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Preservation | Community Assets | Development

Atlas

2012

The Urban Land Conservancy Atlas


Mapping Investments and Opportunities in the Denver Metro Area

Updated May 2012 Authored by James W. Roy II

Our work includes land banking and community-inspired real estate development or, more concisely, comThe purpose of this atlas is to display the impact of the munity development. Urban Land Conservancys (ULC) work in the Metro Denver area and the economic factors that prompt our attention with maps. Mapping Denvers inequities spa- Land Banking tially allows us to better understand our communities of When land is expensive, it is often not economically focus, and pinpoint opportunities for impactful projects feasible to use it for essential community facilities. By that support ULCs mission. acquiring (by gift or purchase) land and buildings at to-

About the Atlas

ULC is a member of Mile High Connects (MHC), a col- days prices, we ensure these properties will be available laborative of experts in the fields of: transit, affordable to serve urban communities in the future when the land housing, jobs, education, and health. MHC created an would otherwise be too expensive. Equity Atlas, comprised of maps and narratives promoting transportation access to housing choices, good jobs, quality schools and essential services such as health care and fresh food. The ULC Atlas compliments the MHC Equity Atlas advocacy to action, and takes a closer look at the intention of ULCs investments in community assets. MHC framed these times in Metro Denver as a once in a lifetime opportunity to build a transit system that supports all of Metro Denvers residents, ULC will use this atlas to make key investments that focus on creating equity throughout Denver and its surrounding municipalities. This Atlas also serves as an educational marketing tool for which potential partners can better understand our work and how we can work together to achieve overCommunity Development arching goals.

About the Urban Land Conservancy


ULC is a nonprofit organization established in 2003 by local business leaders who understood the need to permanently secure real estate asset and use real estate as a tool to benefit urban communities. In much the same way that a land trust preserves open space for future generations, we preserve real estate assets in urban areas to ensure their continued community benefit.

Certain challenging community projects for example, redeveloping a brownfield into an environmentally and socially responsible community may require more capital, resources, and coordination than a nonprofit, for-profit, or governmental organization may possess. Our function is to provide the staff, expertise, and resources needed to facilitate the development of such projects.

How we work

Form long-term partnerships with nonprofit, forOur mission is to acquire, develop, and preserve comprofit, and governmental organizations to assist urmunity assets in urban areas for a variety of community ban communities in addressing their real estate needs needs such as schools, affordable housing, community centers and affordable office space for nonprofits. Our Acquire and hold strategic sites in anticipation of market changes assets consist of real estate and significant seed capital to be leveraged using public and private sources for future Serve as or partner with the master developer on community investment and economic development. community developments

Mile High Transit-Oriented Development Fund


Introduction
ULC, Enterprise Community Partners, the City and County of Denver, and several other investors partnered to establish the first affordable housing TransitOriented Development (TOD) acquisition fund in the country. The purpose of Denvers TOD Fund is to support the creation and preservation of 1,000 affordable housing units through strategic property acquisition in current and future transit corridors. The Fund answers a basic real estate conundrum: when the economy is bad, property values are low and ripe for purchase, but access to capital is poor and affordable housing developers are scarce. Now is the opportune time to invest in real estate around proposed transit stations in order to capitalize on current values and preserve affordable housing before RTDs FasTracks is fully operational.

tainable housing, the TOD Fund will make it possible for families to build wealth and access employment and educational opportunities. It will also provide employers with access to an expanded workforce.

Critical Partnerships
The partnership of government, quasi-governmental organizations, banks, nonprofits and foundations is a critical component of the TOD Fund. Enterprise Community Partners, a national nonprofit, assembled the initial $15 million in capital that allowed the Fund to begin operations in April, 2010. City of Denver is the largest single investor, providing $2.5 million in top loss investment. ULC committed the initial $1.5 million equity to the Fund and leads the real estate acquisition, management, and disposition of assets for the Fund. ULC partners with other developers to achieve the goals of the TOD Fund to preserve and create affordable housing and mixed-use developments.

Expanding TOD to Other Municipalities


Metro Denver is undergoing the nations largest public transit expansion with the addition of five new light rail lines that compliment the existing three lines already serving Denver and its south suburbs. Each of these new rail lines brings opportunity for transit-oriented development in the Denver Metro area. The structure of the TOD Fund offers a unique opportunity to expand into other municipalities in the metro area in order to complement transit oriented development and other activities around expansion of FasTracks. Our desire is to partner with municipalities to explore how this Fund can preserve and create affordable housing and stimulate economic development along rail lines. We wel-

Benefits of the Fund


The Fund is capitalized at $15 million, and is evolving to $30 million in total loan capital. This revolving loan fund will make capital available to purchase and hold sites for up to five years along current and future rails and high frequency bus corridors. The $30 million investment will leverage over $500 million in local economic development activity, serving many economically challenged neighborhoods in Metro Denver with construction and permanent job creation. The Fund will also directly benefit low-income households that on average spend 60% of their gross income on housing and transportation expenses combined. By controlling these expenses and providing access to quality, environmentally-sus-

come the opportunity to answer any questions about pacity to make the investment how an investment in this fund can help achieve com- Investment is done in collaboration and partnership munity development goals and strengthen Metro Denwith Strengthening Neighborhood and other strong vers communities. community partners

ULC Site Selection Criteria


Investment Strategy
ULC concentrates its investments in targeted neighborhoods that have significant economic and social challenges. These high risk neighborhoods include significant portions of Denver as well as sections of first ring suburban communities with similar challenges. We also focus our investments along transit corridors with an emphasis on sites within a half-mile from current and future TOD sites. ULC will consider super project (i.e. TOD Fund) that are consistent with our mission,

Property provides opportunity to generate income

For New Neighborhood Opportunities


New neighborhood/community is determined to have the most compelling unmet needs of all potential new areas under consideration that justifies investment; neighborhood/community must serve high poverty or at-risk populations Investment is of a particularly high catalytic value and includes access to high frequency transit No other stakeholder in the community has the capacity to make the investment

but may be out of our focus area. Each investment must have the potential to be impactful over the long-term and/or catalytic in nature. Unless a property/site is a TOD Fund supported site and/or is an impactful super project, ULC prefers to invest only if the property/site meets the following criteria:

For Current Investment Neighborhoods


Property is adjacent or close to other ULC investments to maximize community impact, to build on other investment, and to capitalize on existing community relationships and partnerships The neighborhood/community continues to demonstrate a need for additional investment No other stakeholder in the community has the ca-

RTD FasTracks Layout


Map on page 4
The RTD FasTracks program is an integration of several transit modes and other programs into a comprehensive region-wide system. Several transit technologies will be used as determined through the environmental process on each corridor. RTD has already been using buses and light rail to meet the Denver metro areas transit needs. As part of FasTracks, new technologies -- commuter rail and bus rapid transit -- will be introduced to the region. In addition to the new rail corridors, extensions and bus rapid transit, FasTracks includes new park-nRides, two new maintenance facilities, expanded bus service called FastConnects and the redevelopment of Denver Union Station. -RTD FasTracks website

ULC has significant resources to dedicate to establishing a new long-term commitment Investment can be accomplished in collaboration and partnership with Strengthening Neighborhood and other strong community assets

Donated Properties
Donated properties will be accepted if: The property has a minimum size of 1 acre, OR The property has a minimum value of $50,000, and The property is located in the Denver metro unless The property is simply a candidate for liquidation with proceeds going to the mission of ULC and the donor places no restriction on sale The property has economically feasible development potential Donated properties will NOT be accepted if: The property has significant environmental issues The property requires servicing of significant debt or negative cash flow

The RTD FasTracks Layout map shows the intended plans of the FasTracks system among high-frequency bus lines, routes that make stops at least every 15 minutes during peak hours. FasTracks plans are subject to change due to funding and construction.

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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District [July, 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Urban Land Conservancy Assets and Investments Database [Microsoft Access file]. Denver, Colorado: Urban Land Conservancy, 2011.

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Urban Land Conservancy Investments


As of May 17, 2012

Urban Land Conservancy Investments


Map on Page 5

an education-focused mission.

The purchase and preservation of Tennyson was completed without taxpayer dollars and is a great example This map contains ULCs investments and opportuni- of how ULC maintains vital community real estate. Our ties. The place marks of the real estate investments are work with Tennyson is a positive homegrown model for represented by two different symbols, one of which rep- nonprofit real estate relationships. resents TOD investments, a specific type of investment focused on building affordable housing around reliable 2. Transitional Housing at 3975 Colorado transit. This includes investments that have been sold to Blvd partners after our goals were met. Currently, all of our investments lie within the City and A real estate company donated this former Budget MoCounty of Denver; however, we are focused on striv- tel to ULC in 2006, and ULC sold the property to Coloing to be a presence in the entire metro area. As MHCs rado Coalition for the Homeless (CCH) in 2012. ULC Equity Atlas revealed, disparities are not limited to the will partner with CCH for the redevelopment of this site inner city. In fact, inequity reaches far into the suburbs to include a mix of affordable housing and other public uses. In the meantime, it is being operated by CCH as as a result of these challenging economic times. transitional housing. Located on a high frequency by Opportunities are real estate findings that the ULC route, this property will be an exemplar of transit-orihas pursued or researched. These opportunities may ented development. Over 350 residents, all previously not materialize into investments if we determine they homeless or in transition (in many cases with children) do not align with our mission. As a nonprofit we have are served annually. This site is two and a half blocks made certain that we do not make real estate transac- from a future light rail stop on the northeast corridor tions for the benefit of the organization, we are solely of FasTracks. focused on providing for other nonprofits and communities of need. Even if real estate opportunities present great potential for being profitable, we will not pursue if 3. Habitat for Humanity Denver Home it does not provide for the people that we intend to aid. Improvement Outlet ULC helped finance the acquisition of Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denvers Denver Home Improvement 1. Tennyson Center for Children Outlet, located at 70 Rio Grande Boulevard, by providIn January of 2011, ing Habitat with a below market bridge loan. In April, Tennyson Cen2008, the bridge loan was fully paid back to the ULC. ter for Children This outlet continues to thrive in Denver. (TCC) purchased the city block where it operates 4. Phillips Center at 29th Avenue and Tennyson ULC purchased Street in northwest the Phillips CenDenver from ULC. Based on an innovative model in ter, with the supwhich ULC purchases urban assets in order to main- port of the Garytain, preserve or redevelop them for community ben- Williams Energy efit, ULC purchased the one-block, 4.12 acre campus Corporation in in April 2005 and re-sold it to Tennyson Center for the 2007 and is redeveloping this 115original purchase price. year old, 95,000 In further support of ULCs mission, TCC agreed as square foot former Denver Tramway Company transpart of the purchase that for 89 years, if TCC sells the portation and maintenance facility. Located in northproperty, it will be sold to another nonprofit entity with east Denver, the Phillips Center occupies a full city block

and currently houses the following seven educationally focused nonprofits: Byrne Urban Scholars, cityWILD, Civic Canopy, Denver Early Childhood Council, Babies to College, Early Excellence and GOAL Academy. ULC has invested over $600,000 into improvements and energy upgrades at the Phillips Center and continues to offer affordable office space for nonprofits. This historic structure is a long-term investment ensuring that important human services are available to the Cole neighborhood and other Denver residents.

5. Jody Apartments (TOD)


Adjacent to the future Sheridan light rail station, Jody Apartments is a 62-unit multifamily community on two plus acres of land situated at Sheridan Station on the West Corridor of FasTracks. Jody will part of a large scale redevelopment that will incorporate affordable housing and other vital services in partnership with ULC, NEWSED, City of Denver, City of Lakewood and RTD. Jodys 62 affordable apartments are owned and operated by NEWSED while ULC owns the land and has a 99 year land lease to guarantee long-term community benefit.

6. 25th & Stout Denver


ULC acquired this land through a real estate company donation in 2008. The property abuts Agape Church and is two blocks away from the 25th & Welton light rail station in a burgeoning Downtown Denver neighborhood. ULCs partner is Northeast Housing and they have a redevelopment plan to build 9 healthy homes as a pilot project with National Jewish Hospital.

destroyed by arson in May 2008. The property was purchased in April 2009 by ULC with assistance from the City of Denvers Office of Economic Development. The ULC oversaw demolition of the burned structures on the 2.6 acre site, resolved environmental issues, and launched a community visioning process with the help of The Denver Foundations Strengthening Neighborhoods Program (SN) to re-imagine the entire six-block area including and surrounding the former shopping center in June 2009. The Holly Area Redevelopment Project (HARP) Visioning Process was a year-and half long open public process that led to creation of a set of Good Neighbor Principles as well as a set of broad design concepts that the ULC committed to using in selecting a developer or developers for the site. The Boys & Girls Club of Metro Denver was selected as the first partner to construct the Nancy P. Anschutz Center which will compliment current assets in the neighborhood. Additional development will occur through the HARP process, enhancing existing community assets including a recreation center and public library.

9. Dahlia Apartments (TOD)


ULC acquired this Northeast Park Hill property in December, 2009. It was foreclosed upon in 2008 qualifying it for the Neighborhood Stabilization Program. The property consists of six buildings with a total of 36, 2-bedroom affordable apartment homes and serves over 100 residents. This property was the first to utilize financing through the TOD Fund.

7. 2000 Block of Glenarm


ULC, in partnership with St. Andrews Church, bought two, 12,500 square foot parking lots at the 2000 block of Glenarm, one block from the transit stop at Welton and 20th. ULC in partnership with St. Andrews Church is land banking these lots with a vision for a mixed-use redevelopment in the future.

10. NEWSED Multi-Tenant NonProfit Center

Owned by NEWSED Community Development Corporation, 1029 Santa Fe Drive houses 5 nonprofit organizations working in the Metro Denver community. The center was brought together through NEWSEDs offer of affordable rent and its desire to only house nonprofit organizations. Derived from NEWSEDs mission, 8. Holly Square the center has a focus on serving low-income people The former Holly Square Shopping Center, located in through education, advocacy, and economic and social the Northeast Park Hill neighborhood of Denver, was justice, in particular the local Latino community. The

groups share facilities in the building and collaborate on social and economic issues whenever possible. The Santa Fe Nonprofit Offices & Warehouse also functions as a ULC investment with the goal of preservation and redevelopment. In partnership with NEWSED, ULC provided a $300,000 PRI loan at a 3% interest rate for two years, for this 31,000 square foot commercial/ warehouse building. In order to preserve the building for long-term community benefit, ULC has the first right to purchase the land at the end of loan term.

12. Mile High Vista (TOD)


ULC purchased this two-acre parcel of land along west Denvers FasTracks light rail corridor for $2.1 million using the TOD Fund. ULC will be the master developer of the site that will include the new west Denver library, a mixed-use workforce housing development with Del Norte Neighborhood Development, and a commercial building. This acquisition will provide enormous opportunity for additional transit oriented development along west Colfax and the future Knox and Decatur light rail stations on the West Corridor. ULC sees this site as a strategic gateway to the west Colfax Denver community, the mix of uses in this development will bring great economic benefit to the area which is essential to the revitalization of the neighborhood. The City and County of Denver will purchase a portion of the site to construct the new west Denver library and Del Norte will purchase a portion for the housing component of this development.

11. Yale Commons (TOD)


Purchased for $1.325 million in July, 2010, this vacant 1.51 acre parcel is adjacent to the Yale Light Rail Station along the Southeast Corridor. ULC acquired the property utilizing the TOD Fund, and the affordable homes developed on this site will directly benefit low income households in their two greatest expenses; housing and transportation, while providing transportation access to services, education, health and employment centers. ULC is a part of Yale TOD Partners, a strategic alliance between RTD, Koelbel and Company and Mile High Development, to create a master plan for a transit-oriented community at the Yale Station. The Master Planning site could include the entire area around the Yale Light Rail Station influence area bound on the East by Interstate 25, on the South by East Yale Avenue, on the West by Eudora Street, and on the North by East Vassar Avenue. The project is accessed from I-25 via the Yale Avenue exit and is approximately 9 miles southeast of downtown Denver. The Denver Tech Center is two light rail stops from the property and Downtown Denver is within eight stops.

13. Delaware Station (TOD)


In June of 2011, ULC purchased land along Denvers FasTracks Southwest light rail corridor that will be developed into an affordable, mixed-use transit oriented development. This property will provide much needed workforce housing and retail opportunity directly across from the Evans Light Rail Station.

ULC purchased this 1 acre property for $1.2 million using the TOD Fund. This site being directly across the street from the Evans Station will provide much economic opportunity in a prime location, giving people Yale TOD Partners desires to develop the Yale Station easy transit access for jobs and education opportunities. area into a master planned TOD community with a mix ULC expects this development to be catalytic to the of uses and concepts that utilize the entire site. To the area, encouraging additional community investment. highest degree possible, the architectural / construction design shall incorporate green building, i.e., E- Star and LEED certification, and other utility cost savings systems.

ULC is partnering with affordable housing developer of 2011, is the 6th acquisition using the TOD Fund. Medici Communities LLC who was awarded low income housing tax credits (LIHTC) from Colorado Housing and Finance Authority (CHFA) for the project. 16. Curtis Park Community Center The LIHTC program provides the private market with ULC, with support an incentive to invest in affordable rental housing. from the City and Medicis Evans Station Lofts will be a five-story develop- County of Denvers ment which will include 50 residential workforce units Office of Economic and 7,100 square feet of retail and commercial space. Development, acThis project will be the first family LIHTC project at an quired the Curtis existing light rail station along RTDs FasTracks, and Park Community will serve households with incomes ranging from 30% Center in January to 60% of the Area Median Income (AMI). of 2012. The property includes two buildings: a 13,000 sq. ft. community center building (including a gym and training/meet14. Villa TOD ing space) and a smaller administrative building (ofVilla TOD, located in Denvers Santa Fe Arts District, fice space) of 5,700 sq. ft. ULC is looking forward to is the fifth property ULC has acquired using the TOD renovating the center as a productive, beneficial asset to Fund. ULC purchased this .31 acre property in August the Curtis Park community. It was owned for almost 70 of 2011 for $1.35million, preserving 16 units of afford- years by American Baptist Church of the Rocky Mounable housing and 7,400 square feet of commercial space. tain Region, who chose to sell it and support ULCs mission of acquiring and preserving real estate for longThe preservation and structural imporvement of Villa term community benefit. TOD will boost the health of the neighborhood by providing workforce housing, affordable office space for The community center is located 5 blocks from several bus routes at East 30th and Downing and 4 blocks from neighborhood programs as well as creating local jobs. the Welton and 29th light rail station in downtown ULC will partner with NEWSED and Denver Inner City Denver. It will serve as part of the Denver Shared Space Parish (DICP) for the long-term management and use Project (DSSP), offering the gym and meeting spaces of the property. Both nonprofits have worked along the for community use. ULC is working with several local Santa Fe corridor for more than 35 years. DICP will be nonprofits to office at this site including: Family Star expanding their services to include housing assistance Montessori Program who will be operating a high-qualand this facility will be a natural extension of their cur- ity preschool program and African-American Leaderrent service area allowing them to fill a vital need in ship Institute, a 20 year old leadership development west Denver. organization who will also be offering programming services.

15. Blake TOD


Blake TOD is a 1.4 acre property at 38th Street and Walnut Street. This site sits adjacent to the first stop of RTDs future East Corridor Commuter Line connecting Downtown Union Station to Denver International Airport. This property, which has been vacant for over a year, will be stabilized and eventually developed as a mixed-use site with an emphasis on affordable housing. Development at this site will be catalytic to the area, with much needed access to transit at the Blake Street Station scheduled to be operational in early 2016. This property, purchased for $1.7 million in November

17. 11th Avenue TOD


ULC acquired 11th Avenue TOD in July of 2012 using Denvers Transit-Oriented Development Fund. This is the 7th property acquired with the TOD Fund. ULC will partner with Rocky Mountain Communities who plans to construct 58 affordable senior homes less than 1/4 mile from the Sheridan Station on the West Rail Line. This 5 story building will have immediate access to rail transit as well as the bike/pedestrian path providing seniors with access to healthy food, health services, jobs and educational opportunities.


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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District [July, 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Denver Metro Affordable Housing Inventory 2011 [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver Office of Economic Development [November, 2011]

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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District [July, 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Denver Metro Affordable Housing Inventory 2011 [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver Office of Economic Development [November, 2011]

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Expiring Affordable Housing

Affordable Housing in Denver


Map on 10
Through the Office of Economic Development of the City and County of Denver, we were able to acquire an inventory of affordable housing across the entire Metro Denver area. This has been key to ULCs community research and placing our focus in areas that will benefit most from our work. The data provided by the City included restricted affordable rental, and for-sale units with the name, address, mix of affordable units, targeted demographic, number of bedrooms, source of funding, owner, size of the development, and the date that affordable housing credits expire.

trying to work and raise a family with non-TOD transportation. She deals with late buses, complicated bus transfers, burdened grocery shopping trips, and must rely on public transportation to get to hospitals when her children are sick. Despite all of that, Keyshas attitude remains positive because of her love for her children, the Sun Valley community, and having quality affordable housing. I was homeless at one point... and that was a lot tougher than this, she says.

Buses have been tricky for Keysha as they are not as reliable as she feels they should be. During inclement weather things are even worse. She told us of instances in which buses were over twenty minutes late, and when they arrive they are too full to get on with her children and stroller. She is forced to make quick bus transfers The map shows restricted affordable rental housing by which involve her leaving her children on the bus to size of the development along with restricted affordable chase another down, only then to turn around and hold for sale housing as yellow squares. Most restricted af- both buses at the stop long enough to make the transfer fordable rental housing is concentrated within the city, with all four children. which presents the ULC an opportunity to think regionally. The map also has the FasTracks TOD layer to show Grocery shopping is an exhausting experience. Travelaffordable housing around existing or future reliable ling to the closest full size grocery store is difficult to transportation. Moving regionally, the ULC would like time correctly because the bus that services her neighto focus on providing affordable housing around these borhood stops running around 8:30pm. She used to key areas so low-income families have reliable access to take her children with her, but realized that she can be more efficient and quick if she leaves them home, which food, healthcare, education, and jobs. creates an almost unbearable feeling of anxiety.

Why does ULC focus on TOD?


Affordable housing in transit oriented developments is reaching a point of high demand. As the advantage of TOD living becomes apparent to a greater number of people, we must remain focused on growing equitably. Low-income families need to have access to communities in and adjacent to TOD sites because of the direct impact it has on their quality of life. Many of these families rely on public transportation as a fundamental resource to their daily lives. Convenient access to public transportation is a real advantage for people in order to save money and time. We had the opportunity to speak with a Sun Valley resident, Keysha, who described a challenging example of housing that does not benefit from reliable transportation. Keysha is a single mom with four children and no access to a car, giving her the unfortunate experience of

Keysha recollected about a time when one of her children had the flu and was running close to a 107 degree temperature. Snow was falling as she made the thirty minute walk with her child bundled up tightly in a stroller. After being seen by the doctor, Keysha walked back home the same way she came. After all of this, Keysha says with a smile I love my community, its calm, I feel stable, and I love my place. She doesnt want to move, she wants her children to do well in school and to make permanent friends. Four years ago, she was homeless for seven months. That experience has given her a positive look on her new life and she really looks forward to the benefit that the future adjacent light rail station will bring to her community in the coming years. Housing that does not benefit from reliable TOD access severely limits opportunities for low-income households, placing extreme restrictions and strain on already vulnerable families. There is a fundamental need to provide well-connected housing options to all income levels, particularly for low income families who depend on public transportation for their livelihood. Equitable

development is key to healthy communities and cities. We need to assure that families like Keyshas have the opportunity to live in areas that will allow them to save money and time, while easily and inexpensively accessing education, employment, services, and ultimately a higher quality of life.

used this data to target communities of need throughout Metro Denver, focusing on areas with the greatest percentage of home foreclosures and highest percentage of subprime mortgage loans.

The data includes a category called Estimated Foreclosure Abandonment Risk Score. The score is not the actual level of problem in each neighborhood, but instead an indicator of a risk of problems. The score is created Expiring Affordable Housing from a combination of indicators including: the decline of home values from the Office of Federal Housing EnMap on page 11 terprise Oversight, percentage of loans made between Analyzing the City of 2004 and 2005 from the Federal Reserve Home MortDenvers affordable hous- gage Disclosure Act, unemployment rates in counties ing data further allowed as of June 2008 from the Labor Department, and resius to extract and display dential addresses identified as being vacant for 90 days the restricted affordable or longer as of June 2008 from the United Stated Postal housing that is recently Service. expired or expiring soon. This data can be considered outdated in 2012 because As affordable housing tax credits expire, its important of the improving economy, however the predictions for organizations such as the ULC to be concerned. We were accurate and many of these communities are still want to ensure the city is not at risk of losing valuable in need of assistance with affordable housing and proaffordable housing. Knowing the details of the expiring grams to assist people threatened by foreclosure. HUD developments allows us to pinpoint properties we may has made these data readily available so local governwant to take action on. Sometimes expiring developments and nonprofits like ULC can pinpoint where our ments are owned and operated by nonprofits with disinvestments will be most impactful. The financial crisis tinct intentions to renew their housing tax credits, this of 2008 created long lasting issues within our communidoes not concern ULC as much as a for-profit developer ties, understanding the factors that generated the crisis who may own an tax credit housing development. is a first step to addressing problems. HUD has done The map shows expiring affordable developments by a tremendous job guiding us to the areas that need us size, similar to the affordable housing inventory map. most. The place marks are also defined by year of expiration, the more red the square is, the sooner it is expiring. The Foreclosure in the City and County of FasTracks layer is also included to ensure Denver is not Denver at risk for losing affordable housing in key TOD areas.

In the State of Colorado, we have faced foreclosures at an alarming rate in past years; however, signs of recovery are apparent. During 2011, foreclosure filings fell 25.3 percent from 2010, the lowest annual total since Map on page 16 2006 (DOH, 2011). Similar results have occurred with The United States Department of Housing and Urban foreclosure sales. In the City and County of Denver, the Development (HUD) published a foreclosure risk as- 2011 foreclosure filings totaled 3,434 while 2010 faced sessment in 2008, forecasting communities at the high- 5,053, a 32 percent change for the better. est risk of destabilization through foreclosures. In this Foreclosure filings provide ULC the ability to understudy, as a part of the Housing and Economic Recovery stand the communities that allow us to carry out our Act of 2008 and the Neighborhood Stabilization Pro- mission. From 2005 to 2011, there were over 31,510 gram, HUD established very specific targeting respon- foreclosure filings in Denver County, as shown on the sibilities for state and local governments. ULC has also

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Foreclosure Risk Assessment

Map on page 17

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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District [July, 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Neighborhood Stabilization Program Targeting [Shapefile]. (2008) Washington, District of Colombia: United States Department of Housing and Urban Development. Available: http://www.huduser.org/portal/datasets/geo/summarylevel.html [February 28, 2012].

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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District [July, 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Denver Public Trustee Foreclosure List [Excel Spreadsheet]. Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver, 2011. Digital GIS Data and Maps [downloaded files]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: City and County of Denver. Available: https://exteft.denvergov.org

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foreclosure map. However, it is important to understand that filings are not sales. Foreclosure filings can be mitigated and stopped from becoming sales with assistance from programs like the Colorado Foreclosure Prevention Task Force and the Colorado Foreclosure Hotline.

ity education provides the means to emerge from low incomes and foster the potential for leadership amongst our youth.

ULC has benefitted tremendously from being able to represent school ratings spatially. The Piton FoundaThe pattern of foreclosures directly reflects the predict- tion is a leader in data and research, educating residents ed foreclosure issues from the previous map of HUD through data analysis and display for the purpose of foreclosure risk. Affordable housing options give fami- community growth and engagement. Piton has been an lies facing foreclosure viable options to retain the value important ally and partner to ULC, and their available of their homes and community. resources were crucial to the educational data provided in this Atlas.

School Performance Ratings

The Colorado Department of Education also has a great tool for analyzing school performance and growth on their website, called SchoolVIEW. With data collected from SchoolVIEW, the ULC was able to average the percent proficient scores on math, reading, and writing of each school in Metro Denver, and geocode it to represent it spatially for ULC to accurately identify com-

Map on page 17
Quality schools and educational programs are an asset to all communities, ULC is dedicated to working with munities in need of educational assistance. ULC is able partners around the Metro Denver who are devoted to to provide and manage space for educational programs providing equal education opportunities for all. to thrive and make a difference in the lives of children ULC has a proven track record of working with educa- across the city. tional programs and nonprofits to improve communi- The map shows School Performance Framework ratings ties that desperately need educational attention. Qual- in Metro Denver. Many of the low-income and HUD risk areas are plagued with low proficiency scores. Mapping this data can be a first step in solving the problem. We must understand the complex relationships that accompany poor school ratings. ULC is working to assist quality educational programs by finding effective real estate solutions to continue their invaluable work in Denvers communities. We have many successful educational partners and will continue providing real estate solutions. Education and health care are the civil rights

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efit to the communities in which they preside, it is important to understand they do not have the ability to service every population lacking access to healthcare. ULC uses health indicators to evaluate community need with the intention of providing solutions to gaps in hospital coverage. We will work with organizations to provide real estate solutions to improve health coverage in Denvers communities. We are able to provide affordable space and connect organizations to a network of services and support through our partners. This map shows the distance from each hospital in Met-

Hospital Coverage for Low Income Populations

Map on page 19
Hospital coverage is another indicator important to ULC. Analyzing the distance of hospitals to various parts of the city reveals an alarming tale. Many lowincome populations are faced with the problem of poor access to health services. Many low-income individuals in these areas rely on public transportation to get to needed health services, sometimes the easiest hospital to get to is not the closest based on transportation connections. Denver Health is Denvers safety net hospital, providing much needed affordable care to the Metro Denver residents. Low-income patrons, many of which are uninsured, have found comfort in the services that the hospital provides. Denver Health has also taken great strides to provide health care to low-income areas by conveniently placing clinics in the neighborhoods that need it most. While these clinics have offered great benro Denver with poverty population density. Clinics are also labeled. The most startling gaps reside in west Denver between Federal and Sheridan Boulevard and the Montbello area in east Denver, north of I-70. Poverty population density was obtained from the Census American Fact Finder website as population in poverty by census tract. The data was then normalized by percentage of block group population to its census tract. Since 1860, Denver Health has played a crucial role in providing and sustaining health care, which has resulted in Denver gaining the reputation as one of the nations healthiest cities. Today, Denver Health continues to care for the needs of vulnerable special populations including the poor, minorities, non-English speakers and refugees. In 2008 Denver Health served approximately 160,000 people, including 25% of Denvers residents and 35% of Denvers children. More than 85% of them were low income or working poor. Denver Health Foundation

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Statistics, Maps, and Data [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Transportation [August, 2011] RTD Developer Resources [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Regional Transportation District 1 [July, 21 2011] Regional Data Catalog [downloaded file]. (2011) Denver, Colorado: Denver Regional Council of Governments [December, 2011] Colorado Department of Health and Environment GIS [shapefile]. (2009) Denver, Colorado: Colorado Department of Health and Environment. Available: http://emaps.dphe.state.co.us/gis/download_data.html#env_links [September, 2011] American Fact Finder [online database]. (2010) Washington, DC: U.S. Census Bureau. Available: http://factfinder2.census.gov [March, 2012] 2011 TIGER/Line Shapefiles [online database]. (2011) Washington, DC. Available: http://www.census.gov/geo/www/tiger/tgrshp2011/tgrshp2011.html [March, 2012]

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