Spring Mar 2013 - May 2013

In this issue:
 A Water Pipeline in Cranberry’s Future? • 1  The Curator’s Journal • 2  The Great Bug Off: A Citizen’s Test of Bug Spray Products • 3  Introducing our Stewards • 5  Preserve News •7 

A Water Pipeline in Cranberry’s Future?
by Mindy Swope-Quintero What?! A water pipeline through our beautiful park?! I couldn’t believe it either, but the possibility of a water pipeline through the preserve has actually been on the table for a few years now. As far back as 1991, Westchester Joint Water Works was unable to secure a filtration avoidance determination from the NYS Department of Health for the continued operation of the Rye Lake plant, which currently provides water to the Town of Harrison, Village/Town of Mamaroneck, City of Rye and part of New Rochelle. As of 2006, construction of another plant was halted due to litigation and Westchester Joint Water Works, in cooperation with Westchester County, began to look at other alternatives.

Plus:
 Cranberry Creative Corner • 8  Cranberry Word Search • 9  Calendar of Events • 10 

In one option, a water pipeline constructed through Cranberry Lake Preserve would connect the Rye Lake Plant to the plant at Kensico.

(Continued on page 6) CRANBERRY L AKE PRESERVE ◦ Westchester County Parks Dept. ◦ 1609 Old Orchard Street, West Harrison, NY 10604 ◦ (914) 428-1005

The Curator’s Journal
Introducing our New Curator

Welcome to the Spring edition of the Stewards of Cranberry Lake Preserve Newsletter!
We hope you enjoy our newsletter. Please consider contributing to future issues. Send articles, artwork or photos to jugglingpaynes@optonline.net Please include the author/artist’s name and write “Stewards Newsletter” in the subject line. You can also mail or drop off your submissions at Cranberry Lake Preserve, 1609 Old Orchard Street, West Harrison, NY 10604

Some of you may already know me from when I was the Curator at Cranberry Lake Preserve 5 years ago. However, I may be new to some of you, so I wanted to say hello and introduce myself. My name is Danniela Ciatto and I have been a Curator with the County for over 10 years now. I was the curator here for 6 years before being transferred to Lenoir Preserve in Yonkers. I have been back about a month now and when I took my first hike I had really forgotten how beautiful and special this place really is, a hidden gem as many refer it to. I am happy to be back and look forward to bringing new and fun things to the Preserve!!! I hope to see some new faces in the preserve as well as the friendly ones I already have the pleasure of knowing. I look forward to seeing you all in the upcoming months.

Sincerely, Danniela Ciatto Curator, Cranberry Lake Preserve

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The Great Bug-Off: A Citizen's Test of Bug Spray Products
by Zaac Chaves A question often asked at Cranberry Lake Preserve's nature lodge is how we can most effectively deter bug bites, usually in regard to mosquitoes and ticks. Preferring not to use chemical spray, my most experienced answer to this question suggests a physical barrier of appropriate clothing; highlights the influence of certain environments or vegetation types; and notes the influence of both hygiene and diet. However, many people have already decided on a chemical spray and want an expert suggestion on which brand and type of chemical to purchase. Modern bug spray is a technologically convenient way to keep bugs away. Then we applied the spray. For the first time in years, I applied spray, and this was not a pleasant feeling. The thin, milky fluid slowly absorbed into my arms and I was particularly displeased to discover that even after the chemical effect wore off, that the mock vanilla-like odor would continue to waft along with me for the entire day.

Responding to these inquiries, and aiming for accuracy, we hosted a spray trial at Cranberry Lake Preserve trialing spray products on our attendees. Embarking on a hike toward the most noxious mosquitoswarms we knew of, we personally observed just how effective these chemicals were, taking notes on the duration these chemicals remained active. This data provides the basis for the expert advice we can share: answering more completely the effectiveness of chemical-defense spray.

While the morning's storm discouraged attendance, the mosquitoes were ready for us on that humid and overcast day. We met the mosquitoes beneath a moist canopy for over an hour, which was enough exposure for all of us to get bit once. Yet the time of the first bite, as well as how many bites varied. All data is recorded on the chart on page 4.

The most effective product demonstrated was 45°N 68°W (notdeet.com), a natural insect repellant personally contributed by the company’s director, Anwer Qureishi. Anwer further took time to explain to us exactly how this product worked. When someone exclaimed "a mosquito landed on me but it’s not biting," Anwer helpfully replied that this is how most repellents work, by confusing the sensors of these insects. That is a major difference between a repellent(ie sensor disorienting) and an insecticide(ie neurotoxin).

REI in Yonkers was "unflinchingly helpful" according to David Steinberg who initially approached the store regarding the Great Bug Off. Their generous sponsorship consisted of an arsenal of currently marketed sprays. Initially, we noted odor ranking and descriptive comments.

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Name

Product

Duration

How does it feel?

Odor /Description

Bites

Todd Taro

45°N 68°W Cutter Picaridin Advanced

+1.5hr 45m dry

7/10, astringent 6/10, like cookie dough and nail-polish remover 5.7/10, nasty chemical smell 3/10, chemically

1 +4

Anwer Bug Off(for dogs) 45m David Coleman Skinsmart Repel Natural 1hr

oily

9 5

Zaac

1hr

mildly oily

7.5/10, mildly sweet; vanillalike

3

With the exception of 45°N 68°W, bugs were deterred for an hour maximum. For an effective chemical barrier to mosquitoes on hikes, it is necessary to reapply most sprays at hourly intervals. However, 45°N 68°W worked for a longer duration, beckoning a later test.

This later test, also known as the second annual Great Bug-Off, will be scheduled for an as-of-yet undecided date in late June or early July. For this trial we will use humidity and warmth to forecast the most mosquito encounters possible for an otherwise leisurely hike. As the bait, you may choose your preferred chemical arsenal, or lack-of-one, and see the later results. Your testimony may even be featured in a later newsletter. Please keep a keen eye on our events list to hear more about scheduling for the next Great Bug-Off.

Fun Facts about Mosquitoes
♦ Mosquitoes are more likely to bite you if you eat bananas. Foods high in potassium and exercising cause your body to release lactic acid, which attracts mosquitoes. ♦ They prefer children over adults. ♦ A mosquito can detect movement from 18 feet away. ♦ Only female mosquitoes drink blood. ♦ Male and female mosquitoes drink flower nectar for nourishment. ♦ Dark clothes attract mosquitoes. They prefer dark colors.

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Introducing our Stewards
Melinda Swope Quintero
Greetings! My name is Melinda (Mindy) Swope Quintero and I am a member of the Stewards of Cranberry Lake board. I am originally from western PA, but have lived in the NY area for over 10 years now. I actually began my career as a fitness professional with a M.S. degree in Sports Management, but realized my heart was in the environmental field so I decided in 2008 to go back to school. At the end of 2011, I finished a degree program through the University of Denver and I now have a M.S. degree in Natural Resources Management. I previously worked for the Conservation division of Westchester County until being laid off at the end of 2011. While with the county, one of my responsibilities was summer camp registration for the nature camps so if you had a child in our nature camps from 2006-2011, then I probably talked with you on the phone, replied to your email or saw you at camp. Although I miss my job with the Conservation division, I found my absolute true love when I gave birth to my daughter last July. For now I am loving being a stay-at-home mom and have found ways to keep busy. One of which is becoming involved with founding and becoming the President of the Stewards of Cranberry Lake. I currently live in White Plains, so Cranberry has a special place in my heart and I want to make sure the park, its programs and staff are here for others to discover and fall in love with. Since late 2011 I have also been a member of the board of the Federated Conservationists of Westchester County (FCWC). It seems like if I am not working on something for the Stewards then I am working on something for FCWC. I really don't know how I would have time for a full time job! When I am not busy 'volunteering' I enjoy many activities. I love to spend time with my husband, daughter, friends and family; work on my photography skills; hike; trail run; ride road bikes; cross country ski; travel when I am able (taking our first plane ride with an infant in March); and try to live life to the fullest! I am thankful for the opportunity to lead this wonderful group of dedicated individuals as President of the Stewards. Please let me know if you have any suggestions, concerns or are interested in becoming more involved either as a member or as part of the board. We are just getting organized, but are already planning some wonderful things for this year so hope to see you at our upcoming events and at the Preserve!

Cristina Ramos-Payne
Hi! My name is Cristina and I am currently the vice-president of the Stewards of Cranberry Lake. I am also editor of this newsletter. Nature has always been a part of my life. I was fortunate to grow up across from a city park in the Bronx and spent a lot of time at the Bronx Zoo and the New York Botanical Garden. I moved to Westchester County 19 years ago with my husband and our first child, who was still a baby at the time. I consider myself a Jack-of-all-trades, master of none. I am an artist specializing in cartooning and facepainting. I have worked as a juggler, a gymnastics and circus arts instructor. I am a homeschooler and I write and draw comics about my homeschooling life which I post on my blog. I believe the only way we can instill a love of the natural world in our children is to make sure they have as much exposure to nature as they possibly can. My first experience with Cranberry Lake was when my oldest was two. We came to the park because it was close to our home. We walked down a muddy path in search of the lake and came to the boardwalk along the water’s edge. It would be the beginning of many adventures at the park, including the oft-told tale of how I lost the purple trail and got lost with my three kids for an hour. My youngest was five at the time and chose to wear a dress and party shoes on our walk. We had to climb down a steep hill with her dressed like this (my kids will insist it was a cliff) in order to reach a trail. I ended up calling my husband, and after he finished laughing, he called the park to ask that our car not be locked in, and whether the red trail would lead us to the parking lot. I wonder if Danniela answered the phone that day? These days the trails are much better marked. It takes a lot more effort on my part to get lost. I’m glad we were able to put together the Stewards to support this preserve and its programs. As many times as I have walked the trails and attended nature classes with my children, I always find something new to discover at Cranberry Lake.

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A Water Pipeline in Cranberry’s Future? (Continued from page 1)
Basically, there are two options. One option is for Westchester County to construct its own UV filtration plant near Kensico Dam Plaza, but changing regulations would leave the county vulnerable in the future to additional costs. If this option is chosen, a water pipeline most likely would be constructed through Cranberry Lake Preserve in order to connect the Rye Lake Plant to the plant at Kensico. The other option involves connecting to a new UV filtration pumping station in Mount Pleasant which was recently built by the NY Department of Environmental Protection. This new plant is the nation’s largest ultraviolet water treatment facility with the capacity to process 2 billion gallons of drinking water daily. Connecting to this plant would cost Westchester $104.8 million. I was unable to determine if this option would also affect Cranberry Lake Preserve with construction of a pipeline, but if you look at any map, it looks like it is definitely a possibility in order to connect the plant in Mount Pleasant to the Rye Lake Plant. To date, discussions are still ongoing and no decision has been made. Either way, we need to determine if our beautiful park will be affected. So please keep your eyes and ears open and if you hear anything about a decision regarding Westchester’s drinking water, please let us know! I will be on the lookout for any further information also. If I find out anything, I will be sure to let you know!

Ripples at Bent Bridge

Photo by Sierra Payne

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A Farewell and a New Role – We extend our best wishes for Taro, who has taken on a new position at the Rye Nature Center. Although he is leaving his curator position, Taro has joined the Cranberry Lake Stewards board so that he can continue to help keep Cranberry Lake Preserve maintained and appreciated in this new role. A Warm Welcome – Please visit the Preserve and say hello to Danniela Ciatto, our new curator. She isn’t exactly new to Cranberry, as she mentions in her bio on page two, so welcome back, Danniela! She has some exciting new plans and programs to offer. Check the Calendar for upcoming events this spring!

In The Nature Center – Danniela has expanded the nature center’s animal collection. There is a new turtle, two doves and some hissing cockroaches. The nature center restrooms have been given a fresh coat of paint. The Trails – Most of the trails are now open. There are still some hazards along the red trail from damage done by Hurricane Sandy. Please be careful!

Photos by Sierra Payne

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Cranberry Creative Corner
Naturally Random
The Frogs are making quite a racket, enough to stuff your head in your jacket. The butterflies are swirling ‘round and ‘round to make you stagger with dizziness.

~Sierra Payne, age 10

Above: A frog swims in one of the vernal pools. Right: A Mourning Cloak suns itself on a rock wall.

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Cranberry Search for Spring
What’s buzzing around, hiding in the trees and rustling through the leaves?

X E R E D T A I L E D H A W K D W V B F

S K R E D I L S D E R A E D E R M H J V

P N K W V T P S D I Q Z P M V L O Q D F

R N K C A A I Q A H D Y C H D P S O R P

I M D Z J A L U S O K I P A X M Q E I N

N N C P S D E I Z X D B X K H O U S B V

G P H O Z E A R E D O Q H P B U I U K H

P H I S R R T R H E T S N O U R T O C J

E D P D P M E E E E M A U P I N O M A J

E R M C P E D L R R D L T F V I J T L V

P A U N W Q W K R T Z A H T J N S I B N

E G N S O O O B N I X M A H E G J T D N

R O K Q O A O X B C C A T M H D T R E P

Q N A K D G D S X K X N C T S O I M G F

A F A J C P P X S T I D H F L V I F N O

N L R W O G E L N Z N E Z F G E W C I B

R Y K N C W C M P F C R O X V W F J W H

M X U D K V K C Q I D E L K C A R G D E

I I M G M N E X E E D A K C I H C Y E D

U L S B P H R R E C A R K C A L B B R M

Black Racer Chickadee Chipmunk Deer Tick Dragonfly Grackle Mosquito Mourning Dove Nuthatch

Pileated Woodpecker Red Eared Slider Red Tailed Hawk Red Winged Blackbird Salamander Spring Peeper Squirrel Titmouse Woodcock

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Cranberry Lake Preserve Calendar of Events • March - June
March
Saturday 30th →1 p.m. Vernal Pools Come on an expedition to catch, discover, and release some wonderful processes that occur in these temporary puddles of melting snow. See a young dragonfly nymph before she has developed her wings. Look for young spotted salamanders and wood frogs too. Marvelous! Saturday 18th →1 p.m. Birds of Prey Day Join Master Falconer, James Eyring as he shows you all his amazing Birds of Prey. Sponsored by the Stewards of Cranberry Lake. (914) 428-1005 Sunday 26th →9:30 a.m. The Nuts-and-Bolts of Forest Mushrooms Experienced guides will teach the basics of field mushrooms identification while sharing advice useful to develop your own skills in collection. (914) 428-1005

April
Sunday 7th →1 p.m. How to Grow Delicious Mushrooms In Your Forest Garden Today the lodge will transform into a hands-on spawning workshop providing you with a very special log to take home; from there you might await a gorgeous bouquet of edible mushrooms. Saturday 20th →1 p.m. Nature Story Time Join the Curator for a nature story time book followed by a craft. A take home goodie will be handed out at the end of the program. Preregistration required. For ages 4-7. (914) 4281005 Saturday 27th →1 p.m. Reptiles and Amphibians Come and learn about the differences between these fascinating creatures. You will get to see these animals up close and personal. (914) 4281005

June
Sunday 2nd →1 p.m. The Hills at Silver Lake Preserve On this hike of the Silver Lake Preserve property, we will seek to reconstruct how this land appeared 150 years ago when it was Westchester's most densely populated black community. (914) 4281005 Saturday 8th →1 p.m. Rockin Geology Come join us for a hike to the quarry learning about the different rocks at Cranberry Lake and make rock necklaces for you to take home. (914) 428-1005. Saturday 22nd →1 p.m. Managing Invasive Plants with a Fork and Knife with Free Samples Before this interactive hike an instructor will provide edible samples and current information about incoming disruptive species that are also nourishing. (914) 428-1005

May
Sunday 5th →11a.m. Mothers Day Spring Ephemeral Walk Come meet with master gardener Mary Harrington for a closer look into the delightful and marvelous world of spring ephemeral plants. (914) 428-1005

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Cranberry Staff
Curator – Danniela Ciatto Naturalist – Zaac Chaves Conservation Division of the Westchester County Department of Parks, Recreation and Conservation

Newsletter Staff
Managing Editor: Cristina Ramos-Payne Assistant Editor: Mindy Swope-Quintero Staff Photographer: Sierra Payne

The Stewards of Cranberry Lake Preserve is dedicated to promoting a better appreciation and understanding of the natural world and the value of Cranberry Lake Preserve. The Stewards provide financial and volunteer aid for exhibits, educational programs, and science equipment. The Stewards also encourage citizen participation in local and state government actions related to the future of the Preserve and nature center.

Photo by Sierra Payne

Become a Member Today!
We are currently unable to accept new memberships.

2012 Stewards Board Members
President – Mindy Swope Quintero Vice-President – C. Ramos-Payne Treasurer – Catherine McGibney

cut along dotted line and return with payment

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Stewards of Cranberry Lake Preserve
Cranberry Lake Preserve 1609 Old Orchard Street West Harrison, NY 10604 USA ADDRESS CORRECTION REQUESTED

Printed on Recycled Paper

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