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Around the World in 80 Days Through Literature

Unit will take a total of 80 days to complete.

Day 1 - 10 - France
Reading: “Around the World in 80 Days” by Jules Verne, novels will be checked out to students. Standards: 3.12.3 Analyze a theme; explain a lesson learned based on events and/or a character’s actions. 6.12.7 Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats. Objectives: SWBAT: Read “Around the World in 80 Days” and analyze the theme of travel within. SWBAT: Discuss, speculate, and explain what they have learned or will learn based on the events and character actions within the book. SWBAT: Listen to one another and gain new insight into how their classmates interpret text and view the same situations. SWBAT: Write well thought out responses to their journal questions and short, descriptive texts for their map to explain what they learned while reading. Day 1: I will explain our goal of traveling around the world through literature in 80 Days and hang up a map, which we will use to track our journey with yarn and put pins. Students will answer the first journal, then we will begin reading. Journals: Will be done every other day (1, 3, 5, 7, 9) 1. Journal: If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go and why? 1. Journal: Is travel important? Why or why not? 1. Journal: What can you learn from other cultures? 1. Journal: Do you think you could beat Phileas Fogg’s record? How would you do it? 1. Journal: Explain your culture. What is unique about it? Vocabulary: Students will complete a vocabulary worksheet, defining the words that they may not be familiar with. Worksheets can be found here, but I plan to modify them to fit my class, as there are so many of them: http://www.lessontutor.com/ees80printPT1.html Discussions: Will be done as whole class and small group throughout the reading process. Assignment: Students will create a map or picture book that illustrates the journey they have taken through the book, creating small placards of text that tells something unique about each place, which they learned through the story.

Day 11 - 16 (Spain, Italy, Russia, China, India, and Austrailia)

Students will be given handout copied of the following poems:

Day 11 - Spain
Journal: Is poetry important? Why or why not? Reading: “Bells of Bastables” and “How Can I Depart if I Love You?” by Rosalia de Castro Vocabulary: treacherous, foliage, verdure, contented, boon

Day 12 - Italy
Reading: “To Sylvia”, “To The Moon”, and “Infinite” by Giacomo Leopardi Vocabulary: solitary, interminable, certitudes, intermingle, sidelong, disconsolate, gracious, tremulous

Day 13 - Russia
Journal: How is poetry different or similar to prose? Reading: “The Land of Moscow…” by Alexander Pushkin; “All in the Moscow…” and “The Military Field-Nurse” by Anna Akhmatova Vocabulary: abide, suppress, Kura’s waters, Tbilisi, immolation, felled, roves, gaiety, famine, vindictive

Day 14 - China
Reading: “Peach Blosson Journey” by Wang Wei and “Sorrow Of Departure” by Li Ching Chao Vocabulary: stealthy, profound, accumulate, coveted, ideograms

Day 15 - India
Journal: Can you learn about different cultures through poetry? If yes, what have you learned so far? Reading: “The Indian Gypsy”, “Street Cries”, and “Nightfall In The City of Hyderabad” by Sarojini Naidu Vocabulary: bygone, frugal, sinuous, tawny, irrevocable, languid, succor, gay, poignant, peridote, languid, scintillates, cavalcades

Day 16 - Australia
Reading: “My Country” by Dorothea Mackellar and “For Australia” by Henry Lawson Vocabulary: coppice, stark, lithe, lianas, paddocks, homing, blathering, paupers, drivel, blatant, foundry

Standards and Objectives for Poetry Lessons
Standards: 3.12.5 Evaluate the use and purpose of imagery, figurative language, and sound devices. 3.12.A1 Analyze an author’s use and purpose of symbolism.

Objectives: SWBAT: Listen for sound devices within the poems and visualize their own interpretation of what the imagery and figurative language means to them personally. SWBAT: Read the words of the poems above then determine whether their initial interpretation has changed. SWBAT: Write about and explain their interpretations by using their own imagery to describe how they visualized both works. They will also translate figurative language into plain language to explain what it meant to them and speculate about the author’s reason for using specific sound devices. SWBAT: Discuss what role the author’s use and purpose of symbolism played in their interpretations. Grammar: We will discuss grammar rules through poetry and how they are used or bent to suit the work. This technique has been suggested for use with ESL/ELL students. Spelling: 25 words will be chosen from those above. Students will be given a copy of the words and then take a spelling/vocabulary test on those 25 words. Assignment: Students will write about and explain their interpretations by using their own imagery to describe how they visualized at least three of the works. They will also translate figurative language into plain language to explain what it meant to them and speculate about the author’s reason for using specific sound devices. They can also draw an illustration that represents what they visualized for one (or all three). Assignment: Students will construct a poem based on their culture and present it to the class.

Day 17 - 19 - Africa
Standards 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. 3.12.A1 Analyze an author’s use and purpose of symbolism. Objectives SWBAT: Read African folktales and make inferences about the author’s culture and historical viewpoints. Students will attempt to evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Write a short analysis of the author’s use and purpose of symbolism. SWBAT: Discuss how the symbolism helped them to interpret the message of the folktale and explain what they found to be the “moral” of the story. Students will read African folktales from a packet containing copies of the following: Talk Leopard, Goat, and Yam How Spider Obtain the Sky God’s Stories Why the Hare Runsaway

Journal: Day 17 - Are you familiar with folktales or fairytales? Do you have a favorite? Take a moment to describe it and explain why it is your favorite. Journal: Day 19 - What makes a folktale timeless? Assignment: Students will choose two of the African folktales we read and write a short explanation about their interpretation of the story and what “moral” they found within the text.

Day 20 - 21 - Egypt
Standards 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. 6.12.4 Write literary analyses; summarize literary information. Objectives SWBAT: Read Egyptian folktales and make inferences about the author’s culture and historical viewpoints. Students will attempt to evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Write a short analysis of one Egyptian folktale, in comparison to a similar one they choose that we have not read in class. SWBAT: Discuss what the three folktales say about the Egyptian culture and the history of Egypt. Students will read Egyptian folktales from a packet containing copies of the following: The Promises of the Three Sisters Goha on the Deathbed The Prince and the Sphinx Assignment: Students will pick one of the Egyptian folktales and find a similar one that we have not read, then write a comparative analysis of the two pieces.

Day 22 - 24 - Israel, Syria, Persia (Iraq), Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan
Standards 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. 6.12.4 Write literary analyses; summarize literary information. Objectives SWBAT: Read Middle Eastern folktales and make inferences about the author’s culture and historical viewpoints. Students will attempt to evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Write a short analysis of one Middle Eastern folktale, in comparison to a similar

one they choose that we have or have not read in class. SWBAT: Discuss what the three folktales say about the Middle Eastern culture and the history of country from which it comes. Students will be given a packet containing copies of the following stories: A Dispute in Sign Language (Israel) Djuha’s Sleeve (Syria) Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp (Persia/Iraq) The Beduin’s Gazelle (Saudi Arabia) What Melody Is the Sweetest? (Afghanistan) Assignment: Students will pick one of the Middle Eastern folktales and find a similar one that we have or have not read, then write a comparative analysis of the two pieces.

Day 25 - 26 - Greece
Standards 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. Objectives SWBAT: Read Middle Eastern folktales and make inferences about the author’s culture and historical viewpoints. Students will attempt to evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Discuss what the three folktales say about the Middle Eastern culture and the history of country from which it comes. Students will be given a packet containing copies of the following folktales: Orpheus and Eurydice The Story of Perseus Truth and Falsehood

Day 26: Epic Heroes and Epithets Lesson Plan
Standards 3.12.A1 Analyze an author’s use and purpose of symbolism. Objectives SWBAT: Read the handout and understand an author’s use of epithets as symbolism. SWBAT: Write their own version an epithet which symbolizes the character of their choice. SWBAT: Discuss why they chose their character, how the character embodies the traits of an epic hero, and share the epithets they created then explain how the epithet applies to the character. SWBAT: Listen to their classmates during discussion and take their thoughts into consideration before responding in a respectful manner.

Vocabulary Hubris: Exaggerated pride or self-confidence. Epithet: Used for characterization, realism, vividness in narrative, and an identifier for the audience. Warm Up Activity Students will be asked to write the name of a character that they consider an epic hero. They will then turn it over and write a few words or a sentence describing the character. Lesson Sequence I will give a brief description of what an epic hero is then ask the students to write the name of a character that they think fits the description and then flip over their card and write a short description of that character. I will ask the students if anyone would like to share theirs and then go into my examples. First, I will tell them to say the first name that pops into their head when I say “The Boy Who Lived” (Harry Potter) then I will ask who they think of when I say “The Girl On Fire” (Katniss Everdeen), “The Boy With The Bread” (Peeta Mellark), “The Man of Steel” (Superman). These will change depending on what the students give as examples. Once they have an idea of these names, I will explain what an epithet is and how it is used. They can reference this on the handout I give them. One more time, I will give epithet examples from Homer. I will then return to modern characters and create parallels between Harry Potter and the epic hero model to explain what epic heroes are and what they do. This will be aided by video clips and a power point. Assignment Choose a popular superhero and create your own epithet for this character. Share with two or three people sitting in front of, behind, or beside you. Explain to them why you believe the character fits the model of an epic hero and then share you epithet and explain how you can up with it. Pick two classmates and create epithets to represent them.

Day 27 - 30 -North America
Standards 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. 5.12.1 Use prewriting strategies to plan written work. 6.12.7 Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats. 7.12.5 Listen to, provide, and evaluate constructive feedback; solve problems by identifying, synthesizing, and evaluating data.

Objectives SWBAT: Read Native American myths and legends and evaluate the influence of culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Watch “Reel Injun” and make inferences about the author’s culture and historical viewpoints that may have influenced, or been the influence for, what they have read and watched. SWBAT: Use prewriting, note taking strategies to plan their essay. SWBAT: Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats: notes, reflections, journal entries, and finally a reflection essay. SWBAT: Listen to one another and provide feedback, then evaluate the constructive feedback they were given and identify, synthesize, and evaluate what they need to do to improve their draft. Lesson will take four days and is part of Unit Plan “Around the World in 80 Days” in which our class will read stories, poetry, novels, and watch films about certain cultures. Day 27: Students will begin by completing a circle map or bubble map that details what they know, or think they know, about Native Americans and the culture. I will hand out an explanation of the 2 – 3 page essay they will write. The essay must be in MLA format and sources must be properly cited. Citation information for the myths and legends will be provided on this explanation sheet. Students will have to write a) what they originally thought about Native Americans, b) what they learned and if the perception changed, and c) how the legends and myths are similar and different to either their own beliefs or the myths and legends they have studied from other cultures. I will give a brief history about Native Americans and ask them to write notes of the back of their charts, listing information that they did not know previous to my lecture. Students will be given a packet of myths and legends from various native tribes. We will read the following stories in this listed order: When Grizzlies Walked Upright (Modoc Tribe) A Tale of Elder Brother (Pima Tribe) The First Ship (Chinook Tribe) Where The Girl Saved Her Brother (Cheyenne Tribe) The Land of the Dead (Serrano Tribe) The Ghost Wife (Brule Sioux Tribe) The End of the World (White River Sioux Tribe) Students will write a reflection on one or more legend, listing the similarities or differences they find in either their own belief system or other mythology they have read previously. Students will finish reading at home if we do not finish the short readings in class. Day 28: Students will begin their day by answering the question: What have I learned from the media (movies, comedians, history shows) about the Indian culture?

We will discuss what we read the previous day and then begin watching “Reel Injun”, which they will take guided notes on. Day 29: Students will immediately begin watching the rest of the film. Upon reading and viewing the documentary “Reel Injun”, the students will write a reflection about what they have perceived versus what is reality, then form groups of two to four and discuss what they have learned. The will begin work on it. They will finish a rough draft as homework. Students will have to write a) what they originally thought about Native Americans, b) what they learned and if the perception changed, and c) how the legends and myths are similar and different to either their own beliefs or the myths and legends they have studied from other cultures. Day 30: We will do a peer editing workshop and then students will spend the period working on revising their drafts and asking me questions they need clarified. A typed second draft will be due the Tuesday following week. Final drafts will be due the Friday of the following week.

Day 31 - 35 - Canada and Ireland
Reading Students will be given copies of: “Are the Rich Happy?” by Stephen Leacock (Canada) “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift (Ireland) Standards 3.12.6 Evaluate the use of stylistic devices to create tone and mood; explain the use of irony. 6.12.6 Write persuasive essays and compositions appropriate to audience and purpose. 5.12.5 Edit for correct word usage: nouns, pronouns, pronoun case, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, subject/verb agreement, verb tenses, pronoun/antecedent agreement, clauses, and phrases. Objectives SWBAT: Read satirical works “Are the Rich Happy?” by Stephen Leacock (Canada) and “A Modest Proposal” by Jonathan Swift and evalute the use of stylistic devices to create tone and mood. They will be able to explain the use of irony within each work. SWBAT: Discuss the author’s intent in writing each piece and why they chose to write them using irony instead of addressing the issues directly. SWBAT: Write a persuasive essay in satirical format about a topic they would like to make a difference about, addressing the audience in a way that is specific to their purpose. SWBAT: Peer edit for correct word usage and grammatical accuracy.
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Journal: What is sarcasm and how is it used? Do you use it? If so, in what way? Journal: Does shock value still work in a society that is desensitized to violence?

Assignment

Day 33 and 34 - Students will spend two days researching a topic they would like to write
a satirical essay about. Students will then write a persuasive essay in satirical format about a

topic they would like to make a difference about, addressing the audience in a way that is specific to their purpose.

Day 35 - Students will peer edit for correct word usage and grammatical accuracy.

Day 36 - 40 - England
Reading Students will be given a copy of “The Taming of the Shrew” by William Shakespeare Standards 3.12.2 Evaluate methods of characterization; describe the motivation for a character’s actions; analyze an author’s development of characters; make inferences and draw conclusions about a character(s) based on evidence. 6.12.2 Write narrative/descriptive compositions appropriate to audience and purpose. Objectives SWBAT: Read “The Taming of the Shrew” and evaluate Shakespeare’s characterization, speculate about character motivation, analyze the author’s character development, and make inferences and draw conclusions about characters based on in text evidence. SWBAT: Discuss the author’s development of Katrina as the shrew and decide what makes her a “shrew”. SWBAT: Write predictions about the character(s) and what they believe will be the outcome to the play. They will choose a scene and write a narrative/descriptive monologue from one character’s perspective, explaining his or her motivations.
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Journal: What is a shrew? Speculate about this term. Journal: Is Shakespeare timeless? Should teachers continue to teach his work? Why or why not?

Assignment Write predictions about the character(s) and what they believe will be the outcome to the play. They will choose a scene and write a narrative/descriptive monologue from one character’s perspective, explaining his or her motivations.

Day 39 and 40 - Students will complete monologues and then view the 90’s teen film “10
Things I Hate About You” to see how “The Taming of the Shrew” was modernized. They will then write a short reflection on whether their opinion of the play changed after seeing it or if it did not. They will also explain whether Shakespeare plays should be modernized or not. Homework Students will write a short reflection on whether their opinion of the play changed after seeing it or if it did not. They will also explain whether Shakespeare plays should be modernized or not. No less than a paragraph, no more than one page. They will also explain

whether Shakespeare plays should be modernized or not.

Day 41 - 51 - Germany
Reading “The Diary of a Young Girl” by Anne Frank Standards 3.12.7 Analyze the influence of historical events and culture on authors’ works. 4.12.4 Make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints; evaluate the influence of historical events and culture on an author’s works. 6.12.7 Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats. Objectives SWBAT: Read “The Diary of a Young Girl” and analyze the influence of historical events and culture on the author’s work. Students will make inferences about an author’s culture and historical viewpoints and evaluate the influence of the Holocaust and culture on an author’s work. SWBAT: Discuss how Anne Frank is different and similar to them. Does her experience make her any different from a “typical” teenager? SWBAT: Write various journal entries discussing their thoughts and feelings about the experiences Anne Frank and her family went through. Journal: Is studying historical texts important? Do they help us to understand historical events more clearly? 1. Journal: What was the Holocaust and what impact did it have on the Western world? 1. Journal: Is Anne Frank’s story important? Why or why not? Explain. 1. Journal: Did you learn anything new about World War II through reading this book? 1. Journal (3 entries): Describe your thoughts and feelings about Anne Frank’s story. Are there moral implications to reading someone’s diary, even after their death?
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Day 50 and 51 - Students will watch the movie “Anne Frank - The Whole Story” Day 52 - 60 - Britain and North America
Reading Students will be given a packet containing the following: “Porphyria’s Lover” by Robert Browning “A Grammarian's Funeral Shortly after the Revival of Learnin” by Robert Browning “The Pied Piper of Hamelin” by Robert Browning “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allan Poe “The Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe “The Pit and the Pendulum” by Edgar Allan Poe “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow” by Washington Irving “The Spectre Bridegroom” by Washington Irving

Standards 3.12.5 Evaluate the use and purpose of imagery, figurative language, and sound devices. 3.12.A1 Analyze an author’s use and purpose of symbolism. 6.12.7 Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats. Objectives SWBAT: Listen for sound devices within the poems and visualize their own interpretation of what the imagery and figurative language means to them personally. SWBAT: Read the words of the poems above then determine whether their initial interpretation has changed. SWBAT: Write an essay about one of the authors above and explain why he should be considered a master of horror or why their morbid writing is so popular. SWBAT: Discuss what role the author’s use and purpose of symbolism played in their interpretations. Grammar We will discuss grammar rules through poetry and how they are used or bent to suit the work. This technique has been suggested for use with ESL/ELL students. Spelling 25 words will be chosen from those above. Students will be given a copy of the words and then take a spelling/vocabulary test on those 25 words. Assignment Students will write an essay about one of the authors above and explain why he should be considered a master of horror.

Day 60 - 70 - South America (Mexico, Peru, Chile, Cuba)
Reading Students will be given a packet containing copies of the following: Quevedo and the King (Mexico) The Drovers Who Lost Their Feet (Mexico) The Hungry Peasant, God, and Death (Mexico) The Snake’s Lover (Peru) “Brown and Agile Child” by Pablo Neruda (Chile) “Ode to Broken Things” by Pablo Neruda (Chile) “Ode to My Socks” by Pablo Neruda (Chile) “Ode to Sadness” by Pablo Neruda (Chile) How El Bizarron Fooled the Devil (Cuba) Standards 3.12.5 Evaluate the use and purpose of imagery, figurative language, and sound devices.

3.12.A1 Analyze an author’s use and purpose of symbolism. 6.12.7 Write a variety of communications in appropriate formats. Objectives: SWBAT: Listen for sound devices within the poems and visualize their own interpretation of what the imagery and figurative language means to them personally. SWBAT: Read the words of the poems above then determine whether their initial interpretation has changed. SWBAT: Write about and explain their interpretations by using their own imagery to describe how they visualized both works. They will also translate figurative language into plain language to explain what it meant to them and speculate about the author’s reason for using specific sound devices. Write an ode to something of their choice, based on Pablo Neruda’s odes. Write a short analysis of one South American folktale, in comparison to a similar one they choose that we have or have not read in class. SWBAT: Discuss what role the author’s use and purpose of symbolism played in their interpretations. Grammar: We will discuss grammar rules through poetry and how they are used or bent to suit the work. This technique has been suggested for use with ESL/ELL students. Spelling: 25 words will be chosen from those above. Students will be given a copy of the words and then take a spelling/vocabulary test on those 25 words. Assignment: Students will write about and explain their interpretations by using their own imagery to describe how they visualized at least three of the works. They will also translate figurative language into plain language to explain what it meant to them and speculate about the author’s reason for using specific sound devices. They can also draw an illustration that represents what they visualized for one (or all three). Assignment: Write a short analysis of one South American folktale, in comparison to a similar one they choose that we have or have not read in class. Assignment: Students will construct an ode based on an object of their choice and present it to the class.

Day 70 - 80 - Research Project
Standards 6.12.2 Write narrative/descriptive compositions appropriate to audience and purpose. 6.12.9 Evaluate credibility of resources; write research papers by analyzing information from primary and secondary sources, paraphrasing and summarizing information, and citing sources using a specified style manual. Objectives SWBAT: Evaluate resources and choose credible primary and secondary sources. The will be able to cite sources using MLA format as needed.

SWBAT: Analyze their findings to construct a narrative/descriptive letter based on their chosen poet/author’s life. Assignment Compose a letter writer from the point of view of your selected poet (or author), reflecting on his or her life and career in the day(s) leading up to their death. Make sure to include important details that happened within their lives. You may highlight both the positive and negative or choose to focus on one (positive or negative). This letter should reflect the feelings and mood that you believe fits the end of their life best, based on the research you have done. You must have at least five credible sources from literary journals, books, and web. You MUST use at least one of each. Draft must be a minimum of 2 double spaced pages, and can only be a maximum of 5 double spaced pages. It must be typed with 1” margins, Times New Roman, 12 point font. Sources must be attached as a “Works Cited” page in MLA format. This letter should be written from the poet/author’s point of view, but based in fact. You may choose not to quote the sources directly, but if you choose to paraphrase you will still need a citation in MLA format. All sources that influenced your paper must be on your “Works Cited” page.

Assessments:
All assessments will be based on what students write in their journals, essays, and their compositions based on what they have learned (odes, poems, etc). Informal assessment will be done through discussions.