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Preventing an Active Shooter

March 2013

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INTRODUCTIONS

HOMELAND SECURITY & EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

TODD JASPER, MSCP, CC

TODD JASPER
Associate Director

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PREVENTION

First, lets start with an experiment...

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PREVENTION

What is your stereotype of an active shooter?

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MYTHS

Grades? Work performance?

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MYTHS

Loner?

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MYTHS

History of Mental Illness?

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MYTHS

Broken families? Trouble at home?

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MYTHS

Active shooters just snap

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MYTHS

If they do plan their attack, they do so in secret

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MYTHS

There are no warning signs for an active shooter

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MYTHS

However...

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A study by the US Secret Service and the US Department of Education examined school shootings and made some startling discoveries.

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A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

There is no accurate or useful prole of


students who engaged in active shooter incidents

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

Most school shooters come from twoparent families

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

Have good grades (only 5% of violent


students receive failing grades)

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

Only a third of school shooters were characterized as loners

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

Fewer than one-fth of school shooters

had been diagnosed with mental health or behavior disorder prior to the attack

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

In over 80% of school attacks, the

attacker told at least one person about his plans. attacker told more than one person about his plans.

In close to 60% of school attacks, the

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PREVENTION
A study by the US Secret Service produced the following ndings:

Over 90% of school attackers exhibit


warning signs

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PREVENTION

90%
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ACTIVE SHOOTER PREVENTION

What does this mean?

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Is it possible to prevent an active shooter?

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If 90% of active shooters exhibit some behavior or present signs that indicate they may become violent, we can prevent active shooters

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PREVENTION
Research by the US Secret Service found that:

93% of active shooters exhibited behavior prior to the


shooting that signaled their intent

95% of shooters planned the attack for more than 2 days In nearly two thirds of attacks, more than one person had
information about the attack before it occurred

Over 90% of attackers engage in some behavior prior to the


attack that cause othersschool ofcials, parents, teachers, police, fellow studentsto be concerned
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PREVENTION

Essentially, preventing an active shooter encompasses two activities (not very complicated)

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PREVENTION

Essentially, preventing an active shooter encompasses two activities (not very complicated)

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PREVENTION
PREVENTION

PROMPT REPORTING

WARNING SIGN AWARENESS

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PREVENTION

Active shooters are a very serious subject. Reporting someone who may become an active shooter is inherently stressful.

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What other reasons might someone be reluctant to report someone?

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PREVENTION

To be more condent in identifying who might become violent, it is important to know the warning signs.

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WARNING SIGNS

In 2011, the FBI assembled 15 warning signs that someone may become violent or become an active shooter.

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WARNING SIGNS

Leakage: boasts, predictions, and subtle threats; stories, essays, poems, and pictures; violent fantasies; and interest in violent video games, movies, and books

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WARNING SIGNS

Depression, anger, impulsive and uncontrollable behavior

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WARNING SIGNS

Poor coping skills

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WARNING SIGNS

Low frustration tolerance

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WARNING SIGNS

Grudges, lack of resiliency

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WARNING SIGNS

Us against them mentality, narcissism

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WARNING SIGNS

Boastfulness about weapons, abusive language

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WARNING SIGNS

Suicidal ideation, wishes of death, desire to kill others

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WARNING SIGNS

Delusions, hallucinations, bizarre thoughts

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WARNING SIGNS

History of physical assault

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WARNING SIGNS

Perpetrator or victim of bullying

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WARNING SIGNS

Substance abuse

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WARNING SIGNS

Rebellion against authority

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WARNING SIGNS

Isolated, withdrawn, fatigued

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Can you spot an potential violent person?

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RESPONSE
HOW TO RESPOND TO AN ACTIVE SHOOTER INCIDENT

1. EVACUATE Have an escape route and plan in mind Leave your belongings behind Keep your hands visible

2. HIDE Hide in an area out of the shooters view Block entry to your hiding place and lock the doors Silence your cell phone and any other device that might draw attention

3. TAKE ACTION As a last resort and only when your life is in immediate danger: Attempt to incapacitate the shooter Acting as a team, use physical aggression and throw items at the shooter

Ofce of the Vice President and General Counsel

Active Shooter
Prevention & Response

Pocket Card
JANUARY 2013

CALL 911 WHEN IT IS SAFE TO DO SO

ACTIVE SHOOTER PREVENTION-- WARNING SIGNS

CSM BEHAVIORAL REVIEW TEAM (BRT) REPORTING PROCESS

Leakage: boasts, predictions, and subtle threats; stories, essays, poems, and pictures; violent fantasies; and interest in violent media Depression, anger, impulsive/uncontrollable behavior Poor coping skills Low frustration tolerance Grudges, lack of resiliency Us against them mentality, narcissism

Boastfulness about weapons, abusive language Suicidal ideation, wishes of death, desire to kill others Delusions, hallucinations, bizarre thoughts History of physical assault Perpetrator or victim of bullying Substance abuse Rebellion against authority

Faculty, sta or students who have a concern about a student should report that concern by lling out and submitting the Student Behavior Incident Report Form online at:

www.csmd.edu/BRT
Or, call the oce of the Vice President of Student and Instructional Support Services at 301-934-7509. Serious life and safety concerns should be immediately reported by calling 911 or by contacting the CSM Department of Public Safety and Preparedness by calling 301-934-7888.

If you observe any of these signs, please contact the CSM Behavioral Review Team (BRT) IMMEDIATELY!

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Isolated, withdrawn, fatigued

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BEHAVIORAL REVIEW TEAM


What is the BRT?

A Behavioral Review Team (BRT) is a team of professionals from across disciplines to review cases and to recommend responses and interventions for instances when student behavior causes concern. The BRT is NOT punitive in any way. Reporting behavior to the BRT is not a punishment. The BRT is specially trained to evaluate student behavior, warning signs, and the context of concerning behavior to determine if a greater threat to safety exists.

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MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID


Mental Health First Aid training course designed to give members of the
public key skills to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.

Just as CPR training helps a layperson without medical training assist an

individual following a heart attack, Mental Health First Aid training helps a layperson assist someone experiencing a mental health crisis

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WHATS NEXT?
More training and exercises Regular updates on reporting
procedures and familiarization with the BRT and Mental Health First Aid on how to identify if a colleague may be showing symptoms of a deeper problem and how to report warning signs.

More outreach to workplace personnel

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