Decker’s Diary

Dear Friends and Family,

on the Mission Field
March 2013

The three months that I was at Abba House has been hard to put into words. I had many problems with my legs and hip and many problems with typical teenagers, of whom I am learning more about. And, except for taking Abba members up to the Eddy Reber Home in Katogwe, I didn’t get a whole lot done of what I had wanted to do during that time. I filled the position again as Dorm Mom and fulfilled duties such as “supply manager” and “devotion leader.” I went back and forth with people about what should be done to fix the dining room & kitchen project, I Grace (right) from Abba House judged and judged again what to do to finish the sits with Pastor Busulwa at a wonderful meal supplied by Pas- missionary quarters, and I felt like I lost control over what to plant in the garden. tor Valentine and his wife who
operate the Eddy Reber Home

Barb Decker Hospital Experience in Uganda
Things were pretty frustrating and almost boring this trip until a doctor found a blood clot high in my left leg. Then things got exciting and I spent three nights in a Ugandan hospital. The food was good and the bed more comfortable than the one I have at Abba House, but I was very glad I didn’t have to stay longer than I did. In Ugandan culture, when someone is in the hospital, a friend stays alongside the patient—often sleeping on the floor next to the bed. I did not have someone stay with me—it’s not my culture—and if I had, I probably would have worried more about her health and well being rather than the other way around. I was able to get to the toilet by myself and so really didn’t need anyone to help except perhaps to scout out things that weren’t supplied—like drinking water, a towel, a pillow and toilet paper. I was admitted on Thursday night, January 31; and though I asked and requested various people, our ward’s bathroom did not receive toilet paper until Friday afternoon. I had requested the pastor’s wife, Deborah, to bring toilet paper when she came to visit on Friday; but because of an abnormal, torrential rain, she could not come until evening. But, when she came, she came with three rolls! Then I was rolling in the richness of having toilet paper! Aha-- the little things in life—that’s what makes the world go around.

Eddy Reber Home children giving a presentation to our Abba House mission group.

The garden has been converted to growing mostly cooking bananas, cassava and sweet potatoes. Its soil seems best for those things and a new plot closer to Abba House has been opened up and is being worked up to plant the vegetables needed to spice up the menu at the Home. It will be easier to maintain nearer to the Home and the food produced will be exclusively for Abba House.

New Garden Plot—

Attitudes—

Perhaps because of the pain I had experienced in my body, the kids seem to irritate me a little more than on other trips. I’m sure it was pure “teenager”—a bit rebellious, cantankerous, and superior. Some that went home for Christmas break came back with ideas that they had gained from outside the secure Abba House situation—and mostly, away from the Word of God. Sometimes, it almost made me want to just go home. But when I was released from the hospital, I was met by Abba House escorts, including the “leader of the pack”, Henry, and a quiet and very much to herself young lady, Irene. The pastor’s wife said that Henry was almost going to leave the home without permission to come and visit me at the hospital and after that time, I saw a side of Henry that shows real concern for others—a healthy helping attitude.

I will support Barbara Decker’s work on the mission field with House of Friends in the following way. ___ Barbara Decker Mission Support (Monthly) $_________(One Time Gift) $________ ___ Abba House Project ( ) Multi-purpose dining/kitchen $___________ ( ) Missionary Quarters $_________ ___ Mission Trip Expenses to Uganda $_________ ___ Please send information on sponsorship of __child __worker.
All donations are tax deductible. Please write checks payable to: House of Friends and send to P O Box 228, Alma, MO 64001 Thank you for caring!

Missionary Quarters—
Construction of the missionary quarters did get underway and hopefully soon I will be able to give my room back to the boys’ house and the next dorm mom. The missionary quarters will have a separate kitchen within, for my cooking Wall in the new living room of the option. I have shared in missionary quarters. their food for one and a half years, but my body does not like it much anymore. They use a lot of cooking oil and fry a lot of things. I have also lived one and a half years without a refrigerator, a real toilet, and a sink, all of which I am desperately hoping for in the missionary quarters and not only just for me but for others that come to serve or visit. House of Friends is still receiving donations for the completion of the missionary quarters. We still need a septic tank and the iron sheets for the roof, which are the most expensive. Then the basic house will be done and we’ll need just the luxury items such as windows, doors, fixtures, and appliances.

basketballs, soccer balls and dodge balls, and shoes--much needed shoes! They also brought bed sheets for everyone and diatomaceous earth to control certain pests in the houses. But, more important than the material stuff, their witness for the love of God for every single person, no matter who they are in life, is what the children of Abba House remember. The visitors also put faces and a hug into the understanding of what a sponsor is to them.

Thanks and Closing Thoughts—
I want to thank first and foremost my prayer partners and warriors who have uplifted me several times during my time in Uganda. And also thank anyone and everyone so much for responding to setting up a medical account for me through House of Friends. The time spent in the Ugandan hospital only came to about $400, including the syringes and needles that they used on me, but the doctors here in the U.S. are quite a bit more expensive, even without a 3-day stay in a hospital. I am continuing to get my blood monitored which puts to myth the declaration to me about having “thin blood,” because it is a struggle to get it to a thinness with which the doctors are satisfied to letting me go back to Uganda. Sometimes three months is plenty of time for a mission and sometimes it’s not. I was almost ready to come home until the time that I was packing to do so. During my recuperation, Alice came in to help me. As she was mopping my room, she said, “You have done so much for us, now it’s our turn to do something for you.” And as I prepared to go, all the kids sent “a hug” along with me. I think that to be able to speak into a child’s life is probably the greatest reward I can have for doing what I am doing. Perhaps that was exactly what I was supposed to do this time instead of completing a project. Thank you all as well for your involvement of speaking into the lives of the Abba House children. May God bless you all.

Blessed by Visitors—
In February, we had very important visitors from far and farther away. We had visitors from Colorado and from Alaska who have blessed the home in many different ways. They brought toys and games, Bibles—all the Stacey and Denver Urlaub of Alaska same version so we can surrounded by the contents of 10 suitcases brought from the cool of Alaska to all read together in dethe warmth of Uganda. votions, balls—

Love to all, Barb Decker

Barbara Decker, Missionary House of Friends P O Box 228 Alma, MO 64001

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