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TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER NO.

TITLE

PAGE NO.

LIST OFABBREVIATIONS LIST OF FIGURES LIST OF FIGURES ABSTRACT 1. 2. INTRODUCTION AIM AND SCOPE OF THE PROJECT
2.1. AIM OF THE PRESENT INVESTIGATION 2.2. SCOPE OF THE PRESENT INVESTIGATION 2.3. EXISTING SYSTEM

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3.

PROPOSED SYSTEM
3.1. BLOCK DIAGRAM 3.1.1. Transmitter Section 3.1.2. Receiver Section 3.1.2. Block Diagram Explanation 3.2. POWER SUPPLY 3.2.1. Transformer 3.2.2. Bridge Rectifier 3.2.3. Voltage Regulator 3.3. MICROCONTROLLER 3.3.1. Pin Diagram 3.3.2. 8051 Pin Functions 3.3.2.1. I/O Ports (P0, P1, P2, P3) 3.3.2.2. Port 0
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3.3.2.3. Port 1 3.3.2.4. Port 2 3.3.2.5. Port 3 3.3.2.6. Oscillator Inputs (Xtal1, Xtal2) 3.3.2.7. Reset Line (Rst) 3.3.2.8. Address Latch Enable (Ale) 3.3.2.9. Program Store Enable (Psen) 3.3.2.10. External Access (Ea) 3.3.2.11. Memory Organization 3.3.2.12. Common Memory Space 3.3.3. Block Diagram Of 8051 Core 3.3.4. Oscillator Characteristics 3.3.5. 8051 Clock 3.3.5.1. Idle Mode 3.3.5.2. Power Down Mode 3.3.5.3. 8051 Reset 3.3.6. Central Processing Unit 3.3.7. The Accumulator 3.3.8. THE "R" Registers 3.3.9. THE "B" Register 3.3.10. The Program Counter (PC) 3.3.11. The Data Pointer (DPTR) 3.3.12. The Stack Pointer (SP) 3.3.13. Input / Output Ports 3.3.14. Timers / Counters 3.3.15. Interrupts 3.3.16. Serial Port 3.3.17. Applications 3.4. SERIAL COMMUNICATION

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3.4.1. Null Modem 3.4.2. RS232 3.4.2.1. Null Modem without Handshaking 3.4.2.2. Compatibility Issues 3.5. HARDWARE TOOLS 3.5.1. GSM Modem 3.5.1.1. Definition 3.5.1.2. Facts And Applications Of GSM/GPRS modem 3.5.1.3. Supply Chain Management 3.5.1.4. Short Data Size 3.5.1.5. Multiple remote data collection points
3.5.1.6. Large transaction volumes

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3.5.1.7. Mobility, Quick installation 3.5.1.8. Transaction terminals 3.5.2. RS 232 3.5.3. MAX 232 3.5.4. RS232 Communication 3.5.4.1. Scope of the Standard 3.5.4.2. Circuit Working Description

4.

SIMULATION AND RESULTS


4.1. KEIL 4.1.1. Flash Magic 4.1.2. Orcad 4.1.2.1. Design Flow Of Orcad 4.1.3. Algorithm for Keil 4.1.4. STEP 1: Copy the program in Keil software

4.1.5. STEP 2: Adjust the values of Timers according to the Requirement


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4.1.6. STEP 3: Run the program 4.1.7. STEP 3: The values are changing according to the Voice 4.2. MATLAB 4.2.1. Algorithm for Matlab 4.2.2. STEP 1:Create a GUI format 4.2.3. STEP 2: Browse for the finger-vein sample for Simulation 4.2.4. STEP 2: Simulated output for the Matlab 4.3. VISUAL BASIC 4.3.1. Transaction Window 4.3.2 Flow Chart

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5.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION


5.1. SUMMARY 5.2. CONCLUSION

REFERENCES

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

MCU RMS CMOS CPU RAM ALU SP PSW PC DPTR UART CD RI DSR CTS DTR DCE RX TX

Micro Controller Unit Root Mean Square Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor Central Processing Unit Random Access Memory Arithmetic Logic Unit Stack Pointer Program Status Word Program Counter Data Pointer Register Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter Carrier Detect Signal Ring Indicator Data Set Ready Clear To Send Data Terminal Ready Data Communication Equipment Receiver Transmitter

LIST OF FIGURES
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FIGURE NO. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 3.8 3.9 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9 4.10

FIGUIRE NAMES
Block Diagram of Transmitter section Block Diagram of Receiver section Circuit Diagram for Power Supply Block Diagram of Power Supply Pin Diagram for 8051 Microcontroller Program Memory Main Memory Internal Data Memory Register Bank Block Diagram of the 8051 Core 8051 Clock 8051 Reset Block diagram of Timers/Counters Simple Null Modem without Handshaking GSM Network Elements Pin Diagram of Max 232 Circuit Diagram of Serial Communication Logic Diagram ORCAD Flowchart Keil software with the program Values of Timers and Registers are changed Ports 0 and 1 are assigned value 1 and Port 2 is assigned value 0 Values are changing according to voice The GUI format for the simulation Browsing for a finger-vein sample for matching Output for matching finger-vein sample Procedure for money transfer Flow chart

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LIST OF TABLES

TABLE NO. 3.1

TABLE NAMES
Output for the Null Modem

PAGE NO. 34

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ABSTRACT
The information age is quickly revolutionizing the way transactions are completed. Everyday actions are increasingly being handled electronically, instead of with pencil and paper or face to face. This growth in electronic transactions has resulted in a greater demand for fast and accurate user identification and authentication. Private information like access codes for buildings, banks accounts and computer systems often use Personal Identification Numbers (PINs) for identification and security clearences. Using the proper PIN gains access, the successful transactions can occur, but the user of the PIN is not verified. Even though PINs are easy to implement , it is also vulnerable to the risk of exposure and being forgotten. Biometrics, which uses human physiological or behavioral features for personal identification, has attracted more and more attention and is becoming one of the most popular and promising alternatives to the traditional password or PIN based authentication techniques. There is a long list of available biometric patterns, and many such systems have been developed and implemented, including those for the face, iris, fingerprint, palmprint, hand shape, voice, signature, and gait. No biometric has yet been developed that is perfectly reliable or secure. In this project, we use a real-time embedded finger-vein recognition system for authentication on ATM machine.

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