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PEA

focus
on educators
California Teachers Association

focus on educators is an award winning publication of the Pittsburg Education Association/CTA/NEA www.peateachers.org

Statement of Mission
The California Teachers Association exists to protect and promote the well-being of its members; to improve the conditions of teaching and learning; to advance the cause of free, universal, and quality public education; to ensure that the human dignity and civil rights of all children and youth are protected; and to secure a more just, equitable, and democratic society. effectiveness. I have discussed your than just the passer of program. You concerns with the Superintendent, are at the front lines. You are the Shannon Ortland and Abe most valuable tool the district has. Doctolero. I asked that there be an How and what you teach is the opportunity for them to hear from determining factor. If you are asked teachers as to the positives and to teach things that do not work, negatives of this program. They said then say something. Work with that you were electronically district people to turn it around to surveyed. Did you ever see the make it successful for you and the Volume XXII, Number 7 results of this survey? Did you even students. Please do not be passive. respond to the survey? It doesn’t As for loss of prep time to create In this Issue sound like they heard about any of lessons for these lesson President’s Message these concerns that you have. I have demonstrations I say to you, “Tell Informational Items… …..pgs. 1-2 asked that Shannon Ortland attend Thank You Corner……….p.3 them NO.” If time is needed to every school site meeting to Community Outreach.......p.3-4 prepare ask for compensation for personally discuss concerns with Bargaining .……………...p.5 the prep time lost. Or perhaps use her. A “live” discussion. PEA Job Descriptions……pgs.5-8 early release days’ time to prepare. CTA News……………....pgs. 8-11 PEA is not asking to throw the baby There is a reason why the contract PEA Calendar…….... ….The Last Page out with the bath water. What we says that your prep time is at YOUR (the teachers) are asking is to have a discretion to use for planning and PEA President’s Message more effective sounding off session preparing. I need my prep time to to fine tune this program. It has its create, set up and review student At the last several Rep Council merits as well as its problems. work. My prep time helps me to meetings it was brought up that the Please teachers be a tool for change. plan and prepare for my students. Lesson Studies program has its Tell them what the problems are, Don’t you need prep time to plan good points and its bad points. and then provide suggestions as to and prepare? Please DO NOT let Many of you are concerned with the correct these problems, to therefore the district get their fingers on our large amount of time you have to make these lesson studies useful to personal teaching preparation time. take to leave your classroom with a you. Since there are many programs It is in our contract that PUSD and sub to attend the collaborations. that get placed in our lap and are PEA agreed on. Lesson studies have Also many of you are concerned mandated by the district, people its merits but it also has its flaws. with the amount of prep time lost to please do not be a door mat. If Let’s be instruments for corrective prepare lessons for these studies. something isn’t working let your action. Finally many of you don’t feel like principal or an administrator know, they are particularly helpful in Wag More and Bark Less! so that it can be corrected. Be an increasing your teacher Chris Coan, PEA President active participant in teaching rather

MARCH 2013

PEA Leadership 2012-2013 President Chris Coan
Willow Cove Elementary/ PEA Office

Rep. Council Meeting Calendar
September 19 October 17 November 14 December 19 January 23 February 20 March 20 April 24 May 15 June 5 ***********************************

Elementary Vice President Cindy Joy
Parkside Elementary

Secondary Vice President Shelly Bascomb
Rancho Medanos

Secretary Tammy Carr
Highlands Elementary

Treasurer Gale Higgins
Stoneman Elementary

School Board Meeting Calendar
August 22 September 12 & 26 October 10 & 24 November 14 December 12 January 9 & 23 February 13 & 27 March 13 & 27 April 17 May 8 & 22 June 5 & 26 ***********************************

Committee Chairs Grievance Committee Richard Higgins – Pittsburg High Negotiations Team Dawn Cova - Chair Political Action Committee Iris Contreras - Chair Elections Chair Ruth Foster Human Rights Committee Vacant Women’s Issues Committee Allison Azevedo - Chair O-Team Vacant CTA State Council Representatives Iris Contreras – PEA Denise James, Sara Savacool, Robert Strickler - AEA Alternate Pandora Bethea - AEA CTA Director District C Terri Jackson NEA Director for California, District 3 Greg Bonaccorsi Technical Editor Susan Harrison – PEA Site Secretary

Are you Getting your PEA Information???
Having the site reps attend their monthly meeting and then reporting back to you is vital in the communication chain of our Association. Roll call at last February 20th Rep Council Meeting: Adult Ed. – absent Stoneman – absent Foothill – present Willow Cove – present Heights – absent MLK Jr. – absent Highlands – present Hillview - absent Los Medanos – present Rancho Medanos –present Marina Vista – absent PHS - present Parkside – present Black Diamond –present ************************************

Focus on Educators is a publication of the Pittsburg Education Association CTA/NEA 159 East 4th Street Pittsburg, CA 94565 Phone: (925) 432-0199 fax: (925) 432-4854

E-MAIL:peatchrs@att.net WEBSITE: www.peateachers.org 2

“THANK YOU” Corner
PEA would like to thank the following people for helping and supporting their local association for the month of March: Thank you to Parkside teachers: Cindy Joy, Kristina Marshall, and Sue Price for volunteering their time to clean up the 4th Street Park. Thank you to the following Read Across America helpers: Shelly Bascomb, Gale Higgins, Cindy Joy, Janet Low, Kristina Marshall, Susan Price, Diana Valencia, and Bebe Montesinos-Vaughan. PEA SCHOLARSHIPS PEA Scholarship Achievement Applications are available for graduating high school seniors who will be attending an institution of higher learning in the fall of 2013. You must be the son or daughter of a parent who is a current member of the PEA/CTA/NEA. You may request a scholarship application form from your site rep. Scholarship forms must be returned to the PEA Office (159 East 4th Street) no later than Wednesday, May 1, 2013. UPCOMING 2013 CTA CONFERENCES Good Teaching Conference – South March 22-24, 2013 Los Angeles Airport Marriott Los Angeles, CA PEA will contribute $50.00 towards conference expenses. PEA VIDEOS TO BORROW Great Public Schools Ancestors in the Americas- Asian American History There and Back – Surviving Breast Cancer Journey to Respect – The History of CTA No Grapes – United Farm Workers CTA – California Civil Rights Initiative Respect – Equality – Hope – The Journey of a People – American Teachers Association TEACH – Inspiration is the Greatest Teacher Wanna borrow? Just ask and we will pony it over to you. peatchrs@att.net or (925) 432-0199

Community Outreach
Read Across America
On March 5th, Read Across America was presented by the teachers of Pittsburg to the students of the afterschool program and the First Baptist Head Start Preschool program. Testimonies from teachers were enthusiastic as well as the students. Bebe Montesinos-Vaughan writes, "Read Across America at Foothill Elementary was a great success.” Mrs. Diana Valencia, our first grade teacher and Mrs. Montesinos-Vaughan our fifth grade teacher, read to children in the After School Program. Mrs. Valencia read a beautiful book about bears to first and second grade students, while Mrs. Montesinos-Vaughan, our fifth grade teacher read an African tale to a group of fifth grade students. Each group enjoyed the treat and asked many questions, relating the story read to other stories they had experienced. It was a great activity for both the students and teachers alike. "I've participated in Read Across Pittsburg since its inception 3 years ago. I highly recommend reading to preschoolers. Their enthusiasm and focus is genuinely inspiring. Please mark your calendar for the 4th annual “Read Across Pittsburg", stated Gale Higgins. Gale read to the Head Start Preschool. Kristina Marshall, this year's teacher of the year wrote, "I had a wonderful time at the Read Across America event at Parkside Elementary. I read to a group of first, second and third graders. Students were excited to have a special story time after school. They were interacting with the story; making predictions and expressing connections as I

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read. It was a great opportunity for both me and the students. “ Our last testimony came from Sue Price. "I so enjoyed Reading Across America with first graders after school. It was entertaining to co-read with Cindy Joy, who not only is a kindergarten teacher, but also my friend. We watched the children's laughter and excitement in participating with certain character parts of the stories. It gave me a different experience to enjoy reading, just because, instead of making each story an academic endeavor.” I would like to thank all the hundreds of teachers who go out of their way and give more of themselves for the betterment of the students of Pittsburg without asking for praise. Thank you for helping the children of Pittsburg. Respectfully submitted, Cindy Joy, PEA Vice-President, Elementary

Bebe Montesinos-Vaughan…Foothill…Read Across America

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Beautifying 4th Street Park

Parkside teachers: Sue Price, Kristina Marshall and Cindy Joy helping to keep our 4th Street Park beautiful.

Diana Valencia…Foothill…Read Across America

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Bargaining Update
There have been several questions regarding Resource Specialists caseload numbers. In case you missed the information from the MOU the first time, the details have been reprinted below. Please share with the special education teachers at your site. MOU for Resource Specialists PUSD & PEA signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in the fall in order to compensate Resource Specialists who complete the case management duties for up to four (4) additional students with a sixth-fifths (6/5) contract. The MOU was agreed upon when the District made efforts to secure an additional part-time special education teacher for this school year but was unable to. Here are the key points:  The 6/5 Contract shall be paid until June 13, 2013 or until each Resource Specialist’s caseload returns to 28 students. At any time during the school year, when a Resource Specialist’s caseload goes above 28 students, he/she shall have the choice of serving those students and shall be compensated with a 6/5 Contract. No Resource Specialist shall be assigned more than 28 students without authorization from PEA. Resource Specialists must give express written agreement to take on the additional case management duties. Resource Specialists at other school sites who are asked to serve more than 28 students shall be offered the same choice of a 6/5 Contract. No Resource Specialist receiving a 6/5 contract shall have more than thirty-two (32) students on his/her caseload. The agreement shall not set a precedent for future 6/5 contracts for Resource Specialists and this MOU will sunset on June 13, 2013. Respectfully submitted, Dawn Cova, PEA Bargaining Chair

Pittsburg Education Association Election of 2013-2014 Officers Timeline
The Declaration of Candidacy applications have been given to your site reps on March 20, 2013. These are due to the PEA office no later than 3:30 p.m. on April 10, 2013. There will be a General Membership meeting for all PEA members on April 24 from 3:45 – 4:00 p.m. at the PEA office. At this time, any nominations can be taken from the floor and candidates can give a speech if they so desire. After this meeting all names will be written on the ballot form. The PEA Elections of Officers Ballot will be distributed to all the school sites on May 8 and members will have from May 8 through May 15 until 3:30 p.m. to cast their vote. Ballots must be turned into the PEA office no later than 3:30 p.m. on May 15, 2013. The counting of the votes by the election committee will occur on May 15. The final results will be sent to site reps on June 5 via email. They will also be posted in the June 5th FOCUS.

PEA Executive Board Job Descriptions
President’s Job Description The President shall be the chief executive office of the Association and its policy leader. The President shall: 1. Preside at all meetings of the Association, the Representative Council and Executive Board; 2. Prepare the agenda for the meetings of the Association, the Representative Council and the Executive Board; 3. Be the official spokesperson for the Association; 4. Be familiar with the governance documents of the Association, CTA, and NEA; 5. Appoint all chairpersons and members of committees, and of the bargaining team, with the approval of the Executive Board by the beginning of each school year;

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6. Appoint the chairperson and members of the bargaining team with the approval of the Executive Board by the beginning of each school year; 7. Call meetings of the Association and the Executive Board; 8. Propose the procedures for grievance processing for ratification by the Executive Board and the Representative Council; 9. Suggest policies, plans and activities for the Association and be held responsible for the progress and work of the Association; 10. Attend meetings of the Service Center Council of which the Association is a part; and 11. Attend other CTA/NEA meetings as directed by the Representative Council. Treasurer’s Job Description The Treasurer is in charge of all areas connected to PEA’s finances. This position is responsible for developing and maintaining short and long-term fiscal planning and accountability. The Treasurer has the following responsibilities:
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Semi-Annually  Prepare and distribute Executive Board Stipends  Prepare and submit PAC filings Monthly  Pay bills  Balance checking account  Prepare and submit updated financial report to Executive Board and Representative Council Note: please refer to CTA Accounting & Reporting Handbook for Treasurers for training and detailed information on Treasurer duties and responsibilities.

Vice President, Secondary Job Description The most important duty of the Vice President, Secondary, shall be to carry the message of the President to the Junior High, High School and Continuation High School members in order to activate the members to participate positively in the association. To do this, it shall be considered necessary for the Vice President, Secondary, to perform the following tasks: 1) 2) 3) Actively attend all Executive Board meetings Actively attend all Representative Council meetings Perform the duties of chairman at any Executive Board or Representative Council meetings that the President is unable to attend Actively attend meetings of the School Board when requested by the President Interact with the Representatives of the secondary schools to assist them in conducting Ten Minute meetings at their sites with all their members Personally notify the Representatives of the secondary schools of upcoming meetings and confirm their attendance and participation Recruit members to participate in the activities of the union at the secondary sites such as Representatives, Executive Board members, Bargaining Team members, Organizing Team members and other committees established by the association Support and advise the President on union matters Promote support for the Bargaining Team among the members

Exercise general supervision over the receipt and disbursement of all funds of PEA. Exert official custody of all funds and property of PEA. Prepare and distribute the annual budget, monthly financial reports, and annual financial report and tax returns. Perform such other duties as may properly appertain to PEA and as may be provided elsewhere in the by-laws or standing rules.

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The Treasurer performs the following tasks:
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Ensure the timely payments of all monthly payments and bills. Perform banking actions. Prepare financial statements and forecasting reports. Work in partnership with the Executive Board to sustain overall goals and objectives. Annually:

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Prepare annual financial report according to PERB guidelines Submit financial information to CPA for tax returns Provide CPA with 1099 information Prepare and submit for approval upcoming year’s financial budget.  Prepare and distribute Representative Council stipends

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Be aware of the status of grievances at the secondary sites and support the successful resolution of same Support the Representatives in carrying out their duties at the secondary sites as it relates to assisting members who have been accused of violations by the administration and reporting violations of the contract by the administration Support the Representative's efforts to foster a positive attitude about the union and participation in the functions of the union at the secondary sites Represent the union in a professional manner at all times Maintain the cell phone number, personal email address and other contact information for all Representatives at each secondary site Establish a communications tree between the President and the secondary sites (which includes the VP) Be a resource for all members of information, position/policy of the association and event schedules Create and deliver to P.E.A. for distribution to all sites the Principal Evaluation Form Consolidate the information from the Principal Evaluation Form in an easily accessible format for both the members and for dissemination to the School Board and District Office Create and distribute to all members at Pittsburg High School a survey on the progress the principal of Pittsburg High School has made to become an effective administrator of educators. This duty shall be terminated if and when the principal has maintained an effective rating for two years running or a new principal is appointed. Consolidate the information from the PHS Principal Survey and present the findings to the Executive Board. To perform all other appropriate duties as assigned by the President In the Fall and Winter, check all secondary sites to make sure class size maximums are followed.

Vice President, Elementary Job Description The most important duty of the Vice President, Elementary, shall be to carry the message of the President to all Elementary School members in order to activate the members to participate positively in the association. To do this, it shall be considered necessary for the Vice President, Elementary, to perform the following tasks: 1) 2) 3) Actively attend all Executive Board meetings Actively attend all Representative Council meetings Perform the duties of chairman at any Executive Board or Representative Council meetings that the President is unable to attend Actively attend meetings of the School Board when requested by the President Coordinate and assist the Representatives of the elementary schools to assist them in conducting Ten Minute meetings at their sites with all their members Personally notify the Representatives of the elementary schools of upcoming meetings and confirm their attendance and participation Recruit members to participate in the activities of the union at the elementary sites such as Representatives, Executive Board members, Bargaining Team members, Organizing Team members and other committees established by the association Support and advise the President on union matters Promote support for the Bargaining Team among the members Be aware of the status of grievances at the elementary sites and support the successful resolution of same Support the Representatives in carrying out their duties at the elementary sites as it relates to assisting members who have been accused of violations by the administration and reporting violations of the contract by the administration Support the Representative's efforts to foster a positive attitude about the union and participation in the functions of the union at the elementary sites Represent the union in a professional manner at all times Maintain the cell phone number, personal email address and other contact information

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15) 16) 17) 18) 19) 20) 21) 22)

for all Representatives at each elementary site Establish a communications tree between the President and the elementary sites (which includes the VP) Be a resource for all members of information, position/policy of the association and event schedules To perform all other appropriate duties as assigned by the President In the Fall, check all elementary sites class sizes to make sure they are following class size maximums Chair over Community Outreach events. Prepare flyers, make appointments, schedule events, etc. Sign checks for Treasurer Preside over Budget Elections and Catastrophic Leave Bank Committees Plan and Organize Community Outreach Events: Farmers Market Table; Sock Drive; Read Across Pittsburg; and Pittsburg Health & Safety Fair

“NEWS…………”
Unions 2.0 – A Look at Unions and the Education Profession
Background Information for Open Conversations NEA’s Policy on Charter Schools “State laws and regulations governing charter schools vary widely. NEA’s state affiliates have positions on charter schools that are appropriate to the situation in their states. NEA’s policy statement sets forth broad parameters, and minimum criteria by which to evaluate state charter laws.” (nea.org) The AFT’s Policy on Charter Schools- The AFT strongly supports charter schools that embody the core values of public education and a democratic society: equal access for all students, especially students with special needs and English language learners; high academic standards, accountability to parents and the public; a commitment to helping all public schools improve; and a commitment to the employees’ right to freely choose union representation. Charter schools are publicly funded schools that are granted autonomy from some state and local regulations in exchange for meeting the terms of each school’s charter. State laws, which vary widely, govern who can authorize charters, who can apply for them, and the total number allowed. Today, there are more than 4,500 charter schools across 40 states and the District of Columbia, enrolling more than 1 million children.” (aft.org) *********************************

Secretary Job Description Duties include the following: 1. Keep a careful and accurate record of the proceedings of each meeting, regular or special, of the Association, Representative Council, and the Executive Board; 2. Be responsible for the distribution of minutes, notice of meetings, and agendas for all meetings to members of the Representative Council and Executive Board; and to the membership when appropriate; 3. Keep an accurate roster of the membership of the PEA Association and of all committees and this information to the office secretary; 4. Carry on the correspondence pertaining to the affairs of the Association as directed by the President; 5. Keep the PEA Office calendar up-to-date with events and meetings related to PEA.

Teacher’s Legal Rights and Duties
VI. SCHOOL SAFETY ISSUES A. Safety Plans Schools must establish school safety plans that:
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Assess the current status of school crime. Identify programs that would provide a high level of school safety, which would include procedures to notify teachers of dangerous pupils; a sexual harassment policy; disaster

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procedures; a dress code prohibiting wearing of gang “colors.”

issue within 10 days. Parents may attend. Ed Code 48915.5 *********************************

Establish a safe and orderly environment conducive to learning. Ed Code 32280

B. Collective Bargaining Safety conditions of employment are negotiable subject under EERA. C. Student Suspension 1. Teacher may suspend for up to two days for acts enumerated in 48900, e.g., causing or threatening bodily harm, possessing weapons, drugs, alcohol, using tobacco, stealing or receiving stolen property, damaging or attempting to damage school property, robbery, extortion, “disruption of school activities or willfully defying valid authority.” Ed Code 48910 2. You must report the suspension to the principal immediately and send the student to the principal’s office. 3. You must ask the parent to attend a conference regarding the suspension, and arrange for the school counselor/psychologist to be present if possible. 4. Principal can decide to keep the child on site, but, “The pupil shall not be returned to the class from which he or she was suspended, during the period of the suspension without the concurrence of the teacher of the class and the principal.” Ed Code 48910(a) 5. The suspended pupil shall not be placed in another regular class during the suspension. Ed Code 48910(b) 6. You may recommend suspension from school. 7. Suspension from school is limited to 20 days in a school year. Ed Code 48903 8. Expulsion a) Acts justifying expulsion = causing serious bodily injury, except in self-defense; possession of a firearm or knife, drug sales, robbery or extortion. Lesser offenses, such as willful defiance, damaging school property, etc. can also justify expulsion if it is shown that the pupil is incorrigible. b) Different rules for special education students--expulsion cannot be for misconduct that was caused by or is a direct manifestation of the student’s identified disability, except in cases of weapons, drugs or inflicting bodily injury. There must be an IEP team meeting to assess this  

The Bad Teacher Narrative …Countering the Message

All too often, in the conversation about our public schools, the quick fix that reformers turn to is blaming the teacher. But this bad teacher narrative is not only harmful to those of us in the business of educating; it is also harmful to those we hope will gain an education, from pre-K students all the way up to young and old adults. By demonizing teachers, we stop looking at the complex reasons that schools are failing, thus preventing us from coming up with real solutions. *********************************

Reducing the Risk: Teen Suicide
SOME CONTRIBUTING FACTORS TO TEEN SUICIDE (Cont.) 12. Mental illness (i.e. schizophrenia) and behavior/mood disorders (including ADHD) 

It’s common for young people to feel depressed because youth is a time filled with so many changes and losses. Depression can make everything seem overwhelming, so that suicide appears to be the only solution. [Some Possible Reasons for Suicide] Cynthia Copeland Lewis suggests that undiagnosed mental disorders may play a part in as many as 90% of all completed teen suicides. [as cited in NPR] Depression – a major factor in teen suicide, is described as a lack of interest, dramatic weight gain or loss, change in appetite, change in sleep habits or fatigue, felling worthless, change of interest in physical relationships, frequent crying, headaches, change of interest in personal appearance, feeling that unpleasant emotions have always been there. [Frankel, Bernard and Kranz, Rachel as cited in NPR] Many suicidal adolescents, like suicidal adults, are deeply depressed, but the signs may be hard to recognize because their sadness and hopelessness are disguised as boredom, apathy, hyperactivity or physical complaints. [The Harvard Mental Health Letter] Depression alone or in combination with aggressive behavior and/or substance abuse or anxiety is found in over half of all completed suicides.

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Aggressive/impulsive behavior is common in both sexes. [American Foundation for Suicidal Prevention]  A third or more of schizophrenic patients attempt suicide and 5-10% eventually succeed. Those most likely to kill themselves are young, unemployed men without families who have a severe illness with relapses that require repeated hospitalization. They are often isolated and abusing alcohol or other drugs. They may act either under the influence of hallucinations and delusions or at times when psychotic symptoms have faded and they can contemplate their lives despairingly. The apparent motionlessness (blunted affect) of schizophrenia makes the moods and intention of these patients difficult to discern. Some otherwise puzzling adolescent suicides may occur because of incipient schizophrenic symptoms. [The Harvard Mental Health Letter] Whatever the cultural background and manner of death, it is clear that the great majority of suicides have a mental or emotional disorder. The most common is depression: 30% to 70% of suicide victims suffer from major depression or bipolar (manic-depressive) disorder. More than two-thirds of moderately to severely depressed patients have suicidal thoughts and suicide accounts for about 15% of deaths among people with major mood disorders. Anxiety disorders occur at a high rate in severely depressed people and may contribute independently to the risk of suicide. [The Harvard Mental Health Letter] It does appear that ADHD [Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder] is associated with excess mortality from suicide. One study by Weiss & Hechtman (1986) found that almost 10% of ADHD individuals have attempted suicide within the past 3 years, and about 5% will die from either suicide or accidental injury. These percentages are much higher than in control populations – the general rate of suicide in the U.S. is about 11 per 100,000. The risk of suicidal gestures seems to be increased by the co-occurrence of CD [chemical dependency], which is the case in perhaps 25% of ADHD individuals. A recent study (Manuzza et al, American Journal of Psychiatry, April 1998) found that children with ADHD show higher than average risk for antisocial behavior and substance-related disorders as adults than do comparison subjects without ADHD [Mental Health Infosource] Severe major depression, “should be considered as lifethreatening as any other terminal medical condition,” notes psychiatrist Andrew Slaby, No One Saw My Pain: Why Teens Kill Themselves (Norton Press). Most adolescents and young adults who commit suicide have diagnosable psychiatric disorders such as a major

affective disorder (bipolar disorder or major depression), schizophrenia, character disorder, or a combination. Comorbidity of these disorders with substance abuse and/or the presence of guns in the house appears to be particularly lethal. [Holinger, Paul C.] *********************************

California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders
STANDARD 3 A school administrator is an educational leader who promotes the success of all students by ensuring management of the organization, operations, and resources for a safe, efficient, and effective learning environment.  Sustain a safe, efficient, clean, well-maintained, and productive school environment that nurtures student learning and supports the professional growth of teachers and support staff.  Utilize effective and nurturing practices in establishing student behavior management systems.  Establish school structures and processes that support student learning.  Utilize effective systems management, organizational development, and problem-solving and decision-making techniques.  Align fiscal, human, and material resources to support the learning of all subgroups of students.  Monitor and evaluate the program and staff.  Manage legal and contractual agreements and records in ways that foster a professional work environment and secure privacy and confidentiality for all students and staff.

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Grading Policy
1. When grades are given for any course of instruction taught in a school district, the grade given to each pupil shall be the grade determined by the teacher of the course and the determination of the pupil’s grade by the teacher, in the absence of clerical or mechanical mistake, fraud, bad faith, or incompetency, shall be final. 2. The governing board of the school district and the superintendent of such district shall not order a pupil’s grade to be changed unless the teacher who determined such grade is, to the extent practicable, given an opportunity to state orally, in writing, or both, the reasons for which such grade was given and is, to the extent practicable, included in all discussions relating to the changing of such grade. 3. No grade of pupil participating in a physical education class, however, may be adversely affected due to the fact that the pupil does not wear standardized physical education apparel where the failure to wear such apparel arises from circumstances beyond the control of the pupil.

Writing up a Grievance

The easiest to explain, but the most difficult to accomplish is the actual writing up of a grievance. It is the bugaboo of many local associations and their leadership. There are two basic rules of thumb in writing up a grievance. K.I.S.S. METHOD   The secret is to keep it simple. Briefly state what has transpired. Statement of Occurrence: The District violated Article XII, Safety and Article III, Non-discrimination when the immediate supervisor failed to replace the light in the Women’s Restroom. Remedy Requested: Adherence to the contract. Replace the bulb.

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“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”
 Margaret Mead
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It is not necessary to write a ten (10)-page dissertation on the subject. The relevant facts can be brought out at the informal or formal level. DO assert violations of every Article and/or Section that have even the remotest relevancy.

YOU CAN’T LOSE A GRIEVANCE AT LEVEL 1 You may not win and you may be persuaded that it has no merit, but you can always appeal the immediate supervisor’s decision.

PEA
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Calendar
MARCH 2013

PEA Executive Board – PEA Office – 159 East 4th St. – 3:45 PM Daylight Saving Time Begins PUSD School Board Meeting – 2000 Railroad Ave. – 7:00 PM St. Patrick’s Day Spring Begins PEA Rep Council – PEA Office – 159 East 4th St. – 3:45 PM Palm Sunday Passover Begins at Sundown PUSD School Board Meeting – 2000 Railroad Ave. – 7:00 PM Cesar Chavez Day/Holiday – no school Good Friday/Holiday – no school Easter

APRIL 2013
1 1-5 10 10 17 22 24 24 24 April Fool’s Day Spring Recess PEA Executive Board Elections Candidacy Forms Due PEA Executive Board – PEA Office – 159 East 4th St. – 3:45 PM PUSD School Board Meeting – 2000 Railroad Ave. – 7:00 PM Earth Day Administrative Professionals Day PEA Rep Council – PEA Office – 159 East 4th St. – 3:45 PM PEA General Membership Mtg. – PEA Office – 159 East 4th St. – 3:45 PM (Executive Board Elections Candidates Nominations)
Next Deadline for Articles is Friday, April 12, 2013
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