tuesday that
the number of hunger strikers
had risen to 24.
The military said in a state-
ment that eight of the 166
war-on-terror captives had
missed enough meals and lost
enough body weight to be fed
nutritional supplements by
tubes snaked up their noses
and into their stomachs.
Guards shackle detainees into
restraint chairs to carry out
the twice daily feedings.
The detainees claim
through their lawyers that
the hunger strike seeks to
end prison camp searches of
their personal copies of the
Quran, which the prisoners
argue has amounted to des-
ecration. They claim that the
hunger strike has been under
way since early February with
detainees drinking water or
honey water for sustenance.
The prison camps spokes-
man, Navy Capt. Robert
Durand, denies that the staff
has done anything but follow
their years-old Quran-handling
procedures, which permit
Muslim linguists in the camps
to search the books at the dis-
cretion of military command-
ers. Guards dont touch the
Qurans, and the linguists treat
the books with respect, he said.
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Are you sad or blue?
Do you have less energy and feel tired all the time?
Do you enjoy things less than you used to?
Do you have trouble sleeping
or are you sleeping too much?
Opinion Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 10
EDITorIal BoarD mEmBErs
Established 1893, 120 years of editorial freedom
QUOTE OF THE DAY
FEATUrED OnlinE rEADEr cOMMEnT
Animal research seeks
humane treatment
TO THE EDITOR:
I cant speak for every
scientist or UNC employee
who works with animals,
but what Carolina
Promoting Animal Welfare
president Matt Leming
(a sophomore computer
science and Russian
major) doesnt seem to
acknowledge in his column,
Silence on vivisection,
is that animal research is
discussed very often among
those of us who actually do
it, and those close to the
research.
Debates over the most
humane way to sacrifice
an animal are a common
topic of debate for myself
and another scientist,
for example. And when
possible, we use alternative
models such as cell culture
in order to avoid working
with animals.
But animal research is
the only way to study many
diseases effectively. And I
doubt anyone would want
a doctor performing a sur-
gery on humans who had
never performed the pro-
cedure prior, or to attempt
new techniques on humans.
When we design experi-
ments, questions we ask
include, What can we
learn? What benefit could
we achieve for humans and
the animals in our care?
How can we minimize the
number of animals to be
sacrificed, and what is the
most humane way we can
sacrifice them?
These active discussions
take place every grant
writing season, and any
scientist who doesnt give
it thorough thought is
unlikely to receive funding
to conduct his or her
research.
Even if they do receive
funding, they are likely
to make improvements
on the proposal prior to
implementing.
Just because these
conversations are not
taking place over lunch at
Lenoir doesnt mean that
they arent happening on
campus.
Scott Neidich
Graduate student
Gillings School of Global
Public Health
Paying teachers more
will make a real impact
TO THE EDITOR:
As Mondays article on
K-12 funding suggests, a
well-funded public educa-
tion system is important to
create a productive and suc-
cessful state.
North Carolina may not
spend the most per pupil in
K-12 education, but simply
throwing more money into
education will not create
results. The state legisla-
ture must devote financial
resources to policies proven
to boost student achieve-
ment.
Research shows teachers
are the single most impor-
tant in-school factor in stu-
dent achievement.
North Carolina ranks
lETTErS TO
THE EDiTOr
The reason animal testing isnt discussed
as often as you would like is because most
people recognize it as a necessary evil.
eyfjc, in response to a column on animal research ethics
But if you start thinking about playing
Kansas in Kansas City, you forget about the
biggest duty, and thats to win a game
Roy Williams, on the Tar Heels possible second round matchup
EDiTOriAl cArTOOn By Matt Leming, UNC Comics, facebook.com/unccomics
A spring
break by
any other
name
I
ts 9 p.m. on a weekday,
youre on spring break,
and youre in a country
where the drinking age is
being able to look the bar-
tender in the eyes without
flinching.
Naturally, you head to the
bar where your friends have
been for more than half an
hour, sipping fish bowls and
wondering where the heck you
were.
You kick back, take a couple
down and forget about life,
stress and your grade point
average for two to seven
hours.
Then you saunter tipsily
back to a seedy hostel and use
your barely-passable-on-a-
good-day language skills to
convince the groundskeeper
he should totally let you in
even though its past mid-
night and you smell like coco
locos.
After some fraction of a
good drunken nights rest, you
heave yourself out of bed, stuff
your face with coffee and pas-
tries and run down to the local
orphanage.
There you play soccer, tear
down cultural barriers and
play a formative role in young,
orphaned childrens lives.
This is followed by coming
back, eating, napping, eating
and starting all over again.
Although this time you might
want to take it easy on the
cocktails.
Sound like a pretty intense
spring break? I ll say.
But heres whats weird.
Suppose youre going as a part
of some organization, and
weeks or months beforehand
you thought youd maybe
learn a little about this dis-
tinct culture you wanted to
make a positive, enduring
impact on.
With that and just one
of those mornings of playing
games with local kids or paint-
ing houses all of a sudden
youve got yourself whats come
to be known as an alternative
spring break trip.
Alternative to what? Well,
everything else I suppose:
working, visiting friends,
getting nine kinds of crazy
with hundreds of people on a
beach, etc. all of which are
respectable options.
But why is it a different
category altogether when
you actually want to interact
productively with a commu-
nity other than your own on
spring break? Shouldnt that
be a default or at least the
ideal?
Spring break is just that
a break but its also an
opportunity to step out of
sheltered university life for a
few days and make some new
connections with the world
outside of our socioeconomic
peer group.
That can mean getting free
shots from the guy who cleans
the hostel toilets or just shar-
ing a dance and an awkward
conversation with a mysterious
foreign lady, but its better if it
doesnt end there.
Learn a few more things
about the real world; be open-
minded.
And who knows, maybe
some of us will get a better
idea of what we actually want
to do with our lives when were
finally out there for good.
But if nothing else, we
should at least be sure to pick
up after ourselves. Tipping
well is good, too.
3/21: COLLEGIATE WRITING
Sarah Bufkin discusses howthe
craft of writing has diminished.
N
E
X
T
Michael Dickson
Cries from the Peanut Gallery
Junior English and journalism major
from Raleigh.
Email: miked3592@gmail.com
SPEAK OUT
Writing guidelines
Please type: Handwritten letters will not be accepted.
Sign and date: No more than two people should sign letters.
Students: Include your year, major and phone number.
Faculty/staff: Include your department and phone number.
Edit: The DTH edits for space, clarity, accuracy and vulgarity. Limit
letters to 250 words.
suBMissiOn
Drop-off or mail to our office at 151 E. Rosemary Street, Chapel
Hill, N.C. 27514
E-mail: opinion@dailytarheel.com
editOrs nOte: Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily
represent the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel or its staff. Editorials reflect
the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel editorial board, which is made up of
eight board members, the opinion editor and the editor.
46th in teacher pay, with
starting salaries for teach-
ers with a four-year degree
being $30,800 before taxes.
Long-term dedication
to teaching isnt rewarded
either, as it takes 15 years of
teaching to break even the
$40,000 mark.
This is where North
Carolina must step up to
recruit stronger and more
talented individuals into
the teaching profession.
We will have more luck
attracting bright, talented
individuals to the classroom
by paying them a salary
that wont scare them away.
Raising the starting
salary for teachers in North
Carolina will raise the
prestige of the teaching
profession. Setting North
Carolina apart will attract
the best talent to our states
schools.
But reform shouldnt
stop there; we must
also devote resources to
retaining and rewarding
high-quality teachers to
ensure the future excellence
of North Carolinas public
schools.
Patrick Mateer 15
Mathematics, economics
County could benefit
from more sidewalks
TO THE EDITOR:
As I read about the
Orange County capital
projects that include a
jail and more emergency
services, I get sad about
their focus.
I wish N.C. took the
infrastructure seriously
with regard to a healthy
lifestyle and opportunities
to ride, walk or safely move
across town on foot, bike or
skateboard.
Sure, you can live in a
small area and get around
somewhat easily (Carrboro
or downtown Chapel Hill)
but to really get around
without a car, you are tak-
ing your life in your own
hands. Some do it, but its
not without anger from
drivers or extreme personal
peril.
Unfortunately, were eat-
ing, sitting and driving like
its 2013.
Parts of the county and
private groups for health
and safety in N.C. try to
address this, but its not a
cultural belief, and so N.C.
enjoys being a top-20 state
for obesity.
Its hard to be healthy
when youre seriously
damaged (or worse) from
being hit by a car.
A healthy lifestyle has
to be integrated into the
process of a community.
Yes, there are paths and
gyms and places to walk,
bike or run safely, after we
park our car which we had
to take to get to the path,
pool or gym.
I hope the commissioners
and others will consider the
larger implications of other
beneficial infrastructure like
paths, shoulders and side-
walks as this area grows and
changes.
We live in a beautiful
state. I hope someday more
people will get outside and
enjoy it.
Lisa Brown
Chapel Hill, N.C.
T
his editorial board
has said it over and
over again. It is
time Chapel Hill repeals
the ordinance banning
more than four unrelated
people from residing in
the same house.
The Land Use
Management Ordinance,
which restricts the number
of occupants, is unrealistic
and in need of a revision.
The ordinance unfairly
burdens landlords and
students alike from pursu-
Repeal resident cap
EDiTOriAl
ing reasonable housing
options without fear of
legal repercussion.
Having more than four
students residing in hous-
es allows students to pay
affordable rent and land-
lords to receive fair value
for their property.
Affordable student
housing can be hard to
come by, and limiting
the number of unrelated
occupants pushes students
farther away.
Landlords are often
willing to skirt the ordi-
nance by signing only four
names to a lease and put-
ting students in danger.
Town residents must
recognize that Chapel Hill
is first and foremost a col-
lege town. But thats not to
say students have the right
to be disruptive.
Pegging the number of
unrelated residents in a
house to the number of
bedrooms seems like a
fair compromise for the
town to settle disputes
between family and stu-
dent neighbors.
It is not reasonable to
expect students to have
only four occupants in
an eight bedroom house.
There simply are not
enough four bedroom
homes available around
the campus.
The towns limit on
residents is unfair
and unrealistic.
A
s the U.S.
Department
of Educations
Office for Civil Rights
investigates UNCs
handling of sexual assault,
it should continue its
history of working with
schools to fix problems
and improve policy rather
than simply issuing a
punishment that would
hurt the University.
While it is within the
offices power to decrease
federal funding to certain
Focus on the xing
EDiTOriAl
universities, this isnt the
way to solve problems
with sexual assault policy.
A cut or complete
withdrawal of funds would
punish UNC without
solving anything.
Moreover, federal
funding cuts could hurt
those who had little
to do with forming or
implementing the sexual
assault policy. Cutting
financial aid or housing
funding doesnt seem to
solve a thing.
Punishments as the
default course of action
encourage universities to
rush to comply with laws
simply to avoid losing fund-
ing, rather than getting to
the root of the issues.
When complaints are
filed and universities are
found to violate laws,
working to solve the prob-
lem rather than immedi-
ately issuing punishments
is vital.
In the past the office has
worked with university
officials to precisely
identify and resolve
problems with how Title
IX violations are handled.
Taking this route with
UNC will ensure that the
problems with the cur-
rent policy are thoroughly
resolved to prevent future
injustice and violence.
Title IX complaints
wont be solved by
punishment.
cOlUMn
T
he pro-Israel
community at UNC
is committed to
open dialogue around the
Israeli-Palestinian conflict
and together creating a
space where all students feel
respected. We are saddened
and frustrated when the
campus community turns to
one-sided finger pointing.
Israeli Apartheid Week,
put on by UNC Students for
Justice in Palestine, directly
challenges those interested in
peace by blaming Israel alone
for the conflict and incorrectly
labeling Israel as an apartheid
state. This week, organized
nationally on college cam-
puses, often creates silence
between pro-Israel and pro-
Palestine groups; at worst, it
creates hostile environments.
Our organizations have
different perspectives. Hillel
inspires students to build a
personal relationship with
Israel and is broadly commit-
ted to supporting Israel as a
Jewish and democratic state
with secure and recognized
borders. J Street UNC feels
that to address disparities
in rights of Palestinians and
Israelis in the West Bank
israel Abitbol, Kira Borman,
Josh Orol
Heels for Israel campus liaison, Hil-
lel co-president, J Street UNC board
Email: abitbol@email.unc.edu,
kborman@email.unc.edu, orol@
live.unc.edu
requires acknowledging what
J Street understands to be a
military occupation but not
apartheid. Heels for Israel is
committed to resolving the
conflict through direct nego-
tiations without third-party
involvement, leading to a
two-state solution that assures
the Jewish State of Israels
national security.
Even with these differ-
ences, we agree that Israel
proper is not an apartheid
(racially separated) state.
There are Palestinians serv-
ing in the Israeli Parliament
and Supreme Court, and the
declaration of independence
affirms equality for all.
SJP seeks to raise aware-
ness of the problems facing
Palestinians. However, call-
ing Israel an apartheid state
focuses solely on Israels
faults, ignoring the intersec-
tion of the rights and national
aspirations of both peoples.
We do not want to shy
away from the truths and sad-
ness on both sides. Rather, we
should create a space where
pro-Israel and pro-Palestine
groups can work together. We
should listen to both the trag-
edy in the West Bank and the
fears of Israeli citizens living
with security concerns.
We call on all students
to share in educating our
campus about what it takes
to achieve peace, bringing in
speakers with a range of views
and following varying news
sources. It also means under-
standing the regions history
and the sensitivities that shut
down conversation rather
than encourage it.
We desire peace and want
to see a bilaterally agreed
upon two-state solution
resulting in a Palestinian state
alongside Israel. We call upon
students to come together
to discuss steps we can take
toward justice and peace.
Inaccurate apartheid rhetoric inflames and divides.
Elevating Israel dialogue
anDy Thomason EDITOR, 962-4086 OR EDITOR@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
ChElsEa PhIPPs OPINION CO-EDITOR, OPINION@DAILYTARHEEL.COM
naThan DamBrosIo OPINION CO-EDITOR
sanEm kaBaCa ASSISTANT OPINION EDITOR
NAYAb kHAN
TREY MANgUM
zACH gAvER
MATTHEw OAkES
kAREEM RAMADAN
PATRICk RYAN
CODY wELTON
SIERRA wINgATE-bEY
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 11
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Central Air
Washer/Dryer
High Speed Internet
Cable TV
All for $860 per month
593.5100
612 Hillsborough Street Chapel Hill, NC
414489.CRTR
919.489.8788
5512 Sunlight Drive, Durham, NC 27707
www.evergreensnc.com
Wireless Internet Access
2 Gated Dog Parks
Only 5 Miles to UNC
Bus route access
Walk to Shopping and Dining
Monthly Socials and Events
24-hr Fitness & Business Center
Large Patios with Scenic Views
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*w
ith a 12 m
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Apply by M
ay 1st
Duke
UNC
Enjoy Life Enjoy Life Enjoy Life
CRTR
dthousing
Where UNC
likes to live.
guide
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 14
919-942-7806
500 Umstead Drive
Chapel Hill, NC 27516
www.bolinwoodcondos.com
2BR, 923 sq feet: $685
3BR 1212 sq feet: $800
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Private Balconies
Energy-Efficient Laundry
Facility
Onsite Pool
Basketball Court
N-Line Bus Stop
24 Hour Emergency Service
When the time comes to ditch the dorm or move in
with friends, check out the really cool houses at:
Call us now to find out about
your next house: 919-605-4810
We make finding your new place easy Visit our
website where you can see photos of our houses,
floor plans, map locations and much more!
Complete information on our houses
is on-line. We only rent clean, well
maintained homes. Call us soon to
get a chance at yours.
4 bedrooms, 2 baths
$2,040/mo., August 2013
Carrboro
www.CoolBlueRentals.com
414320.CRTR
Notting Hill
100 Drew Hill Lane, Chapel Hill 27514
1 B EDROOM /1 B ATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 730-896 SF
2 B EDROOM /2 B ATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,121-1,188 SF
2 B EDROOM /2 B ATH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,333 SF
Email: nottinghill@bellpartnersinc.com
Toll Free 1-866-837-2752 | Fax 919-928-8007
Pet friendly
Laundry Facility/ Connections
Lease: Flexible
Chapel Hills finest luxury community is just
minutes from Duke University, UNC and RTP
Located in Raskis, Guy Phillips and East
Chapel Hill school districts
24-hour fitness
Business center with conference tables
Busline for Chapel Hill
Corporate units available From 1-40, exit #270. Travel South on US 15-501 toward Chapel Hill. Go approx. 3/4 mile
to right on Sage Road. Take first right on Old Sterling Dr. Notting Hill is 1/4 mile on left.

Notting Hill
A PA R T ME N T H O ME S
414432.CRTR
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 15
S TRATFORD H ILLS
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919-929-3015 www.stratfordhillsapartments.com
700 Bolinwood Drive Chapel Hill, NC 27514
Just 1/2 mile from UNC!
Offering 1, 2
& 3 bedroom
apartments
in a convenient
& quiet location.
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5 Hamilton Road
Chapel Hill, NC 27517-4029
Phone: 919.967.7081
www.glenlennoxapartments.com
EQUAL HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
OUR REPUTATION FOR OUR REPUTATION FOR
EXCELLENCE IS STERLING EXCELLENCE IS STERLING
www.glenlennoxapartments.com www.glenlennoxapartments.com
Bring in this coupon and receive
$150 OFF the lease reservation fee!
Good for new rentals only.
One coupon per rental.
Expires 6/30/13
Now accepting wait list applications
for the 2013-2014 school year.
Wednesday, March 20, 2013 The Daily Tar Heel 16
THINK YOU KNOW
GRANVILLE TOWERS?
It's a new day at Granville Towers. We recently renovated
our rooms and added new amenities that improve student
life. Granville Towers residents enjoy traditional double or
multiple single room options, flexible meal plans, parking
pass availability, and amenities you won't find elsewhere.
TRANSFORMING STUDENT HOUSING
THINK AGAIN!
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL 2013
125 W. FRANKLIN ST.tDOWNTOWN CHAPEL HILL
(800)332-3113t888(3"/7*--&508&34$0.t