National Training for

Funding Education
Beyond High School

Counselors and Mentors:

Participant Guide

Fall 2007

Federal

Federal

Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”

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Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”

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Sneak Preview
• This is a sneak preview of the Federal Student Aid Public Service Announcement (PSA) • “My Story” campaign launches nationally January 2008 • Federal Student Aid is very excited about it • The campaign is designed to reach students across America by telling the stories of real students in a very real way
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Participant Guide

Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”
Background
• Federal Student Aid tested the “My Story” campaign by showing it to students and parents from low-income households • Feedback was very positive • Students especially liked that the stories were real and that the messages communicated were barriers they face everyday • Overall, the messages resonated loudly and clearly
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Where You Will See “My Story”
• The same students and parents also provided great suggestions about how to get the campaign out there in ways that will make it accessible to students and their parents • This will include posting the videos on MySpace, YouTube, and also using more traditional media such as television, radio, cinema ads, and bus cards
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“My Story” Campaign Goals
• Increase awareness of programs administered by Federal Student Aid • Promote equal access to the tools and materials that help them make informed decisions about financing post-secondary education

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Participant Guide

Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”
Where You Fit In
• Need the help of counselors and mentors to make this campaign work • Later we’ll discuss ways to get the word out and get students excited about “My Story” • You can help Federal Student Aid find future “My Story” stars

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Questions

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What’s Next?
• Now that the word is out about federal financial aid, prepare to counsel students • NT4CM workshop provides:
– Information – Tools – Resources
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Participant Guide

Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”
Workshop Agenda
• Overview of financial aid • How to apply for federal financial aid
– FAFSA4caster – FAFSA on the Web (FOTW) Worksheet

• Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
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Workshop Agenda
• Searching for scholarships • State and institutional aid • Available resources

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Participant Guide
• Relevant handouts for each topic • Copies of PowerPoint presentations • Useful resources
– Additional resources available at www.fsa4counselors.ed.gov

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Participant Guide

Section I Introduction – Federal Student Aid PSA “My Story”

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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs

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Section II Overview of Financial Aid Programs

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Financial Aid
Money from a source other than the family to assist with the cost of attending college

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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs
Financial Need
Cost of Attendance – Expected Family Contribution (EFC) = Financial Need

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Cost of Attendance
• Direct costs • Indirect costs • COA varies significantly from college to college

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Expected Family Contribution (EFC)
• Amount family can reasonably be expected to contribute • Stays the same regardless of college • Two components
– Parent contribution – Student contribution

• Calculated using FAFSA data and a formula specified in law
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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs
Categories of Aid
• Need-based aid

• Non need-based aid

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Types of Aid
• Grants • Scholarships • Loans • Employment
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Sources of Aid
• Federal government • States • Colleges • Private sources
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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs
Title IV Aid Programs
• Federal Pell Grant • Campus-Based Programs
– Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG) – Federal Work-Study – Federal Perkins Loan

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Title IV Aid Programs
• Federal Family Education Loan Program (FFELP) • William D. Ford Direct Student Loan Program (DL)

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Title IV Aid Programs
• Leveraging Educational Assistance Program (LEAP) • Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) • National Science and Mathematics to Retain Talent (SMART) Grant
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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs
Other Federal Aid Programs
• Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program • Corporation for National and Community Service • U.S. Department for Veteran Affairs • Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC)
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Other Federal Aid Programs
• Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Grants • Vocational rehabilitation benefits • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS)

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Other Sources of Aid
• Institutional or private tuition plans • Other family resources • Home equity loans • Private/alternative loans • Tuition savings plans (529 plans) • Employer sponsored tuition plans
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Participant Guide

Section II
Overview of Financial Aid Programs

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Participant Guide

What Do You Know About Federal Student Aid?
1) The Federal Government provides roughly ____________ annually in financial aid programs for higher education. a. $900,000,000 b. $9,000,000,000 c. $90,000,000,000 2) The “foundation” of federal financial aid programs is the ________ Grant. a. Byrd b. Pell c. Kennedy 3) EFC stands for ________________________. a. expected family contribution b. estimated family compliance c. exceptional family cooperation 4) Campus based aid includes these three programs. a. Perkins Loans, NCLB, FFEL loans b. Federal work study, state work study, direct loans c. Federal work study, Perkins Loans, SEOG 5) In 2006 the Federal Government (taxpayers) guaranteed almost _______________ in student loans. a. $1,200,000,000,000 b. $120,000,000,000 c. $12,000,000,000 6) Federal student aid may be used to pay for these college living expenses. a. Apartment rent, utilities, car purchase b. Food, new stereo, transportation c. Apartment rent, food, transportation 7) A student must usually be enrolled ______________ to quality for federal financial aid. a. at least half-time b. on a full-time basis c. in at least one non-credit course 8) Who has the power of “professional judgment?” a. The Secretary of Education b. A financial aid officer c. A college president

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Handout

9) No student may receive more financial aid than ___________________. a. the total cost of tuition b. the total cost of tuition and fees c. the total cost of education 10) You may attend __________________ to be eligible for federal financial aid. a. a vocational or career school b. a community college c. a four-year college d. a graduate school e. all of the above

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Handout

What Do You Know About Federal Student Aid? Answers
1) The Federal Government provides roughly ____________ annually in financial aid programs for higher education. The correct answer is c, $90,000,000,000. 2) The “foundation” of federal financial aid programs is the ________ Grant. The correct answer is b, Pell. 3) EFC stands for ________________________. The correct answer is a, expected family contribution. 4) Campus based aid includes these three programs. The correct answer is c, Federal work study, Perkins Loans, SEOG. 5) In 2006 the Federal Government (taxpayers) guaranteed almost _______________ in student loans. The correct answer is b, $120,000,000,000. 6) Federal student aid may be used to pay for these college living expenses. The correct answer is c, apartment rent, food, transportation. 7) A student must usually be enrolled ______________ to quality for federal financial aid. The correct answer is a, at least half-time. 8) Who has the power of “professional judgment?” The correct answer is b, a financial aid officer. 9) No student may receive more financial aid than ___________________. The correct answer is c, the total cost of education. 10) You may attend __________________ to be eligible for federal financial aid. The correct answer is e, all of the above.

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Handout

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Handout

Title IV Programs
• • • • Federal Pell Grant Program The Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) Program The National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grant Program Campus-Based Programs Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program Federal Perkins Loan Program • Federal Family Education Loan (FFEL) Program Federal Stafford Loans Federal Unsubsidized Stafford Loans Federal PLUS Federal Consolidation Loans • Federal Direct Student Loan (Direct Loan) Program Direct Stafford Loans Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans Direct PLUS Direct Consolidation Loans • Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Program Includes the Special Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (SLEAP) Program

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Handout

Title IV Programs: Summary Information
The Title IV programs are authorized by the Higher Education Act of 1965 (HEA), as amended, and are administered by Federal Student Aid (FSA)—an office within the U.S. Department of Education (ED). Program
Federal Pell Grant Program

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Description
• Grant program • Serves as “foundation” of financial aid package • Portable

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Meet Title IV general student eligibility criteria • Undergraduate students (with no baccalaureate or first professional degree), including less-thanhalf-time students Exception: Students enrolled at least half time in post-baccalaureate program at school that does not offer baccalaureate in education, to obtain state teacher certification or licensing credential required for employment as elementary or secondary school teacher • Not incarcerated in a federal or state penal institution • Demonstrate need

Award Amounts
• 2007-08 annual minimum: $400 • 2007-08 annual maximum: $4,310 • Award amount based on student’s: Cost of attendance (COA) Expected family contribution (EFC) Enrollment status • No aggregate limit

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Academic Competitiveness Grant (ACG) Program

Description
Grant assistance to eligible students during the first and/or second academic year of study in an eligible undergraduate program

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• U.S. citizen • Enrolled full time in a degree program at a 2-year or 4-year degree-granting school • Eligible for a Federal Pell Grant • Must have attended a rigorous secondary school program • Must have completed high school after 1/1/06 and cannot have been previously enrolled in an undergraduate program to be eligible as a first year undergraduate • Must have completed high school after 1/1/05 to be eligible as a second year undergraduate • Must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 at end of the first academic year of undergraduate study • U.S. citizen • Enrolled full time in 4-year degree program • Eligible for a Federal Pell Grant • Must be pursuing an eligible major in the physical, life, or computer sciences; mathematics; technology; engineering; or a foreign language critical to the national security • Must maintain at least 3.0 in the academic discipline selected

Award Amounts
• $750 for a first year undergraduate • $1,300 for a second year undergraduate

National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent (SMART) Grant

Grant assistance to eligible students during the third and/or fourth academic year(s) of study in an eligible undergraduate program

• $4,000 per academic year

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) Program

Description
• Campus-based grant program • ED allocates federal funds to schools • Schools provide matching nonfederal funds • Schools award funds to students • Campus-based employment program • ED allocates federal funds to schools • Schools provide matching nonfederal funds • Schools award funds to students and approve jobs

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Meet Title IV general student eligibility criteria • Undergraduate students (with no baccalaureate or first professional degree) • No minimum enrollment required; less-than-halftime students eligible • Priority given to students with exceptional financial need (i.e., lowest EFCs) • Priority given to Federal Pell Grant recipients

Award Amounts
• $100 minimum annual award (may be prorated for less than full-year attendance) • $4,000 maximum annual award • $4,400 expanded maximum annual award for students in study abroad programs • No aggregate limit

Federal Work-Study (FWS) Program

• Meet Title IV general student eligibility criteria • No minimum enrollment required; less-than-halftime students eligible • Undergraduate, graduate, or professional students • Exception to regular student criterion: Students enrolled at least half time in teacher certification program when the certificate is from a state rather than the school and is required for employment as an elementary or secondary school teacher in that state

• Set by school based on such factors as funding availability, number of eligible students, reasonable work expectations, etc.

Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal Perkins Loan Program

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Description
• Campus-based long-term, lowinterest loan program • ED allocates federal funds to schools • Schools provide matching nonfederal funds • Schools award funds to students

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Meet Title IV general student eligibility criteria • No minimum enrollment required; lessthan-half-time students eligible • Undergraduate, graduate, or professional students • Exception to regular student criterion: Students enrolled at least half time in teacher certification program when a state awards the certificate (rather than the school) required for employment as an elementary or secondary school teacher in that state • Priority to students with school-defined exceptional financial need • Willingness to repay • Driver’s license number (if any) • Determination of Federal Pell Grant eligibility (for undergraduates) • Not incarcerated • Not in medical internship or residency unless part of program • Additional requirements if prior Title IV loan discharged due to total and permanent disability

Award Amounts
• $4,000/year: undergraduate • $6,000/year: graduate or professional student • $8,000 aggregate: not completed 2 years of undergraduate study • $20,000 aggregate: successfully completed at least 2 years of baccalaureate program • $40,000 aggregate: graduate or professional student (includes undergraduate amounts) • Study abroad: May exceed annual and aggregate limits by 20% if there are reasonable excess costs

Interest Rates and Loan Fees
• 5% interest rate • No loan fees

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal Stafford Loan and Direct Stafford Loan Programs

Description
• Long-term, lowinterest loans • Interest subsidy for subsidized loans • FFEL funds from lenders • Direct Loan funds from federal government

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Meet Title IV general student eligibility criteria • Undergraduate, graduate, or professional students • At least half-time enrollment • Exception to regular student requirement for: Teacher certification when the certificate is from a state rather than the school and is required for employment as an elementary or secondary school teacher in that state Single 12-month period during which the student is taking coursework the school determines is necessary to enroll in degree or certificate program (preparatory coursework) • Determination of Federal Pell Grant eligibility for undergraduates • Not incarcerated • Not in medical internship or residency unless part of program • Additional requirements if prior Title IV loan discharged due to total and permanent disability

Award Amounts
Base annual limits: • $2,625/year: preparatory coursework for admission into an undergraduate program • $3,500/year: 1st-year undergraduate1, 2 • $4,500/year: 2nd-year undergraduate1, 2 • $5,500 each remaining year undergraduate1, 2 • $5,500/year: teacher certification programs or preparatory coursework for admission into a graduate or professional program • $8,500/year: graduate/professional1 Additional unsubsidized annual loan limits3,4: • $4,000/year: 1st or 2ndyear undergraduate2 or preparatory coursework for admission into an undergraduate program • $5,000 each remaining year undergraduate2

Interest Rates and Loan Fees
Interest rate:

• Fixed • 6.8% FFEL fees: • Default fee of 1% of principal and origination fee of up to 1.5% • Lender may charge reduced origination fee on loans to all student borrowers • Lender may also charge lower fee for student borrowers who meet certain regulatory criteria than for other borrowers • Reduction of origination fee must be applied to both subsidized and unsubsidized loans • Lender may pay default fee on behalf of borrower

________________________
1 2

Combined subsidized and unsubsidized amounts Prorated for programs or remaining periods of enrollment less than 1 academic year 3 Independent students and dependent students whose parents are unable to borrow PLUS 4 Certain health profession students subject to higher additional unsubsidized loan limits

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal Stafford Loan and Direct Stafford Loan Programs (continued)

Description

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Subsidized loans if student demonstrates need [i.e., COA exceeds sum of EFC and estimated financial assistance (EFA) for loan period] • Unsubsidized loans if student does not demonstrate need or demonstrate only limited need Unsubsidized loan amount is difference between COA and EFA, up to applicable loan limit Unsubsidized loans may replace all or part of student’s EFC

Award Amounts
• $7,000/year: teacher certification programs or preparatory coursework for admission into a graduate or professional program • $12,000/year: graduate/professional Aggregate Limits: • $23,000 for dependent student1 • $23,000 subsidized for independent undergraduate or dependent student whose parents unable to borrow PLUS • $46,000 unsubsidized (minus subsidized amount borrowed) for independent undergraduate student or dependent student whose parents unable to borrow PLUS4

Interest Rates and Loan Fees
Direct Loan fees: • Origination fee up to 2.5% of principal allowed

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal Stafford Loan and Direct Stafford Loan Programs (continued)

Description

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria

Award Amounts
• $65,500 subsidized for graduate/professional (including amounts borrowed as undergraduate) • $138,500 unsubsidized (minus subsidized amount borrowed), for graduate or professional degree, including amounts borrowed as undergraduate4

Interest Rates and Loan Fees

________________________
Certain health profession students subject to higher additional unsubsidized loan limits

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Federal PLUS and Direct PLUS Programs

Description
• Long-term, lowinterest loans for parents of dependent students and for graduate and professional students • Federal PLUS funds from lenders • Direct PLUS funds from federal government

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Graduate or professional student, biological or adoptive parent or stepparent* of eligible dependent undergraduate • Sign Statement of Educational Purpose on promissory note • Provide Social Security Numbers of parent borrower and student • Not in default or owe Title IV overpayment • U.S. citizen or national, or eligible noncitizen • No adverse credit history • Additional requirements if prior Title IV loan discharged due to total and permanent disability
*If stepparent’s financial information would be collected on FAFSA. Legal guardians are not eligible PLUS borrowers.

Award Amounts
• No annual or aggregate limits, except cannot borrow more than difference between COA and EFA

Interest Rates and Loan Fees
Interest rate: • Fixed • 8.5% for Federal PLUS • 7.9% for Direct PLUS PLUS fees • FFEL: 2% origination fee; 1% insurance fee • Direct Loan: 4% origination fee; no insurance fee • Reduction of origination fee not permitted

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Title IV Programs: Summary Information
Program
Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (LEAP) Program

Description
• Federal allocation to states to provide grants and work-study assistance • State match required • Names of awards vary by state

Program-Specific Eligibility Criteria
• Must meet Title IV general student eligibility requirements • Must demonstrate substantial financial need as defined by state and approved by ED • Additional criteria may be set by state, such as: Academic level (undergraduate, graduate/professional) Enrollment status (full time, part time, less than half time) Residency (in-state, out-of-state) • Must meet Title IV general student eligibility requirements • Must demonstrate substantial financial need as defined by state and approved by ED • Additional criteria may be set by state, such as: Academic level (undergraduate, graduate/professional) Enrollment status (full time, part time, less than half time) Residency (in-state, out-of-state)

Award Amounts
• Maximum annual award may not exceed $5,000 • State may set lower maximum

Special Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership (SLEAP) Program

• Component of LEAP Program • Federal funds used by state to: supplement LEAP awards; increase number of LEAP recipients; award merit or critical career scholarships • State match required • Names of awards vary by state

• Annual award amounts may exceed $5,000 maximum set under LEAP

Other Student Assistance Programs
Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship Program
• • • • • Exceptional students who show promise of continued excellence Administered by ED through state agencies $1,500 per year through federal allocation to states Maximum of 4 years of eligibility at an eligible institution Selection criteria set by state

Corporation for National and Community Service
• The National and Community Service Trust Act of 1993 established the Corporation for National and Community Service, which is the parent organization for two national AmeriCorps programs: National Civilian Community Corps (NCCC) Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) Each state has a commission for national service to recruit participants and organize programs of service to communities Education awards may be used to pay for past, present, or future educational costs, including partial repayment of federal student loans NCCC awards vary based on one to two years of full-time or part-time service VISTA educational awards are based on full-time service Additional information available on AmeriCorps Web site at www.americorps.org

• • • • •

U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs
• Chapter 30 Montgomery G.I. Bill Active Duty benefits for Active Duty service members to be used while on active duty or redeemed after separation from service Chapter 1606 Montgomery G.I. Bill Selected Reserve benefits available to Selected Reservists during period of participation in Selected Reserve Chapter 1607 Reserve Educational Assistance Program (or REAP)benefits available to members of the U.S. Armed Forces Reserve components called or ordered to active duty in response to a war or national emergency as declared by the President and supported by federal funds on or after September 11, 2001. National Guard members are eligible if called or ordered to active duty in response to a national emergency by the President or Secretary of Defense and supported by federal funds

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Handout

Chapter 32 Veterans Educational Assistance Program (VEAP) benefits for certain veterans who elected to make contributions from their military pay to participate in this educational benefit program Chapter 35 Survivors’ and Dependents’ Education Assistance Program (DEA) benefits for the spouse or children of a: Veteran who is permanently and totally disabled as result of a service-related injury Deceased veteran who had a total and permanent disability from servicerelated injury Service member who is missing in action or is captured in the line of duty and currently is being held by a hostile force Service member who currently is forcibly detained or interned in the line of duty by a foreign government or power A service member hospitalized or receiving outpatient care for a VA determined service-connected permanent and total disability and is likely to be discharged for that disability VA Work-Study Program employment available to any student receiving VA educational benefits and attending school at least three-quarter time Students may work at school’s VA office, VA Regional Office, VA Medical Facilities, or at approved state employment offices Tutorial Assistance Program for students receiving VA education assistance for at least half-time enrollment and needing tutorial assistance Additional Information VA regional office or VA Center VA Web site: www.gibill.va.gov/

Reserve Officer Training Corps
• • • • Postsecondary education funding in exchange for commitment of military service at conclusion of education In-school participation as scholarship or nonscholarship (stipend only) recipient Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) programs offered by the U.S. Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marines Additional information available on Department of Defense ROTC Web site at www.todaysmilitary.com/app/tm/get/collegehelp/rotc

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Handout

U.S. Department of the Interior – Bureau of Indian Affairs
• • • • • Member of, or at least one-quarter Indian blood descendent of, an American Indian tribe, or is Alaska Native Seeking undergraduate or graduate degree Has demonstrated financial need Coordination with campus-based aid required (see 673.6 of the General Provisions regulations for the campus-based programs) Additional information available on Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Office of Indian Education Programs Web site at www.oiep.bia.edu

Vocational Rehabilitation Services
• • • • Administered by state agencies Services and financial assistance for students with disabilities Services include vocational guidance and counseling, medical services and appliances, job placement and follow-up, and job training skills Includes tuition, fees, books, supplies, room, board, and transportation awards

Nonfederal State Aid
• • • • States establish their own eligibility requirements for their grant, loan, and/or workstudy programs States may choose to restrict aid to residents of the state and/or to attendance at schools within the state Many states use the FAFSA; others use their own applications All states impose their own application deadlines

Student Assistance Programs for the Health Professions
Additional information regarding the following financial assistance programs offered by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Bureau of Health Professions may be found on the Internet at http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa. Nursing Student Loan (NSL) Program Student Eligibility • Must be enrolled or accepted for enrollment at least half-time in nursing program leading to a diploma, associate degree, baccalaureate degree, or graduate degree

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Handout

• •

U.S. citizen or national, or lawful permanent resident of U.S., Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Republic of Palau Must demonstrate financial need Must be in good academic standing and capable of maintaining good academic standing, as defined by school

Annual and Aggregate Loan Limits • $2,500 per year until final 2 years of program • $4,000 per year in final 2 years of program • $13,000 aggregate limit Interest rate • 5% Repayment • Repayment begins nine months after ceasing at least half-time enrollment • 10-year maximum repayment period • Under certain conditions, repayment may be deferred and interest does not accrue during deferment period Health Professions Student Loan (HPSL) Program Student Eligibility • Full-time enrollment in programs leading to following degrees: Doctor of allopathic medicine (only if borrowed under HPSL prior to 7/1/93) Doctor of osteopathic medicine (only if borrowed under HPSL prior to 7/1/93) Doctor of dentistry Doctor of podiatric medicine Doctor of optometry Doctor of veterinary medicine Bachelor or doctor of science in pharmacy • U.S. citizen or national, or lawful permanent resident of U.S., Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Republic of Palau • Must demonstrate financial need (parental data must be provided) • Must be in good academic standing and capable of maintaining good academic standing (as defined by school) • Must be registered with Selective Service, if required Annual Loan Maximum • May not exceed cost of attendance
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No aggregate limit

Interest rate • 5% Repayment • 1-year grace period after full-time enrollment ceases • 10 to 25-year repayment period • Under certain conditions, repayment may be deferred and interest does not accrue during deferment period Primary Care Loan (PCL) Program Student Eligibility • Full-time enrollment in programs leading to degree in: Allopathic medicine Osteopathic medicine • U.S. citizen or national, or lawful permanent resident of U.S., Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Republic of Palau • Must demonstrate financial need (parental data must be provided) • Must be in good academic standing and capable of maintaining good academic standing (as defined by school) • Must be registered with Selective Service if required • Must agree to: Enter and complete approved residency training in primary health care within 4 years of graduation Work in primary health care practice until loan is fully repaid Annual Loan Maximum • May not exceed cost of attendance • No aggregate limit Interest rate • 5% Repayment • 1-year grace period after full time enrollment ceases • 10 to 25-year repayment period • Under certain conditions, repayment may be deferred and interest does not accrue during deferment period Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students
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Student Eligibility • Full-time enrollment in programs leading to following: Doctor of allopathic medicine Doctor of osteopathic medicine Doctor of dentistry Doctor of veterinary medicine Doctor of optometry Doctor of podiatric medicine Doctor of chiropractic medicine Baccalaureate or graduate degree in pharmacy Graduate degree in public health Baccalaureate or graduate degree in allied health (i.e., dental hygiene, medicine laboratory technology, occupational or physical therapy, radiologic technology, speech pathology, audiology, registered dietitians) Graduate degree in behavioral and mental health practice (clinical psychology, clinical social work, professional counseling, and marriage and family therapy) Training of physician assistants Diploma, associate degree, baccalaureate degree, or graduate degree in nursing • U.S. citizen or national, or lawful permanent resident of U.S., Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Republic of Palau • Must demonstrate financial need (parental data must be provided) • Disadvantaged background • Cost of attending would constitute severe hardship Awards • May not exceed tuition, other educational costs, and reasonable living expenses • Awarded by school in order of greatest need with preference to students who have participated in Health Careers Opportunity Program or Nursing Workforce Diversity Program Loans for Disadvantaged Students (LDS) Student Eligibility • Full-time enrollment in programs leading to following degrees: Doctor of allopathic medicine Doctor of osteopathic medicine Doctor of dentistry Bachelor or doctor of science in pharmacy Doctor of podiatric medicine
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• • •

Doctor of optometry Doctor of veterinary medicine U.S. citizen or national, or lawful permanent resident of U.S., Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Northern Mariana Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Guam, American Samoa, Federated States of Micronesia, Marshall Islands, or Republic of Palau Must demonstrate financial need (parental data must be provided) Must be registered with Selective Service if required Disadvantaged background

Awards • Cannot exceed educational costs • Awarded to students in order of greatest financial need Interest rate • 5% Repayment • 1-year grace period after full-time enrollment ceases • 10 to 25-year repayment period • Under certain conditions, repayment may be deferred and interest does not accrue during deferment period National Health Service Corps (NHSC) Scholarships Student Eligibility • U.S. citizens • Full-time enrollment in following schools or programs: Allopathic or osteopathic medical school Family nurse practitioner program Nurse-midwifery program Baccalaureate or master’s physician assistant program Dentistry program as third or fourth year student • Must complete service commitment in federally-designated health professional shortage area • Scholars completing medical school are expected to complete residency programs in family medicine, general pediatrics, general internal medicine, psychiatry, or obstetrics and gynecology • Scholars completing dental school are expected to complete residency programs in general practice or pediatric dentistry Award Amount • Payment of tuition, fees, books, supplies, equipment, and monthly stipend
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Handout

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster

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Section IIIA FAFSA4caster

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What is the FAFSA4caster?
• Early start on the financial aid process • Instantly calculates federal student aid eligibility • Access FAFSA4caster at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov

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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster
www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov click on FAFSA4caster

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Why do we need the FAFSA4caster?
• Help students determine how they are going to pay for college • Eligibility for aid influences decisions about college • Financial aid planning process before college applications are due

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FAFSA4caster
Simplifies financial aid process: • Provides information about college planning, admissions, and federal financial aid – Handy timeline of most activities student must complete before applying for college
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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster
FAFSA4caster
Simplifies the financial aid process:
• Describes the Federal Student Aid programs • Provides aid eligibility requirements • Provides an overview of the federal financial aid process
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Benefits of the FAFSA4caster
• Provides an estimated Expected Family Contribution (EFC) • Calculate eligibility for federal aid, including grants • Reduce time to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)
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Benefits of the FAFSA4caster
• Match conducted with Social Security Administration • Automatically generates and e-mails the Federal Student Aid PIN in time to use with FAFSA on the Web • Available in Spanish • FAFSA4caster is free
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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster
Who should use the FAFSA4caster?
Students who want to get an early start on the application process
• Any student considering their financial options to help pay for a postsecondary education – High school juniors – Parents of younger students – Non-traditional students (adult learners)
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How accurate is the FAFSA4caster?
• Estimate of eligibility based on the current laws and the information the student provides • Changes in income, household size, or other factors may affect eligibility when student completes the FAFSA

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Filling out a FAFSA4caster
Students will:
• Provide their Social Security Number (SSN) and first and last name exactly as they appear on their Social Security Card • Create a password • Refer to their W-2 Forms, bank statements, business, and mortgage information • Have their alien registration or permanent resident card (if not a U.S. citizen)
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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster
Begin the FAFSA4caster

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FAFSA4caster
Students will have to start a new FAFSA4caster if they: • Forget their password • Do not retrieve a saved FAFSA4caster within 45 days

Slide IIIA - 14

FAFSA4caster
FAFSA4caster gives an estimate of a student’s ENTIRE federal student aid package, including eligibility for student loans, by collecting additional data such as:
• Grade level • Other program specific criteria

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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster
Estimated Award Package

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Do students still need to complete the FAFSA?
• Yes. They should complete the FAFSA as soon as possible on or after January 1of the year they attend college. • Schools use information to determine eligibility for aid and to create award package. • FAFSA4caster will pre-populate many of the questions on the FAFSA, significantly reducing the time it takes to complete the FAFSA.
Slide IIIA - 17

Things to Remember
• No signatures are required to complete and submit a FAFSA4caster • No SARs or ISIRs generated • Applicant notified if SSA match fails • No PIN is needed to access the FAFSA4caster • Customer Service and built-in help is available
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Participant Guide

Section IIIA FAFSA4caster

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Participant Guide

Section IIIB
Applying for Federal Financial Aid

Slide IIIB - 1

Section IIIB Applying for Federal Financial Aid

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FAFSA Completion Resources
• www.fafsa.ed.gov • FAFSA Tips Brochure • FAFSA on the Web Tips Card • College Goal Sunday

Slide IIIB - 3

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Participant Guide

Section IIIB
Applying for Federal Financial Aid
FAFSA
• Is produced by the U.S. Department of Education • Collects family’s personal and financial information used to calculate student’s EFC • Available in English and Spanish • Available in three formats:
– Electronically via FAFSA on the Web – Paper FAFSA – PDF FAFSA
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FAFSA on the Web

• Web site: www.fafsa.ed.gov • 2008-09 FAFSA on the Web available on January 1, 2008 • FAFSA on the Web Worksheet:
– Used as “pre-application” worksheet – Questions follow order of FAFSA on the Web
Slide IIIB - 5

FAFSA on the Web
Good reasons to file electronically:
• Built-in edits to help prevent costly errors • Skip-logic allows student and/or parent to skip unnecessary questions • More timely submission of original application and any necessary corrections • More detailed instructions and “help” for common questions • Ability to check application status on-line • Simplified renewal application process
Slide IIIB - 6

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Participant Guide

Section IIIB
Applying for Federal Financial Aid
PIN Registration
• Web site: www.pin.ed.gov • Can request PIN before January 1, 2008 • Not required, but speeds processing • May be used by students and parents throughout aid process, including subsequent school years
Slide IIIB - 7

FAFSA on the Web Worksheet
2008-09 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet— 8-page booklet containing: • Instructions • 97 questions in 5 sections • Worksheets A, B, and C
Slide IIIB - 8

Frequent FAFSA Errors
• Parent and student Social Security Numbers • Divorced/remarried parental information • Income earned by parents/stepparents • Untaxed income • U.S. income taxes paid • Household size • Number of household members in college • Real estate and investment net worth
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Participant Guide

Section IIIB
Applying for Federal Financial Aid
FAFSA Processing Results
Central Processing System (CPS) notifies student of FAFSA processing results by: • Paper Student Aid Report (SAR) if paper
FAFSA was filed and student’s e-mail address was not provided • SAR Acknowledgement if filed electronically via FAFSA on the Web and student’s e-mail address was not provided
Slide IIIB - 10

FAFSA Processing Results
• CPS notifies student of FAFSA processing results by:
– E-mail notification containing a direct link to student’s on-line SAR if student’s e-mail was provided on paper or electronic FAFSA

• Student with PIN can view SAR on-line at www.fafsa.ed.gov
Slide IIIB - 11

Making Corrections
If necessary, corrections to FAFSA data may be made by: • Using FAFSA on the Web (www.fafsa.ed.gov) if
student has a PIN; • Updating paper SAR (SAR Information Acknowledgement cannot be used to make corrections); or • Submitting documentation to school’s financial aid office
Slide IIIB - 12

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Participant Guide

Section IIIB
Applying for Federal Financial Aid
Special Circumstances
• Can’t include on FAFSA • Contact each college • College will:
– Request documentation – Review situation on case by case basis – Decisions final and cannot be appealed to U.S. Department of Education
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Participant Guide

Case Study 1
Taneka Williams
Taneka Williams is a graduating high school senior from Bowie, Maryland, who plans on starting college Fall 2008. Her mother, Chrystal Williams, is a 38-year-old single parent. Taneka’s parents divorced in May 1995. Taneka has a younger brother, Malik, 14, who also lives with Chrsytal. Malik is in the eighth grade and has a minor learning disability and requires additional assistance at school. Chrystal pays $50 a month for Malik’s disability-related expenses. Chrystal’s 5 year old niece, Aisha, lives with her. Chrystal provides all of her niece’s support. Chrystal earned $20,800 in 2007 working at Wal-Mart. Taneka’s father is supposed to pay $300 in monthly child support. However, he is currently unemployed and has not paid child support since December 2005. Chrystal owns the family home, which is her only asset. Chrystal filed a 1040A with a filing status of head of household an adjusted gross income (AGI) of $20,800, four exemptions, no federal tax liability, child tax credits of $1,431, and an earned income credit (EIC) of $3,280. Taneka works weekends, summers, and holidays at Claire’s. She earned $3,640 in 2007. She filed a 1040EZ, with an AGI of $3,655, and a federal tax liability of $0. Taneka has saved $500, which she plans to use for college expenses. She wants to attend Local Community College as a full-time student. She plans to live off campus. She hopes to transfer to Nearby State University after obtaining her associate degree at Local Community College to finish work on her baccalaureate degree. Taneka would like to be considered for all aid available. Taneka was born March 3,1990, in Baltimore, Maryland. Her address is 600 Cherry Street, Bowie, Maryland, 20062. Her telephone number is 301.555.1234. Her Maryland driver’s license number is 55261 and her Social Security Number is 111-11-1111. She is single with no children. Taneka does not have any illegal drug convictions. Both of Taneka’s parents finished high school in 1987. Chrystal’s Social Security Number is 111-11-1112 and her date of birth is November 13, 1969. Taneka will file a FAFSA on the Web. Both Taneka and her mom have PINs, so they may sign the FAFSA electronically. The Federal School Code for Local Community College is 333333.

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Case Study 2
Debra Davis
Debra is a high school senior who will start college in Fall 2008 at What a Great State University. She will graduate from a New York City high school in May 2008 with a New York Regents Diploma with an Advanced designation. Debra lives in New York City with her mother, stepfather, and younger sister, who is a junior in high school. Their address is 1212 River Street, New York, New York, 10012; their telephone number is (212)5551000. Debra and her family have always lived in New York. Debra was born in New York City on November 13, 1990. Her Social Security Number is 444-44-4444, which is also her driver’s license number. She is single and has no dependents of her own. Debra’s e-mail address is Debra.Davis@americaemail.com. Her mother and stepfather were married in October 1992. Debra’s mother, Denise Palmer and stepfather, Donald Palmer, are both college graduates. Denise’s Social Security Number is 444-55-5555 and her date of birth is March 3, 1962. Donald’s Social Security Number is 444-66-6666 and his date of birth is July 1, 1962. Denise’s e-mail address is Denise.Palmer@americaemail.com. Debra’s mother and stepfather filed an IRS Form 1040 for the 2007 tax year. Denise owns and operates a small bagel shop with five full-time employees. She earned $15,000 in 2007, $13,500 in wages and $1,500 in business income (as reported on Schedule C of the 1040). Donald works for the city and earned $68,000 in 2007. They reported an adjusted gross income (AGI) of $83,450, a $1,500 Lifetime Learning tax credit (Donald is working on his master’s degree part time), and a tax liability of $6,524. Denise and Donald claimed Debra’s sister as an exemption. Donald contributed $5,000 to a tax-deferred pension plan. No one in the family received benefits from a meanstested federal program in 2007. Denise’s bagel shop is currently valued at $150,000 with debt of $70,000. Denise and Donald have $15,000 in savings and reported $450 in taxable interest income. Debra’s parents divorced in 1991. Debra’s father, Daryl, is an attorney with a law firm in Albany, NY. Per the terms of the divorce, Daryl pays Denise $400 a month in child support for Debra until she turns 18 and he claimed Debra on his tax return for 2007. Daryl made $120,000 in 2007. Denise received $1,600 in child support in 2007. Debra earned $800 in 2007 working as a lifeguard over the summer. She will not file a tax return for 2007. She will use the money in her savings account to pay for her senior class trip and has no assets. Debra was convicted in October 2006 for the possession of an illegal drug. Debra plans to enroll full-time at WGSU (Federal School Code 444444) for both the fall and spring semesters. She wants to live on campus and hopes to finish her bachelor’s degree in May 2012. Debra is interested in student loans, but not work-study.
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Debra will file her application using FAFSA on the Web; she did not apply for financial aid for her first year at WGSU. Debra and her mother will submit their signatures using a signature page.

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Case Study Solutions

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2008 — 2009
FAFSA on the web worksheet
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

www.fafsa.ed.gov

DO NOT MAIL THIS WORKSHEET.
You must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for federal student aid and to apply for most state and college aid. Applying online with FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.ed.gov is faster and easier than using a paper FAFSA. For state or college aid, the deadline may be as early as January 2008. See the table to the right for state deadlines. Check with your high school counselor or your college’s financial aid administrator about other deadlines.

• Complete this Worksheet only if you plan to use FAFSA on the Web to apply for federal student aid. • Sections in gray are for parent information. • In parentheses after each question is the number that is used on FAFSA on the Web and the paper FAFSA.

• Submit your FAFSA early, but not before January 1, 2008.

Apply Faster—Sign your FAFSA with a Federal Student Aid PIN. If you do not have a PIN, you can apply for one at www.pin.ed.gov. You will receive your PIN and then you can electronically sign when you submit your FAFSA. If you are providing parent information, one parent must also sign your FAFSA. To sign electronically, your parent should also apply for a PIN.

R D

T F A

You will need the following information to complete this Worksheet:
❏ Your Social Security Number and your parents’ Social Security Numbers if you are providing parent information; ❏ Your driver’s license number if you have one; ❏ Your Alien Registration Number if you are not a U.S. citizen; ❏ 2007 federal tax information or tax returns (including IRS W-2 information) for yourself (and spouse if you are married) and for your parents if you are providing parent information. If you have not yet filed a 2007 income tax return, you can still submit your FAFSA but you must provide income and tax information. ❏ Records of untaxed income, such as Social Security benefits, welfare benefits (e.g., TANF), and veterans benefits, for yourself, and your parents if you are providing parent information; and ❏ Information on savings, investments, and business and farm assets for yourself, and your parents if you are providing parent information.

WARNING! Be wary of organizations that charge a fee to submit your application or to find you money for school. In general, the help you pay for can be obtained for free from your school or from Federal Student Aid.

NOTE: If you or your family have unusual circumstances (such as loss of employment), complete FAFSA on the Web to the extent you can, then submit the application and consult the financial aid office at the college you plan to attend.

STATE AID DEADLINES Check with the school’s financial aid administrator for these states and territories: AL, *AS, CO, *FM, GA, *GU, *HI, *MH, *MP, NE, *NM, *NV, OR, PR, *PW, *SD, *TX, UT, *VA, *VI, *VT, WA, WI, and *WY AK April 15, 2008 (date received) AR Academic Challenge - June 1, 2008 Workforce Grant - Contact your financial aid administrator. Higher Education Opportunity Grant - June 1, 2008 (fall term) - November 1, 2008 (spring term) (date received) AZ June 30, 2009 (date received) * CA Initial awards - March 2, 2008 Additional community college awards September 2, 2008 (date postmarked) #* CT February 15, 2008 (date received) * DC June 30, 2008 (date received by state) DE April 15, 2008 (date received) FL May 15, 2008 (date processed) IA July 1, 2008 (date received) #* ID March 1, 2008 (date received) # IL First-time applicants - September 30, 2008 Continuing applicants - August 15, 2008 (date received) IN March 10, 2008 (date received) # *KS April 1, 2008 (date received) # KY March 15, 2008 (date received) LA July 1, 2008 (date received) # MA May 1, 2008 (date received) MD March 1, 2008 (date received) ME May 1, 2008 (date received) MI March 1, 2008 (date received) MN 30 days after term starts (date received) MO April 1, 2008 (date received) # MS MTAG and MESG Grants - September 15, 2008 HELP Scholarship - March 31, 2008 # MT March 1, 2008 (date received) NC March 15, 2008 (date received) ND March 15, 2008 (date received) NH May 1, 2008 (date received) NJ June 1, 2008, if you received a Tuition Aid Grant in 2007-2008 All other applicants - October 1, 2008, fall and spring terms - March 1, 2009, spring term only (date received) * NY May 1, 2009 (date received) OH October 1, 2008 (date received) # OK April 15, 2008 (date received) for best consideration * PA All 2007-2008 State Grant recipients & all non-2007-2008 State Grant recipients in degree programs - May 1, 2008 All other applicants - August 1, 2008 (date received) # RI March 1, 2008 (date received) SC Tuition Grants - June 30, 2008 (date received) # TN State Grant - March 1, 2008 State Lottery - September 1, 2008 (date received) * WV March 1, 2008 (date received) # For priority consideration, submit application by date specified. * Additional form may be required.

www.fafsa.ed.gov

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

PAge 1

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Handout

SECTION 1 – STUDENT INFORMATION
• Use of this Worksheet is optional. It should not be submitted to Federal Student Aid or to your school. • Not all of the questions from FAFSA on the Web appear in this Worksheet, but questions are generally ordered as they appear online. • Once you are online, you may be able to skip some questions based on your answers to earlier questions. Your Social Security Number (Q8) Your last name (Q1) Your driver’s license number (optional) (Q11) Are you a U.S. citizen? (Q14)

If you are neither a citizen nor an eligible noncitizen, you are not eligible for ❏ Eligible noncitizen Generally you are an eligible noncitizen if you are: federal student aid. However, you should still complete the application, because • A permanent U.S. resident with a Permanent Resident Card (I-551); you may be eligible for state or college aid. • A conditional permanent resident (I-551C); or If you are in the U.S. on an F1 or F2 student visa, or a J1 or J2 exchange visitor visa, or a G series visa (pertaining to international organizations), you must answer “Neither citizen nor eligible noncitizen.”

1 1 1 - 1 1 - 1 Williams 55261 ❏ X U.S. citizen (U.S. national)

1

1 1

Your Alien Registration Number (Q15) If you are an eligible Your marital status as of today (Q16)

noncitizen, enter your eight- or nine-digit Alien Registration Number.

“As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA.

Month and year you were married, separated, divorced or widowed (Q17) (Example: Month and year: 05/1997) Your state of legal residence (Q18) Did you become a legal resident of your state before January 1, 2003? (Q19)

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T F A
A
M M Y ❏ X Yes M

• The holder of an Arrival-Departure Record (I-94) from the Department of Homeland Security showing any of the following designations: “Refugee,” “Asylum Granted,” “Parolee” (I-94 confirms paroled for a minimum of one year and status has not expired), or “Cuban-Haitian Entrant.”

❏ Neither citizen nor eligible noncitizen

❏ X Single, divorced, or widowed ❏ Married/remarried Y

❏ Separated Y

Y

MD
❏ No Y Y Y Y M

If “No,” when did you become a legal resident of your state? (Q20)
(Example: Month and year: 05/2004)

Most male students must register with the Selective Service System to get federal aid. If you are a male between the ages of 18 and 25 and NOT already registered with Selective Service, answer “Yes” and Selective Service will register you. (Q22) What degree or certificate will you be working on during the 2008-2009 school year? (Q23)

❏ Yes

❏ No

X

❏ 1st bachelor’s degree ❏ 2nd bachelor’s degree ❏ Associate degree (occupational/ technical program) ❏ Associate degree (general education or transfer program) ❏ Certificate or diploma for completing an occupational, technical, or educational program of less than two years

❏ Certificate or diploma for completing an occupational, technical, or educational program of at least two years ❏ Teaching credential (nondegree program) ❏ Graduate or professional degree ❏ Other/Undecided

What will be your grade level when you begin the 2008-2009 school year? (Q24)

❏ X 1st year/never attended college before ❏ 1st year/attended college ❏ 2nd year/sophomore ❏ 3rd year/junior

❏ 4th year/senior ❏ 5th year/other undergraduate ❏ 1st year graduate/professional ❏ Continuing graduate/professional or beyond

At the start of the 2008-2009 school year, what do you expect your enrollment status to be? (Q25)
(Enrollment definitions refer to undergraduate study.)

❏ X Full-time (at least 12 credit hours in a term or 24 clock hours per week) ❏ 3/4-time (at least 9 credit hours in a term or 18 clock hours per week) ❏ Half-time (at least 6 credit hours in a term or 12 clock hours per week) ❏ Less than half-time (fewer than 6 credit hours in a term or less than 12 clock hours per week) ❏ Not sure

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2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

www.fafsa.ed.gov

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SECTION 1

(continued)

– STUDENT INFORMATION
❏ X Both work-study and student loans ❏ Neither ❏ Don’t know ❏ Student loans (which you must pay back)

In addition to grants, what types of student aid interest you? (Q26)

Will you have your first bachelor’s degree before July 1, 2008? (Q28) Highest school your father completed (Q29)
Some states and schools offer aid based upon the level of schooling your parents have completed.

❏ Yes ❏ X High school ❏ Middle school/Jr. High

❏ X No

❏ College or beyond ❏ Other/unknown ❏ Middle school/Jr. High ❏ College or beyond ❏ Other/unknown ❏ Yes
If you have a conviction for possessing or selling illegal drugs, you should submit your FAFSA anyway. You may be eligible for non-federal student aid from state or private sources.

Highest school your mother completed (Q30)

Some states and schools offer aid based upon the level of schooling your parents have completed.

Have you been convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study)? (Q31)
A federal law suspends eligibility for some students with drug convictions. Count only federal or state convictions for the possession or sale of illegal drugs if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study). Do not count convictions that have been removed from your record, or occurred before you turned age 18, unless you were tried as an adult. If you answer “Yes,” you can use an interactive worksheet when completing the FAFSA online, or you can print a worksheet at www.fafsa.ed.gov/q31wksht89.pdf. Based on your answers to the worksheet questions, you can determine if the conviction affects your eligibility for federal student aid.

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❏ X High school

❏ X No

SECTION 2 – STUDENT DEPENDENCY STATUS
Were you born before January 1, 1985? (Q48) At the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year, will you be working on a master’s or doctorate program (such as an MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, or graduate certificate, etc.)? (Q49) As of today, are you married? (Q50) (Answer “Yes” if you are separated but not divorced.) “As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA. Do you have children who receive more than half of their support from you? (Q51) Do you have dependents other than your children/spouse who live with you and who receive more than half of their support from you, now and through June 30, 2009? (Q52) Are (a) both of your parents deceased, or (b) are you (or were you until age 18) a ward/dependent of the court? (Q53) Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training? (Q54) Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces? (Q55)
Answer “Yes,” you are a veteran, if you (1) have engaged in active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, or Coast Guard) or are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee who was called to active duty for purposes other than training, or were a cadet or midshipman at one of the service academies, and (2) were released under a condition other than dishonorable. Also answer “Yes” if you are not a veteran now but will be by June 30, 2009. Answer “No,” you are not a veteran, if you (1) have never engaged in active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, (2) are currently an ROTC student or a cadet or midshipman at a service academy, or (3) are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee activated only for training. Also answer “No” if you are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces and will continue to serve through June 30, 2009.

❏ Yes ❏ Yes

❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ No X

❏ Yes ❏ Yes ❏ Yes

❏ Yes ❏ Yes ❏ Yes

If you answered “YES” to ANY of the previous questions, you do not have to provide parental information. Skip to Section 4 on page 6. If you answered “NO” to ALL of the previous questions, then you must provide parental information. Complete Section 3 on the next page.
www.fafsa.ed.gov 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet Page 3

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SECTION 3 – PARENTAl Information
• If you answered “NO” to all the questions in Section 2, you must complete this section even if you do not live with your parents. Refer to your parents’ IRS tax return when necessary.
- Answer the questions as of the date you will complete and sign your FAFSA. - Grandparents, foster parents and legal guardians are not considered parents on this form unless they have legally adopted you. - If both of your parents are living and married to each other, answer the questions about them. - If your parent is widowed or single, answer the questions about that parent. If your widowed parent is remarried as of today, answer the questions about that parent and the person to whom your parent is married (your stepparent). - If your parents are divorced or separated, answer the questions about the parent you lived with more during the past 12 months. If you did not live with one parent more than the other, give answers about the parent who provided more financial support during the past 12 months, or during the most recent year that you actually received support from a parent. If this parent is remarried as of today, answer the questions about that parent and the person to whom your parent is married (your stepparent).

What is your parents’ marital status as of today? (Q56)
“As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA.

Month and year your parents were married, separated, divorced, or widowed (Q57) (Example: Month and year: 05/1997) What is your parents’ e-mail address? (optional)

What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) Social Security Number? (Q58) What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) last name? (Q59)

What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) date of birth? (Q61)
(Example: Month, day and year: 05/07/1961)

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T F A

❏ Married/remarried ❏ Single ❏ X Divorced/separated ❏ Widowed M 0 M Y Y Y Y 5 1 9 9 5

-

-

M

M

D -

D

Y -

Y

Y

Y

What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) Social Security Number? (Q62) What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) last name? (Q63) What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) date of birth? (Q65)
(Example: Month, day and year: 05/07/1961)

1 1 1
M 0

1 1

1 1 1 2
Y 9 Y 2 6 Y

Williams
M D D 1 7 0 1 Y

What is your parents’ state of legal residence? (Q68) Did your parents become legal residents of the state before January 1, 2003? (Q69) If “No,” give month and year legal residency began for the parent who has lived in the state the longest. (Q70) (Example: Month and year: 05/2004) Have your parents completed a 2007 IRS income tax return or other income tax return? (Q76) What income tax return did your parents file or will they file for 2007? (Q77)

MD ❏ X Yes
M M Y Y Y

❏ No Y

❏ X Already completed ❏ Will file ❏ Will not file ❏ IRS 1040

❏ X IRS 1040A, 1040EZ

❏ A foreign tax return ❏ A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or a freely associated state

If your parents have filed or will file a 1040, were they eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ? (Q78)
In general, a person is eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes less than $100,000, does not itemize deductions, does not receive income from his or her business or farm, and does not receive alimony. A person is not eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes $100,000 or more, itemizes deductions, receives income from his or her own business or farm, is self-employed, receives alimony, or is required to file Schedule D for capital gains. If you filed a 1040 only to claim Hope or Lifetime Learning tax credits, and would have otherwise been eligible for a 1040A or 1040EZ, you should answer “Yes.”
Page 4 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

❏ Yes ❏ No ❏ Don’t know

www.fafsa.ed.gov

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SECTION 3

(continued)

– PARENTAl Information
❏ Supplemental Security Income ❏ Food Stamps ❏ Free or Reduced Price School Lunch ❏ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) ❏ Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) $

In 2007, did you, your parents, or anyone in your parents’ household receive benefits from any of the federal benefit programs listed? (Q71-75) Mark all the programs that apply.
The federal benefit programs are listed in the answer column. Report benefits received for all of your parents’ household members. Include in your parents’ household: (1) your parents and yourself, even if you don’t live with your parents; (2) your parents’ other children if (a) your parents will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, or (b) the children could answer “No” to every question in Section 2 of this worksheet; and (3) other people only if they live with your parents, your parents provide more than half of their support, and your parents will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

What was your parents’ adjusted gross income for 2007? (Q79)
Adjusted gross income is on IRS form 1040—line 37; 1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.

20,800
$

How much did your parents earn from working (wages, salaries, tips, combat pay, etc.) in 2007? (Q82, 83) Answer this question whether or not your parents filed a tax
return. This information may be on their W-2 forms, or on IRS Form 1040—lines 7+12+18+Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1.

What was the amount your parents paid in income tax for 2007? (Q80) Enter your parents’ exemptions for 2007. (Q81)

Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 57; 1040A—line 35; or 1040EZ—line 11.

Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or 1040A—line 6d. On the 1040EZ, if a person checked either the “you” or “spouse” box on line 5, use EZ worksheet line F to determine the number of exemptions ($3,300 equals one exemption). If a person didn’t check either box on line 5, enter 01 if he or she is single, or 02 if he or she is married.

How many people are in your parents’ household? (Q66)

Include in your parents’ household: (1) your parents and yourself, even if you don’t live with your parents, (2) your parents’ other children if (a) your parents will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, or (b) the children could answer “No” to every question in Section 2 of this worksheet, and (3) include other people only if they live with your parents, your parents provide more than half of their support, and your parents will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

R D

T F A

Father/Stepfather

Mother/Stepmother $ $

20,800

0 4

4

How many people in the question above will be college students in 2008-2009? (Q67)
Always count yourself. Do not include your parents. Include others only if they will attend college at least half-time in 2008-2009 in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate.

1

Parent FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C. Complete the Worksheets on page 8 to answer the questions below.
Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet A (Q84) Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet B (Q85) Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet C (Q86) $ $ $

4,711 0 0

Parent Asset Information
• Investments include real estate (do not include the family home), trust funds, UGMA and UTMA accounts, money market funds, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, stocks, stock options, bonds, other securities, Coverdell savings accounts, 529 college savings plans, the refund value of 529 state prepaid tuition plans, installment and land sale contracts (including mortgages held), commodities, etc. For more information about reporting educational savings plans call 1-800-4-FED-AID. Investment value means the current balance or market value of these investments as of today. Investment debt means only those debts that are related to the investments. • Do not include the value of life insurance, retirement plans (pension funds, annuities, noneducation IRAs, Keogh plans, etc.) or cash, savings, and checking accounts already reported in Q43 and Q87. • Business and/or investment farm value includes the market value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment, inventory, etc. Business and/or investment farm debt means only those debts for which the business or investment farm was used as collateral.

As of today, what is your parents’ total current balance in cash, savings, and checking accounts? (Q87) As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ investments, including real estate (not their home)? (Q88) Net worth means current value minus debt. As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ current business and/or investment farms? (Q89) Do not include the value of a family farm that you (your spouse and/or your parents) live on
and operate. Do not include the value of a small business that you (your spouse and/or your parents) own and control and that has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees. www.fafsa.ed.gov

$ $ $

0

0
0
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Handout

SECTION 4 – STUDENT FINANCES
• Answer the questions as of the date you will complete and sign your FAFSA. • This section asks about your income. Refer to your IRS tax return when necessary. • If you filed a foreign tax return, convert all figures to U.S. dollars, using the exchange rate. To view the daily exchange rates, go to www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h10/update. • If you are married as of today, report your and your spouse’s income, even if you were not married in 2007. Ignore references to spouse if you are single, divorced, separated or widowed. Have you completed a 2007 IRS income tax return or other income tax return? (Q32) What income tax return did you file or will you file for 2007? (Q33) ❏ X Already completed ❏ Will file ❏ Will not file ❏ IRS 1040

If you filed or will file a 1040, were you eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ? (Q34)

In general, you are eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if you make less than $100,000, do not itemize deductions, do not receive income from your business or farm, and do not receive alimony. A person is not eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes $100,000 or more, itemizes deductions, receives income from his or her own business or farm, is self-employed, receives alimony, or is required to file Schedule D for capital gains. If you filed a 1040 only to claim Hope or Lifetime Learning tax credits, and you would otherwise have been eligible for a 1040A or 1040EZ, you should answer “Yes.”

What was your (and your spouse’s) adjusted gross income for 2007? (Q35)
Adjusted gross income is on IRS Form 1040—line 37; 1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.

R D

T F A
$ $ $

❏ X IRS 1040A or 1040EZ

❏ A foreign tax return ❏ A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or a freely associated state ❏ Yes ❏ No ❏ Don’t know

3,655
$ $

How much did you (and your spouse) earn from working (wages, salaries, tips, combat pay, etc.) in 2007? (Q38, 39)
Answer this question whether or not you filed a tax return. This information may be on your W-2 forms or on IRS Form 1040—lines 7+12+18+Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1.

Student Spouse

3,640

If you receive veterans’ education benefits, for how many months from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, will you receive these benefits? Use 01 to 12. (Q46) What is the amount of your monthly veterans’ education benefits? (Q47) What was your (and your spouse’s) income tax for 2007? (Q36)
Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 57; 1040A—line 35; or 1040EZ—line 11.

0

Enter your (and your spouse’s) exemptions for 2007. (Q37)
Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or 1040A—line 6d. On the 1040EZ, if a person checked either the “you” or “spouse” box on line 5, use EZ worksheet line F to determine the number of exemptions ($3,300 equals one exemption). If a person didn’t check either box on line 5, enter 01 if he or she is single, or 02 if he or she is married.

0

• If you answered “YES” to ANY question in Section 2, answer the following questions. • If you answer “NO” to all the questions in Section 2, skip these questions and go to “Student FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C.”

How many people are in your household? (Q90)
Include in your household: (1) yourself (and your spouse, if you are married), (2) your children, if you will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, and (3) other people if they now live with you, you provide more than half of their support, and you will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

How many people in the question above will be college students in 2008-2009? (Q91)
Always count yourself. Include others only if they will attend college at least half-time in 2008-2009 in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate.

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Handout

SECTION 4

(continued)

– STUDENT FINANCES
❏ Supplemental Security Income ❏ Food Stamps ❏ Free or Reduced Price School Lunch ❏ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) ❏ Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

In 2007, did you (or your spouse) or anyone in your household (from Q90) receive benefits from any of the federal benefit programs listed? (Q92-96) Mark all the programs that apply.
The federal benefit programs are listed in the answer column. Report benefits received for all of your household members. Use the instructions in Q90 to identify who is included in your household. Answering these questions will not reduce your eligibility for student aid or these other federal benefits.

Student FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C. Complete the Worksheets on page 8 to answer the questions below.
Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet A (Q40) Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet B (Q41) Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet C (Q42) $ $

Student Asset Information (See page 5 for instructions on reporting assets.)
As of today, what is your (and your spouse’s) total current balance of cash, savings and checking accounts? (Q43) As of today, what is the net worth of your (and your spouse’s) investments, including real estate (not your home)? (Q44)
Net worth means current value minus debt.

As of today, what is the net worth of your (and your spouse’s) current business and/or investment farms? (Q45)

Do not include the value of a family farm that you (your spouse and/or your parents) live on and operate. Do not include the value of a small business that you (your spouse and/or your parents) own and control and that has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees.

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T F A
$ $ $ 3rd school (Q97.e) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.f) 8th school (Q97.o) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.p)

$

0 0 0 500 0 0

SECTION 5 – SCHOOLS TO RECEIVE INFORMATION • If you do not know the school code, write the school’s name. You will have a chance online to search for the school code. • For each school code, indicate the corresponding housing plan. 1st school Federal School Code 2nd school (Q97.c) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.d) 7th school (Q97.m) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.n) 4th school (Q97.g) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.h) 9th school (Q97.q) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.r) 5th school (Q97.i) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.j) 10th school (Q97.s) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.t)

333333
(Q97.a) ❏ X off campus ❏ on campus

Housing Plan

❏ with parent (Q97.b) 6th school

Federal School Code

(Q97.k) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.l)

Housing Plan

Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov and enter the information from this worksheet.
Additional help is available online, or you can call 1-800-4-FED-AID. TTY users (hearing impaired) may call 1-800-730-8913. For more information on federal student aid visit www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov. You can also talk with your school’s financial aid office about other types of student aid that may be available

DO NOT MAIL THIS WORKSHEET.
www.fafsa.ed.gov 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet Page 7

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Handout

FAFSA WORKSHEETS - CALENDAR YEAR 2007
These worksheets are solely for completing the FAFSA Worksheet questions, on page 7 for the student and, on page 5 for the student’s parents.

FAFSA Worksheet A—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $ $ $

0 0 0 0

Parents For Page 5 Earned income credit from IRS Form 1040—line 66a; 1040A—line 40a; or 1040EZ—line 8a Additional child tax credit from IRS Form 1040—line 68 or 1040A—line 41 Welfare benefits, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Do not include food stamps or subsidized housing. Social Security benefits received, for all household members as reported in question 90 (or 66 for your parents), that were not taxed (such as SSI). Report benefits paid to parents in the Parents’ column, and benefits paid directly to student (or spouse) in the Student/Spouse column. Enter in question 40 on Page 7. $ $ $ $

3,280 1,431 0 0

$

0

FAFSA Worksheet B—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Payments to tax-deferred pension and savings plans (paid directly or withheld from earnings), including, but not limited to, amounts reported on the W-2 Form in Boxes 12a through 12d, codes D, E, F, G, H, and S. IRA deductions and payments to self-employed SEP, SIMPLE, and Keogh and other qualified plans from IRS Form 1040—line 28 + line 32 or 1040A—line 17 Child support received for all children. Don’t include foster care or adoption payments. Tax exempt interest income from IRS Form 1040—line 8b or 1040A—line 8b Foreign income exclusion from IRS Form 2555—line 45 or 2555EZ—line 18 Untaxed portions of IRA distributions from IRS Form 1040—lines (15a minus 15b) or 1040A—lines (11a minus 11b). Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here. Untaxed portions of pensions from IRS Form 1040—lines (16a minus 16b) or 1040A—lines (12a minus 12b). Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here. Credit for federal tax on special fuels from IRS Form 4136—line 20 (nonfarmers only) Housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the military, clergy and others (including cash payments and cash value of benefits) Veterans’ noneducation benefits such as Disability, Death Pension, or Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC), and/or VA Educational Work-Study allowances Other untaxed income not reported elsewhere on Worksheets A and B, such as workers’ compensation, untaxed portions of railroad retirement benefits, Black Lung Benefits, disability, etc. Tax filers only: report combat pay not included in adjusted gross income (Q35 and Q79). Don’t include student aid, Workforce Investment Act educational benefits, combat pay if you are not a tax filer, or benefits from flexible spending arrangements (e.g., cafeteria plans). Money received, or paid on your behalf (e.g., bills), not reported elsewhere on this form Enter in question 41 on Page 7.

R D

T F A

Enter in question 84 $ on Page 5.

4,711

Parents For Page 5 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$ $

0 0

XXXXXXXXX

Enter in question 85 $ on Page 5.

0

FAFSA Worksheet C—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $

0 0

Parents For Page 5 Education credits (Hope and Lifetime Learning tax credits) from IRS Form 1040—line 50 or 1040A—line 31 Child support paid because of divorce or separation or as a result of a legal requirement. Don’t include support for children in your (or your parents’) household, as reported in question 90 (or question 66 for your parents). Taxable earnings from need-based employment programs, such as Federal Work-Study and need-based employment portions of fellowships and assistantships. Student grant and scholarship aid reported to the IRS in your (or your parents’) adjusted gross income. Includes AmeriCorps benefits (awards, living allowances, and interest accrual payments), as well as grant or scholarship portions of fellowships and assistantships. Enter in question 42 on Page 7. $ $

0 0
0

$ $

0

$ $

0

0

$
Page 8

0

Enter in question 86 $ on Page 5.

0
Handout

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

www.fafsa.ed.gov

IIIB - 14

2008 — 2009
FAFSA on the web worksheet
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL STUDENT AID

www.fafsa.ed.gov

DO NOT MAIL THIS WORKSHEET.
You must complete and submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to apply for federal student aid and to apply for most state and college aid. Applying online with FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.ed.gov is faster and easier than using a paper FAFSA. For state or college aid, the deadline may be as early as January 2008. See the table to the right for state deadlines. Check with your high school counselor or your college’s financial aid administrator about other deadlines.

• Complete this Worksheet only if you plan to use FAFSA on the Web to apply for federal student aid. • Sections in gray are for parent information. • In parentheses after each question is the number that is used on FAFSA on the Web and the paper FAFSA.

• Submit your FAFSA early, but not before January 1, 2008.

Apply Faster—Sign your FAFSA with a Federal Student Aid PIN. If you do not have a PIN, you can apply for one at www.pin.ed.gov. You will receive your PIN and then you can electronically sign when you submit your FAFSA. If you are providing parent information, one parent must also sign your FAFSA. To sign electronically, your parent should also apply for a PIN.

R D

T F A

You will need the following information to complete this Worksheet:
❏ Your Social Security Number and your parents’ Social Security Numbers if you are providing parent information; ❏ Your driver’s license number if you have one; ❏ Your Alien Registration Number if you are not a U.S. citizen; ❏ 2007 federal tax information or tax returns (including IRS W-2 information) for yourself (and spouse if you are married) and for your parents if you are providing parent information. If you have not yet filed a 2007 income tax return, you can still submit your FAFSA but you must provide income and tax information. ❏ Records of untaxed income, such as Social Security benefits, welfare benefits (e.g., TANF), and veterans benefits, for yourself, and your parents if you are providing parent information; and ❏ Information on savings, investments, and business and farm assets for yourself, and your parents if you are providing parent information.

WARNING! Be wary of organizations that charge a fee to submit your application or to find you money for school. In general, the help you pay for can be obtained for free from your school or from Federal Student Aid.

NOTE: If you or your family have unusual circumstances (such as loss of employment), complete FAFSA on the Web to the extent you can, then submit the application and consult the financial aid office at the college you plan to attend.

STATE AID DEADLINES Check with the school’s financial aid administrator for these states and territories: AL, *AS, CO, *FM, GA, *GU, *HI, *MH, *MP, NE, *NM, *NV, OR, PR, *PW, *SD, *TX, UT, *VA, *VI, *VT, WA, WI, and *WY AK April 15, 2008 (date received) AR Academic Challenge - June 1, 2008 Workforce Grant - Contact your financial aid administrator. Higher Education Opportunity Grant - June 1, 2008 (fall term) - November 1, 2008 (spring term) (date received) AZ June 30, 2009 (date received) * CA Initial awards - March 2, 2008 Additional community college awards September 2, 2008 (date postmarked) #* CT February 15, 2008 (date received) * DC June 30, 2008 (date received by state) DE April 15, 2008 (date received) FL May 15, 2008 (date processed) IA July 1, 2008 (date received) #* ID March 1, 2008 (date received) # IL First-time applicants - September 30, 2008 Continuing applicants - August 15, 2008 (date received) IN March 10, 2008 (date received) # *KS April 1, 2008 (date received) # KY March 15, 2008 (date received) LA July 1, 2008 (date received) # MA May 1, 2008 (date received) MD March 1, 2008 (date received) ME May 1, 2008 (date received) MI March 1, 2008 (date received) MN 30 days after term starts (date received) MO April 1, 2008 (date received) # MS MTAG and MESG Grants - September 15, 2008 HELP Scholarship - March 31, 2008 # MT March 1, 2008 (date received) NC March 15, 2008 (date received) ND March 15, 2008 (date received) NH May 1, 2008 (date received) NJ June 1, 2008, if you received a Tuition Aid Grant in 2007-2008 All other applicants - October 1, 2008, fall and spring terms - March 1, 2009, spring term only (date received) * NY May 1, 2009 (date received) OH October 1, 2008 (date received) # OK April 15, 2008 (date received) for best consideration * PA All 2007-2008 State Grant recipients & all non-2007-2008 State Grant recipients in degree programs - May 1, 2008 All other applicants - August 1, 2008 (date received) # RI March 1, 2008 (date received) SC Tuition Grants - June 30, 2008 (date received) # TN State Grant - March 1, 2008 State Lottery - September 1, 2008 (date received) * WV March 1, 2008 (date received) # For priority consideration, submit application by date specified. * Additional form may be required.

www.fafsa.ed.gov

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

PAge 1

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Handout

SECTION 1 – STUDENT INFORMATION
• Use of this Worksheet is optional. It should not be submitted to Federal Student Aid or to your school. • Not all of the questions from FAFSA on the Web appear in this Worksheet, but questions are generally ordered as they appear online. • Once you are online, you may be able to skip some questions based on your answers to earlier questions. Your Social Security Number (Q8) Your last name (Q1) Your driver’s license number (optional) (Q11) Are you a U.S. citizen? (Q14)

If you are neither a citizen nor an eligible noncitizen, you are not eligible for ❏ Eligible noncitizen Generally you are an eligible noncitizen if you are: federal student aid. However, you should still complete the application, because • A permanent U.S. resident with a Permanent Resident Card (I-551); you may be eligible for state or college aid. • A conditional permanent resident (I-551C); or If you are in the U.S. on an F1 or F2 student visa, or a J1 or J2 exchange visitor visa, or a G series visa (pertaining to international organizations), you must answer “Neither citizen nor eligible noncitizen.”

4 4 4 - 4 4 - 4 Davis 444444444 ❏ X U.S. citizen (U.S. national)

4

4 4

Your Alien Registration Number (Q15) If you are an eligible Your marital status as of today (Q16)

noncitizen, enter your eight- or nine-digit Alien Registration Number.

“As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA.

Month and year you were married, separated, divorced or widowed (Q17) (Example: Month and year: 05/1997) Your state of legal residence (Q18) Did you become a legal resident of your state before January 1, 2003? (Q19)

R D

T F A
A
M M Y ❏ X Yes M M Y ❏ Yes

• The holder of an Arrival-Departure Record (I-94) from the Department of Homeland Security showing any of the following designations: “Refugee,” “Asylum Granted,” “Parolee” (I-94 confirms paroled for a minimum of one year and status has not expired), or “Cuban-Haitian Entrant.”

❏ Neither citizen nor eligible noncitizen

❏ X Single, divorced, or widowed ❏ Married/remarried Y

❏ Separated Y

Y

❏ No Y Y Y

If “No,” when did you become a legal resident of your state? (Q20)
(Example: Month and year: 05/2004)

Most male students must register with the Selective Service System to get federal aid. If you are a male between the ages of 18 and 25 and NOT already registered with Selective Service, answer “Yes” and Selective Service will register you. (Q22) What degree or certificate will you be working on during the 2008-2009 school year? (Q23)

❏ No

❏ X 1st bachelor’s degree ❏ 2nd bachelor’s degree ❏ Associate degree (occupational/ technical program) ❏ Associate degree (general education or transfer program) ❏ Certificate or diploma for completing an occupational, technical, or educational program of less than two years ❏ X 1st year/never attended college before ❏ 1st year/attended college ❏ 2nd year/sophomore ❏ 3rd year/junior

❏ Certificate or diploma for completing an occupational, technical, or educational program of at least two years ❏ Teaching credential (nondegree program) ❏ Graduate or professional degree ❏ Other/Undecided

What will be your grade level when you begin the 2008-2009 school year? (Q24)

❏ 4th year/senior ❏ 5th year/other undergraduate ❏ 1st year graduate/professional ❏ Continuing graduate/professional or beyond

At the start of the 2008-2009 school year, what do you expect your enrollment status to be? (Q25)
(Enrollment definitions refer to undergraduate study.)

❏ X Full-time (at least 12 credit hours in a term or 24 clock hours per week) ❏ 3/4-time (at least 9 credit hours in a term or 18 clock hours per week) ❏ Half-time (at least 6 credit hours in a term or 12 clock hours per week) ❏ Less than half-time (fewer than 6 credit hours in a term or less than 12 clock hours per week) ❏ Not sure

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Handout

SECTION 1

(continued)

– STUDENT INFORMATION
❏ X Student loans (which you must pay back) ❏ Both work-study and student loans ❏ Neither ❏ Don’t know ❏ X No

In addition to grants, what types of student aid interest you? (Q26)

Will you have your first bachelor’s degree before July 1, 2008? (Q28) Highest school your father completed (Q29)
Some states and schools offer aid based upon the level of schooling your parents have completed.

❏ Yes ❏ Middle school/Jr. High ❏ High school ❏ X College or beyond ❏ Other/unknown ❏ Middle school/Jr. High ❏ High school ❏ X College or beyond ❏ Other/unknown ❏ Yes

Highest school your mother completed (Q30)

Some states and schools offer aid based upon the level of schooling your parents have completed.

Have you been convicted for the possession or sale of illegal drugs for an offense that occurred while you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study)? (Q31)
A federal law suspends eligibility for some students with drug convictions. Count only federal or state convictions for the possession or sale of illegal drugs if the offense occurred during a period of enrollment for which you were receiving federal student aid (grants, loans, and/or work-study). Do not count convictions that have been removed from your record, or occurred before you turned age 18, unless you were tried as an adult. If you answer “Yes,” you can use an interactive worksheet when completing the FAFSA online, or you can print a worksheet at www.fafsa.ed.gov/q31wksht89.pdf. Based on your answers to the worksheet questions, you can determine if the conviction affects your eligibility for federal student aid.

R D

T F A

If you have a conviction for possessing or selling illegal drugs, you should submit your FAFSA anyway. You may be eligible for non-federal student aid from state or private sources.

❏ X No

SECTION 2 – STUDENT DEPENDENCY STATUS
Were you born before January 1, 1985? (Q48) At the beginning of the 2008-2009 school year, will you be working on a master’s or doctorate program (such as an MA, MBA, MD, JD, PhD, EdD, or graduate certificate, etc.)? (Q49) As of today, are you married? (Q50) (Answer “Yes” if you are separated but not divorced.) “As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA. Do you have children who receive more than half of their support from you? (Q51) Do you have dependents other than your children/spouse who live with you and who receive more than half of their support from you, now and through June 30, 2009? (Q52) Are (a) both of your parents deceased, or (b) are you (or were you until age 18) a ward/dependent of the court? (Q53) Are you currently serving on active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposes other than training? (Q54) Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces? (Q55)
Answer “Yes,” you are a veteran, if you (1) have engaged in active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, or Coast Guard) or are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee who was called to active duty for purposes other than training, or were a cadet or midshipman at one of the service academies, and (2) were released under a condition other than dishonorable. Also answer “Yes” if you are not a veteran now but will be by June 30, 2009. Answer “No,” you are not a veteran, if you (1) have never engaged in active duty in the U.S. Armed Forces, (2) are currently an ROTC student or a cadet or midshipman at a service academy, or (3) are a National Guard or Reserves enlistee activated only for training. Also answer “No” if you are currently serving in the U.S. Armed Forces and will continue to serve through June 30, 2009.

❏ Yes ❏ Yes

❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ X No ❏ No X

❏ Yes ❏ Yes ❏ Yes

❏ Yes ❏ Yes ❏ Yes

If you answered “YES” to ANY of the previous questions, you do not have to provide parental information. Skip to Section 4 on page 6. If you answered “NO” to ALL of the previous questions, then you must provide parental information. Complete Section 3 on the next page.
www.fafsa.ed.gov 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet Page 3

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Handout

SECTION 3 – PARENTAl Information
• If you answered “NO” to all the questions in Section 2, you must complete this section even if you do not live with your parents. Refer to your parents’ IRS tax return when necessary.
- Answer the questions as of the date you will complete and sign your FAFSA. - Grandparents, foster parents and legal guardians are not considered parents on this form unless they have legally adopted you. - If both of your parents are living and married to each other, answer the questions about them. - If your parent is widowed or single, answer the questions about that parent. If your widowed parent is remarried as of today, answer the questions about that parent and the person to whom your parent is married (your stepparent). - If your parents are divorced or separated, answer the questions about the parent you lived with more during the past 12 months. If you did not live with one parent more than the other, give answers about the parent who provided more financial support during the past 12 months, or during the most recent year that you actually received support from a parent. If this parent is remarried as of today, answer the questions about that parent and the person to whom your parent is married (your stepparent).

What is your parents’ marital status as of today? (Q56)
“As of today” refers to the day that you sign your FAFSA.

Month and year your parents were married, separated, divorced, or widowed (Q57) (Example: Month and year: 05/1997) What is your parents’ e-mail address? (optional)

What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) Social Security Number? (Q58) What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) last name? (Q59)

What is your father’s (or stepfather’s) date of birth? (Q61)
(Example: Month, day and year: 05/07/1961)

R D

T F A

❏ X Married/remarried

❏ Single ❏ Divorced/separated ❏ Widowed M 1 M Y Y Y Y 0 1 9 9 2

Denise.Palmer@americaemail.com

4 4 4 Palmer
M M 0 7

-

6 6

-

6 6 6 6
Y Y 6 2

D D 1 0 1 Y -

Y 9 -

What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) Social Security Number? (Q62) What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) last name? (Q63) What is your mother’s (or stepmother’s) date of birth? (Q65)
(Example: Month, day and year: 05/07/1961)

4 4 4
M M D

5 5
D Y

5 5 5 5
Y Y Y

What is your parents’ state of legal residence? (Q68) Did your parents become legal residents of the state before January 1, 2003? (Q69) If “No,” give month and year legal residency began for the parent who has lived in the state the longest. (Q70) (Example: Month and year: 05/2004) Have your parents completed a 2007 IRS income tax return or other income tax return? (Q76) What income tax return did your parents file or will they file for 2007? (Q77)

NY ❏ X Yes
M M Y Y Y

❏ No Y

❏ X Already completed ❏ Will file ❏ Will not file

❏ X IRS 1040

❏ IRS 1040A, 1040EZ ❏ A foreign tax return ❏ A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or a freely associated state

If your parents have filed or will file a 1040, were they eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ? (Q78)
In general, a person is eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes less than $100,000, does not itemize deductions, does not receive income from his or her business or farm, and does not receive alimony. A person is not eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes $100,000 or more, itemizes deductions, receives income from his or her own business or farm, is self-employed, receives alimony, or is required to file Schedule D for capital gains. If you filed a 1040 only to claim Hope or Lifetime Learning tax credits, and would have otherwise been eligible for a 1040A or 1040EZ, you should answer “Yes.”
Page 4 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

❏ Yes ❏ X No ❏ Don’t know

www.fafsa.ed.gov

IIIB - 18

Handout

SECTION 3

(continued)

– PARENTAl Information
❏ Supplemental Security Income ❏ Food Stamps ❏ Free or Reduced Price School Lunch ❏ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) ❏ Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) $

In 2007, did you, your parents, or anyone in your parents’ household receive benefits from any of the federal benefit programs listed? (Q71-75) Mark all the programs that apply.
The federal benefit programs are listed in the answer column. Report benefits received for all of your parents’ household members. Include in your parents’ household: (1) your parents and yourself, even if you don’t live with your parents; (2) your parents’ other children if (a) your parents will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, or (b) the children could answer “No” to every question in Section 2 of this worksheet; and (3) other people only if they live with your parents, your parents provide more than half of their support, and your parents will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

What was your parents’ adjusted gross income for 2007? (Q79)
Adjusted gross income is on IRS form 1040—line 37; 1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.

83,450
$

How much did your parents earn from working (wages, salaries, tips, combat pay, etc.) in 2007? (Q82, 83) Answer this question whether or not your parents filed a tax
return. This information may be on their W-2 forms, or on IRS Form 1040—lines 7+12+18+Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1.

What was the amount your parents paid in income tax for 2007? (Q80) Enter your parents’ exemptions for 2007. (Q81)

Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 57; 1040A—line 35; or 1040EZ—line 11.

Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or 1040A—line 6d. On the 1040EZ, if a person checked either the “you” or “spouse” box on line 5, use EZ worksheet line F to determine the number of exemptions ($3,300 equals one exemption). If a person didn’t check either box on line 5, enter 01 if he or she is single, or 02 if he or she is married.

How many people are in your parents’ household? (Q66)

Include in your parents’ household: (1) your parents and yourself, even if you don’t live with your parents, (2) your parents’ other children if (a) your parents will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, or (b) the children could answer “No” to every question in Section 2 of this worksheet, and (3) include other people only if they live with your parents, your parents provide more than half of their support, and your parents will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

R D

T F A

Father/Stepfather

68,000 13,500

Mother/Stepmother $ $

6,524 3

4

How many people in the question above will be college students in 2008-2009? (Q67)
Always count yourself. Do not include your parents. Include others only if they will attend college at least half-time in 2008-2009 in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate.

1

Parent FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C. Complete the Worksheets on page 8 to answer the questions below.
Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet A (Q84) Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet B (Q85) Your parents’ amount from FAFSA Worksheet C (Q86) $ $ $

0 6,600 1,500

Parent Asset Information
• Investments include real estate (do not include the family home), trust funds, UGMA and UTMA accounts, money market funds, mutual funds, certificates of deposit, stocks, stock options, bonds, other securities, Coverdell savings accounts, 529 college savings plans, the refund value of 529 state prepaid tuition plans, installment and land sale contracts (including mortgages held), commodities, etc. For more information about reporting educational savings plans call 1-800-4-FED-AID. Investment value means the current balance or market value of these investments as of today. Investment debt means only those debts that are related to the investments. • Do not include the value of life insurance, retirement plans (pension funds, annuities, noneducation IRAs, Keogh plans, etc.) or cash, savings, and checking accounts already reported in Q43 and Q87. • Business and/or investment farm value includes the market value of land, buildings, machinery, equipment, inventory, etc. Business and/or investment farm debt means only those debts for which the business or investment farm was used as collateral.

As of today, what is your parents’ total current balance in cash, savings, and checking accounts? (Q87) As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ investments, including real estate (not their home)? (Q88) Net worth means current value minus debt. As of today, what is the net worth of your parents’ current business and/or investment farms? (Q89) Do not include the value of a family farm that you (your spouse and/or your parents) live on
and operate. Do not include the value of a small business that you (your spouse and/or your parents) own and control and that has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees. www.fafsa.ed.gov

$ $ $

15,000

0
0
Page 5

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

IIIB - 19

Handout

SECTION 4 – STUDENT FINANCES
• Answer the questions as of the date you will complete and sign your FAFSA. • This section asks about your income. Refer to your IRS tax return when necessary. • If you filed a foreign tax return, convert all figures to U.S. dollars, using the exchange rate. To view the daily exchange rates, go to www.federalreserve.gov/releases/h10/update. • If you are married as of today, report your and your spouse’s income, even if you were not married in 2007. Ignore references to spouse if you are single, divorced, separated or widowed. Have you completed a 2007 IRS income tax return or other income tax return? (Q32) What income tax return did you file or will you file for 2007? (Q33) ❏ Already completed ❏ Will file ❏ X Will not file ❏ IRS 1040 ❏ IRS 1040A or 1040EZ ❏ A foreign tax return ❏ A tax return with Puerto Rico, another U.S. territory or a freely associated state ❏ Yes ❏ No ❏ Don’t know

If you filed or will file a 1040, were you eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ? (Q34)

In general, you are eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if you make less than $100,000, do not itemize deductions, do not receive income from your business or farm, and do not receive alimony. A person is not eligible to file a 1040A or 1040EZ if he or she makes $100,000 or more, itemizes deductions, receives income from his or her own business or farm, is self-employed, receives alimony, or is required to file Schedule D for capital gains. If you filed a 1040 only to claim Hope or Lifetime Learning tax credits, and you would otherwise have been eligible for a 1040A or 1040EZ, you should answer “Yes.”

What was your (and your spouse’s) adjusted gross income for 2007? (Q35)
Adjusted gross income is on IRS Form 1040—line 37; 1040A—line 21; or 1040EZ—line 4.

R D

T F A
$ $ $

0
$ $

How much did you (and your spouse) earn from working (wages, salaries, tips, combat pay, etc.) in 2007? (Q38, 39)
Answer this question whether or not you filed a tax return. This information may be on your W-2 forms or on IRS Form 1040—lines 7+12+18+Box 14 of IRS Schedule K-1 (Form 1065); 1040A—line 7; or 1040EZ—line 1.

Student Spouse

800

If you receive veterans’ education benefits, for how many months from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, will you receive these benefits? Use 01 to 12. (Q46) What is the amount of your monthly veterans’ education benefits? (Q47) What was your (and your spouse’s) income tax for 2007? (Q36)
Income tax amount is on IRS Form 1040—line 57; 1040A—line 35; or 1040EZ—line 11.

0

Enter your (and your spouse’s) exemptions for 2007. (Q37)
Exemptions are on IRS Form 1040—line 6d or 1040A—line 6d. On the 1040EZ, if a person checked either the “you” or “spouse” box on line 5, use EZ worksheet line F to determine the number of exemptions ($3,300 equals one exemption). If a person didn’t check either box on line 5, enter 01 if he or she is single, or 02 if he or she is married.

0

• If you answered “YES” to ANY question in Section 2, answer the following questions. • If you answer “NO” to all the questions in Section 2, skip these questions and go to “Student FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C.”

How many people are in your household? (Q90)
Include in your household: (1) yourself (and your spouse, if you are married), (2) your children, if you will provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009, and (3) other people if they now live with you, you provide more than half of their support, and you will continue to provide more than half of their support from July 1, 2008, through June 30, 2009.

How many people in the question above will be college students in 2008-2009? (Q91)
Always count yourself. Include others only if they will attend college at least half-time in 2008-2009 in a program that leads to a college degree or certificate.

Page 6

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

www.fafsa.ed.gov

IIIB - 20

Handout

SECTION 4

(continued)

– STUDENT FINANCES
❏ Supplemental Security Income ❏ Food Stamps ❏ Free or Reduced Price School Lunch ❏ Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) ❏ Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC)

In 2007, did you (or your spouse) or anyone in your household (from Q90) receive benefits from any of the federal benefit programs listed? (Q92-96) Mark all the programs that apply.
The federal benefit programs are listed in the answer column. Report benefits received for all of your household members. Use the instructions in Q90 to identify who is included in your household. Answering these questions will not reduce your eligibility for student aid or these other federal benefits.

Student FAFSA Worksheets A, B and C. Complete the Worksheets on page 8 to answer the questions below.
Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet A (Q40) Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet B (Q41) Your amount from FAFSA Worksheet C (Q42) $ $

Student Asset Information (See page 5 for instructions on reporting assets.)
As of today, what is your (and your spouse’s) total current balance of cash, savings and checking accounts? (Q43) As of today, what is the net worth of your (and your spouse’s) investments, including real estate (not your home)? (Q44)
Net worth means current value minus debt.

As of today, what is the net worth of your (and your spouse’s) current business and/or investment farms? (Q45)

Do not include the value of a family farm that you (your spouse and/or your parents) live on and operate. Do not include the value of a small business that you (your spouse and/or your parents) own and control and that has 100 or fewer full-time or full-time equivalent employees.

R D

T F A
$ $ $ 3rd school (Q97.e) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.f) 8th school (Q97.o) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.p)

$

0 0 0 0 0 0

SECTION 5 – SCHOOLS TO RECEIVE INFORMATION • If you do not know the school code, write the school’s name. You will have a chance online to search for the school code. • For each school code, indicate the corresponding housing plan. 1st school Federal School Code 2nd school (Q97.c) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.d) 7th school (Q97.m) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.n) 4th school (Q97.g) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.h) 9th school (Q97.q) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.r) 5th school (Q97.i) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.j) 10th school (Q97.s) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.t)

444444
(Q97.a) ❏ X on campus

Housing Plan

❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.b) 6th school

Federal School Code

(Q97.k) ❏ on campus ❏ off campus ❏ with parent (Q97.l)

Housing Plan

Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov and enter the information from this worksheet.
Additional help is available online, or you can call 1-800-4-FED-AID. TTY users (hearing impaired) may call 1-800-730-8913. For more information on federal student aid visit www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov. You can also talk with your school’s financial aid office about other types of student aid that may be available

DO NOT MAIL THIS WORKSHEET.
www.fafsa.ed.gov 2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet Page 7

IIIB - 21

Handout

FAFSA WORKSHEETS - CALENDAR YEAR 2007
These worksheets are solely for completing the FAFSA Worksheet questions, on page 7 for the student and, on page 5 for the student’s parents.

FAFSA Worksheet A—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $ $ $

0 0 0 0

Parents For Page 5 Earned income credit from IRS Form 1040—line 66a; 1040A—line 40a; or 1040EZ—line 8a Additional child tax credit from IRS Form 1040—line 68 or 1040A—line 41 Welfare benefits, including Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF). Do not include food stamps or subsidized housing. Social Security benefits received, for all household members as reported in question 90 (or 66 for your parents), that were not taxed (such as SSI). Report benefits paid to parents in the Parents’ column, and benefits paid directly to student (or spouse) in the Student/Spouse column. Enter in question 40 on Page 7. $ $ $ $

0 0 0

0 0

$

0

FAFSA Worksheet B—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Payments to tax-deferred pension and savings plans (paid directly or withheld from earnings), including, but not limited to, amounts reported on the W-2 Form in Boxes 12a through 12d, codes D, E, F, G, H, and S. IRA deductions and payments to self-employed SEP, SIMPLE, and Keogh and other qualified plans from IRS Form 1040—line 28 + line 32 or 1040A—line 17 Child support received for all children. Don’t include foster care or adoption payments. Tax exempt interest income from IRS Form 1040—line 8b or 1040A—line 8b Foreign income exclusion from IRS Form 2555—line 45 or 2555EZ—line 18 Untaxed portions of IRA distributions from IRS Form 1040—lines (15a minus 15b) or 1040A—lines (11a minus 11b). Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here. Untaxed portions of pensions from IRS Form 1040—lines (16a minus 16b) or 1040A—lines (12a minus 12b). Exclude rollovers. If negative, enter a zero here. Credit for federal tax on special fuels from IRS Form 4136—line 20 (nonfarmers only) Housing, food and other living allowances paid to members of the military, clergy and others (including cash payments and cash value of benefits) Veterans’ noneducation benefits such as Disability, Death Pension, or Dependency & Indemnity Compensation (DIC), and/or VA Educational Work-Study allowances Other untaxed income not reported elsewhere on Worksheets A and B, such as workers’ compensation, untaxed portions of railroad retirement benefits, Black Lung Benefits, disability, etc. Tax filers only: report combat pay not included in adjusted gross income (Q35 and Q79). Don’t include student aid, Workforce Investment Act educational benefits, combat pay if you are not a tax filer, or benefits from flexible spending arrangements (e.g., cafeteria plans). Money received, or paid on your behalf (e.g., bills), not reported elsewhere on this form Enter in question 41 on Page 7.

R D

T F A

Enter in question 84 $ on Page 5.

Parents For Page 5 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,000 0

1,600 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

$ $

0 0

XXXXXXXXX

Enter in question 85 $ on Page 5.

6,600

FAFSA Worksheet C—Report Annual Amounts
Student/Spouse For Page 7 $ $

0 0

Parents For Page 5 Education credits (Hope and Lifetime Learning tax credits) from IRS Form 1040—line 50 or 1040A—line 31 Child support paid because of divorce or separation or as a result of a legal requirement. Don’t include support for children in your (or your parents’) household, as reported in question 90 (or question 66 for your parents). Taxable earnings from need-based employment programs, such as Federal Work-Study and need-based employment portions of fellowships and assistantships. Student grant and scholarship aid reported to the IRS in your (or your parents’) adjusted gross income. Includes AmeriCorps benefits (awards, living allowances, and interest accrual payments), as well as grant or scholarship portions of fellowships and assistantships. Enter in question 42 on Page 7. $ $

1,500 0
0 0

$ $

0

$ $

0

$
Page 8

0

Enter in question 86 $ on Page 5.

1,500
Handout

2008-2009 FAFSA on the Web Worksheet

www.fafsa.ed.gov

IIIB - 22

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)

Slide IV - 1

Section IV Academic Competitiveness Grants

Slide IV - 2

Background
• One of two new grant programs created by The Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005 (HERA)
– National Science and Mathematics Access to Retain Talent, or SMART, Grants for third and fourth year students

• Encourage students to be academically prepared for college • Help maintain U.S. competitiveness in global economy
Slide IV - 3

IV - 1

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
Award Amounts
• $750 for first year students • $1,300 for second year students

Slide IV - 4

ACG Eligibility Criteria
• U.S. citizen • Federal Pell Grant recipient for same award year • Full time enrollment • First or second year student in a two or four year degree program • Completion of a rigorous secondary school program
Slide IV - 5

ACG Eligibility Criteria: First Year Students
• Not previously enrolled as a degree seeking student in an undergraduate program • Completed secondary program of study after January 1, 2006

Slide IV - 6

IV - 2

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
ACG Eligibility Criteria: Second Year Students
• Completed secondary program of study after January 1, 2005 • Has at least a 3.0 GPA in an eligible program at end of first year of college

Slide IV - 7

Rigorous Secondary School Program Options
• State designated programs • Coursework designated by the Secretary • AP/IB

Slide IV - 8

State Designated Programs
• An advanced or honors diploma established by a state and in existence for the 2004/05 or 2005/06 school years • State Scholar’s Initiative • Submitted state recognized plan

Slide IV - 9

IV - 3

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
Coursework Designated by the Secretary
• 4 years of English • 3 years of mathematics (Algebra I and higher) • 3 years of science (biology, chemistry, physics) • 3 years of social studies • 1 year of a foreign language
Slide IV - 10

AP/IB
Successful completion of at least two courses with a minimum passing test score in those two courses
• Score of at least 3 for Advanced Placement • Score of at least 4 for International Baccalaureate

Slide IV - 11

Rigorous Program Options
• All states have at least one designated rigorous program • Students from every state have at least three ways to meet rigorous program requirement

Slide IV - 12

IV - 4

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
Documenting Completion of Rigorous Programs
• Colleges required to collect and retain documentation that a student meets at least one of the options • Colleges may document the program option that is the most efficient for them
– Students may eligible under more than one definition of rigorous program
Slide IV - 13

How Students Apply: FAFSA on the Web
• Submit FAFSA • If data indicates possible eligibility, prompted to answer questions

Slide IV - 14

How Students Apply: Paper FAFSA
• Student Aid Report (SAR) indicates possible eligibility • Instructed to call Federal Student Aid Center at 1-800-4FEDAID (1-800-4333243) to answer questions about eligibility

Slide IV - 15

IV - 5

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
How Students Apply: Self Identification
Self identify to financial aid office at college
• In person or in writing • Will need to submit documentation

Slide IV - 16

What Counselors Can Do
• Encourage students to take rigorous courses • Provide documentation of completion of rigorous program
– In a timely manner – To students or directly to colleges

Slide IV - 17

What Counselors Can Do
• Let students enrolled in AP or IB classes know how important it is to take the exams • Tell students about the program

Slide IV - 18

IV - 6

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
GPA for Second Year ACG
• For second academic year, student must have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0 from first year • GPA only checked once, at end of first year

Slide IV - 19

Resources
www.fsa4schools.ed.gov
• Rigorous high school program codes • Submit a question feature

Slide IV - 20

Questions

Slide IV - 21

IV - 7

Participant Guide

Section IV
Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)

Slide IV - 22

IV - 8

Participant Guide

Academic Competitiveness Grants (ACG)
Background • • • One of two new grant programs creating by the Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005 (HERA) Encourage students to be academically prepared for college Help maintain U.S. competitiveness in global economy

Award Amounts • • $750 for first year students $1,300 for second year students

General ACG Eligibility Criteria • • • • • U.S. citizen Federal Pell Grant recipient for same award year Full time enrollment First or second year student in a two or four year degree program Completion of a rigorous secondary school program

ACG Eligibility Criteria: First Year Students • • Not previously enrolled as a degree seeking student in an undergraduate program Completed secondary program of study after January 1, 2006

ACG Eligibility Criteria: Second Year Students • • Completed secondary program of study after January 1, 2005 Has at least a 3.0 GPA in an eligible program from first year of college study

Rigorous Secondary School Program Options • State designated programs An advanced or honors diploma established by a state and in existence for the 2004/05 and 2005/06 school years State Scholar’s Initiative

IV - 1

Handout

Submitted state recognized plan • Coursework designated by the Secretary 4 years of English 3 years of mathematics (Algebra I and higher) 3 years of science (biology, chemistry, physics) 3 years of social science 1 year of a foreign language • Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) Successful completion of at least two courses with a minimum passing score on tests Score of at least 3 for AP Score of at least 4 for IB • • All states have at least one designated rigorous program Students from every state have at least three ways to meet rigorous program requirement

Documenting Completion of Rigorous Programs • • Colleges required to collect and retain documentation that confirms a student meets at least one of the rigorous program options Colleges may document the eligibility option that is the most efficient for the them Students may meet more than one definition of rigorous program How Students Apply • FAFSA on the Web Submit FAFSA If data indicates eligibility, prompted to answer questions • Paper FAFSA Student Aid Report (SAR) will indicate possible eligibility Instructed to call the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4FEDAID (1-800-433-3243) to answer questions about eligibility • Self identify to financial aid office In person or in writing Will need to submit documentation

IV - 2

Handout

What Counselors Can Do • • Encourage students to take courses that meet the definition of “rigor” Provide students with documentation showing they have meet the rigorous program criterion Provide in a timely manner Provide to students or directly to college • • • Let students enrolled in AP or IB classes how important it is to take the exams Tell students about the program Emphasize importance of first year GPA

GPA for Second Year ACG • • For second academic year, student must have a cumulative GPA of at least a 3.0 from first year GPA only checked once, at the end of first year Cannot gain eligibility during second year Resources • www.fsa4schools.ed.gov Rigorous high school program codes Submit a question feature

IV - 3

Handout

This Page Intentionally Left Blank

IV - 4

Handout

Section V
Searching for Scholarships

Slide V - 1

Section V Searching for Scholarships

Slide V - 2

Scholarship Sources
• Federal • State • Institutional • Private

Slide V - 3

V-1

Participant Guide

Section V
Searching for Scholarships
Federal Sources
www.students.gov
• U.S. Department of Education (Robert C. Byrd Honors Scholarship • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • U.S. Armed Forces

Slide V - 4

State and Institutional Sources
• Insert URL for state aid agency • Insert URLs for institutions

Slide V - 5

Private Sources
• Foundations • Community organizations and civic groups • Religious or ethnicity-based organizations • Organizations related to student’s field • Local businesses and employers
Slide V - 6

V-2

Participant Guide

Section V
Searching for Scholarships

Internet Research Tools

Slide V - 7

Typical On Line Scholarship Search
• Search using keyword • Search targeted to student’s information • Use free searches

Slide V - 8

Avoiding Financial Aid Fraud

Slide V - 9

V-3

Participant Guide

Section V
Searching for Scholarships
Warning Signs of Fraud
• Students unaware of free resources • Students pay for help or “guaranteed” aid before seeking advice from knowledgeable adult

Slide V - 10

Common Fraud Complaints
• Paying for guaranteed aid and not receiving anything • Paying for help to find aid • Paying to file the FAFSA

Slide V - 11

Resources for Avoiding Financial Aid Fraud

Slide V - 12

V-4

Participant Guide

Section V
Searching for Scholarships
U.S. Department of Education Web Site
• Looking for Student Aid • Student publications page • Office of the Inspector General hotline

Slide V - 13

Federal Trade Commission Site
• Handouts • Lists of individuals and companies found guilty of fraud • Complaint form • Publications to order
Slide V - 14

Slide V - 15

V-5

Participant Guide

Fraud Awareness Resources
U.S. Department of Education
www.studentaid.ed.gov/LSA Handouts: Save Your Money, Save Your Identity Links: Text of College Scholarship Fraud Act Annual Reports to Congress on financial aid fraud www.studentaid.ed.gov/pubs Handouts: Don’t Get Scammed on Your Way to College Don’t Get Stung Other student info topics, including identity theft Ordering: Hard copy of Save Your Money, Save Your Identity available at www.FSAPubs.org

Complaints: 1-800-MIS-USED www.ed.gov/misused oig.hotline@ed.gov

Federal Trade Commission
www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams Flyers: OUCH! Students Getting Stung Trying to Find $$$ for College 6 $igns That Your $cholarship is $unk Links: List of defendants in Project $cholar$cam Spanish content www.ftc.gov/counselors Links: OUCH! Students Getting Stung Trying to Find $$$ for College Other consumer info topics, including identity theft Ordering instructions for FTC publications Complaints: 1-877-FTC-HELP www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams

V-1

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Save Your Money, Save Your Identity
How Financial Aid Applicants Can Avoid Fraud and Identity Theft Save Your Money
Don’t Pay for Help Finding Money for College
Commercial financial aid advice services can cost well over $1,000. You might have heard or seen these claims at seminars, over the phone from telemarketers, or online: • • • “Buy now or miss this opportunity.” Don’t give in to pressure tactics. Remember, the “opportunity” is a chance to pay for information you could find yourself for free. We’ve provided a list of sources below. “We guarantee you’ll get aid.” A company could claim it fulfilled its promise if you were offered student loans or a $200 scholarship. Is that worth a fee of $1,000 or more? “I’ve got aid for you; give me your credit card or bank account number.” Never give out a credit card or bank account number unless you know the organization you are giving it to is legitimate. You could be putting yourself at risk of identity theft. For tips on avoiding identity theft, see “Save Your Identity” below.

Try these free sources of information:
• • • • • • • • • • • • the U.S. Department of Education’s Web site: www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov the Federal Student Aid Information Center (see back of brochure) other federal agencies: www.students.gov your state education agency a college or career school financial aid office a high school or TRIO counselor your library’s reference section FREE online scholarship searches foundations, religious or community organizations, local businesses or civic groups organizations (including professional associations) related to your field of interest ethnicity-based organizations your employer or your parents’ employers

Don’t Pay for the FAFSA
Several Web sites offer help filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for a fee. These sites are not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education. We urge you not to pay these sites for assistance that is provided free elsewhere. The official FAFSA is at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov, and you can get free help from • the financial aid administrator at your college, • the FAFSA’s online help at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov and • the Federal Student Aid Information Center (see back of brochure). If you are asked for your credit card information while filling out the FAFSA online, you are not at the official government site. Remember, the FAFSA site address has .gov in it!
V-3 Handout

Save Your Identity
Keep Your Information Safe
How Does Identity Theft Happen?
Criminals gain access to personal data such as names, Social Security numbers, and bank and credit card information. Using the stolen data, the criminal can fraudulently obtain credit cards, establish cellular phone accounts, and more.

Reduce Your Risk When Applying for Aid
• • Apply for federal student aid by filling out the FAFSA at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov. After completing the FAFSA online, exit the application and close the browser; any cookies created during your session will be deleted automatically. Keep your Federal Student Aid PIN in a secure place. (Get your PIN at the FAFSA site.) Don’t tell anyone your PIN, even if that person is helping you fill out the FAFSA. Review your financial aid award documents and keep track of the amounts applied for and awarded. If someone offers you aid for which you haven’t applied, don’t reveal any personal information before checking with your high school counselor or college financial aid officer. Shred receipts and documents with personal information if they are no longer needed. Immediately report all lost or stolen identification (credit card, driver’s license, etc.) to the issuer (and to the police, if appropriate).

• • • • • •

Report Fraud and Identity Theft
Report Financial Aid Fraud
A company charging for financial aid advice is not committing fraud unless it doesn’t deliver what it promises. For more information about financial aid fraud or to report fraud, call the Federal Trade Commission toll free at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or go to www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams.

Report Identity Theft
If you suspect that your student information has been stolen, it is important to act quickly. These offices will help you determine what steps to take depending on your situation: U.S. Department of Education Office of Inspector General Hotline 1-800-MIS-USED (1-800-647-8733) complain online: www.ed.gov/misused Federal Trade Commission 1-877-IDTHEFT (1-877-438-4338) complain online: www.ftc.gov/idtheft

V-4

Handout

More information about federal student aid: www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov Federal Student Aid Information Center 1-800-4-FED-AID (1-800-433-3243) TTY for the hearing impaired: 1-800-730-8913 For callers without access to the toll-free number: 1-319-337-5665

This information is available in brochure form. Students may order single copies from 1-800-4FED-AID or from www.edpubs.org. Counselors may order in bulk from www.FSAPubs.org.
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Section VII
Conclusion

Slide VII - 1

Section VII Conclusion

Slide VII - 2

Conclusion
• • • • • • • Being Involved in the Process An Overview of Aid Programs Applying for Financial Aid Academic Competitiveness Grants Searching for Scholarships State and Institutional Aid Opportunities Next Step – Resources
Slide VII - 3

VII - 1

Participant Guide

Section VII
Conclusion
Federal Resources
• Print Documents • Federal Web Sites • Phone Number

Slide VII - 4

Miscellaneous Resources
• Review this section for a variety of Web site that contain financial aid resource information for counselors as you assist students and parents • Features College Goal Sunday, “Ask an Advisor” Training Manual and an EnglishSpanish Glossary
Slide VII - 5

Questions

Slide VII - 6

VII - 2

Participant Guide

Section VII
Conclusion
Thank You
• We know how important you are to students and their families and we thank you for everything you do • Graduates of NT4CM are now official members of the Network!

Slide VII - 7

The Network
• A Federal Student Aid driven community of counselors and mentors, access groups and organizations • The goal of the Network is to help students and their families manage financing postsecondary education

Slide VII - 8

Members of the Network
• Members are the experts in helping students and their families prepare financially for college • When students see the Network logo, they will know that they are speaking to an expert – and a trusted source • Membership in the Network means you are a trusted source
Slide VII - 9

VII - 3

Participant Guide

Section VII
Conclusion
How the Network Supports You – The Benefits
• Now that different areas of financial aid have joined forces, you will benefit from shared information, full support and combined resources Federal Student Aid, local FAAs and their GA College Access groups • More programs like NT4CM in the future • Great source of support and information for each other
Slide VII - 10

“My Story” PSA Get the Word Out
• You’ll be the first to know! • We’ll keep you informed of developments via email and IFAP postings • We’ll provide promotional posters and flyers • “My Story” videos will be posted on the Federal Student Aid Web site for presentation needs • You’ll receive email alerts when videos are posted on YouTube and MySpace
Slide VII - 11

“My Story” PSA How You Can Get Involved
• Help Federal Student Aid find the future “My Story” stars • Encourage recent high school graduates to submit their own stories • Watch for details in your e-mail about this exciting opportunity

Slide VII - 12

VII - 4

Participant Guide

Section VII
Conclusion
Evaluations
• Your opinion is very important to us • Please take the time to complete the evaluation form • We will use your comments and suggestions to improve future training and outreach efforts • Please return completed evaluation forms to us
Slide VII - 13

Slide VII - 14

VII - 5

Participant Guide

Save Your Money, Save Your Identity
How Financial Aid Applicants Can Avoid Fraud and Identity Theft Save Your Money
Don’t Pay for Help Finding Money for College
Commercial financial aid advice services can cost well over $1,000. You might have heard or seen these claims at seminars, over the phone from telemarketers, or online: • • • “Buy now or miss this opportunity.” Don’t give in to pressure tactics. Remember, the “opportunity” is a chance to pay for information you could find yourself for free. We’ve provided a list of sources below. “We guarantee you’ll get aid.” A company could claim it fulfilled its promise if you were offered student loans or a $200 scholarship. Is that worth a fee of $1,000 or more? “I’ve got aid for you; give me your credit card or bank account number.” Never give out a credit card or bank account number unless you know the organization you are giving it to is legitimate. You could be putting yourself at risk of identity theft. For tips on avoiding identity theft, see “Save Your Identity” below.

Try these free sources of information:
• • • • • • • • • • • • the U.S. Department of Education’s Web site: www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov the Federal Student Aid Information Center (see back of brochure) other federal agencies: www.students.gov your state education agency a college or career school financial aid office a high school or TRIO counselor your library’s reference section FREE online scholarship searches foundations, religious or community organizations, local businesses or civic groups organizations (including professional associations) related to your field of interest ethnicity-based organizations your employer or your parents’ employers

Don’t Pay for the FAFSA
Several Web sites offer help filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) for a fee. These sites are not affiliated with or endorsed by the U.S. Department of Education. We urge you not to pay these sites for assistance that is provided free elsewhere. The official FAFSA is at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov, and you can get free help from • the financial aid administrator at your college, • the FAFSA’s online help at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov and • the Federal Student Aid Information Center (see back of brochure). If you are asked for your credit card information while filling out the FAFSA online, you are not at the official government site. Remember, the FAFSA site address has .gov in it!
© NT4CM 2007 V-3 Handout

State

State

Resources

Resources

Resources

Master

Master Resources

Master Resource List
Federal Student Aid Information Center Provides counselors, students, and families with information about federal financial aid programs and answers questions about financial aid and completing the FAFSA. 1-800-4-FED-AID or 1-800-433-3243, 1-800-730-8913 (TTY) studentaid@ed.gov Web Sites www.fsa4counselors.ed.gov FSA for Counselors provides basic college access and financial aid information for middle school, high school, and TRIO counselors. Features include the Counselors and Mentors Handbook, other federal student aid publications (with instructions on how to download or order them), training information, and scripts and slides for presenting a financial aid night. Click on “Network & Potential Partnerships” in the Counselor Resources section to learn about associations that support your work and to access a search tool to help you find TRIO programs around the country. What you can download or print from this site: • Counselors and Mentors Handbook • Finding Money for College, a PowerPoint presentation introducing basic concepts of financial aid and the FAFSA process • Application Form Tracking Worksheet, which allows students to track the various pieces of their college applications • Award Package Comparison Worksheet, which allows students to compare and contrast financial aid award letters from various colleges • Cost of Attendance Comparison Worksheet, which allows students to compare and contrast the costs of different colleges • Financial Aid Application Checklist, which allows students to track the different parts of their financial aid application • Financial Aid Consultants and Scholarship Search Services Fact Sheet, which provides information on consultants and scholarship searches, and tips to avoid being scammed • Foster Youth FAFSA Tips, which provides tips to help foster youth complete the FAFSA • Glossary of Financial Aid Terms, which provides definitions of many financial aid terms for counselors, students, and families • Sample Scholarship Inquiry Letter, which gives students language and format to request scholarship information An image of the home page of FSA for Counselors is provided in your participant materials, along with text describing more features of the site.

1

Master Resource List

www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov Web site for students that provides information on federal aid programs, a college search, a scholarship search, a career interest inventory, and links to FAFSA and PIN sites. What is available from this Web site: • Fact sheets, such as How Do I Apply for Federal Student Aid, Who is My “Parent” When I Fill Out the FAFSA, and Why Get a Federal Student Loan. The fact sheets are also part of the Counselors and Mentors Handbook. • Save Your Money, Save Your Identity, a brochure warning about scholarship scams and identity theft; also provides list of places to look for scholarship information • Start Here, Go Further With Federal Student Aid: Money for Education Beyond High School, a video program explaining the federal student aid programs and application process • Start Here, Go Further: Money for Higher Education, a Spanish-language video program explaining the federal student aid programs and application process • Annual reports to the U.S. Congress on scholarship fraud from the Department of Education, Federal Trade Commission, and Department of Justice on types of fraud and what the government is doing to raise awareness www.fafsa.ed.gov What is available at this site: FAFSA on the Web FAFSA.ed.gov is the Web site where students complete and submit FAFSA on the Web. Students and families may also print the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet from the site. After submitting the FAFSA, students may use this site to check the status of their application, view processing results, and submit corrections. FAFSA4caster If students want to begin exploring their financial aid options and get an early start on the financial aid process, FAFSA4caster is for them! By using FAFSA4caster, students and families will receive an early estimate of eligibility for federal student aid. This Web site provides students with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of the financial aid process; become familiar with the various types of federal student aid that are available; and investigate other sources of aid, such as grants and scholarships. When students are ready to apply for aid, they can easily transition from FAFSA4caster to FAFSA on the Web. Much of the information that students enter in the FAFSA4caster will populate the FAFSA on the Web application, making the experience of applying for federal student aid a lot easier.

2

Master Resource List

www.pin.ed.gov On this site, students and parents may apply for a FSA Personal Identification Number, or PIN. A FSA PIN allows students and parents to sign the FAFSA electronically. A FSA PIN will also allow students to access application information after they submit the FAFSA, sign and access other financial aid documents such as loan promissory notes, and access loan information after they leave college. www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/about/ac-smart/state-programs06.html On this Web site, counselors will find information about the programs approved by the Secretary of Education as rigorous secondary programs in each state. Completion of a rigorous secondary program is one criterion students must meet in order to be eligible for an Academic Competitiveness Grant, or ACG. www.students.gov Students.gov is the student gateway to the U.S. government. In addition to college and career resources, it provides information about the military, campus life, study resources, and information about the U.S. government. www.nasfaa.org/redesign/Parents/Students.html The Parent and Student section of the NASFAA Web site provides a variety of helpful information. What you can download or print from this site: • Cash for College, an on line brochure that offers basic facts about the student financial aid programs which is updated annually • Parent and Student Guide to Federal Tax Benefits for Tuition and Fees, provides guidance to help explain two tax credits offering federal income tax relief for college expenses-the Hope Scholarship Tax Credit and the Lifetime Learning Tax Credit-as well as available tax deductions for tuition and fees. • Becoming Credit-Wise: What Students (and You!) Should Know is an article that was published in NASFAA’s Student Aid Transcript magazine. While written for aid administrators, the article provides excellent guidance for students, who need to understand their student loans and manage their spending well. Understanding how credit works is an essential part of that, especially for students who must supplement their federal loans with private, credit-based loans. www.collegegoalsundayusa.org/ College Goal Sunday is a program in over 30 states that helps students and families learn about financial aid and provides one on one help for completing the FAFSA.

3

Master Resource List

www.collegeaccess.org This site functions as a site for counselors, access advisors and mentors with vast resources for college access in general. What you can download or print from this site: • A resource guide for counselors that contains detailed financial aid information www.finaid.org This comprehensive Web site includes information about scholarships, loans, savings plans, and military aid. It also has information about other types of aid, aid applications, financial aid calculators, and an “Ask the Aid Advisor” feature for personalized assistance. www.tgslc.org/pdf/Spanish_glossary.pdf What you can download or print form this site: • A glossary that contains a comprehensive list of higher education related words including financial aid terms in Spanish. www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams and www.ftc.gov/counselors These Web sites provide information on scholarship scams and an on line complaint form. What you can download or print from these sites: • Fact sheets Brochures and Handouts The following brochures and handouts are included in your materials: • ACG/SMART Fact Sheet This fact sheet provides basic information about the ACG and National Sciences and Mathematics to Retain Talent (SMART) Grants. • Fraud Awareness Resources Fact Sheet This fact sheet lists places for counselors to find handouts, on line information, and ways to report fraud.

FSA4counselors Brochure Highlights major features and services available on the FSA4counselors Web site

Other Resources
4 Master Resource List

Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Hotline • Call the FTC to report financial aid and scholarship scams. • 1-877-FTC-HELP U.S. Department of Education Inspector General • Contact the Inspector General to report financial aid fraud. • www.ed.gov/misued 1-800-MIS-USED Oig.hotline@ed.gov

5

Master Resource List

Resources

Federal

Federal Resources

Federal Resources
www.FSA4counselors.ed.gov FSA for Counselors provides basic college access and financial aid information for middle school, high school, and TRIO counselors. Features include the Counselors and Mentors Handbook, other federal student aid publications (with instructions on how to download or order them), training information, and scripts and slides for presenting a financial aid night. Click on “Network & Potential Partnerships” in the Counselor Resources section to locate financial aid professionals in your community who can assist you. www.studentaid.ed.gov Studentaid.ed.gov is Federal Student Aid’s gateway Web site for students. It provides a wealth of knowledge, including information about applying for college and financial aid, information about financial aid, scholarship and career searches, and links to other Web sites. www.students.gov Students.gov is the student gateway to the U.S. government. In addition to college and career resources, it provides information about the military, campus life, study resources, and information about the U.S. government. www.fafsa4caster.ed.gov If students want to begin exploring their financial aid options and get an early start on the financial aid process, FAFSA4caster is for them! By using FAFSA4caster, students and families will receive an early estimate of eligibility for federal student aid. This Web site provides students with an opportunity to increase their knowledge of the financial aid process; become familiar with the various types of federal student aid that are available; and investigate other sources of aid, such as grants and scholarships. When students are ready to apply for aid, they can easily transition from FAFSA4caster to FAFSA on the Web. Much of the information that students enter in the FAFSA4caster will populate the FAFSA on the Web application, making the experience of applying for federal student aid a lot easier. www.fafsa.ed.gov FAFSA.ed.gov is the Web site where students complete and submit the FAFSA on the Web. Students and families may also print the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet from the site. After submitting the FAFSA, students may use this site to check the status of their application, view processing results, and submit corrections.

1

Federal Resources

www.pin.ed.gov On this site, students and parents may apply for a FSA Personal Identification Number, or PIN. A FSA PIN allows students and parents to sign the FAFSA electronically. A FSA PIN will also allow students to access application information after they submit the FAFSA, sign and access other financial aid documents such as loan promissory notes, and access loan information after they leave college. www.ed.gov/admins/finaid/about/ac-smart/state-programs06.html On this Web site, counselors will find information about the programs approved by the Secretary of Education as rigorous secondary programs in each state. Completion of a rigorous secondary program is one criterion students must meet in order to be eligible for an Academic Competitiveness Grant, or ACG. 1-800-4FED-AID/1-800-433-3243/1-800-730-8913 (TTY) Counselors, students, and families may use these numbers to reach the Federal Student Aid Information Center. Information center staff can answer general questions about financial aid and provide students and families with information about their submitted and/or processed FAFSA.

2

Federal Resources

Federal Student Aid for Counselors is loaded with resources for you to help students reach their goals.

Survey Share your thoughts about the site and how we can improve.

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Section 3Site Map Section 4 Section 5 FAQs Contact Us Help

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Section 7

Section 8
FAFSA Information Find resources to help students complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

Federal Student Aid for Counselors
Welcome to your online source of federal student aid information to help students and parents plan and prepare for college, career and trade school.
Answering Students’ Questions FAFSA Information

Answering Students’ Questions Access financial aid calculators, eligibility criteria, and student FAQs. Getting the Word Out Access resources to help plan and publicize your financial aid events. Scholarships Help students find scholarships without getting scammed.

Answering Students’ Questions FAFSA Information Getting the Word Out Counselor Resources Federal Financial Aid Programs State Agencies Scholarships Related Links
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Beyond High School
Eligibility Calculators and Tools Application Deadlines

Counselors and Mentors:

Counselor Resources Find information on networking, training and ordering free publications.

Fall 2007
What’s New
A New Look for Federal Student Aid for Counselors!

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Counselor Resources

What’s New Get the latest information about federal student aid.

Planning a Financial Aid Night Promotional Materials

Counselors and Mentors Handbook Publications and Ordering

Calendar of Events
Below are events that may be of interest to you, your students and their parents. Simply click a highlighted date for more information. Upcoming College Fairs Upcoming Conferences/Workshops

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Calendar of Events View upcoming conferences, workshops and college fairs.

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Check out the many things you can do at www.fsa4counselors.ed.gov

How Students Find Money for College or Career School
Order Federal Student Aid Forms and Publications
Step One: Join our mailing list
If you do not have a mailing list (ML) number, call the Federal Student Aid Publications Ordering System (FSAPubs) at 1-800-394-7084. ML numbers are available to high schools, TRIO and GEAR UP programs, libraries, and nonprofits (which include school districts, associations, tribal governments, etc.).

Step Two: Order forms and publications
Using your ML number as identification, you can order the following free items (and more) at www.FSAPubs.org or by e-mailing orders@fsapubs.org: • FAFSA on the Web Worksheet and Spanish version: Planilla de preparación para FAFSA en la Web • Funding Education Beyond High School: The Guide to Federal Student Aid and Spanish version: Cómo costear los estudios postsecundarios: Guía de programas federales de ayuda estudiantil • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and Spanish FAFSA: Solicitud Gratuita de Ayuda Federal para Estudiantes • College Preparation Checklist and Spanish version: Lista de preparación para los estudios universitarios • FAFSA Tips • Counselors and Mentors Handbook on Federal Student Aid • Start Here, Go Further With Federal Student Aid: Money for Education Beyond High School (DVD or VHS; DVD offers Spanish captioning; for VHS with Spanish captioning, specify in your order) These free items are available by download or special request, as indicated: • We Have A Bright Future poster – for people working with American Indians, Alaska Natives, or Native Hawaiians; request from cindy.cameron@ed.gov; PDF at www.studentaid.ed.gov/brightfuture • Fact sheets explaining federal aid programs and procedures, inspiring students to go to postsecondary school, and providing fraud prevention advice – download at www.studentaid.ed.gov/pubs These free items are available from the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID: • Funding Education Beyond High School: Audio Highlights on CD or cassette • Braille Funding Education Beyond High School: The Guide to Federal Student Aid • Braille FAFSA on the Web Worksheet • Braille FAFSA Note: Students may read most of these publications at www.FederalStudentAid.ed.gov/pubs or order single copies from the Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-4-FED-AID.
MLpublist, 6/14/07

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Order Federal Materials

Resources

State

State Resources

Resources

Miscellaneous

Miscellaneous Resources

Miscellaneous Resources
www.nasfaa.org/redesign/ParentsStudents.html The student and parent section of the NASFAA Web site provides a variety of information, including how to find help completing the FAFSA, an on line financial aid brochure, a guide to tuition tax benefits, an article on understanding credit, and links to other on line resources. www.finaid.org This comprehensive Web site includes information about scholarships, loans, savings plans, and military aid. It also has information about other types of aid, aid applications, financial aid calculators, and an “Ask the Aid Advisor” feature for personalized assistance. The Web sites of the colleges and universities in your area are also excellent resources. The financial aid sections of each site should include information about aid specific to the school as well as links to additional resources. http://www.collegegoalsundayusa.org/ College Goal Sunday is a program in over 30 states that helps students and families learn about financial aid and provides one on one help for completing the FAFSA. The following resource documents are available for downloading or printing from www.FSA4counselors.ed.gov: • • • • • • • • • • Foster Youth FAFSA Tips Guide to Federal Tax Benefits for Tuition and Fees Student Aid Program Summary Financial Aid Application Checklist Application Form Tracking Worksheet Cost of Attendance Comparison Worksheet Award Package Comparison Worksheet Financial Aid Consultants and Scholarship Search Services Fact Sheet Sample Scholarship Inquiry Letter Glossary of Financial Aid Words

The above list of resources will provide students and families with information about financial aid, applying for aid, tracking and comparing information from the schools to which they apply, a sample scholarship inquiry letter, and a glossary.

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Miscellaneous Resources

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National Training for Counselors and Mentors: Funding Education Beyond High School

Fall 2007

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