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Volume 103 ∙ February 16, 2012 ∙ Number 17
Volume 103 ∙ February 16, 2012 ∙ Number 17

Mount Berry Church celebrates 100 years

KristEN sEllErs

Deputy News Editor

Mount Berry Church will be holding a special service

on Sunday Feb. 19 inviting students and alumni to cele-

brate the 100th year of church services in the Berry College Chapel.

Interim Chaplain Jon Huggins said this special service

has been in the works since the summer. While Huggins

was reading over Mount Berry Church history, he saw the

very first service date, Feb. 22 1912 and thought it to be ap- propriate to begin the planning process for a celebration.

Students and alumni will participate in leading the ser- vice through scripture readings and leading worship. Ad-

junct instructor Allyson Chambers is a native of Rome, Ga. and grew up in Mount Berry Church. During the service

she will be sharing the history of the church. The special

guest speaker for the celebration is Will Willimon, former

Dean of the Chapel at Duke University.

With the service so soon, Huggins said he is excited for the whole experience.

“I have a really strong sense of history and significance

of the moment. This is what makes being at Berry so spe- cial. Being a part of a historic story that we can all be proud of- the story that begins with Martha Berry,” Huggins said. Huggins said how Martha Berry decided to start the church on campus.

“It was her Christian faith to live a life of benevolent

purpose for the good of others. In addition to education, she felt that students needed spiritual formation. So in ad- dition to starting Berry schools she founded the church,” Huggins said.

Before College Chapel was built and Mount Berry Church existed, Martha Berry would load up wagons and

take the students to church in the community, rotating de- nominations each week. This began the foundation for an interdenominational church on Berry’s campus. Once College Chapel was built and services began, Mar- tha Berry kept the service open as interdenominational. Associate Professor of Sociology and former Chaplain Dale McConkey said one time when a band came to lead worship one Sunday at Mount Berry Church they com-

mented that the outside of the church looks Baptist, the in- side looks Episcopalian and the hymnals look Evangelical.

McConkey said that is a prime demonstration that Mount Berry Church as always been interdenominational where

students of different backgrounds can come together as one body. “It’s really cool to me that the church has been around

for 100 years. In my life it has been a really big impact be- ing able to fellowship with other students at Berry, “ staff

supervisor of the Chaplain’s Office senior Sarah Thomas

said.

Director of worship at Mount Berry Church, junior Lisa

Anders, said Mount Berry Church has provided a place

where all students can come where there is no denomina-

tion affiliation and they get to know and fellow believers.

“I feel really privileged to have a part in the 100th service. It is cool to know that for 100 years people have

worshiped at Berry College in the chapel and we can now

celebrate the faithfulness of the Lord and of the people at

Berry,” Anders said. “Even though many things have changed about the format of the worship services, the continuity of students

having the opportunity to express their faith on campus for

100 years is definitely worth celebrating,” McConkey said.

Huggins said he hopes students will come and be a part

of the moment.

The 100th anniversary service of Mount Berry Church is Sunday Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. in College Chapel.

Volume 103 ∙ February 16, 2012 ∙ Number 17 Mount Berry Church celebrates 100 years KristEN

cabiN lOg 1968

Volume 103 ∙ February 16, 2012 ∙ Number 17 Mount Berry Church celebrates 100 years KristEN

New HOPE scholarship eligibility standards, budget determinants

KElly dicKErsON

News Editor

The HOPE scholarship pro- gram has been under recent pres- sure due to the inability of Geor- gia lottery revenue to keep pace with the program. Students were initially re- quired to maintain a 3.0 GPA to retain their HOPE scholarship. Now, if students want the full- tuition scholarship, called the Zell Miller Scholarship, they must graduate as valedictorian, saluta- torian, or have at least a 3.7 high school GPA and a 1200 SAT score and they must maintain a 3.5 GPA while in college. This year students with a 3.0 GPA received about $500 less per semester.

see “HOPE” P. 3

Volume 103 ∙ February 16, 2012 ∙ Number 17 Mount Berry Church celebrates 100 years KristEN

rydEr mcENtyrE, Graphics Editor FrOm timEsFrEEPrEss.cOm

vv Features | Page 6-7 Battling Racial Stereotypes Entertainment | Page 8 Sports | Page 10
vv
Features | Page 6-7
Battling Racial Stereotypes
Entertainment | Page 8
Sports | Page 10
Hearts for Haiti
1976 women’s
championship
team
Benefit Concert

Fact of the Week:

During your life- time, you’ll eat about 60,000 pounds of food, that’s the weight of about six elephants.

Please recycle our paper.

Please recycle our paper.

Please recycle our paper.

PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR

news

FebRUARy 16, 2012

PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 - Chimney Fire - On Feb. 11 officers

-Chimney Fire- On Feb. 11 officers responded to a chimney fire at the River Farm Home off Jones Bend Road. There was no damage from the fire.

“No matter how minor the dam- age, all traffic accidents should be reported to campus police.”
“No matter how minor the dam-
age, all traffic accidents should be
reported to campus police.”
PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 - Chimney Fire - On Feb. 11 officers
PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 - Chimney Fire - On Feb. 11 officers

New York Times columnist to speak at Berry

KellY DiCKersoN

News Editor

New York Times columnist Ross Douthat will speak about “Bad Religion and Ameri- can Public Life Today,” Thursday at 7 p.m. in Spruill Ballroom. Douthat joined the New York Times as an op-ed columnist in April 2009. He is the youngest op-ed columnist to ever work at the New York Times. He also the author of “Privilege: Harvard and the Education of the Ruling Class” and co-author of “Grand New Party: How Republicans Can Win the Work- ing Class and Save the American Dream.” Douthat’s latest book “Bad Religion: How

We Became a Nation of Heretics” covers the 1950s to present and examines how the Chris- tian faith has declined over time. Douthat will be in the Science Auditorium at 4 p.m. tomorrow to answer questions and comment on the 2012 election. All faculty, staff and students are invited to attend. Before the New York Times, Douthat worked as senior editor of the Atlantic and as a blogger for theatlantic.com. Douthat is originally from Conneticut but now lives in Washington D.C. His latest book has been described as “a powerful and origi- nal critique of how American Christianity has gone astray—and the deeply troubling conse- quences for American life and politics.

PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 - Chimney Fire - On Feb. 11 officers

CoNTriBuTeD BY oFFiCe oF puBliC relaTioNs

The Last Night of Ballyhoo

The Last Night of Ballyhoo ChrisTiaN TurNer, Assistant Photo Editor The Berry College Theatre Company is

ChrisTiaN TurNer, Assistant Photo Editor

The Berry College Theatre Company is performing the play “The Last Night of Ballyhoo”, starting Feb. 16. Senior Alex

Middleton and junior Darren Barnet (above) are two of the students starring in the play. For the full story see Entertainment pg.

9.

What makes a curious reader? You do. Read to your child today and inspire a lifelong

What makes a curious reader?

You do.

Read to your child today and inspire

What makes a curious reader? You do. Read to your child today and inspire a lifelong

a lifelong love of reading.

www.read.gov

What makes a curious reader? You do. Read to your child today and inspire a lifelong
PAGe 2, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 - Chimney Fire - On Feb. 11 officers

HUNGER KEEPS UP ON CURRENT EVENTS, TOO.

 

1 IN 6 AMERICANS STRUGGLES WITH HUNGER.

TOGETHER

1 IN 6 AMERICANS STRUGGLES WITH HUNGER. TOGETHER

WE’RE

Hunger is closer than you think. Reach out to your local food bank for ways to

Hunger is closer than you think. Reach out to your local food bank for ways to do your part. Visit FeedingAmerica.org today.

 

February 16, 2012

News

CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 3

HOPE

coNTINueD FRoM Pg. 1

the future of the nation,” Large said. “They are making it harder for people to get an education.”

Georgia officials said last year they

believed the HOPe program would go broke by 2013 if changes to the program were not

Other changes made last year to the schol- arship include putting a limit on total family income for eligibility for the scholarship. Junior Courtney Large said she thinks education scholarships are not what should be cut to save money.

“I think its sad that they always make

budget cuts in education; it’s sacrificing

made. The amount given to students was based on tuition increases, however awards given through HOPe now will be adjusted annu- ally based on lottery revenue. Changes made last year require techni- cal college students to maintain a 3.0 GPa in an effort to save money. because of this new requirement, there has been a 12 percent

decrease in the number of students enrolled in technical schools. Georgia state represen- tative stacey evans is sponsoring a bill that would lower the GPa requirement to 2.5 so

that more people will be able to finance a

technical degree. Current students will not be grandfa- thered into the new program; they will have to earn the scholarship based on the new terms. The Tennessee scholarship is facing simi- lar problems to the HOPe budget and is looking to make comparable changes in its policy and eligibility requirements.

Smores, bonfire residence social

Smores, bonfire residence social cHRISTIaN TuRNeR, Asst. Photo Editor The Morgan/Deerfield RAs put together a bonfire

cHRISTIaN TuRNeR, Asst. Photo Editor

The Morgan/Deerfield RAs put together a bonfire for their residents Sunday night. Junior Katherine McDonald, freshman Emily Martins, junior Nana Linge and freshman Karl Kutti enjoy some smores while hanging out.

American Heart Association Memorials A gift from the heart. The memory of a loved one lives
American Heart Association Memorials
A gift from
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For more information please
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TAK E YO U R HEART F O R A WA L K . YOU COULD
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February 16, 2012 News CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 3 HOPE coNTINueD FRoM Pg. 1 the future of
February 16, 2012 News CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 3 HOPE coNTINueD FRoM Pg. 1 the future of
Ross Douthat Seminar Hear a seminar on today’s politics, the state and orga- nization of the

Ross Douthat Seminar

Hear a seminar on today’s politics, the state and orga- nization of the republican Party and the 2012 election by columnist, conservative blogger and former senior

editor of The atlantic ross

Douthat Thursday Feb.

  • 16 at 4 p.m. in the evans

auditorium or at 7 p.m. in

spruill ballroom. Ce credit offered.

Poetry Reading

Hear poet allison Joseph, who has written six books of poetry, discuss and read some of her work Friday Feb. 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the science auditorium. Ce credit offered.

From Harm to Home

Enjoy a benefit concert to

support the International rescue Committee (IrC) and learn more about the work of IrC, Georgia’s re- located refugees, and how to help Friday Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. in the Ford audito- rium. Ce credit offered.

Mission Improvable

Have fun watching the number one touring improv comedy act in the nation saturday Feb. 18 at 9 p.m. in spruill ballroom.

Mime-matics

explore mathematical ideas

through the art of miming

sunday Feb. 19 at 5:30 p.m.

in the science auditorium. Ce credit offered.

Irish Film Series

watch “bloody sunday” as the next installment

in the Irish film series

sunday Feb. 19 at 7 p.m. in blackstone 200. Ce credit offered.

The Not So Wild, Wild

West

Hear Professor of econom-

ics emeritus at wheaton

College Peter Hill present his lecture on property rights, development and evolution during the settle- ment of the west Monday Feb. 20 at 7:30 p.m. in the science auditorium. Ce credit offered.

Markets and Morality

Hear Professor of econom- ics emeritus at wheaton College Peter Hill lecture on markets and morality Tuesday Feb. 21 at 11 a.m. in the evans auditorium. Ce credit offered.

Lumen Lecture Series

Hear bishop of the Meth- odist Church Dr. will wil-

limon speak on issues of faith and life Tuesday Feb.

  • 21 at 7 p.m. in spruill ball-

room. Ce credit offered.

pAGE 4, CAMpUs CARRiER

OpiniOns

FEbRUARy 16, 2012

Social awkwardness: the safari guide We all know the phrase “ it’s only awkward if get
Social awkwardness: the safari guide
We all know the phrase
“ it’s only awkward if
get in their way.
spotting Tip #2: Gib -
you make it awkward!”
just isn’t true. s ome -
times, it just is awkward.
And there are simply
awkward people in this
world who, no matter
how hard you try, always
seem to make the situ-
ation awkward beyond
imagining.
Due to the frequent
occurrence of this—par-
ticularly here on cam-
berish. if what the per-
son is saying seems in no
way to correlate to what
you’re saying (such as
them bringing up their
ailing great-aunt while
you’re raving about a
basketball game), it is a
generally a good indica -
tion that the person is
awkward.
How to deal with
this: be resolute. you
pus—below you’ll find
finish that conversation
an excerpt from the “G”
section of The Carrier’s
safari guide for not only
how to spot an inher-
ently awkward person,
but how to deal with
them accordingly.
spotting Tip #1: Gait.
“Gait” is simply a word
referring to how a person
walks, or their stride. if a
with all the semblance of
order that you can mus -
ter. And at the end, per-
haps discuss that ailing
great-aunt.
spotting Tip #3: Gaze.
if a person avoids eye
contact or engages in too
much eye contact when
you address them, it isn’t
your fault that you feel
person is shuffling along,
stomping about or inex -
plicably hustling to their
seemingly ordinary des -
tination, awkwardness
awkward.
How to deal with this:
may be a part of their
innate composition.
How to deal with this:
If they are shuffling, fall
into stride with them,
strike up a conversation
and attempt to pick up
the pace. Oftentimes,
they will catch on to the
cue and walk a bit more
normally with you. if
they are stomping, move
all of your valuables
which may be within
their stomping grounds.
And if they are sprint -
ing, by all means, don’t
if the person is avoiding
eye contact, do your best
to continue the conversa -
tion, perhaps while bob -
bing your head along to
keep their eyes on you.
Hopefully they’ll real-
ize what they’re doing
and attempt to correct
it. if the person engages
in too much eye contact,
look away and point out
something behind the
person. While they’re
turned to look at it,
you’ve at least gained a
moment to take a breath
and collect yourself
while you think of what
else to do.
The Carrier editorial reflects a consensus of the The Carrier’s editorial board.
pAGE 4, CAMpUs CARRiER OpiniOns FEbRUARy 16, 2012 Social awkwardness: the safari guide We all know

Abe Lincoln: Vampire hunter?

Sports Editor
Sports Editor

PAuL WATSon

if you ask even the most igno- rant American to name an impor- tant United states president, Abraham Lincoln will surely be at the top of the list. After all, he freed the slaves and ended the Civil War. Why wouldn’t he be the greatest? seth Grahame-smith recently published a novel called “Abra- ham Lincoln, Zombie Hunter,”

which is being adapted for film.

in this novel, Grahame-smith retells the life of Lincoln, from birth to assassination, supple-

mented with “secret diaries” of Lincoln to reveal his central role in a world-wide struggle against vampirism. Though this story is

fictional, it isn’t far from the real

Abe Lincoln. Thomas Jefferson once claimed, “A democracy cannot be both ignorant and free.” The control that Honest Abe imposed upon the press was nothing short of why Americans nowadays cry out against the governments of China and north Korea. if we are to truly respect and honor our right to speak out against the government, if we are to truly be free, we must look back on our leaders who hindered that right and make sure history does not repeat itself. Man should be free to keep his government in check. Unfortunately, the man regarded as one of the greatest leaders in our nation’s history robbed his people of that right. During the Civil War, Lincoln was praised for leadership in the north, and the Confederate

states’ leader, Jefferson Davis, was praised in the south. Lincoln considered the south to still be part of the Union throughout the war. in this line of thinking, Lin- coln’s army fought itself—a snake eating its own body, if you will.

There was virtually no criti-

cism of either leader in their respective “nations.” This is because both severely censored the press. That’s right, good ol’ Honest Abe was only as honest

as he allowed the press to say he was. Though he didn’t hunt vam- pires, he hunted the press with

more efficiency than any vampire

hunter could dream of. Wartime censorship has been used to “protect” national security interests. The words “clear and present danger” are the yardstick by which censorship rights of government—as opposed to free- speech rights of individuals—are measured in times of crisis. president Abraham Lincoln used this type of censorship dur- ing the Civil War. First Amend- ment freedoms and protections were secondary, according to Lincoln, to the preservation of the nation. He believed in the “ends justify the means” argu- ment in preserving all the laws. The Civil War alterations to the protections guaranteed under the First Amendment consisted of opening mail and censoring anti- Union newspapers. This censorship was epito- mized in the penultimate year of the war. by May 1864, Lincoln’s patience with the press ran out. Two new york papers published a fake story reporting a presiden- tial proclamation that claimed Lincoln was about to draft 400,000 men. Lincoln ordered the two newspapers be shut down and their publishers imprisoned. The independent Telegraph system,

which dispersed the story, was taken over by the military. Another misconception of Lincoln is his all-revered Emanci- pation proclamation. This docu- ment, considered one of the most important in American history, was, for all intents and purposes, a failure. To start with, this docu- ment was published two years before the war ended and pro- claimed the freedom of slaves in the 10 states then in rebellion, thus applying to 3.1 million of the 4 million slaves in the U.s. at that time. That would be like Mexico coming in during the Civil War and freeing the slaves. As the Confederate states of America established its own government and drafted its own constitution, it was considered its own nation, even if unrecognized by the Union. Therefore, Lincoln had no power to free slaves in the Con- federacy. second, the proclama- tion only addressed the south— over 900,000 slaves remained in ownership of their masters in the north and West. The proclamation also simply freed slaves. by doing so, all Lin- coln did was basically declare that slaves were actually humans, not property. it did not address their citizenship status or what rights they had otherwise. i argue the real significance of the Emancipa- tion proclamation. it was merely a piece of propaganda that actu- ally freed no slaves. i question whether Americans understand the man to whom they refer as the greatest president. if we still glaze over the facts that he fought a war against a nation he didn’t recognize as an inde- pendent country, wrote laws that were inconsequential and tried to destroy the value of the First Amendment, we don’t deserve to be free in our ignorance.

the CARRIeR

Berry College

Recipient of Georgia College press Association’s senior College General Excellence Award, 1988-1998, 2000-2002, 2004

Campus Carrier

490520 Berry College Mt. Berry, GA 30149

(706) 236-2294 E-mail: campus_carrier@berry.edu

Ashley McIntyre

Bonny Harper

Andy Plott

Editor-in-Chief

Opinions Editor

Business Manager

Elizabeth Petrey

Ryder McEntyre

Anna Curtis

Managing Editor

Graphics Editor

Asst. Business Manager

Rachel Childs

Heather Barger

Emily Faulkner

Copy Editor

Entertainment Editor

Asst. Entertainment

Kelly Dickerson

Kristen Sellers

Editor

News Editor

Deputy News Editor

Kaitlyn Pierce

Kimberly Treese

Sydney Kelly

Cartoonist

Features Editor

Asst. Features Editor

Kevin Kleine

Parker Sealy

Christian Turner

Adviser

Photo Editor

Asst. Photo Editor

Paul Watson

Steven Evans

Editorial

board

Sports Editor

Ana Hadas

Asst. Sports Editor

Austin Sumter

Online Editor

Asst. Online Editor

The Carrier is published weekly except during examination periods and holidays. The opinions, either editorial or com- mercial, expressed in The Carrier are not necessarily those of the administration, berry College’s board of trustees or The Carrier editorial board. student publica- tions are located in 202 Richards Gym. The Carrier reserves the right to edit all content for length, style, grammar and libel. The Carrier is available on the berry College campus, one free per person.

February 16, 2012

opinions

paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier

Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the most outra- geous problem. I seem to be

Dear Ms. Turnbuckle,

I

have been having the most outra-

geous problem.

I

seem to be incredibly infatuated

with men that I have never met before in real life. Yes, I am talking about online men.

It seems like every time I go on my computer, I get the urge to go to You- Tube and watch these men for hours on end.

I

decided to create a Twitter account

to talk to these men, and I have even gone so far as to pay almost a thou-

sand dollars just to fly to California

and meet them in real life. Is this infatuation close to obsession?

Sincerely, Slave to the Internet

Dear slave to the internet, This problem is becoming more

and more frequent in today’s times.

in fact, now that you mention it, this might just explain my dear niece penelope’s sudden vacation to California last summer.

First, I’ll answer the question

you posed at the end, and, well dear, the answer to that is certainly a resounding yes. in fact, i would argue that “infatuation” and “obsession” are synonymous, and any amount of debate you may have over word choice would sim-

ply be a result of being in denial about your problem. but i won’t just leave you with that simple answer to your simple

question. I want to help you.

The solution to your issue is

simply this: First, you must give

nearly all of your money to vari- ous charities and/or the poor. That way, you won’t have enough left

to spend it on such things as plane tickets and the like. Then, you must bake endless batches of mud brownies (because mud is free, and you have no money) and send them to these online men. if they like them, they’ll gain weight and become unappealing to you, and if they don’t like them, they’ll cease to

find you appealing (After all, what

man wants a woman who can’t

bake good brownies?) Either way:

problem solved!

Hugs and cheesecake squares,

Ms. Turnbuckle

matter the method of inquiry, she’ll do

her best to respond promptly (and, of course, humorously) right here in the opinions section of The Carrier.

yahoo.com or find Viola Turnbuckle

burdens, secrets or questions at her

Ms. Turnbuckle wants to hear your

on Facebook and ask her there! no

woes! be a dear and send her your

personal email, violaturnbuckle@

ASk VioLA turnbuckLe

Formula for greatness?

Guest Writer
Guest Writer

Brin EntErKin

going far beyond that. it’s living for something greater than ourselves (in his

case, God). This pursuit is not always conscious, but it still manages to dictate many parts

of a person’s life. it could translate into

This summer i traveled through india

and very briefly met an American man

who simply didn’t fit into the mold of

a typical “american abroad.” He wore

dilapidated clothing and walked covered

in dirt and grease from head to toe. He moved to india years ago to live in the slums and minister to the locals. How-

ever, he first left the United States, sold

most of his belongings and learned Hindi. He moved to Mumbai, purchased a small

piece of land and built a life within the

confines of economic devastation. He

slept on the ground and worked in an

iron factory. This man, he is greatness.

He left everything, everyone, in order to

pursue something greater than himself. yet no one will ever remember his name.

For hundreds of years scholars have reflected on the question: Is there a for- mula for greatness? Works of art like Machiavelli’s “The prince” all the way to Jim Collins’ book, “Good to Great,” provide individual methodologies for achieving such a lofty goal. people con- sume media, read books and partake in

conversations to truly investigate ways to achieve greatness. Maslow’s hierar- chy of needs suggests that “greatness” is found at the very top of the pyramid, as a component of self-actualization. i think the lesson to be learned from the story of the man i met in india is the key. it’s not pursuing an individual or even idealist approach to greatness— that’s merely the world’s standard. it’s

scoring the highest grade on a test, mak- ing the most money, being the most

attractive, finding the best spouse or

pursing the happiest lifestyle. We have misconstrued the idea of greatness by forcing it into an individual pursuit. We have defined greatness as some- thing achieved by accomplishing an individualistic objective. no longer do

people achieve this quality silently or

behind closed doors, but rather in a way that brings about recognition and glory. When i picture greatness, i see an extremely successful businessperson or the president of a nation. i envision the

Dalai Lama or King solomon. yet these people, though individually great, only play into the idea of socially constructed greatness. The more i pull away from this worldly idea, the more i realize how

wrong my definition once was.

My mother also fits this mold, some- one who gave up her career as well as her wishes to no longer seek something that

coincides with the world’s definition of “great.” people who achieve this stan- dard often do so without even knowing. it is simply beautiful. you may know a few of these individuals yourself. Indeed, greatness is an subjective defi- nition. However, I find it imperative that

if we choose to seek greatness we must lay down our individual pursuits. We

must first pursue something much larger

than ourselves, regardless of how exactly

you define that.

‘Dry’ policy leads to drinking and driving

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Features Editor

KimBErly trEESE

in last week’s issue of The Carrier, there was a news release in the “police

Beat” which read: “Car Accident—On

Feb. 7 at approximately 1:15 a.m. offi- cers responded to an accident near the

Cook Building. Officers determined the driver was under the influence and

arrested her for Dui.” i believe that this incident is a per- fect example of why alcohol should be legal on campus. i understand that the actions of the individual were irrespon- sible and i especially believe that every- one who chooses to drink should have a designated driver, but i also think that berry’s policy encourages such poor decisions.

For example, say you’re 21 years old and you really want to just have a fun relaxing night with some friends and a few alcoholic beverages. you have two

options: Drink illegally on campus and

hope you don’t get caught or drink off campus and hope you can convince someone dependable to be your DD. option two sounds ideal to avoid disciplinary action, but what happens

if you can’t find a DD or while you are

out, something comes up and your DD bails? Then you are already intoxicated

with no safe way back to school, so what are you left to do? The only thing you can do besides sleep at an off-cam- pus apartment (and few students have off-campus-residing friends), which is

drive back under the influence.

The fact of the matter is, berry’s dry

campus policy is founded in good faith

and meant to help students uphold a

certain character, but when the week is over and the tests are done, we’re still college kids at heart. Whether college students’ habits are a good or bad thing is highly debatable but nevertheless

still prevalent. For some people it’s all

part of the college experience. Furthermore, with the addition of football next year, is having a dry campus really a practical policy? Tail- gating, barbecuing and drinking are a large part of the college football atmo - sphere—so much so, i’m willing to bet at most big schools, people can tell you about certain game nights and who they were with in every minute detail

but not what the final score was at the

end of the game. The tailgating before the game is a social event and drinking during the game is customary. some of the best and most well-supported foot-

ball teams like Lsu, uGa and auburn are at schools with some sort of party atmosphere, good or bad. so how do you expect a football team to be supported when you have no scholarship athletes and a dry campus? by enticing them with a hotdog and root

beer float tailgate event? If anything, it

will probably lead to a student-desig - nated, off-campus spot for tailgating events and an increase in drunk drivers before and after the game. i’m not condoning drinking, and i’m especially not condoning drinking and driving. i’m merely trying to point out that this policy which is meant to guide the character of students may lead to the physical harm of many students in the future. i understand that, as stu-

dents, it is our responsibility to have a DD if we wish to go out and drink, but i also believe that berry’s policy prevents us from making the more responsible

decision: to drink and stay in.

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

“What is the biggest way to tell when someone’s awkward?”

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

not talking in conversa- tions and not offering feedback when you say something to them.”

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Justin Boyd

Freshman

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Sadie Jones

Sophomore

body language, like darty eyes or
body language,
like darty eyes or

being fidgety.”

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

When you’re in a group of people and they’re just creeping on the outside of the group and trying to insert themselves into the conversation.”

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Alexandria Wisner

Junior

February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the
February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Too much or too little eye contact.”

Karl Kuutti

Freshman is awkward They say, ‘This ’” ...
Freshman
is awkward
They say, ‘This
’”
...
February 16, 2012 opinions paGe 5, CaMpus Carrier Dear Ms. Turnbuckle, I have been having the

Allison Preg

Sophomore

Letter SubmiSSion PoLicy

Letters to the editor must include a name, address and phone number, along with the writer’s class year or title. The Carrier reserves the right to edit for length, style, grammar and libel. E-mail: campus_carrier@berry.edu

PaGe 6, CaMPus CarrIer

Features

February 16, 2012

Battling Racial Stereotypes

Kimberly TreeSe

Features Editor

Sydney Kelly

Asst. Features Editor

Despite America being a melting pot of cultures and races, stereotyping is still a prevalent issue in the United States today. People of different religious faiths, communities and traditions are frequently met with judgment and misun-

derstanding. Often these misunderstandings are founded on a broad oversimplification of a people’s viewpoint or

culture, even among the students at Berry. These experiences can have dramatic emotional and psychological effects on victims could carry with them through the rest of their lives. Stereotyping can range anywhere from over- generalizations to direct racism and can be enforced unconsciously or with malicious intent.

Here are some of the stereotypes that multi-national students have faced on campus, in the media and throughout their daily lives.

U.S. Demographics The below demographics were obtained from the 2010 U.S. Census Bu- reau. Due to
U.S. Demographics
The below demographics were obtained from the 2010 U.S. Census Bu-
reau. Due to polling techniques, numbers do not add to 100 percent.
More information can be found at www.census.gov.
White
(Not Hispanic)
63.7%
White
72.4%
Hispanic or Latino
16.3%
African American
12.6%
Hawaiian/Pacific
Islander
Two or more races
Native American
and Inuit
Asian
.2%
2.9%
4.8%
.9%
Multicultural Groups on Campus

Orgullo

Orgullo, the Spanish

word for ‘pride’, is an

organization built to promote awareness of the Hispanic cul- ture in the Berry and Rome community.

The Black Student Alliance

The Black Student Alliance (BSA) is a group of students who work to promote the integration of black culture

with Berry’s social, academic

and religious environment.

Berry International Club

The Berry International Club is a student organization

dedicated to the unity, fellow- ship and cultural exchange

across Berry’s campus and

in the Rome community.

Interfaith Council

Founded in 2003, the Interfaith Council is a collection of faculty and students to build a context in which members of different faiths can feel welcomed. The council exists to spread aware- ness and assist in a dialogue about the major religious and cultural groups on Berry’s Cam- pus and in the Rome community.

February 16, 2012

Features

CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 7

Profiling at Berry: A first-hand account

Ahmad Walid Naseri

February 16, 2012 Features CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 7 Profiling at Berry: A first-hand account Ahmad Walid

Sophomore Ahmad Naseri simply goes by Walid. Among his array of activities, Naseri is a KCAB programmer, a member of International Club and the Bonner Leadership Team, and the Club Soccer Captain. He is also the event coordinator for the Berry Muslim Group, a new religion-in-life group that aims to bring religious diversity to

Berry’s campus. The story of his youth is as diverse and surprising as many multicultural people living in America

today.

Naseri was born in Afghanistan and lived there for the first six years of his life. His family moved to Belarus, Rus- sia and resided there for another seven years before finally moving to the United States when he was 13. As a

result, Naseri speaks four languages including Arabic and Russian.

Like so many Middle Eastern people in the United States today, Naseri has faced racial stereotyping on more

than one occasion. Everywhere from the airport, where he says he’s almost always pulled aside to be fully

frisked, to a Berry classroom, where a derogatory comment was made about his country of origin, has present- ed Naseri with situations of racial discrimination.

“It just feels like they think of you as less than a human,” Naseri said. “It’s not my fault I’m from Afghanistan, grew up in Russia and my first name is Ahmad, but they blame me.”

Naseri accepts that many people paint an incorrect picture of people of a different race or culture. He overcomes these experiences by choosing to move on and be as true to himself as possible.

“You have to let people see you're not who they think you are,” Naseri said.

Josy Roman

February 16, 2012 Features CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 7 Profiling at Berry: A first-hand account Ahmad Walid

Sophomore Josy Roman spent a majority of her childhood in Houston, Texas speaking Spanish as a first lan- guage with her parents. Her family was originally from Puebla, a small village in southern Mexico and moved to the United States a few years before she was born. In the second grade, her family moved to Peachtree City, Ga. so that her mother could be closer to her sister.

At Berry, Roman said she has only one experience with racial discrimination. A cultural event on campus ad- dressed the issue of illegal immigration.

“The guys behind me were so rude,” Roman said. “Basically, the woman’s point was that immigrants are peo- ple too and they keep shouting things like ‘No! We should throw them outta the country!’ and ‘They're draining all our tax dollars!’”

Despite this incidence, Roman expressed that the most prevalent form of racism she has experienced has

been within the Latina community. The higher-level of income her family, her father’s position at Chick-fil-a and

her attendance at Berry have all contributed to a negative image of her family among other Hispanic peoples.

“They look at me as a ‘higher-up Latina’ because we’re not ‘with them,’” Roman said.

Roman continues to thrive as an employee at Viking Fusion and an active member of the Berry community, despite these moments of ste- reotyping. She said her group of friends embrace her heritage and cultural traditions with understanding and humor.

“The other day we threw a party and they signed the card for me,” Roman said laughing. “It was card with a row of different kinds of

dogs and they said ‘Don’t worry, we didn’t sign your name above the Chihuahua because we thought it would upset you.’”

Antonio Thurmond

February 16, 2012 Features CaMPus CarrIer, PaGe 7 Profiling at Berry: A first-hand account Ahmad Walid

Sophomore Antonio Thurmond has struggled with racial stereotypes since he was a young child. After moving to Statham, Ga. in the third grade, his mother enrolled him in an after-school program.

“Once the head of the after-school program realized we were African-American, she explained to my mom

that they didn’t ‘want to have any trouble in after-school,’” Thurmond said. “She was hesitant to enroll us until

my mom explained that our cousin was in after-school as well, and then she was more willing to let us in.”

Thurmond said he understands that stereotyping is often part of a greater initiative to be humorous, but he points out that a belief that the stereotypes are true is a sign of ignorance.

"I honestly think it has to do with the environment you grew up in,” Thurmond said. “If you grew up somewhere where the only experience to diversity was what you see on television and what others in your environment

have told you, you’ll believe that the stereotypes are actual fact.”

Thurmond said racial discrimination has had a major effect on his romantic life more than any other social rela-

tionships.

“I’ve only dated one girl out of my race in my life and when we did, her family could not know,” Thur mond said. “I had several white

friends, both male and female, tell me that if they dated someone black or Hispanic, their families would disown them.”

Despite these moments of discrimination, Thurmond continues to succeed on Berry’s campus. He takes his experiences and resolves to

not make the same mistakes and encourages others to do the same.

“Don’t think just because some people you meet are one way that every person of that group is that way,” Thurmond said.

PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr

EntErtainmEnt

FEbrUary 16, 2012

Highlights from the 2012 Grammys

Commentary by emily Faulkner,

Asst. Entertainment Editor

in case you were too busy doing homework or don’t have a television, here are a few things that you missed during this year’s 54th annual Grammy awards.

PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr EntErtainmEnt FEbrUary 16, 2012 Highlights from the 2012 Grammys Commentary by emily
PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr EntErtainmEnt FEbrUary 16, 2012 Highlights from the 2012 Grammys Commentary by emily

antHony mandler

Columbia reCords
Columbia reCords

adele stole the show by winning a total of six Grammy awards. Her awards included Pop Vocal album, best Pop Solo Vocal Per-

formance, Short Form music Video, record Of the year, and Song Of the year. She con-

tinued to amaze the crowd by giving her first

there were lots of tears as Jennifer Hudson paid tribute to Whitney Hous- ton with her performance of ‘i Will always Love you.’

live performance since her throat surgery.

PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr EntErtainmEnt FEbrUary 16, 2012 Highlights from the 2012 Grammys Commentary by emily
PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr EntErtainmEnt FEbrUary 16, 2012 Highlights from the 2012 Grammys Commentary by emily

universal republiC reCords

JaGJaGuwar

nicki minaj generated mixed reviews with her performance this year which included monks, a priest and even an exorcism.

Bon Iver had an excellent night at his first

Grammy awards, winning best new artist and best alternative music album.

PaGE 8, CamPUS CarriEr EntErtainmEnt FEbrUary 16, 2012 Highlights from the 2012 Grammys Commentary by emily

Know Your Grammy Awards:

Know Your Grammy Awards: Album of the Year: Awarded to the performer and the production team

Album of the Year:

Awarded to the performer and the production team of a

full album.

Record of the Year:

Awarded to the performer and the production team of a single song.

Song of the Year:

Awarded to the writer(s)/composer(s) of a single song.

Best New Artist:

Awarded to a performer

who releases, during the eligibility year,

the first recording

that establishes the public identity of that artist (which is not

necessarily their first

proper release).

Genres at the Grammys:

Alternative Americana Bluegrass Blues Childrens Christian Comedy Country Dance Folk Gospel Instrumental Jazz Latin Mexican Musical Theatre New Age Pop R&B Rap Reggae Rock Roots Spoken Word World

FEbruary 16, 2012

EntErtainmEnt

PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr

Student benefit concert helps world health

GraCe Dunklin

Staff Reporter

This year’s Hearts for Haiti benefit concert was held

saturday, Feb. 11 in the spruill ballroom to raise money for the Partners in Health Foundation. seniors Joshua stevenson and Deshon battle started Hearts for Haiti during their freshman year as an effort to raise money for the Partners in Health Foundation to use how they see fit. The Partners in Health Foundation is ded- icated to providing medical care and support for people in impoverished countries around the world. Haiti is just one of 12 countries in which Partners in Health has a current project running. “We called it ‘Hearts for Haiti’ because it’s right before Valentine’s Day every year, and it’s kind of a nice alterna- tive for people who may not have these big, lavish plans for Valentine’s Day,” said stevenson. Freshman stacy Wells, sophomore Dillon yost, senior ariel rainbow, freshmen Frankie Hudson and Christopher Valentine, senior Dakota Floyd and new Dawn contrib- uted their time and efforts towards the concert. new Dawn is comprised of stevenson on the keyboard, battle on the saxophone and sophomore bas Du Vuyst on drums. all of the performers brought different styles to the concert. Hudson and Valentine performed a duet adapta- tion of “i Dreamed a Dream” from “Les miserables,” while new Dawn presented a version of Katy Perry’s “Et” with saxophone instead of vocals. Other songs performed at the concert were adele’s “set Fire to the rain,” nicki minaj’s “super bass” and Flobots’ “Handlebars.” Floyd presented only original compositions he had written for his band when they tour.

FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin

“I am really passionate about benefit shows, and this

cause in particular is, i think, a great one, and so i felt like i

would lend my time to their show,” rainbow said.

rainbow said she has been singing ever since she can remember and has played the guitar for about 10 years.

Her music is influenced greatly by many artists, including

ryan adams and grace Potter and the nocturnals. Freshman Jane Hill said that she especially liked yost’s performance because he had a lot of energy in his music. yost’s songs ranged from buddy Holly to several songs of his own composition. Hearts for Haiti raised a total of $411.93 to give to Partners in Health and there were over 60 people in attendance.

FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin

Parker sealy, Photo Editor

Seniors Dakota Floyd, DeShon Battle, sophomore

Dillon Yost and senior Ariel Rainbow sang at Hearts for Haiti on Feb. 11 in the Spruill Ballroom.

‘Ballyhoo’ explores Jewish culture

Commentary By

Justin Davis

Guest Writer

the unlikely relationship between a slavic new york Jew and a Jewish southern belle may seem a trivial thing, but “the Last night of ballyhoo” proves that it is no small matter. berry College theatre Company’s latest performance, opening on thursday, attempts to jump through the intri- cate hoops of social relationships in southern Jewish cul- ture on the dawn of World War ii. From the debates of whether or not Jews should celebrate Christmas with or without a star on the tree to the importance of going to col- lege, the play provides all sorts of insights to this different sort of society. most teenage girls today worry about who will take them to prom, but Lala Levy, a college-age yet childish Jewish girl, wants to know who will take her to the Jew- ish festival ballyhoo. Lala lives with her mother boo Levy, her uncle adolph Freitag and her aunt reba Freitag. both Lala’s father as well as her uncle simon, reba’s husband, have passed away, making for an interesting arrangement at home. things only get more complicated when uncle adolph brings home a charming new employee, Joe Far- kas, just as Lala’s seemingly perfect cousin sunny Freitag arrives home from college for the holidays. the girls start to wonder which girl Joe will choose. the tension in the air is hard to miss in some scenes, while others will have the audience rolling with laughter. Only a few minor points feel rushed, but the play is not boring by any means. Everything from the lights to a plate of fried chicken make the audience feel like they are in the house with the Levys and the Freitags. many plays that explore this sort of tension seem to have trouble balancing lightheartedness with taking things too seriously. However, “ballyhoo” does an excellent job of keeping things from getting too touchy while still paying the proper respect to Jewish culture, which really opens up

FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin

Christian turner, Asst. Photo Editor

Berry College Theatre Company presents “The Last Night of Ballyhoo,” which portrays the life of two Jewish families.

the audience to enjoy the story while still learning about the nuances of a different period in time. the play is well worth seeing. some audience members may simply come away with a good laugh while the more attentive might gain a whole new perspective on how peo- ple interacted seventy years ago and just how serious reli- gious discrimination was. Phenomenal acting carries the

play brilliantly on an excellently designed set that literally makes the audience feel right at home. the play runs Feb. 16 through the 19 and Feb. 23 through the 26 at 8 p.m. on thursday through saturday and 2 p.m. on sunday. tickets will be $5 opening night and $7 for the rest of the performances.

FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin
FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin
FEbruary 16, 2012 EntErtainmEnt PagE 9, CamPus CarriEr Student benefit concert helps world health GraCe Dunklin

February 16, 2012

SportS

page 10, campuS carrier

February 16, 2012 SportS page 10, campuS carrier 1976 championship team honored Paul Watson Sports Editor

1976 championship team honored

Paul Watson

Sports Editor

one of the most memorable moments in berry sports

history occurred the evening of march 27, 1976, when the

Lady Vikings brought home Berry’s first ever national

championship title. on Feb. 11, this championship team was honored dur- ing half time of the Lady Vikings basketball game against Lagrange college. in 1976, the Lady Vikings were led by women’s basket-

ball head coach Kay James, who was confronted with one

of the best problems a coach could have: She had to find

playing time for her five returning players, as well as a

host of very talented younger players. in 1976, James’ team, led by captains Nancy parris

(77), Sharon adamson (77) and barbara Struckoff (77) was highly unrecognized by the berry and rome community. at the beginning of the season, when the athletics pro- grams went out, the mention of regional championships and beyond was left off. yet the team turned the tide on march 27, 1976. the Lady Vikings traveled to ashland, ohio to play in the national championships against the university of West georgia, whom they had already played in state and

regional playoffs. The team flew to Ohio—a first for many on the team—then traveled in a 15-seater commuter bus to

the arena. Half the team became sick on the bus. Nonethe- less, they won the game 68-62, taking the association for intercollegiate athletics for Women (aiaW) championship title. this was a highlight in many of the players’ career. “the championship was the only time in our career that we had radio coverage,” said Sharon adamson bass (78). “We didn’t have much support from the fans before the national championship.” Lisa Lynn payne (79) said people who were not at the game were not aware of the win for a while. “With technology [in 1976], we sent Western union tele- grams when we won,” payne said. the Lady Vikings were in for a big shock on their ride back into georgia. once they crossed the state border, a

state trooper flashed his lights and got in front of the bus,

scaring many of the teammates. “We started crying when we realized it was an escort and we weren’t getting pulled over,” said margaret Down- ing (78). then came one of the best memories bass said she ever had at berry. When they got back to berry, there was a mass of people waiting to greet and cheer on the new champions. the community was also proud of the new champi- ons. according to the rome-News tribune, g.L. Sutton, chairman of the Floyd county board of commissioners, declared march 28-apr. 3 “Lady Vikings Week in Floyd county.

February 16, 2012 SportS page 10, campuS carrier 1976 championship team honored Paul Watson Sports Editor

Photos courtesy Berry archives

For more pictures, check out vikingfusion.berry.edu/

“[the Lady Vikings] have every right to be proud, not only for themselves but also for the honor and recognition they have brought to Floyd county,” Sutton said, accord-

ing to the rome News-tribune. “Not many communi- ties can throw out its chest and say that it’s the home of a national champion.”

But things still were not easy for the Lady Vikings—or any other women’s team—at Berry, even after the champi- onship. title iX, which bans sex discrimination in schools,

whether it be in academics or athletics, was still only four

years old, so it had not taken full effect. in 1977 and 1978,

the Lady Vikings finished third in the finals. This led to the team finally receiving new warm-ups and uniforms

the year after, though they still had to buy their own socks and shoes (which were adidas, not the traditional chuck taylor converses), and they still had no locker room. the basketball team also had to play on the volleyball team to keep their athletic scholarships. even living at berry was much different than it is today. “We lived in trailers on campus, where the townhouses are now,” said bass. even through the hardships, the women played as a solid team. “We never felt jealousy,” said paula Dean (78). “i was proud when margaret scored because i was proud of her individual effort, which was part of the collective effort.” “everyone was a star, and we used that for the team,” said giordano. pam pinyan thompson (78) said that the Lady Vikings were quite dominant against their opponents. “We didn’t have a three-point line, but we still averaged about 83 points a game,” she said.

In her five years as head coach at Berry, James’ teams compiled an 85-30 record. She led the Lady Vikings, who

had never won a state title, to three straight state and regional titles. She then moved to the university of South- ern mississippi. in her 22 seasons coaching the Southern miss Lady eagles, she became the all-time winningest coach in Lady eagle history with 403 victories. in her 27 total seasons coaching, James recorded 488 wins and 244 losses. She is one of 46 coaches with 400-plus victories in

NCAA Division I history. She also ranks in the top 25 of all-

time Division i coaches in victories, seasons coached and games coached. celeste powell giordano (78), said James was way ahead of her time and she took the team to the next level. “We really had a sisterhood. We played together very well without getting in cliques or anything,” giordano

said. “coach James predetermined what she was doing

with the team and instilled it in us.” coming back to berry, the championship team said they saw many changes, which were not all bad. “the biggest change is the cage center,” said bass. “even through all the changes, berry hasn’t changed the openness and beauty of the school.” Dean said alumni have played a big part in the change. “a lot of alumni come back and give back through mon- etary donation,” she said. “all the things put on this cam- pus for the students is great.” “things change. change for improvement is good,” said Dean. “We can’t just stick our heads in the sand.”

page 11, campuS carrier

SportS

February 16, 2012

Berry College Club Soccer wins first game COUrTESy AndrEW dAUBin Berry College Club Soccer (BCCS) won

Berry College Club

Soccer wins first game

COUrTESy AndrEW dAUBin

Berry College Club Soccer (BCCS) won their first game of the season at Grizzard Park this past Sunday. The team defeated the “Argentines,” a local club team that is 3-0. Forward Donavon Anderson, a Berry sophomore, led BCCS by scoring three goals. He connected 60% of his shots for goals and helped the offense cripple the opposing defense with 22 total shots. Berry took a total of 22 shots against the Argentines. Freshman defender Aus- tin Mansour provided the leadership necessary to only allow three shots on the club’s goal. They will be returning to action this Sunday at 3 p.m. at at Grizzard Park.

page 11, campuS carrier SportS February 16, 2012 Berry College Club Soccer wins first game COUrTESy

Lady Vikings equestrian team scrimmages against UGA

STEVEn EVAnS

Asst. Sports Editor

the Lady Vikings equestrian team has proven yet again that they can ride with the big shots. on Saturday, the university of georgia (uga), ranked second in Ncaa Division i, equestrian team hosted the berry equestrian team in a scrimmage at the uga eques- trian complex in bishop, ga. both the Western and english teams competed in the scrimmage. “berry college is a member of [the Ncaa] and has been com-

peting in the sport of equestrian,” uga head coach meghan boenig, an alumna of berry, said prior to the scrimmage. “We would like to do everything we can do help them learn the [National col- legiate equestrian association] format and advance the sport. this is a great opportunity expose berry to the format and allows our riders to gain some additional experience.” the english team rode in the morning and the Western team rode in the afternoon at the scrim- mage. For the scrimmage, each team was composed of six rid- ers, and one rider from each team rode at a time. the teams were judged based off of execution of the maneuvers and positioning of patterns they had to run. the

Berry team finished with he riders

averaging a score of 67/70. being a scrimmage, uga’s score was not communicated to the Lady Vikings, however. “[We] went head to head with riders from uga to gain expe- rience on top-level horses and to expose ourselves to a differ-

ent level of riding,” sophomore and Western team captain ariel robelen said. “We put up a good

scrimmage and definitely gave a

run for their money, but because

it was a scrimmage there was no real emphasis on score, but we

definitely gained that invaluable

experience.” the Lady Vikings’ english team also attended a horse show hosted by the university of geor- gia at chateau Élan on Saturday and Sunday. on Saturday, the university of

South Carolina came in first place,

and the Lady Vikings came in 5th overall. Freshman brittney conti

got reserve High point rider at the show on Saturday, meaning she earned the second-highest number of points of any other rider. on Sunday, the Lady Vikings truly showed their potential and

finished first place. Freshman

autumn clark was awarded High point rider, meaning she scored the highest of any other rider. clark has also been awarded berry college athlete of the Week. in addition to clark’s placing, soph- omore rider Savannah bleakly was awarded reserve High point rider on Sunday “Despite the freezing tem- peratures, we pulled through and made an impression at the

show,” freshman Jessica tabb said. “Not only am i proud of my first collegiate horse show perfor- mance, i am also proud of how my team performed. We never lost focus of the win, and worked

tremendously well under difficult

conditions.” tabb came in second in the Walk/trot/canter event both days of the show. the Western team will show next at Judson college on Feb. 18, and the annual Spring clas- sic will take place at berry on Feb. 24 and Feb 25. both the english and Western teams will compete in shows during both days of the Spring classic.

page 11, campuS carrier SportS February 16, 2012 Berry College Club Soccer wins first game COUrTESy

bowdoin Field

vs. Lagrange: L 84-65

Women’s Basketball

vs. Lagrange: W 105-95

Men’s Basketball

uga

Equestrian (Hunter Seat)

W 10-7

Vikings Baseball

vs. Berea

Feb. 18 at 1:00 pm

Doubleheader

Feb. 12

Men’s Lacrosse vs. Birmingham-Southern

Feb. 18 at 3:00 pm Ford Fields

Vikings Baseball

vs. Bates

Feb. 21 at 2:00 pm Doubleheader bowdoin Field

Feb. 21 starting at 6 p.m. cage center

Vikings Baseball

vs. Bates

Feb. 22 at 2:00 pm bowdoin Field

Men’s and Women’s Bas- ketball vs. Covenant

uga

Vikings Baseball

Feb. 11

vs. emory: L 7-4

Vikings Baseball

Vulcan invitational

Women’s and Men’s Out- door Track

Feb. 10

vs. birmingham-Southern:

bowdoin Field vs. Lagrange: L 84-65 Women’s Basketball vs. Lagrange: W 105-95 Men’s Basketball uga Equestrian
bowdoin Field vs. Lagrange: L 84-65 Women’s Basketball vs. Lagrange: W 105-95 Men’s Basketball uga Equestrian

vs. Guilford

Women’s Lacrosse

cage center

Feb. 16 starting at 6 p.m.

Men’s and Women’s Bas- ketball vs. Shorter

L 58-69

vs. birmingham-Southern:

Men’s Basketball

Feb. 14

Feb. 18 at 1:00 pm Ford Fields

Equestrian (Hunter Seat)

PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR

news

FebRUARy 16, 2012

PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor the Cutie
PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor the Cutie

photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor

the Cutie Pie Show

PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor the Cutie
PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor the Cutie

The Easy Bake Improv team performed on Tuesday in the Kran - nert Underground. The audience was treated to a come - dic show, called the Cutie Pie Show, without a script. The group performs every two weeks.

PAGe 12, CAMPUs CARRIeR news FebRUARy 16, 2012 photos by parker sealy, Photo Editor the Cutie