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POLICE NOT HAPPY WITH SENTENCE OF SEX OFFENDER/PAGE 4
Friday, March 22, 2013 u One dollar

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Claremont’s own road warrior/

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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont resident James “Jim” Beasom III woke up on the morning of his recent 90th birthday and did what he has done nearly every day for more than a decade: He embarked on a 20-mile ride along the foothills on his bicycle. He rides an recumbent bicycle, above, along Bonita Avenue in La Verne during a recent ride with the Claremont Senior Bicycle Group. Mr. Beasom is a retired surgeon and has been a Claremont resident since 1955.

Opanyi Nasiali steps up as mayor/PAGE 3

ARToon brings out hidden talents/ PAGE 27

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 15

CALENDAR/ PAGE 20 SPORTS/ PAGE 28

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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READERS’ COMMENTS
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
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ADVENTURES
IN HAIKU
And then she swallowed a lump of disagreement changing to love thoughts
—Peggy Woodruff Haiku submissions should reflect upon life or events in Claremont. Please email entries to editor@claremont-courier.com.

Water rates are reasonable
Dear Editor: I would like to first state my support for Tobias Hecht’s Viewpoint regarding the purchase of Golden State Water in Claremont. We have 5 people and pay a bill of about $50 to $60 per month, which I agree is quite reasonable. I would like to add that we all live in a desert, and so water is a precious and limited resource. Water is removed from aquifers at a much faster rate than it is replaced. Wasting water to make unused miniature golf courses in everyone's backyard is inane. One the other hand, I would also like to respond to Nick Mirman’s letter to the editor on the same subject. Giant forprofit corporations do not have constitutional rights, people do. Golden State Water is also quite capable of defending itself. Consequently, I doubt that anyone really thinks that your “California Alliance to Protect Private Property Rights” is anything but a shill. I suggest you quit this battle and go protect someone who needs it.
Brian Sutin Claremont

Support the NVRA
Dear Editor: The fate of the National Voter Registration Act (NVRA) now lies with the Supreme Court. For the second time in as many months, the justices are hearing arguments on vital legislation that has encouraged active participation in our democracy for nearly 2 decades. The League of Women Voters of Arizona is a plaintiff in the case and the LWVUS has submitted an amicus brief to the Court. If the Supreme Court rules against the NVRA, states would be free to pass laws that could restrict voter registration activities and thereby prevent eligible citizens from registering to vote. Pledge to support new voters and the organizations that bring them into the political process. Contact the Supreme Court to let them know of your support for the NVRA. Thank you.
Ellen Taylor VP, Advocacy LWV of the Claremont Area

Editor-in-Chief Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Saturday, March 23 Architectural Commission Special Meeting, 9 a.m. City Hall north parking lot Monday, March 25 Tree Committee Council Chamber, 6 p.m. Tuesday, March 26 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 27 Parks, Hillsides & Utilities Committee Special Meeting Community Services, 6:30 p.m. 1616 Monte Vista Ave. Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m.

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 19

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Mayor Schroeder passes the torch to Opanyi Nasiali

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ouncilmember Opanyi Nasiali has received a name change. It’s Mayor Nasiali for 2013-2014.

Mr. Nasiali was unanimously selected to serve as Claremont’s mayor by his fellow council members at a special meeting Tuesday night. He takes up his new title after serving the city over the past year as mayor pro tem. He is still getting used to the name change. “I keep pinching myself,” he joked. But he has no false notions over what the title of mayor might mean for him. It hasn’t changed his mindset as a council member whatsoever, he assured. “I am one among equals,” Mr. Nasiali said. “We all have one duty, one responsibility, and that is to do what the people CITY elected us to do, and that’s it. The COUNCIL main thing that is foremost above anything else is that we are here to do the people’s job.” His first act as mayor was to lead the council in selecting Joe Lyons as the new mayor pro tem, also unanimously affirmed. The duo will now lead the city after joining the council together in March of 2011. Priorities for the councilmember-turned-mayor have not changed much since that election. As mayor, he brings his campaign slogan “living within our means” along for the ride. “We are doing a pretty good job right now and I want to continue that,” Mr. Nasiali said. “I want to make sure the city is financially stable because if you don’t have that stability you can’t provide the services that people need and are used to. That is my personal number-one goal.” Since his election 2 years ago, Mr. Nasiali has put his motto to work by aiding the city in negotiations with its employees, transitioning to having each employee pay their own portion of their Public Employees’ Retirement System contribution (PERS). As mayor, he plans to continue those efforts with eyes fo-

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Councilmember Larry Schroeder kisses his wife Laurie after he was sworn in for his second term on the council during a special meeting Tuesday night. Mr. Schroeder chose to have his wife administer the oath of office after the council certified the recent municipal election.

cused on areas of local concern that the council has deemed most important to the city: local water issues, overcrowding of the Wilderness Park, economic development and a new police station. “All of those are things that if we don’t keep our eye on them, we can easily go into the forest and expense staff time on things that are not as critical as the ones we set as our priorities as a council.” We need to maintain a focus on things relevant to Claremont within the purview of the local council, Mr. Nasiali continued. “Let’s focus our attention to the things we need to do within that list of priorities we established for ourselves,” Mr. Nasiali said. Another important area of focus for the new mayor is building upon the city’s relationships with its schools. Among his goals, Mr. Nasiali would like to reintroduce “city government day,” bringing high school students to City Hall for the day to shadow the city manager and other staff members. The day would ideally culminate with the students joining for a city council meeting. He also plans to invite all local schools to send a student representative or group of student representatives to start off each meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance. He hopes educating young students about their government and increasing their involvement will encourage their interest in community involvement. Recognizing the low voter turnout in recent city elections, he finds the need to engage children in local government even more vital. “I’m hoping that if we start students at a young age to see how their government functions and understand how it works, maybe there will be some interest in their realizing they too can play a role,” he said. Mr. Nasiali grew up in Kenya during a time when public education did not exist. Neither of his parents

had higher than a grade school education, but instilled in their son the importance of education. Though his parents were not wealthy, they managed to scrape together enough money to send their son to school. They instilled the value of education within their son, a value that remains today. “I recognize the importance of emphasizing education as the cornerstone of whatever we do in our lives,” Mr. Nasiali said. “I want our students to know their council is interested in their success.” Not just their athletic success, but for those accomplished in the classroom as well. He wants to set an example for Claremont’s budding academics by recognizing those who excel at city council meetings. “It gives the students something to work hard for, scholastically speaking,” he said. As Mr. Nasiali assumes his role as mayor—the emails are already rolling in—former Mayor Larry Schroeder settles into his role as city council member, fresh from re-election. Mr. Schroeder and fellow Councilmember Corey Calaycay were reinstated into their positions on Tuesday evening. “It’s finally beginning to sink in,” Mr. Nasiali said the morning following his selection. “But I’ll take each day as it comes and always remember the reason why I do this, why we [council members, volunteers for the city] all do this. It’s not a position of power. We do it because we have this unique desire to serve the community in which we live. “The idea that I can actually contribute something to the betterment of the community, that is always foremost,” he continued. “It is an honor that people see that and give me the privilege of serving on the city council.”
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Golden State to replace aging pipelines near Foothill and Mills
Golden State Water Company has started work to replace 1300 feet of aging pipelines north of Foothill Boulevard at Morelia Drive, Guadalajara Place and Cuernavaca Place. The work is expected to last through the end of April, but company officials say streets will remain open during construction. Construction crews are expected to be working Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Parking restrictions along those streets will be issued as deemed necessary for building supplies. Service may be temporarily affected when the new pipelines are connected to individual customer service lines. Customers will be notified in advance if any interruptions should occur. Questions or concerns about construction activities can be directed to Golden

OUR TOWN
State’s 24-hour Customer Service Center at 1-800-999-4033. Find out more about construction in Claremont by visiting our blog, www.claremontcourier.blogspot.com.

community and is intended for those approaching retirement, newly retired, or still in the work force. For information, visit www.claremont seniors.org or call 399-5488.

Cityʼs After Work series earns state award
The Claremont Senior Program and Committee on Aging have been presented with a Lifelong Learning Program Award by the California Parks and Recreation Society Aging Section for their After Work program. This award recognizes outstanding local accomplishments toward the promotion of lifelong learning opportunities for older adults. After Work is a series of presentations and social mixers held throughout the

Chris Holden names Zephyr Tate-Mann ʻWoman of the Yearʼ
Assemblymember Chris Holden has named one of Claremont’s own as “Women of the Year” for the 41st Assembly District. Zephyr Tate-Mann was presented with the honor at a special celebration held last weekend. Ms. Tate-Mann is the owner of a Claremont construction and investment firm, a lawyer and a community activist. In 2012, she was appointed to the California Earthquake Authority by Governor Jerry Brown. She is an active member of the board of directors of the Pomona Valley Human Relations Coun-

cil and is active in many civic groups including the American Business Women Association, Black Women Lawyers Association, NAACP and the Claremont Democratic Club. Read more about Ms. Tate-Mann’s distinction in next Friday’s edition of the COURIER.

CMC to replace Ducey Gymnasium
Claremont McKenna College is getting a new athletics center. The Claremont Architectural Commission recently approved the Roberts Pavilion to be built on the northeast corner of Mills Avenue and Sixth Street, replacing the school’s former Ducey Gymnasium. In addition to varsity and recreational courts, the new 13,000 square-foot-athletic complex will include a fitness center, sports medicine facility and office space.

Police not satisfied with sentence of Pomona man

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laremont police are calling on a the US Attorney’s office for a second opinion after a local man wanted for meeting with a child for lewd purposes got away with a lighter-than-anticipated sentence.
Claremont police arrested Donny Wade, a 32-yearold resident of Pomona, on March 13 after being found with a 14-year-old runaway from Utah. Mr. Wade and the juvenile had met through online chat rooms on Meetme.com. Mr. Wade successfully persuaded the girl to come out to Claremont, buying her a ticket on the Greyhound on March 8, according to police. The teenager had been missing for 5 days before police caught up with her on the roof of the parking

structure at First Street and Claremont Boulevard. The teen had been linked to Mr. Wade’s home and several local hotels before she was found. Police were able to locate her by tracking her computer usage. Mr. Wade was arrested and the teen returned to her family. Though police recommended criminal charges for lewd acts with a child as well as meeting with a child for lewd purposes, the DA only upheld the latter offense, to which Mr. Wade pleaded no contest on March 14. He was sentenced to one year county jail time with 5 years probation, according to the District Attorney. Officers say he will also be required to register as a sex offender. Local police remain disappointed with the ruling, believing that Mr. Wade should have at least been sentenced to state prison. Further, they fear that Mr. Wade will be up to his old ways once released.

“This plea agreement doesn’t even address probation conditions that prohibit the defendant, once he’s released from County jail, from using the Internet and associating with children,” said Claremont’s Chief of Police Paul Cooper in a statement. “While there is no requirement that the district attorney’s office contact law enforcement agencies when plea bargaining cases, in this matter we would have hoped that we could have been provided an opportunity to provide our input, especially when this plea was made so early on in the process, at the defendant’s arraignment,” Chief Cooper continued. Claremont police will continue to investigate whether or not federal laws were violated with the ruling and will be contacting the US Attorney’s office for a review.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Wednesday, March 13 A man walked into Razzle Dazzle late Wednesday afternoon, but not with the intent of walking out with a frozen treat on a hot winter’s day. He had his eyes on a different prize.After demanding money from the cashier, the crook took off out of sight with $90 in his pocket. Police have no leads in this case.

POLICE BLOTTER

Thursday, March 14 A week of fancy feasting has come to an end for Claremont resident Julian Uribe. The 21-year-old was caught on tape stealing cuts of meat and lobster tails at the Claremont Stater Brothers market, 1055 W. Foothill Blvd., from Saturday, March 9 through Wednesday, March 13, according to Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. Police brought an end to the fine dining on Thursday. No more surf-andturf behind bars. **** Wanted: a man with a nice, new chain necklace from the Diamond Center in Claremont. The man made off with the jewelry late last month using a fraudulent credit card. He is described as Caucasian with blonde hair and a beard,

about 5 foot 9 and 160 pounds. Friday, March 15 An afternoon siesta on the lawn in front of City Hall was cut short for Pasadena resident James Harrington, who had apparently enjoyed an early St. Patrick’s Day celebration. The 45-yearold was seen staggering along the street before he decided to sprawl out on the grass for some shuteye, according to Lt. Ciszek. Claremont police brought his nap to an end when they determined Mr. Harrington was under the influence of alcohol and unable to care for himself. He was arrested for public intoxication and held at the local jail until sober. **** The hate crimes continue at Honnold Library, 800 N. Dartmouth Ave. Throughout the past several months, police have found a series of swastikas drawn in blue ink in the bathrooms of the library as well as in various other college buildings. The story on Friday was slightly different. This time, police found derogatory statements targeting several racial and cultural groups. There are no suspects, but investigation continues.

Saturday, March 16 Police are searching for a man involved in a startling attack on a local senior in the 500 block of South Indian Hill. According to the report, the woman awoke in her bed on Saturday night to find a man who had climbed up on her bed exposing his genitals. She screamed and the man fled. Investigation continues. **** On Indian Hill Boulevard in Village West, American Apparel shoppers were interrupted on Saturday afternoon when they were accosted by a man with no shoes, screaming at customers and appearing lost and confused. He was taken to the hospital for a mental evaluation. **** Later on Saturday evening, the residents of a home on Wharton Drive were also given a shock when they received an unexpected new lawn decoration. A driver speeding down the street had taken too sharp of a left turn and collided with a tree. Both the driver and a passenger were in stable condition, but transported to the hospital with physical injuries. There was no alcohol involved in the incident, according to Lt. Ciszek. Sunday, March 17 Claremont residents and guests were

well-behaved this St. Patrick’s Day, police report. Nothing out-of-the-ordinary occurred in Claremont other than a stolen license plate. Monday, March 18 A man and a woman were arrested Monday night after police discovered the car they were driving was listed as a felony vehicle out of Glendora. Police say the car was involved in a pursuit that was called off because of reckless driving. There might have been a reason for that. Driver Johnathan Anderson, 30, of Azusa was found to be driving unlicensed. He was arrested. Passenger Deanna Cooper, 32, of Glendora was also nabbed, but for different reasons. She was found in possession of methamphetamine and a glass pipe with which to smoke it, according to Lt. Ciszek. She joined him behind bars. Tuesday, March 19 Police are investigating the burglary of an apartment in the 600 block of Montgomery Circle. According to the police log, among the loot stolen was $200 in cash, jewelry and an iPad along with 2 handguns, 9 long rifles and a shotgun.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Baldy View ROP future unknown as staff are given pink slips

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ith Governor Jerry Brown proposing a new K-12 funding system, the future of the Baldy View Regional Occupational Program is uncertain.

At the Thursday, March 7 meeting of the Claremont school board, board president and Baldy View ROP Commissioner Mary Caenepeel reported that employees of the local Joint Powers Authority— which provides career technical education (CTE) to residents of Claremont, Upland, Chino and Chaffey Joint Union school districts—have all been given pink slips. Unlike her staff, Baldy View ROP Superintendent Shelley Adams doesn’t stand to lose her job come June 30, when the state budget is finalized, because she is in the first months of a 3-year contract. Nonetheless, “It’s so disheartening to go through this process,” she said. Flexible funding poses risks Ms. Adams had hoped to devote her tenure to updating Baldy View’s classes to reflect current standards and trends, including new digital and green technologies. Instead, she is fighting to make sure CTE programs don’t get lost in the funding shuffle. The crisis began on January 10, when Governor Brown unveiled his proposed 2013-14 budget, which introduces a new Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) to the state’s education system. Currently, some $7 billion in funding for 62 categorical programs, from oral health exams for kindergartners to CTE, is doled out to an array of departments and agencies. It is a process that critics argue has led to too many layers of bureaucracy, financial waste and iniquity. “Under the current system, districts receive notably different per-pupil funding rates based on historical factors and varying participation in categorical programs,” the Legislative Analyst’s Office notes. Under the LCFF, categorical funding would be consolidated and given straight to school districts. On top of a lump sum base grant based on enrollment, districts would receive additional funding for traditionally underserved students such as English learners, foster children and lowincome students. Another categorical program, class size reduction, would be replaced with extra funding for children in grades K-3, while CTE funds would go straight to districts based on how many high school students are enrolled. Districts could use CTE money as they see fit, including for areas other than vocational education, in keeping with Governor Brown’s belief that individual districts are the best judges of what their students need. Baldy View ROP, which has an annual operating budget of $8 million, currently has $7 million in reserves, according to Ms. Caenepeel. As a Joint Powers Authority, it is required to have enough money in its coffers, or enough guaranteed state funding, to pay for the program for 3 years. Under the proposed LCFF system, they cannot be sure they will be getting CEF funds—and getting them at the same

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Dakota Wiemann checks the air filter on a truck he is fixing during an ROP automotive repair class at Claremont High School. Dakota is only a sophomore at CHS, but has already decided to pursue a career as a mechanic.

levels they have enhead to an alternate locajoyed—in the coming tion, such as the Ontario years. Airport for training in airMs. Adams believes port careers or the Salon this flexibility may have Success Academy in Upthe “unintended conseland to learn cosmetology. quences” of undercutting Another benefit of a reCTE programs as Califorgional ROP program is that nia districts, which have it can coordinate with busibeen under-funded for ness and industry throughyears, are tempted to dip out the region to secure into vocational education opportunities for students funds for other pressing without the districts comneeds. peting against one another, Ms. Adams headed to Ms. Adams said. Sacramento earlier this Advocates say that keepmonth to lobby legislators Members of the afterschool ROP automotive repair class work on a ing CTE programs alive is regarding the importance 1980s Pontiac and a late-model Nissan at CHS. Teacher Mark Childers more important than ever of CTE programs in ad- structures the class so students at various levels can tackle a repair. now that schools are vance of the April 19 asswitching over to a Comcome to appreciate the economy of scale sembly budget hearing. Like other available through regional ROP. mon Core curriculum, which stresses the providers and advocates of CTE, she is “Baldy View ROP offers programs and real-world application of knowledge. pressing for vocational education funding classes in 11 out of 15 industry sectors. “An ROP class can explain why geomto be excluded from the LCFF, or ear- Any one school is going to find it very dif- etry is important—if you take a construcmarked specifically for career develop- ficult to do that,” Ms. Caenepeel noted. tion class, you’ll understand what angles ment programs. Baldy View ROP offers a number of mean,” Ms. Caenepeel said. “In a pharThe conversations she and her col- CTE classes at Claremont High School, macy class, you learn that dosage calculaleagues had with lawmakers left her hope- including Automotive Technology, Crim- tion is so important, it can mean life or ful. “We understand where [the governor] inal Justice, Sports Medicine, Stage De- death.” is wanting to go,” she said. “We just want sign & Tech, Video Production/Digital ROP courses are also vital in a time to be part of the conversation.” when the economy is just rebounding and Design and Virtual Enterprise. employers are looking for young people CHS students may also, if their schedImportant local support with real-life skills, Ms. Adams said. If Closer to home, Ms. Adams is hoping ules permit, attend courses offered by Baldy View ROP and similar programs that the districts which currently partner other schools in the Baldy View Joint evolve in the way she anticipates, they can with Baldy View ROP will continue to Powers Authority, such as Architectural also help prepare youths for the green jobs fund the Joint Powers Authority, regard- Drafting or Forensic Science/CSI at Upthat many say will mark the economic land High School, Floral Design & Sales less of potential funding changes. landscape in the coming years. Along with opting to use CTE money at Chaffey High School and Culinary “I would like to believe that people will for non-CTE needs, a district might also Skills at Don Lugo High School. start to understand what a loss it would be Additionally, Baldy View ROP offers decide to hold on to CTE money to serve to lose ROP and CTE programs, and programs directly operated through their many courses at its career-training center what’s to be gained by keeping the struchigh schools. Ms. Caenepeel said she feels in Ontario, including training in Dental ture in place,” Ms. Adams said. this would be a mistake. Over the years, Assistance and Emergency Medical Re—Sarah Torribio the CUSD board president said, she has sponse. Baldy View participants can also storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Water issues in Claremont: Water for life, not for profit
by Marilee Scaff

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laremont residents recently received mailers charging a “water grab” as the city moves toward reacquiring its water system. In 1922, Claremont—with only 2500 residents— asked the little southern California Water Company over in San Dimas to take over operation of its water company, and they did—for free! We know who engaged in a “water grab.” In the late 1990s, they went to court to get exclusive rights to most of the water used in Claremont, again for free!
In the last 90 years, that little San Dimas company has morphed into a national conglomerate, with shares sold through the New York Stock Exchange under the name “American States Water;” its chief aim: profitability for its stockholders. They later changed the “Southern California Water Co.” name to “Golden State Water Co.” Every 3 years they submit rate increase requests to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) and expect to be awarded at least half their inflated estimates. Only 12 years ago, the CPUC also granted “regional rates,” so Claremont and Bishop and Calipatria and cities that must rely entirely on expensive imported water all pay the same rates, despite vast differences in water costs. (Claremont gets more than half its water from local wells at a quarter of the cost of imported water.) As a private business, GSW has no transparency in their operation, and it is impossible to get straight facts about their affairs.

Demystifying
SUSTAINABILITY
Claremont would like to negotiate a fair market price, but Golden State has refused to negotiate with Claremont officials. The only legal alternative is eminent domain proceedings, under which the price will be settled in court. Golden State has tried to vilify this process as foolishly expensive, scaring residents so they will oppose it. The mailings and similar news stories are generated by a Sacramento PR firm, California Alliance to Protect Private Property Rights, employed by Golden State Water Company and paid for by you, with high water rates. Wise Claremonters won’t be fooled by these exaggerations. We can buy the company and reduce costs of operation, even tho' water rates may not drop immediately. Fact: residents of Claremont contribute approximately $8 million a year in profits to Golden State’s shareholders compared to our neighboring cities that own their water systems. That money would pay off revenue bonds used to purchase the water company, so that in less than 30 years we would own and control our own water resources and even earlier have lower water rates than under Golden State Water. Water decisions require long-range thinking. So, what are the issues? If the city acquires its own water rights and distribution system, the benefits carefully weighed are: (1) local control: 85 percent of California cities own their water companies, setting their own rates; (2) transparency in public meetings and published

reports. A proprietary company does not have to make details of its operations public, and Golden State Water does not do so; (3) rates set locally based on actual costs of water and services, not by far-off managers and the CPUC; (4) $8 million/year not sent out of town to distant stockholders would pay off bonds. There is no need to increase taxes as the bonds could be paid for by water users without increasing water rates. (5) conservers of water would not have to pay that WRAM charge which pays Golden State for not delivering water; (6) with long-range planning, we could increase storage, better utilize storm water and improve the yield of local wells; (7) owning our water company assures us permanent control of this scarce natural resource. (8) But we don’t have a Claremont water manager! Of course not; we have not needed one. But there are many around and neighboring cities have voiced offers of help. Claremont surely has as competent residents as our neighbors. OF COURSE, WE CAN DO IT! “Water for life, not for profit” should be Claremont’s motto. Marilee Scaff, a longtime Claremont resident and a student of local water issues for decades, is a member of Sustainable Claremont and has been active on the Sustainable Claremont Water Action Group since its founding in early 2009. Demystifying Sustainability is a project of Sustainable Claremont (sustainableclaremont.org). Email address info@sustainableclaremont.org. Follow us on Facebook at: facebook.com/sustainableclaremont and on Twitter #GreenClaremont

Come on, George! You got to get in touch and let out your inner puppy that is playful, smell, nosey and fun to be around.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Lack of maintenance results in tree removal
by Michael Heilpern

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hank you for publishing a story about the city’s plan to remove the 50foot-tall pine trees in The Club neighborhood, which appeared in the March 1 edition of the COURIER.

Like Tonya Bennitt, quoted in the article, many of us who chose to live in The Club neighborhood were attracted by the pine trees, which give the neighborhood its distinctive quality. They are also appreciated by the dozens of Claremont residents from outside the immediate neighborhood who enjoy walking, jogging, biking or pushing baby strollers on these streets every day of the week. In December, when the Community and Human Services Department notified some of the area residents of its intentions, it prompted a spontaneous outcry, including a hard copy petition to protect the trees, which now has close to 100 signatures. This is in addition to the online petition referred to in the article. Links to both petitions can now be found online at www.ProtectClaremont Trees.org. The article quotes Stacy Cuevas, community and human services manager, as

saying that “issues with the health and stability of the towering pines at The Club have been ongoing since 2005.” It would be more accurate to state that issues with the pines disrupting hardscape have been ongoing since 2005. Given that the city, in the first phase of its tree mitigation plan, chose not to have the trees evaluated for health and stability by a certified arborist, we never really learned how many of them were either unhealthy or unstable. What we did learn was how much the character of Shenandoah Drive was changed by removing just one-third of the trees. We also learned that you can’t really “replace” a 50-foot pine tree with a 10-foot sapling of any species. What you end up doing is not “replacing” the tree but destroying it, and then planting another that may grow to replace it in 25 to 30 years. Now, nearly 8 years after they were planted, a brief tour of Shenandoah Drive clearly demonstrates how much these young trees will need to grow before they come close to replacing the giants that were cut down. When the city attempted to remove another third of the trees in 2008, it was met with tremendous resistance from the neighborhood. So much so that the city council insisted that all the trees that were damag-

VIEWPOINT
ing hardscape be individually evaluated to preserve as many as possible, as prescribed by our tree policy guidelines. As a result, only 12 trees were removed. Additionally, in 2008, the city council had the “special circumstances mitigation” provision, which previously had allowed the city to remove healthy trees, stricken from the tree policy guidelines—a clear indication that healthy trees should not be “mitigated” in the future. Which is why it is so surprising that staff would recommend a similar course of action once again. The Community and Human Services Commission, a citizens’ advisory board, heard the department’s plans for The Club neighborhood on February 6. Contrary to the report in the COURIER, the commission did not “recommend the removal of any of the trees with roots causing significant damage.” Rather, it voted unanimously, 7-0, to recommend that the city adhere to the tree policy guidelines, which require that each tree be evaluated individually to determine whether hardscape damage could safely be remedied through the usual means of trimming or grinding

the tree’s roots. The article also states that the department estimated the cost to “fix the problem” of damaged hardscape at $470,859. According to the staff report of January 28, that figure is an estimate of the total cost since 2005, including work that was completed in 2005 and 2008 plus future work. What Ms. Cuevas did not tell the COURIER is that damage to the side streets that feed into Shenandoah Drive has not been addressed at all in at least 10 years, a source of frustration for people living on those streets. In our view, this is not primarily a “tree problem” but a problem of lack of regular maintenance. The craziest thing about the latest “tree replacement” program is that it is entirely unnecessary. We have a conservative, wellconceived tree policy, which allows for mature trees to be removed if there is no other way to remedy damage to hardscape without endangering their health or stability. The tree policy does not prevent us from maintaining our roads and sidewalks. Rather, it slows down our process so that we consider all other alternatives before destroying valuable community assets that will take an entire generation to be replaced in the name of cost-savings or efficiency.

Safety concerns require replacement of Club trees
by Dennis Vlasich, Board President, The Club HOA

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ver the last 2 weeks, there has been discussion in the COURIER about the pine tree mitigation project in the development known as “The Club” (surrounding The Claremont Club on Monte Vista).
The petition presented to the COURIER by Tonya Bennitt, a homeowner in the association, has 28 signatures, unverified. There are 309 homeowners in The Club HOA, so this represents a very small percentage. Since Ms. Bennitt lives in the Vista section of the HOA, the only pine trees near those homes are along Shenandoah and far enough away from their home not to pose a threat. It is the cul-de-sacs in the Single Family section of the HOA where the problems are the worse, threatening

streets, driveways and utility boxes. The board, by law, represents all 309 and are elected in 2-year cycles just as the city council is. Ms. Bennitt was notified by the HOA of the several meetings regarding the trees and the board’s position with respect to the city’s proposal, but no petition was presented or comment made despite its publication on the agendas for all of these meetings. Nonetheless, the important fact here is that none of the 28 petitioners (to the board’s knowledge) are speaking for those homeowners who are in imminent danger of these 30-year-old, unmaintained trees that are planted too close to utility lines, streets, curbs, sidewalks and driveways breaking the hardscape or the utility lines as dozens have already done over the past 10 years. It’s easy to vote to save the trees when it’s not about to fall on your house because the roots have been pruned so close to the

VIEWPOINT
trunk that the tree’s stability has been severely compromised. Another storm like the one we had in 2005 will likely bring down most of these trees (as it did a dozen or so back then) and damage homes, cars or worse. It is the board’s fiduciary responsibility to keep the community safe by taking reasonable precautions to avoid such foreseeable disasters. The board has read the city staff’s recommendation and, contrary to the claims represented by Ms. Bennitt in the article, it does not mean that 59 trees will be cut down. The plan recommends that first, all pine trees get pruned to reduce the foliage that could bring down the top-heavy trees in a storm. Second, it recommends that an arborist assess each tree as to its imminent threat to damage in-

frastructure and to remove it if root pruning will compromise its health or stability. (As a side note, root pruning is not an acceptable tree maintenance approach according to the Arbor Day Foundation, the agency that gives Claremont its “City of Trees” designation). The board indicated that of the 110 trees, no more than 59 would fall into this category but that the actual number of trees removed would likely be half that, according to city staff. The board feels that we need to eliminate the threat of damage to our homes and begin planting the trees for the next generation. For every tree removed, a new one will be planted that is more appropriate for the area, or it will be relocated to a more suitable environment. We are confident that the city staff will do everything it can to save the trees, but also help us to keep our community safe and attractive.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

8

Community-wide yard sale spaces on sale April 6
Crossroads Inc. invites vendors to take part in their community wide yard sale to take place on May 11 from 8 a.m. to noon in Cahuilla Park. There are 150 spaces available to go on sale starting April 6 for $20; once reserved, no refunds will be given. All funds will benefit the Crossroads programs to assist women who have been incarcerated. To reserve a space visit the Hughes Community Center at 1700 Danbury Rd., between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. Monday through Thursday, until 6 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Saturday. For information, visit www.cross roadswomen.org or call 243-0018.

OUR TOWN
from the National Science Foundation’s Partnerships for Innovation program for the project “Raman Spectroscopic Platform for Analysis of Volatile Organic Compound Biomarkers.” The project aims to establish the key technical innovations for a compact, cost-effective and user-friendly Raman-based platform to analyze organic compounds in the gas phase or in aqueous solution at the point-ofcare or point-of-use for medical, industrial, emergency response and defense-related applications. Mr. Taylor, an associate professor of chemistry at Pomona College, and Angelika Niemz, the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Professor at Keck Graduate Institute, are the co-principal investigators on the grant. Claremont Biosolutions and Tanner Research, in Monrovia,

are also part of the research team. Pomona students Alexandra Antonoplis (’14) and Constance Wu (’14) are currently working on the project, and the grant includes research funds for 2 students each of the next 2 summers.

Local scholars acknowledged by Rose-Hulman Institute
Three Claremonters have made their way onto the winter quarter dean’s list at the Rose-Hulman (RHT) Institute of Technology in Indiana. These distinguished local scholars include juniors Ryely Moore and Marcel Snijder van Wissenkerke and senior Theodore Swartz, all mechanical engineering students. RHT has one of the most highly regarded engineering programs in the nation. To make the dean’s list, students must receive at least a 3.3 grade point average.

Claremont colleges professors nab science grant
Pomona College professor Charles Taylor is part of a research team recently awarded a $599,858 grant

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

9

S

ince 1990, the Claremont Interfaith Council (originally the Claremont Ecumenical Council) has sponsored events that have become part of the social fabric of our community, including the annual Thanksgiving prayer service, the Good Friday service and the baccalaureate service at Claremont High School. Members of the council have joined together in supporting causes that combat homelessness, AIDS and hunger, as well as promoting tolerance, world peace and bringing light to social issues. Members of the Claremont Interfaith Council are representative of the city’s diverse religious community. The current president is Ron White, president of the local stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Mr. White succeeded Rocky Supinger, associate pastor at Claremont Presbyterian Church, who followed Paul Buch, the cantor at Temple Beth Israel. The friendship and cooperation among members of the council affirms that people of good will and mutual respect can work together for the good of all. We hope to use this column as a platform to demonstrate that people of divergent faiths and perspectives can express their views without diminishing others and that people can disagree without being disagreeable. We invite you to join the conversation, get involved and think about some of the issues facing our community as we seek to come together when many elements of our society seek to push us apart. Collectively and individually, we look forward to contributing regularly to the COURIER in the hope that our varied perspectives will help stimulate constructive dialogue. We feel privileged to be part of a community that honors and respects cultural and spiritual diversity and look forward to making a constructive and positive impact through future columns.
—Claremont Interfaith Council

Sandy Hook and a test of faith
by Marcus Dowd

I

cried twice this weekend. The second time was at the memorial service for a woman whose kindness was limitless. She helped start the program I now chair at our church and, as I sat down for the service, I was out of sorts and unfocused, thinking about where I had to be next. Then her children spoke. I cried so hard, I was afraid I might cause a disturbance.
The first time I cried was the day before at a Bat Mitzvah in Los Angeles for the daughter of an old college friend. As my friend addressed his daughter, he started to break down, and I broke right down with him. My wife and I have a 13-year-old daughter of our own. I’m not sure what crying has to do with faith, but I do know I felt better after each service than before I went in. Call it catharsis. Call it process. All I know is I was a mess each time. And all that crying made me remember the last time I cried. My polyglot sister has always been good with languages—her job as a Latin teacher has afforded her great opportunities. Schools have sought her out to start and build programs. She left her most recent job last year but still, that morning, when I first heard the name “Sandy Hook,” I knew I needed to give her a call to make sure she was all right. I wasn’t worried about her as she hadn’t taught at the elementary school that was all over news channels, but she had been a high school teacher in the Sandy Hook district. I was a little surprised at how quickly she called me back. Yes, she said, she had been a teacher at the high school and had-

Inter-Faithfully SPEAKING
n’t taught any of the children who had lost their lives, though she knew some of the families. I was just starting to relax when she told me she had, instead, taught “the shooter.” Up to that point, like the rest of the nation, I was in shock thinking about so many children, and their protectors, none of whom I knew. Now I was worried about my sister. Alternately referring to the shooter as autistic and having Asperger’s, she spoke in a wavering voice about how she had to teach him, one on one, “in one of those trailers separate from the other classrooms,” for an entire year before he could be allowed into her classroom where—though he was still disruptive the second year—he finally settled into being a good student the third year under her charge. If you ever meet my sister, please don’t tell her that I said she was speaking in a wavering voice, she’d deny it. She’s never wanted anyone to ask her how she was doing. She is always fine. My sister lives alone and her students have always been most important in her life. When people ask her how she’s doing, it’s almost like they’re insulting her. Besides, no one ever need ask about her devotion to her life’s work; all one has to do is take a look at the results. Former students are doctors and lawyers and NFL players. And the devotion she showed to helping “the shooter” did not go unnoticed by his mother, who befriended my sister. When the shooter’s parents went through their divorce, the only thing they fought over was the Red Sox season tickets. And so it was that the shooter’s mother took my sister to Red Sox games; and my sister repaid the mother in kind, taking her to Broadway shows—something my sister and I were often lucky enough to do growing up in New Jersey. Her living alone worried me. I wanted to make sure my sister had someone to talk to about all this. Obviously, it was a lot to take in. Never mind that she knew some of those families who lost children on that day. She knew the shooter. She had been friends with the mother. When the initial reports came out identifying the shooter’s older brother as the culprit, my sister said she screamed in her classroom, in front of her kids. She had taught him, too. She told me that the older brother could not have done such a thing, that he was a gentle human being. I could hear the confusion in her voice. “Why?” she asked. “How could anyone do this? How could she have those guns in the house? Why do those guns exist at all? What is wrong with us?” My sister loves my children, her niece and nephew, but she’s had enough experience with kids and their parents to ask a haunting question. “Have your children ever done anything that kept you awake at night?” It caught me off guard. “Of course,” I answered. Then she asked how the shooter’s dad was ever going to get to sleep again. I told her I didn’t know. Again, I was crying. All I wanted was to be able to answer her questions. My sister, who lives alone and needs protection. My sister, who has devoted her life to her students. My awardwinning sister, who has had articles written about her and her outstanding works n the local papers. My sister, a guiding light, a mentor, a teacher to so many over the years. She has so many reasons to be proud and so many students she has shown love. But her brother can’t help worrying about her. I hope that she is able to put aside this one troubled student and find compassion. She can’t forget him, of course, any more than she can forget about an entire town— one where she spent 10 years teaching Latin to its sons and daughters. Virtually all of them will go on, or have gone on, to the rest of their lives, better for having known her, as am I. I just worry about her. And I try not to cry.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

10

Biking proves to be age elixir for Claremont senior

C

laremont resident James “Jim” Beasom III woke up on SENIOR the morning of his SPOTLIGHT recent 90th birthday and did what he has done nearly every day for more than a decade: He embarked on a 20-mile ride along the foothills on his bicycle. He finished his exercise before many Claremonters were even out of their beds.
Picking up speed around the local hills has become a staple for the nonagenarian, who was one of the founding members of the Claremont Senior Bike Group (CSBG). The retired surgeon may be growing older, but he has no plan to change his routine. Where some fear age, Dr. Beasom welcomes it. “It keeps me young,” he said of staying active and riding alongside his CSBG cohorts. “All the people I bike with are young, so I never think of myself as old.” Maybe he has located the fountain of youth, speculates fellow CSBG founder Larry Scheetz, who asserts that, to him, his cycling friend doesn’t seem a day over 60. “The most noticeable trait is his youthfulness. He moves and acts like someone much younger, because he takes really good care of himself,” Mr. Scheetz said. “He golfs a really low score and carries his clubs on his back rather than use a cart, it’s good for his young bones.” Yes, he does still golf—and is proud of his ability to hit the ball 220 yards—and is happy to add any skills he can bring to the table for the CSBG. He feels he has found his niche, so much so that if he goes more than a few days off the bike, he begins to go through withdrawals. It’s clinically proven, the doctor assures. “If I go 2 or 3 rainy days without it I feel very edgy and uncomfortable,” he explains. Finding his stride Growing up, Dr. Beasom wasn’t much of an athlete. He was agile, but he admits he didn’t even make the cut

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Dr. Jim Beasom chats with a fellow rider on Wednesday before the start of a Claremont Senior Bicycle Group morning ride from the back parking lot of Joslyn Center.

to play on his high school football team. When he made the decision to pursue a career in medicine, he all but kissed any potential athletic prowess goodbye. “I never had the time,” Dr. Beasom said. “I always worked 60 to 70 hours a week when I had my practice.” It wasn’t even until age 60 that Dr. Beasom started to bike. He was enjoying a day at the beach with his wife, Tracy, when she suggested they rent a couple of bikes and ride along the coastline. He obliged. “We rented one of those old rickety bikes and she en-

joyed it so much,” Dr. Beasom recalled. A doting husband, Dr. Beasom found a way to nurture his wife’s newfound love for biking as a couple. While looking through a magazine, he learned about Eurobike, a bicycling group that travels around Europe. It wasn’t hard to convince her. They signed up, bought themselves bikes and started training. To date, Dr. Beasom and his wife have biked most of Europe. Some of their treasured
SENIOR SPOTLIGHT toninues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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SENIOR SPOTLIGHT continued from the previous page

memories are cycling through small villages in Italy, stopping to rest in old manors converted into lodging for about 15 people, perfect for their bike group. However, those biking trips were only once a year, and Dr. Beasom acknowledged that after returning from his trips, the biking usually “petered out.” It wasn’t until Dr. Beasom was in his 70s that biking took a more serious hold on him. Until that point, he was busy working as a surgeon helping others with their joints. He was, at one time, chief of staff of Pomona Valley Hospital and was also one of the early southern California surgeons to perform artificial joint replacements. Adding biking into his regimen helped him keep up with the long surgery hours. “I knew that exercise was important and that biking was an excellent form because it’s easy on the joints and you can do it at any age,” he explained.

As Dr. Beasom cut back on hours at his practice, he began adding more time on the bike. “If you want to increase your strength and endurance, you’ve got to work out and you’ve got to put in the hours,” he said. “You’ve got to do it forever. You can’t quit.” The key is in finding the right type of exercise. Some love the gym or the tennis court, but Dr. Beasom found it boring. Cycling was the one sport that kept him engaged, even when riding alone. “There is something calming about cruising through the neighborhood, looking at the plants and flowers and trees, and enjoying the breeze blowing on you,” Dr. Beasom said. “Runners always have this pained expression.” While he enjoys riding alone or with his wife, it was an added benefit when Mr. Scheetz proposed that his friend help start a bike group in the late 1990s: “I wanted to be able to keep up,” he said. “It really pushed me.”

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Dr. Beasom gets ready for the start of the Claremont Senior Bicycle Groupʼs weekly morning ride at the Joslyn Center.

Fellow biker Dorothy Elwell, current president of the CSBG, assures her friend doesn’t need much pushing. “He outrides me!” Ms. Elwell said. “He is strong, consistent and delightful. And if we have any medical problems, we have him.” Though he is now 90, Dr. Beasom says he hasn’t seen his skill level change, mostly because he is consistent with his exercise. The doctor insists other seniors can do the same. The science proves it, according to the doctor. “Years ago we thought once you reach 65 your muscle strength goes downhill. Now we know, with exercise, you can maintain your strength well into your 90s. People in their 70s can start to work out and gradually build up strength and do well,” Dr. Beasom says, adding, “If you don’t do something that requires balance, you lose it. Biking is great for stimulating the inner ear and helping with balance.”

To this day, Dr. Beasom continues to lead the Monday and Wednesday morning rides with his trademark, “Tally ho!” And if he isn’t there to do it, the group recites it for him, Ms. Elwell says. “There’s a ride for everyone,” he assures. Dr. Beasom prefers riding with the lower level, but that isn’t to say that he is any less equipped to take on the Claremont Hills. Padua and Mt. Baldy Road are regular jaunts. It’s about finding what’s right and sticking with it. For Dr. Beasom, it’s a love affair with the bicycle. “Going down Mt. Baldy at 50 miles an hour, you just don’t feel old,” he said with a smile. “That’s part of enjoying life, not feeling old.” Find out more about the CSBG at www.claremontseniorbikegroup.org.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Botanic Garden shows colors of the wild through art

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n order to look toward the future, Claremont’s Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden (RSABG) is digging through its past.

After several years of work delving into the garden’s archives, staff at the botanic garden present their findings through their latest exhibition “Where They Grow Wild,” a collection of artwork reflecting the history of southern California’s wildflowers. The RSABG exhibit is one of 3 displays under the greater theme of “When They Were Wild,” a collaboration with the Theodore Payne Foundation for Wildflowers and Native Plants and the Huntington Library. The Payne Foundation has an accompanying exhibit complementing the main exhibit at the Huntington Library. These original works, some hidden in the dust for more than 100 years, are on display for the first time through June 10. “It really is a look back,” said Lucinda McDade, RSABG’s interim executive director. “A look back at the years when the flora of California was first being seriously discovered.” Over 300 original pieces—illustrations, slides and watercolors—depict the discovery of early California botanic art, spanning “everything from plants of the sea shore and plants of the mountains to the whole flora of southern California,” according to Ms. McDade. Illustrations include Milford Zornes’ local depictions of the flowers of Silverado, and Santiago Canyon as doodled on the field notes of artist and author Clara Mason Fox, never before seen by the public. Though the local gar-

den might not be known for its artistic displays, the staff is looking to change that, showing how the core of RSABG’s mission can be found within these artistic gems. “It’s a very real world application of seeing how our garden is a bridge between research and the public. You see all these illustrations that for a very long time were only seen by scientists and botanists and now they are on display for the public,” said garden spokesperson Pauline Nash. “I think that’s really important for conservation efforts.” Digging through the archives to piece together the art exhibit proved to be a significant challenge. For one thing, there is no one file for botanic art within any one of the botanic gardens. Some of the pieces, like Ms. Mason Fox’s illustrations, are filed along with other field notes in the herbarium. Others are unaccounted for. “This has been years in the making,” said Bart O’Brien, co-curator and RSABG’s director of special projects. “We are just giving them their due, albeit 100 years too late in many cases.” The idea for the exhibition sprang from a meeting in 2006 between Mr. O’Brien and John Wickham, president of the board for the Theodore Payne Foundation, cultural landscaper Carolyn Bennett and eventually with Jim Folsom, director at the Huntington. “We all knew about these various collections that were
WHERE THEY GROW WILD continues on the next page AT RIGHT: Several drawings by renowned local artist Milford Zornes are part of the Wild in Print exhibit at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Library specialist Irene Holiman points out some of the interesting drawings that are part of the exhibit Where They Grow Wild currently on display in the administrative building at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden in Claremont. The exhibit is a co-production by Rancho Santa Ana and the Huntington Library in San Marino.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

WHERE THEY GROW WILD continued from the previous page

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just kind of sitting around that nobody paid any attention to and really weren’t getting much of the respect they deserved,” Mr. O’Brien said. “We really wanted to bring attention to them in the hopes of locating more.” While it took years to get off the ground, the efforts are now paying off. Since work began on the exhibition for the Huntington, Mr. O’Brien says they were contacted by a variety of different groups—the Los Angeles Museum of Natural Art and the Thacher School in Ojai—with botanic art collections to be donated to the cause, resulting in an even greater venture than they had initially hoped for. With an abundance of art, they decided not to limit the display to the Huntington, with the Theodore Payne and RSABG hosting displays to compliment the main exhibit. “You can sort of look at this as a miniature of ‘Pacific Standard Time,’” explained Mr. O’Brien, referring to a collaborative series of art displays organized by the Getty last year. RSABG’s exhibit is an expansion of the Huntington’s display with a focus on the history of the local botanic garden, according to Ms. McDade. RSABG moved to Claremont from Orange County in the early 1950s to affiliate itself with the Claremont Consortium and, in particular Pomona College, which was introducing a master’s degree in botany. Much of the RSABG exhibit displays work commissioned and published by Phil Munz, former dean of Pomona College’s botany department and former executive director at the Garden. His publications feature works of a variety of artists, many of whom were his students, filed within the garden’s archives and herbarium. Clara Mason Fox’s works, several of which are on display at RSABG, are a particularly exciting find for the botanic staff as many of them were buried within the herbarium. “It’s like finding a misshelved book in a very, very large library except that it’s actually much harder,” Ms. McDade explained. “Books advertise where they ought to be on their spine. Herbarium specimens are not filed like that. So it’s pure chance, really, when we find something.” Another highlight for Ms. McDade is located upstairs from the main exhibit. RSABG’s display begins in the Garden’s gallery and continues upstairs in the library with “Wild in Print,” featuring yet more botanic art, such as North American Wild Flowers by Mary Vaux Walcott. While a few prints are on display outside the library, a copy of the book is within, with a special note written by the author in 1926: “With best wishes for the success of the wild garden.” Another notable feature of the library’s display is an assortment of original glass lantern slides by Lustin Martindale from the 1930s. Mr. Martindale would capture images of wildflowers and other plants in black-andwhite and hand paint each slide. At that time, the 7-by11 slides sold for $2, the 11-by-14 for $3.50. “When They Were Wild” and its accompanying displays may only be shown through the beginning of June, but garden archivists are working hard to ensure the collections do not sit in the dust for another 50 years. All of the prints, and more, can be viewed in a virtual exhibit found on the RSABG website at www.rsabg.org. “Local plants are always given short shrift as people go for exotic plants instead of looking at the options within their own backyard,” Mr. O’Brien said. “It’s important for us to bring about people’s awareness that California has this amazingly beautiful flora that most of us just take for granted or never go out to see. This [exhibit] is about promoting an awareness and appreciation.” “When They Were Wild” displays can be found at RSABG (1500 N. College Ave., Claremont), the Huntington Library (1151 Oxford Rd., San Marino) and the Theodore Payne Foundation (10459 Tuxford St., Sun Valley) now through June 10. RSABG’s gallery exhibit is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and in the garden library, Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Viewing is free with garden admission, priced at $8 for adults, $6 for those 65 and older as well as students, $4 for children 3-12 and free for members and children under 3. —Beth Hartnett

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff These beautiful illustrations of wildflowers by Ruth T. Brunstetter are on display in the library of Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden as part of the exhibit Where They Grow Wild.

Upcoming RSABG events
All events free with Garden admission or membership. Visitors 65 and older free on Monday, April 1:

Weekend Wildflower Walks Now through June 9, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy a guided tour among the garden’s wildflowers. Wildflower Show Saturday through Monday, March 30, 31 and April 1. A special indoors display of wildflowers from across the region. Clara Mason Fox: Pioneer, Painter, and Poet of Orange County, California Saturday, April 20 at 1 p.m. California Author Series Talk and book-signing. Lorraine Passero, a relative of Clara Mason Fox, delves into the life of the artist and author, whose illustration,

“Eschscholzia californica, Silverado Canyon,” was selected to represent the “When They Were Wild” exhibition. Reservations are required. Assure a spot at the lecture and booksigning by visiting www.rsabg.org/ community-education. California Wildflowers and Early California Nurseries Sunday, May 11 at 1 p.m. Bart O’Brien, “When They Were Wild” co-curator and RSABG’s director of special events, discusses the history of the native wildflowers as seen in the local botanic gardens. Register for this event at www.rsabg.org/community-education.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Barry Schmit
Parrot aficionado, US Air Force veteran, bicycle enthusiast
A memorial service for Barry Marshall Schmit, formerly of Claremont, will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, March 30, 2013 at Todd Memorial Chapel, 325 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont. Mr. Schmit died at his Whitestown, Indiana home on February 16, 2013. He was 56. Mr. Schmit was born December 2, 1956 in Orange, California. The son of Mary Ellen (Rogers) Schmit and the late Kenneth G. Schmit, Mr. Schmit lived in Claremont off and on for 20 years, working as a welder and painter and building tandem bicycles at Santana Cycles in the Packing House. The Schmit family lived in several southern California cities, including San Diego, Highland and Claremont. For a period of time, the Schmits lived in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, where Mr. Schmit graduated from Ridge High School. Following graduation, he honorably served in the United States Air Force.  Mr. Schmit had a Harlequin Macaw named Apache, whom he raised and trained for a number of years. The 2 could frequently be seen riding on his bicycle or strolling through the Claremont Village. An avid builder of bicycles, Mr. Schmit also thoroughly enjoyed riding them, his family noted. Mr. Schmit eventually moved to Las Vegas and began working at Medco Health Solutions as an IT systems engineer. In 2008, he moved to Whitestown to assist with establishment of Medco’s facility.

OBITUARIES
Mr. Schmit was preceded in death by his wife, Janet (Mahoney) Schmit, who died in 2002. He is survived by his mother, Mary Ellen Schmit of Claremont, his brother Glenn and his wife Melissa of Adairsville, Georgia, his 4 sisters, Dana Wood and her husband Steve of Etiwanda, Brenda Schmit of Claremont, Karen Garay and her husband William of Rancho Cucamonga, and Cynthia Schmit of Los Angeles. Mr. Schmit is also survived by 5 nieces and 5 nephews. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the American Cancer Society or to Parrots First, a nonprofit that manages parrot adoption, care, education and rehabilitation for injured birds, at www.parrotsfirst.org.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Newsflash! Student singers mob Claremont plaza

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n afternoon that looked like any other in the plaza in Claremont’s Village West turned decidedly musical on Sunday, March 17 as children from across the Claremont Unified School District erupted into song.
The seemingly impromptu interpretation of Louis Prima’s “Sing, Sing, Sing (With a Swing)”—the vocal equivalent of the dancing flash mobs gaining steam through the power of social media—was actually the result of weeks of preparation. Music teacher Donna Marie Minano, who taught it to the kids of Sumner and Mountain View, picked the song. Music teachers Christina Harrell (Oakmont), Charlotte Van Ryswyck (Vista), Edris Boyle-Kuzia (Sycamore) and Lisa Pettygrove (Condit/Chapparal), likewise instructed their students in belting out the 1936 classic. The melodious outburst was planned to spread the word about the importance of the mission of the Claremont Educational Foundation (CEF), which is to fund music in local elementary schools at a time when budget cuts have spurred the demise of music programs across the nation. CEF, a volunteer-driven community nonprofit, also helps fund art at CUSD elementary schools as well as technology at El Roble Intermediate and Claremont High Schools. CUSD’s first flash mob was the brainchild of CEF president Ken Corhan, who thought the gleeful gimmick would be a great way to share the fruits of the local public school music program with the community. The credit for getting the event off the ground, however, goes to the organizational skills of Ms. Minano, Mr. Corhan emphasized. “They say genius is one percent inspiration and 99

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff CUSD music teacher Donna Marie Minano leads a combined group of Claremont students in a rendition of “Sing, Sing, Sing,” on Sunday in the public plaza of Village West.

percent perspiration. I had the one percent and she had the 99 percent,” he said. Flash mob participant Audrey Sinsky, a second grader at Sycamore Elementary School, said she was excited about the event but experienced a close call. “I almost missed it because I went to watch my uncle run in the LA marathon,” she noted. Condit third grader Nellie Beatty was another of the dozens of students—many clad in green in acknowledgement of St. Patrick’s Day—to enjoin the crowd with the song’s catchy refrain: “Sing sing, sing, sing. Everybody start to sing...Now you’re singing with a swing.” “I liked it. It was really fun,” she said, noting that she was taught to sing by Ms. Pettygrove. By contrast, Monique Lilka, a Sumner student

characterized as a bit shy by her mother, described bursting into song in public as “very weird.” However, she had good things to say about her afterschool chorus instructor. “Ms. Minano is very kind, and she has a nice voice,” Monique said. The plaza, packed with patrons of the surrounding eateries and shops as well as with the student performers’ families, was a hub of activity during and after the sing-off. Several young children in attendance took advantage of the hot day to splash in the plaza fountain. Meanwhile, Mr. Corhan and his CFF crew manned a booth where they dispensed information about their organization as well as snacks like fruit gummies for the kids. Of course, they urged people to participate in the 2012-2013 Toyota Prius Car Raffle. Those interested in supporting CEF have until approximately 2 p.m. on Friday, April 21, 2013 to buy
FLASH MOB continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff As the flash mob performance begins on Sunday, the children perform the first chorus from the 4 corners of the public plaza in Village West. Later, the 4 groups joined forces in the center to sing together. FLASH MOB continued from the previous page

tickets for one of the nonprofit’s biggest annual fundraisers. Tickets, which are $20, are being sold by members of the CEF board and at various locations in the Claremont Unified School District, including the school offices at Chaparral, Condit, Mountain View, Sumner/Danbury, Oakmont, Sycamore and El Roble schools. You can also buy raffle tickets from members of

the Claremont High School Speech and Debate Team and from members of the CHS classes of 2013 and 2014 as well as from the CHS Cheer Team (also available at City Hall), with a portion of ticket sales benefiting the student groups. Those 18 and older may purchase as many tickets as they wish. If less than 1,000 raffle tickets are sold, the Grand Prize winner will receive $10,000 rather than a Prius. This is the third year in a row Claremont Toyota has donated a Prius to be raffled off by CEF.

A representative of Claremont Toyota will randomly draw a winning ticket at about 2 p.m. on April 21 at the showroom of Claremont Toyota (508 Auto Center Dr. in Claremont). You do not have to be present to win. For information, contact the Claremont Educational Foundation at 399-1709 or info@ClaremontEducationalFoundation.org. Or visit www.claremonteducationalfoundation.org.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Celebrate the opening of the Don F. Fruechte Theatre at Claremont High School
The Claremont Unified School District Board of Education and the Claremont High School Theatre Renovation Committee invite the public to the opening of the newly renovated Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts. Recognizing that schedules are busy, there are several opportunities to join in the celebration. On Thursday, March 28 at 3:30 p.m. a dedication ceremony and ribbon-cutting will be held with guided tours. The ribboncutting and dedication will be repeated on Saturday, March 30 at 1 p.m. Also on Saturday, March 30, a Claremont High School Alumni performance has been scheduled at 7:30 p.m. Tickets for the performance are required and can be purchased through the Claremont High School ASB website. The Theatre Renovation Project was paid for through a $1.5 million career and technical education grant from the state, which was matched through donations from CUSD, community members, CHS alumni, current students and their families, estates and foundations.
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff

LASPA Center for Leadership at Scripps College established with $5 million gift
President Lori Bettison-Varga announced a $5 million gift to establish a women’s leadership center at Scripps College. The new center will be named in honor of Eileen Schock Laspa ’67,

OUR TOWN
P’95 and Jude Laspa, Harvey Mudd College ’65, P’95 who made the keystone gift. The LASPA Center for Leadership at Scripps College will embody programming focusing on 21st century leadership including leadership, analysis, scholarship, public service and action.

The LASPA Center will advance the overall mission of Scripps College to educate women to develop their intellects and talents through participation in a community of scholars so as graduates they may contribute to society through public and private lives of leadership, service, integrity, and creativity. The center will provide students with new opportunities to work closely with

extraordinary leaders, especially women, in areas such as, art, science, business, education, media, government and social entrepreneurship through strategic national and international partnerships and a visiting practitioners and scholars program. Research and action grants, resources for faculty-student research, and expanded internship partnerships are also critical to the center’s model.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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CHS Speech and Debate move on to state championships
On March 3, the CHS Speech and Debate Team took first place in the 16-team Citrus Belt Speech Association, winning the League Sweepstakes for the sixth year in a row. Under the guidance of David Chamberlain, 31 CHS students have advanced to the State Speech and

OUR TOWN
Debate Championship, which takes opens on April 19 in Santa Clarita. Claremont High School’s state qualifiers are: Seniors Cole Boyer, Jahnavi Curlin (league champion), Mirella Gutierrez, Nimrah Imam, Hannah Mathieson (league champion), Annie Nguyen, Harsh Rambhatla (league champion), Sam Schiffris, Jacob Smith (league champion), Loring Thomas (league champion), Matt Thomas, Kahler Verrill, Madison Weigand; juniors, Madison Anderson, Heidi Bjornlie, Blake Boyer (league champion), Rish Chitre, Savannah Daniels, Madeleine Helland, Daniel Knudsen, Elijah Pantoja, Jilly Pascua, William Sirski, Brian Xie (league champion, second place Individual League Sweepstakes), Diana Zhao; sophomores, Laurel Anderson, Gavin Greene, Isaac Gutierrez, Anita Mathias, Sharon Musa, Mackenzie Orr.

bers, Community and Human Services Commissioners and youth of Claremont. Guests are invited to enjoy food, games and an opportunity to interact with City officials. This event provides the YAC and TAC participants, Teen Committee members, Webb School representatives, council members, and Community and Human Services Commissioners the ability to meet and chat while enjoying fun activities. For information, call the YAC at 399-5360.

Columnist Gustavo Arellano to speak at CGU
Gustavo Arellano, the alt-weekly newspaper editor, author and college professor who is best known for his nationally syndicated “¡Ask a Mexican!” column, will visit Claremont Graduate University (CGU) on Tuesday, March 26 for a conversation on topics ranging from education to immigration reform to food. The discussion, titled “Living the Legacy of Cesar Chavez: A conversation on the topics facing Latinos today,” is sponsored by CGU’s Latino Graduate Student Association and the Peter F. Drucker and Masatoshi Ito Graduate School of Management. It begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Administrative Campus Center, 101 S. Mills Ave. A cocktail hour is slated from 6 to 7:15 p.m. The events are free and open to the public.

Chat & Chow with city council at the YAC
This evening, Friday, March 22 from 5 to 7 p.m., the Youth Activity Center (YAC) and Teen Activity Center (TAC) are hosting an evening with city council mem-

Friday, March 22 to Saturday, March 30

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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CALENDAR
YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

Party Parade
Padua Hills Theatre goes to the dogs at “The Pound at Padua.”

Movie listings
Jesus Christ Superstar makes a comeback on the silver screen.

Page 22

Page 25

March Friday

22

March Saturday

23

March Sunday

24

March Tuesday

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ARTOON EXHIBITION The new Claremont Museum of Art arts education project gives voice to a generation of middle school students through the art of cartooning. Student-produced ARToon cartoons will be on exhibit at El Roble Intermediate School in the Multi-Purpose Room, located at 665 N. Mountain Ave., Claremont from 6 to 8 p.m. EDUCATION FUNDRAISER Friends and family of the Sycamore School Library are having a fundraising event hosted by Mrs. Nelson’s Toy and Book Shop. Enjoy an evening of fun, food and entertainment. Proceeds of sales benefit Sycamore’s library. 6 to 8 p.m. at Mrs. Nelson’s, 1030 Bonita Ave., La Verne. Additionally, Eddies New York Pizzeria (1065 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont) will donate 10 percent of its sales from March 22 through 28 to the Sycamore School Library—make sure to mention the Sycamore Library fundraiser.

COLLEGES TOUR Visit the Claremont Colleges with a Claremont Heritage guide. The tour begins at 9:30 a.m. in front of Seaver House, located at 305 N. College Ave., Claremont. The walking tour includes a 2-and-a-half hour tour of the history, architecture and people of this unique academic community of associated colleges. Emphasis is on the 2 oldest schools, Pomona College and Scripps College for Women. The tour also includes Claremont Graduate School, Claremont McKenna College, Harvey Mudd College and Pitzer College. The event will be canceled if raining at 8 a.m. The tour is $8 per person. ORIGAMI Learn about origami, watch a demonstration and make simple models. Linda Adams has been doing origami since the age of 12 and teaching the paperfolding technique for the last 15 years. Space is limited to 20 guests. The class is for ages 12 to 18. Sign up at the adult information desk. Free program sponsored by Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 to 3 p.m. Claremont Library Meeting Room, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.

POETRY READING with Jericho Brown and Maurya Simon. Hosted by The Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902. CONCERT Sébastien Vallée conducts the Mountainside Master Chorale in a performance featuring Morten Lauridsens’ “Lux Aeterna” and Theodore Dubois’ “The Last Seven Words of Christ.” 4 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults or $15 for seniors and students. Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont.

March Monday

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GOOGLE Library workshop, “Harnessing the Power of Google Scholar.” Learn tricks for basic search and advanced search strategies using both Google Scholar and Google Books. Get the most out of your research. Noon to 1 p.m. Honnold/Mudd Library, 800 Dartmouth Ave., Claremont. 607-4352.

GENEALOGY University Club members Bob Smith, Celeste Palmer, Bill Waggener and Anne Sonner will discuss how they discovered ancestors who did remarkable things during various periods in American history. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $6. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. CLUB ASSEMBLY An interactive opportunity for Claremont Senior Computer Club members to identify their needs and wants about future programs, education, workshops and other activities. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488. LECTURE “Lifespan of a Singing Society or Talk About Holding a Note.” Six Nations Women Singing Society performs. This event is part of
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

March Thursday

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the Humanities Institute’s spring series. 7:30 p.m. Scripps College Performing Arts Center, Garrison Theater, 231 E. Tenth St., Claremont. WINDS & WHIMSY Violinist Cindy Fan will open the concert with “Zigeunerweisen” (Gypsy Airs) by Sarasate and Elgar’s “Salut d’Amour,” accompanied at the piano by Jane Chen. Clarinetists Donald Blaskick and James Lytthans will perform a special arrangement for 2. The concluding number will be “Il Convegno” (The Meeting) by Ponchielli. Free admission. A free-will offering will be collected to benefit the John Walker Competition. 7:30 p.m. Claremont United Methodist Church, 211 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont.

March Wednesday

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LENTEN CONCERT SERIES Scott Anderson, a Claremont Graduate University doctorial candidate, performs on the organ. Music includes works by Mendelssohn, Frescobaldi and Trio Sonata #4 by J.S. Bach, Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C Major. 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont.

LECTURE “From Parchment to Cyberspace or Putting the Cogito into Digital Humanities.” Stephen G. Nichols of Johns Hopkins University is one of the most distinguished medievalists in the world, most notably the author of Romanesque Signs: Early Medieval Narrative and Iconography and co-editor of The New Medievalism. He has devoted much of his time since 1996 to issues of digital editions of medieval manuscripts and, more generally, to the question of the future of the book and knowledge in the digital age. 4:15 p.m. Pomona College’s Hahn 101, located at 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. THEATER FOR YOUNG AUDIENCES A collaboration of the Pomona College Department of Theatre and Dance and Fremont Middle School, Pomona College theater arts students explore theatrical styles with middle school students to create a piece based upon works of literary and cultural significance. 7:30 p.m. Pomona College’s Seaver Theatre, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 621-8186.

China for the past 3-and-a-half years and has accumulated many stories to share. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Buddhamouse Emporium, 134 Yale Ave., Claremont.

March Saturday

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PANCAKE BREAKFAST Hosted by the Kiwanis Club of Claremont. Proceeds benefit community programs like Shoes That Fit and Read Me and help fund school grants. 7 to 11 a.m. at Memorial Park on Indian Hill. NANO DAYS Celebrate NanoDays 2013 at the Claremont Public Library with students and faculty of the Pomona College Department of Physics and Astronomy, lead by their department head, Professor David Tanenbaum. NanoDays is a nation-

wide festival of educational programs about nanoscale science and engineering. Visitors will explore how 3D images are made, investigate new nano products and materials. There will be a special story time reading of Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who. 1 to 3 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont. 621-4902..
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Phone: 621-4761. Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

March Friday

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AUTHOR READING AND SIGNING Anthony Garcia has lived in

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Life’s “ruff,” party accordingly

by J&J, “Claremont After Hours” COURIER blog

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he sixth stop on this year’s Claremont Community Foundation Party Parade was one to remember!

Arriving at the beautiful Padua Hills Theatre, we were dazzled by the spectacular panoramic Claremont views. Strings of twinkling lights and lanterns in the trees added a whimsical vibe to the venue. Stuffed leather dog mannequins lent by Petco and elaborate dog topiaries lent by the LA County Fair stood watch from various locations. Tables were covered in houndstooth fabrics and all of the helpers wore hats of the same -themed material. From the food to the entertainment, the overwhelming theme was dogs! We first made our way to the silent auction table where many Claremont artists including Laura Barnes, Amanda Huynh and others showed their generosity and love for pooches by donating dog-themed art. We then indulged in the amazing spread of tasty treats. Food for the event was donated by local eateries including Applebee’s, Casa de Salsa, Darvish Restaurant, Delhi Palace, Eureka!, Spaggies, Espiaus, The Press and more. Most of the food was served on dog Frisbees and, later in the evening, large dog bowls were handed out for an ice cream social. In addition to the delicious food inside the Padua Hills Theatre, The

puppy ears to wear. Her sister quickly saved her with another dollar donation, making her incarceration far shorter than we had hoped for. As we were leaving the pound, we ran into Liisa Primack, the chairman and coordinator for the night’s festivities. Ms. Primack was dressed in full doggy attire, sporting a Labrador skirt instead of the classic Poodle skirt because she and her family raise Labrador seeing-eye dogs. So who better than this dog-lover to create an entire night dedicated to canines? Ms. Primack explained that the inspiration for the event came from a desire to celebrate local Claremont culture. Securing the Claremont band The Dogs was the jumping-off point, Ms. Primack noted, COURIER photo/Jenelle Rensch and the idea grew from there. Claremont realtors Charlene Bolton and her husband Mike McKenzie dance the night This event included all of our favorite away to the music of The Dogs at the Party Parade event “The Pound at Padua” last Fri- things: food, booze, great music and, not day. See more photos and read about the eveningʼs festivities on the COURIERʼs blog, to mention, a good cause. One hundred Claremont After Hours. Click the link on our homepage at www.claremont-courier.com. percent of the proceeds raised from the event will Greasy Weiner food truck was only a Paul Steffen, owner go to the Claremont Comshort walk out to the parking lot. The of Wheeler Steffen munity Foundation, an owner of the food truck, Adam Sotheby’s International organization that donates Dragotta, was serving up some seri- Real Estate, alongside funds to support art and ously hard-core hot dogs, including a Claremonter Andy Priphilanthropy in Claremont. bacon-wrapped dog with mayonnaise! mack, served as barEverything from the art to Extra food was donated to Cross- tender for the evening, the food and location were roads, an organization providing hous- pouring a selection of CLAREMONT donated and, with more ing, education and counseling to women tasty beers on tap, inAFTER HOURS than 250 tickets sold, who have been incarcerated. The left- cluding brews from Claremont and the CCF over dog bowls and Frisbees were do- Claremont Craft Ales. will reap the rewards of Ms. Primack’s nated to the Guide Dogs of America. Our editor Kathryn Dunn and her sisand the committee’s hard work. We had ter Lisa Schlick accompanied us on our a great time and left the party feeling Party Parade escapade. When we caught tired, full and happy. wind that no one had been in the “dog We’re done with this puppy—on to pound,” we couldn’t think of a better the next! person to christen it than our own boss. —Jenelle Rensch & Jessica Gustin For a dollar, we had our editor captured claremontafterhours@gmail.com on a leash by Rosie Bister, Oakmont El[Editor’s note: Claremont After Hours is a new ementary School office manager and COURIER blog focusing on Claremont’s nightlife. head of the event’s dog pound commit- Click “Claremont After Hours” on the lower left side tee. Whistles were blowing as Kathryn of our our homepage, www.claremont-courier.com. was thrown into a dog kennel and given See page 23 for more Party Parade information.]

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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Party Parade remaining events listing
he Claremont Community Foundation (CCF) invites residents to their 17th annual Party Parade, a series of events hosted by community members and local businesses to raise money for the many programs and endeavors supported by the CCF. To purchase tickets to any of the following events, visit www.claremontfoundation.org. Organizers recommend making reservations early—several events have already sold out. To join “the best non-party in town,” opt for Party Parade event #17, Do Your Own Thing, which allows guests to donate to CCF without having to attend an event. # 10 Bunco Central Win prizes and enjoy chef-prepared appetizers at Claremont Place in an evening of this popular, mindless dice game.Friday, March 22 at 7 p.m. Bunco Central at Claremont Place Senior Living, 120 W. San Jose Ave., Claremont. $35 per person (40 guests). Hosts: Claremont Place Senior Living—Judith Jones, Sonja Stump Photography— Sonja Stump and Bob Fagg. #11 Dom’s Speakeasy Our very own 1920s-style illicit nightclub with PROHIBITED libations and decadent morsels. Vocalist Tony Di Gerlando will provide mood

T

music from a bygone era. Friday, March 22 at 7:30 p.m. Dom’s Lounge, Smith Campus Center (lower level, southeast end), Pomona College, 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. $65 per person (60 guests). Hosts: Annie and Mike Alpert, Suzanne Hall and Ken Corhan, Vicki Hardy and Richard Chute, Victoria and Jack Greening, Kristen and Steve Hagstrom, Janell and Randall Lewis, Tracey and Spike Meury, Michelle and Jim Mitchell, Don Pattison, Liisa and Andy Primack, Marion and Jess Swick, Kathy and Ray Woodbury. With thanks to Pomona College, Wine Warehouse and Spike Meury. # 12 MAHJ! Bring your current American Mah Jongg card and come play, laugh, snack, win unique prizes and experience the thrill of yelling “MAHJ!” Saturday, March 23 from 1 to 4 p.m. 1207 Berkeley Ave., Claremont $40 per person (9 or 10 guests) Host: Tammy Zipser. # 14 From Dirt To Dinner Tour our Urban Farms then enjoy a collaborative feast of “Home Grown and Local” bounty. Sunday, March 24 from 1 to 6 p.m. Kidwell home. 335 Alamosa Dr., Claremont. $45 per person (30 guests). Hosts: Kelly and Cristy Kidwell, Sung and Myra Sohn,

Pitzer Grove House—Zenia Gutierrez, Danielle and Campbell Wright. Contributors/helpers: Ron Mittino, Nancy Auerbach, Doug and Judy McGoon, Liisa Primack. # 15 Mutts & Margaritas Party with your pooch at a Fiesta in the Zoom Room; a playground for your pet and delicious fare including margaritas by Casa de Salsa for you. Friday, March 29 from 5 to 7 p.m. Zoom Room, Old School House, 405 W. Foothill Blvd. #204, Claremont. $15 per person or canine (15 dogs). Don’t forget to list each guest and each canine when you reserve. Hosts: Francine and Bill Baker, Suzanne Hall and Ken Corhan, Kristen and Steve Hagstrom, Angela Sousa. # 16 Souper Supper X Sample sumptuous soups and delectable Bear Claw Bread Pudding at a beautiful setting. Good cooks and good company! Friday, March 29 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Home of Dr. Gerald and Barbara Friedman. 4003 Via Padova, Claremont. $50 per person (75 guests) Hosts: Rosemary and Butch Henderson, Liisa and Andrew Primack. Guest chefs: Francine Baker, Nickie Cleaves, Suzanne Wojcik, Kay Held, Carol Levey, Rosie Bister, Teddie Warner, Marilyn Bidwell, Cindy Denne Radici,

Lola Taylor and Bill McAlister, Velma McKelvey and Janet Vandevender. #17 Do Your Own Thing Okay, so you’ve got another wonderful idea about how to spend some quality time and help your community. Perhaps you’d love to stay home for a change, curl up with a good book, eat some ice cream straight from the carton, play “Angry Birds,” have a family game night, watch your favorite movie, listen to some soothing tunes and go to bed early. Maybe you’ve been planning to invite some old friends or new neighbors over to your place for a special dinner you’ve dreamed up. You can’t use scheduling conflicts, dietary restrictions or budget limitations as an excuse to miss this party. Just do your own thing alone or with family and friends and forward your party donation to the Claremont Community Foundation. Know that your contribution is helping your community. Feels good, doesn’t it? Date: Check your calendar for an open spot! Time: At your convenience. Where: Your choice. Price: You name it. Just for you or include as many friends and family as you wish! Host: You. For more information, call 398-1060 or visit www.claremontfoundation.org.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through April 27: Two mid-career women artists from the Inland Empire are featured this month at 57 Underground. Mary Hughes has exhibited all over the region, establishing herself as a painter of darkened and elusive dreamscapes, in which forms appear and disappear from behind seemingly arbitrary and random patterns of paint, and recognizable objects move from background to foreground, depending on the viewer’s focus. Yi-li Chin Ward has had a career notable for her consistent and persistent interpretations of the female form. Ms. Chin’s paintings are economical of line, and seem not at all that particular. Yet, if one spends the time with them, one sees that they are very particular, and very specific about thought and emotion. Closing reception: Saturday, April 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. Art walk: March 30; April 13 and 27 from 5 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through May 5: “Friendship Forged in Fire: British Ceramics in America,” featuring British pottery in a thematic and chronological order, from the industrial potteries of the Victorian era, to the Arts and Crafts movement, to the traditionalist approach of Bernard Leach and his followers. Modern ceramic artists will be represented by the works of Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth. The largest segment of the exhibition will display contemporary innovations of “post-modern” ceramic art being created in Great Britain today. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 626-3322. —Through March 31: “Partnering” tells of the relationship of individuals with each other. Also included are collages, prints and a number of constructions made from antiques and found items. Jan Wheatcroft exhibits tapestry weavings, woven from handspun and naturally dyed wools and silks, and depicts a rat who meditates, partners who dance, a circus goat that balances on a high wire and a cat who flies across the sun on the back of a bird. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through, March 31: The Claremont COURIER is featured at The Colony for the month of March as they celebrate the kick-off of their weekly edition. Participants in The Colony this month include stained glass/mosaics by Jenifer Hall, watercolors by Arwen Allen, photography by Vicki, limited edition prints by Melody Grace Cave, photography by Barbara Sammons, plus a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. —Saturday, March 23: “Terms of Serv-

GALLERIES

ice.” Transform literary terms like anaphora, euphony and dissonance from abstractions into powerful tools. 1 to 2 p.m. $10. Free open forum from 2 to 3 p.m. —Tuesday, March 26: Workout belly dance class with Jacki Torres of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, March 27: Folkloric belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —April 5 through 27: The Colony celebrates Earth Day this month with featured artist Sumi Foley, who utilizes recycled kimono fabrics. —Saturday, April 12: “MadMod Social.” Indulge in an evening in the 1960s, featuring oldies music plus retro-inspired food and drink. Catering provided by Euro Café. Dress in ‘60s cocktail attire— RD Foto Studio will be on site for portraits. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Tickets are only available at The Colony at Loft 204. For more information, email info@loft204.com. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through April 12: “Found in Translation,” an investigation into the role of technology as a catalyst for human connectivity featuring Charles Long. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 624-0548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. —Sunday, March 24: Opening reception from 3 to 6 p.m. Internationally recognized watercolor painter, author and twice president of the National Watercolor Society, Gerald Brommer. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Through March 29: Student work, grades 7 through 12. —April 11 through 28: 32nd annual Open Juried Show. Art take-in: Saturday, April 6 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening reception: Saturday, April 13 from 6 to 9 p.m. Awards reception: Sunday, April 28 from 2 to 4 p.m. LATINO ART MUSEUM: 281 S. Thomas St. Suite 105, Pomona. www.lamoa.net. 620-6009 or 484-2618. —Through March 30: Ninth Women International Exhibition. —April 5 through 27: Solo exhibit featuring Oscar Londoño. MAIN STREET GALLERY: 252C S. Main St., Pomona. 868-2979. —Through March 30: “Mind In Transition: The Art of Yi Kai,” featuring paintings from the artist’s Tibetan travels resulting in a personal comparison of the spiritual and material values between the east and west. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@malooffoun dation.org or www.malooffoundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on

Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, advance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features droughttolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. NICHOLS GALLERY: First floor of the Broad Center on Pitzer College campus. Tuesday through Friday, 12 to 5 p.m. or by appointment throughout the year. 607-8797. —Through March 22: “Martha Wilson,” an independent traveling exhibition. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —March 24 through 29: “There Be Dragons,” MFA Thesis Show by Jacqueline Bell Johnson. Soft opening: Sunday, March 24 from noon to 5 p.m. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —March 24 through 29: “Reticent Doodle” MFA Thesis Exhibition by Matthew Hillseth. Soft opening: Sunday, March 24 from noon to 5 p.m. Opening reception: Tuesday, March 26 from 6 to 9 p.m. East Gallery. PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Thursday through Sunday. Visit www.permadirty.org. —Through May 3: “Intertwine Originals,” an exhibition celebrating 7 emerging artists who got their start in the Inland Empire and Chaffey College community. The artists exhibiting are some of the original resident artists of PermaDirty Project Space and intertwined in many different ways with each other and PermaDirty since it opened one year ago. —Saturday, March 23: “Introduction to Buddhism.” Learn about the different styles of Buddhism and discuss its origins beginning with Siddhartha Gautama, the man himself, and moving to the Four Noble Truths and the Eight Fold Path. The session concludes with meditation. Light snacks and refreshments will be provided. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. $50. RSVP required. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —Through March 24: “Fabulous Fauna: Mythical Beasts from around the Globe.” Mermaids, dragons, griffins, phoenixes, fu dogs and more. This exhibit will also give the public a rare look at some of the amazing imperial Chinese dragon robes in the museum’s collection. —April 20 through July 28: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” Opening reception: Saturday, April 20. Enjoy an all-day event featuring music, dance, food and crafts from the region.

POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 330 N. College Ave. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Admission info: 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum. —Through April 14: “Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice” unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. —Through April 14: “Project Series 45, Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove” consists of a new suite of 4 paintings and 4 drawings based on Akira Kurosawa’s film Rashomon (1950). —Through April 14: “Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection” showcases American artists of the 20th and 21st centuries who have made their art work an integral part of their political activism. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 6258767 or www.rsabg.org. —Saturday, March 23: Spring open house and free admission for all visitors. —March 30 through 31: Annual Wildflower Festival. Experience Fay’s Wildflower Meadow flowers and enjoy an extensive indoor exhibition of California wildflowers. Learn about projects underway by Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden scientists to document the rich flora of Southern California. Exhibit is included in garden admission. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. —Monday, April 1: Wildflower Festival Senior Free Admission Day for guests over 65 years old. Includes refreshments, walking and tram tours. —Through June 9: “Where They Grow Wild,” an exclusive display of original artworks from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s archival collections, complementing the “When they were Wild” collaborative exhibition with the Huntington and the Theodore Payne Foundation. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scrippscollege.edu/wil liamson-gallery/. —Through April 7: “Denatured Nature,” Scripps College Ceramic Annual—the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through March 30: “Embracing the Cross,” paintings by featured artist Fr. Bill Moore. Closing reception: March 30 from 6 to 9 p.m.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: Oz the Great and Powerful [PG], Emperor [PG13], Incredible Burt Wonderstone [PG13], Bless Me, Ultima [PG13], Dead Man Down [R], Stoker [R], Great Expectations [NR]. —March 24 at 10 a.m. and 26 at 7:30 p.m.: Tosca [NR] from London’s Royal Opera House. Italian with English subtitles. —Thursday, March 28: Jesus Christ Superstar [G]. Fourty years after its first release in 1973, this modern passion play re-imagined into the magnetic Broadway musical by Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber (with lyrics by Tim Rice) and immortalized into film by writer/director Norman Jewison, will be on Laemmle Theatre big screens for one night only, Thursday, March 28 at 7:30 p.m. Set during the week leading up to the crucifixion of Jesus, the film uniquely explores the unasked question: Why did Judas betray Jesus? The film Jesus Christ Superstar travels the terrain of the seduction and challenges of destiny, celebrity, friendship, fear, love, passion and our notions of success and failure. Both Ted Neely who

portrayed Jesus and Carl Anderson who portrayed Judas (in the film as well as on Broadway) were both nominated for Golden Globe Awards for the searing insights they give into the heart and soul of these biblical figures. Released as a single in January 1971, “Superstar” made it to the top 15. A month later, Helen Reddy’s version of “I Don’t Know How To Love Him”—her first hit single—also reached the top 15. The recording of the same song from the original show album released as a single in April 1971, also made the top 30. The album spent close to 2 years on the charts, including 3 weeks at number one in 1971. Other number one albums that year included John Lennon’s “Imagine,” George Harrison’s “All Things Must Pass,” Janis Joplin’s “Pearl,” Carole King’s “Tapestry,” “Sticky Fingers” by The Rolling Stones, and “Four Way Street” by Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.All proceeds of the screening will benefit the Carl Anderson Memorial Scholarship Fund. See www.AgapeLive.com and www.Laemmle.com for tickets. The late Carl Anderson is best known for his celebrated star performance as Judas in Jesus Christ, Superstar on Broadway, in the motion picture and on stages across the country while on tour. His role as the preacher in The Color Purple, his Emmy for Onstage LA, and performances with a host of outstanding artists including Nancy Wilson at Carnegie Hall, are also highlights in the life of this creative artist and openhearted man. Founded in 2004, Agape’s Carl Anderson Memorial Scholarship Fund was established to support students pursuing careers in the arts and now assists all Agape students seeking higher education.

ART WALK
Claremont Galleries:

Email art walk listing submissions to calendar@claremont-courier.com for first Friday publication by Thursday, March 28 at 5 p.m.
specifics about their artists being displayed and the unique activities that will take place during each art walk. Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine art. The Claremont COURIER Calendar publishes a walking tour map on the first Friday of the month for the convienence of our readers. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs participating galleries.

Do you participate in the First Friday Art Walk from 6 and 9 p.m.? Participate in our new art walk map. Those included must be a legitimate art gallery with a business license, located in the Claremont Village and open during the art walk. Send a press release to calendar@claremont-courier.com or mail 1420 N. Claremont Blvd. Ste., 205B, Claremont to identify your gallery as participating in the art walk with your special event information. In order to remain on the map, galleries must update their event information each month with

Next art walk: Friday, April 5

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

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PERFORMING ARTS
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 607-4375. —April 11 through 14: Krunk Fu Battle Battle directed by Joyce Lu. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, April 5: Friday Noon Concert featuring Danielle Ondarza (horn), Stephen Klein (tuba), Maria Perez Goodman (piano) and Jason Goodman (percussion). 12:15 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bri dges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —April 20 and 21: Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella is an enchanting version of the classic story featuring music of the famous waltz king, Johann Strauss. $29 to $39 with discounts for seniors and children. Two performances on Saturday, April 20 at 1 and 7 p.m. and one performance on Sunday, April 21 at 1 p.m. —Sunday, May 12: Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher, called “one of the establishment’s most entertaining critics” by The New York Times, will perform at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium presented by AEG LIVE. Mr. Maher, who has garnered 23 Emmy nominations over 18 years, is the host of HBO’s television series Real Time, which features Maher’s funny, sociopolitical commentary and a roundtable of guests, including Ari-

anna Huffington, Ben Affleck, Michael Moore and Robin Williams, among numerous others. He has described himself as a libertarian and “as a progressive, as a sane person.” Maher’s 2008 film Religulous (directed by Larry David), a satirical skewer of organized religion, is the seventh highest grossing documentary of all time. He is formerly the host of the Comedy Central and ABC late night talk show Politically Incorrect. Maher has written 4 bestsellers, most recently The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass (2012), Does Anybody Have a Problem with That? Politically Incorrect’s Greatest Hits (2010) and New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer (2005). His most recent HBO stand-up special was Bill Maher: But I’m Not Wrong (2010). Mr. Maher is a frequent commentator on CNN, MSNBC and HLN cable networks. Tickets cost $50.25 and $70.25, with additional online fees. Performance begins at 8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.pomona.edu/bridges or calling 607-1139. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, March 23: Claremont Young Musicians Orchestra presents “A Concert for Children” featuring music that tells a story with music wizard and maestro Roger Samuel including music by Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Saint-Saens and Copland. Come early to see and hear the instruments up close. Event features audience participation and prizes. 10:30 a.m. Admission is free. For information call 624-3614.
Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #203

—Saturday, April 6: West African Music and Dance presented by the CalArts African Music and Dance Ensemble directed by Yeko Ladzekpo-Cole and Andrew Grueschow. The performance features traditional repertoire from the Ewe and Dagomba people of Ghana, Togo and Benin, West Africa. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through March 24: The Sound of Music. —March 29 through May 5: Sweet Charity. GARRISON THEATER: 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Scripps College Performing Arts Center. 607-2634 or visit www.scrippscollege.edu. —Saturday, March 23: The Claremont Chorale performs works by Joseph Haydn. Contact 542-8340 or info@claremontchorale.org for ticket information. 3 p.m. —Thursday, April 11: The Rembrandt Club gather to view “From Ballet to Bollywood: Scripps Dance Concert Preview” with new choreography developed by Scripps dance majors, minors and faculty. A tea and coffee will follow in Lee Pattison Court, adjacent to Garrison Theater. —Friday, April 12 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 13 at 2 and 8 p.m.: “Scripps Dances,” Scripps College Dance Department’s annual spring concert of original dance works choreographed by students and faculty. $10 general admisAcross
1. Major focus for Claremont city 6. A degree 9. Annual sale of local artists' work 13. _____ Hills, California city 14. Star turn 16. ____ friendly 17. V.I.P. 18. Sarcastic remarks 19. Plumber's concern 20. Laudatory lines 21. "Clever" individual to a Brit. 24. Schoolbag item 26. Animal with an attitude 27. Piled up 29. In the know 31. Pulpit

sion or $5 for faculty, staff and seniors. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-9411 or www.haughpac.com. —Saturday, March 23: American Family Theater presents Beauty and the Beast. $6. 1:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. —Sunday, March 24: Cinema Toast starring New York vocalists Scott Coulter, Jessica Hendy and Lee Lessack, who perform Hollywood classics from The Wizard of Oz’s “Over the Rainbow” to Breakfast at Tiffany’s “Moon River.” $13 to $26. 2 p.m. —Saturday, March 30: “I’m Old Fashioned” starring Emmy and Tony award winning actor Hal Linden. $26 to $28. 8 p.m. —April 12 through 14: Legally Blonde: The Musical presented by Citrus Musical Theatre Workshop. $18 to $20. LYMAN HALL: Thatcher Music Building, 340 N. College Ave., Claremont. —Saturday, March 30: Junior recital featuring Albert Chang on violin and Roger Sheu on piano. Music will include works by Bach, Brahms, Messiaen, Ravel, Rachmaninoff and Takemitsu. 8 p.m. 607-2671. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —May 2 through 5: Pomona College Spring Dance Concert with artistic direction by Laurie Cameron. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
63. AD part 64. Lose steam 65. Turn topsy-turvy 66. Cold war initials 67. Work with a shuttle 68. Exams

COURIER CROSSWORD

32. Brass that looks like gold 34. Tooth supporter 37. Furnaces 39. Shoot the breeze 40. Trash hauler 42. Dined 43. Maniacal 46. Misses 47. Lush 48. Perfect place 50. German mistress 52. Used to express disgust 53. Unproductively 56. Annoyance 59. Racetrack fence 60. Old associates 61. Like Cheerios

Down
1. Brazo river city 2. Matured 3. So-so 4. "___ Time transfigured me": Yeats 5. Mob 6. Lowest point 7. H.S. class 8. Winning, card for example 9. Affluent city-dweller 10. From the East 11. Duplicate 12. Journey 15. Stellar 22. Get a makeover 23. Bush 25. Fairy tale's second word 27. Maori war dance 28. Send 29. Dazzle 30. Came alive 33. Scandinavian rugs 34. They are used in pencils 35. Tropical fruit 36. A land formation 38. Boy or Girl follower 41. Full of excitement 44. Small channel 45. Binary 47. Popeye, e.g.
49. Compete for the cheer leading team

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #202

50. Fibrous foods 51. Archaeological site 52. Plus 53. Munich missus 54. Stage direction 55. Antitoxins 57. 1996 Broadway musical 58. Extremities 62. Tarzan's buddy

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

27

Students brush up on creative side with ARToon

S

tudents at El Roble Intermediate School have found a new way of expressing their opinions through the Claremont Museum of Art course, ARToon, celebrating the comic art style.

For the past 7 weeks, students have been meeting after school to learn and create their own pieces of work to be put on display today, March 22. “I want them to feel the sense of accomplishment of seeing it through to the end,” said Wendy Kubiak, El Roble art teacher said. “This is the thing that is really great, they are taking part in a show that is bigger than just the stuff they do in class.” The original idea for ARToon came forward after program director Lori Lama noticed a project had not been hosted for the middle school age since a 2009 Graffiti project. Ms. Lama emailed El Roble to see if there was an interest in having the project and got funding from Curtis Real Estate, Peggy A. Carlson, Wealthcare Capital Management, Inc., and Gould Asset Management, LLC. The contributions bought newsprint paper, 20 x 30 inch sized art boards and special cartooning markers for the students to use. “Could we have done this more cheaply? Yeah, maybe, but it is like asking an oil painter to paint with house paint,” Ms. Lama said. “Yes, you can paint with house paint, but it doesn’t yield the same thing.” After meeting with Ms. Kubiak and

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff El Roble 7th grade student Cuatli Kimbwala works on his final cartoon in preparation for the ARToon exhibition on March 22.

discussing what they expected from the project, they went forward with inviting artists to the campus to share their background with cartooning. “It’s almost like a mentoring project, you want to give them an experience that allows them to really step outside of their life into somebody else’s shoes and in this instance they were stepping into a cartoonist’s shoes,” Ms. Lama said. The course started with presentations by artists to help get ideas flowing. High School students from the ARTstART program did research on comic strip art going back to the 1800s to share the history of the art form. From there, Lalo Alcaraz, Anne Cleaves and Javier Hernandez each

came in to present their work and how they generate story ideas. They were selected to make presentations to the group about different aspects of being a cartoonist. Using either an interactive activity or a slideshow, different styles from single-panel to multi-panel comics were given and built in class as examples for the students to base their own work. One of these interactive projects was a story builder exercise in which the students came up with ideas and built the story of a lollypop boy and his dog, Gumdrop, being trapped inside a piñata. “The story was really cute,” Ms. Kubiak said. “The whole thing was class generated and was really useful to them,”

Eighth grader Alex Moreno did a colorful, multi-panel comic strip that shared his opinion on how the United States does not contribute anything but bad television to the rest of the world. “The media just is really stupid,” Alex said. “The opinion I have might be what someone in Australia or France thinks of what America has contributed too.” The student work ranged from opinion pieces to sharing a story the students developed all on their own. Another eighth grader, Naya DyarPlace, used a one panel-style to illustrate a cover to a story she has been working on for nearly a year. Her character, Iris, is out to avenge her family after they die in a fire. The image shows a young woman gripping a heart shaped pendant by its chain and letting it dangle as she stares straight with blank eyes. “Maybe someone in here will end up being the next Picasso for a future generation or maybe they will decide to go to art school, who knows.” Ms. Lama said. “It broadens their horizons and lets them know that there are more than their phones, Facebook, and Twitter.” The student’s artwork will be on display in the multipurpose room at El Roble Intermediate School at 6 p.m. tonight. The event is free and open to the public.
—Christina Burton
[Editor’s note: Christina Burton is a senior at the University of La Verne where she is book editor for the college’s newspaper The Campus Times. Ms. Burton previously served as editor-in-chief, managing editor and arts editor. She will graduate in May with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. This is her first assignment as an editorial intern at the COURIER. —KD]

NIGHTLIFE
THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Through March 30: The Friends of the Bernard Biological Field Station (FBBFS) are having their annual silent auction of works by local artists during the month of March. Ceramics, glass, paintings, jewelry, textiles, and more are up for bid. Items can be seen in the window of the Folk Music Center. Bids can be left any day except Mondays from now through March 30. FBBFS is a non-profit organization dedicated to education and the environment. —Saturday, April 20: The Dustbowl Revival is a Venice, California-based roots collective that merges old school bluegrass, gospel, jug band, swamp blues and hot swing of the 1930s. Performance at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $10. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —March 22 and 23: Peter Berman has been seen on Comedy Central Presents, CBS’ The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson and the Montreal Comedy Festival. Katsy Chappell hosts the event and Picard Maneuver and Shaman Johal will also be featured. —March 29 and 30: KT Tatara’s comedy is sometimes brutally honest and provides unique insight into timeless topics such as gender roles and race. He has per-

formed across the country and is one of the most requested comedians on the college circuit. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. —Friday, April 19: Bullet for my Valentine. —Thursday, April 25: Crystal Castles. THE GLASS HOUSE: 200 W. Second St., Pomona. 865-3802. —Friday, March 22: Breakthru presents Artist vs. Poet featuring This Century, More Amor, Madison, Marie and Mackenzie Paige, Highway, Savannah Van Band and Dare to Dream. $12 to $14. 6 p.m. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, March 22: Nutty (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 23: Big Papa and the TCB album release party featuring special guests (swing). $5 cover charge. —Sunday, March 24: Amanda Castro (bossa nova/jazz). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, March 26: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, March 27: Open Jam Night Dave Weaver and the Specials (jazz). 8 p.m. —Thursday, March 28: Coleslaw at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, March 29: Hobo Jazz (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, March 30: Rumble King (rock ‘n roll). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2

a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, March 22: Tremoloco (Mexican-Americana roots). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 23: The Claremont Voodoo Society (blues). 10 p.m. —Tuesday, March 26: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, March 27: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, March 28: The Amy Rowe Trio (jazz). 9 p.m. —Friday, March 29: Bill & Cristi (American songbook). 10 p.m. —Saturday, March 30: Former Friends of Young Americans (indie). 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 5474266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. 767-2255. —Fridays: Gypsy Kings Style Spanish Guitar. Enjoy the authentic sounds of Kimera during your dinner/appetizers and drinks in the VIP lounge. 7 to 10 p.m.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

28

Singles play makes the difference in CHS tennis win

T

he “Ides of March” provided a warm, sunny day for boys tennis. The Wolfpack took on the Palm Springs Indians in a final tuneup match before league play. Claremont took all but one singles match to win a close one, 10-8.

Claremont came into the season with high expectations following a solid 2012 campaign, during which the Wolfpack were ousted in the second round of CIF. Against the Indians on Friday, the Leahy brothers, Alan and Andrew, led the Wolfpack. Cameron Lorek slotted into the 3rd seed in Claremont’s singles lineup. Chaska Yamane provided cover as the alternate for the match. The doubles pairings have been questionable in the last few matches for Claremont, and coach Clint Rees has experimented with his players to find the optimal duo: “We lost too many doubles sets in our last match against Troy, so we are still trying to get some experience and continuity there,” he said. Rees put Nathan Morgan and Damion Rodgers at the third seed, then put Alex Zhang and Naveen Mohideen at #1, and Henry Diep and Rish Citre at #2. Rees commented on what seemed to be a disorganized lineup. “I can’t say right now which is our best pairing. Since it is still preseason, I mixed it up a little bit today to figure out which of my guys have the best chemistry on the court.” Senior Alan Leahy began the day against Palm Springs’ #1 seed PJ Keye. After going up 5-1, he allowed Keye 2 games before sealing the set, 6-3. The shock on his teammates’ faces was apparent, as they wondered aloud how Leahy managed to allow his opponent to get on the scoreboard for the first time all season. Leahy bounced back to win his next 2 sets 6-0, 6-0 against Palm Springs #2 Andrew Nelson, and 3rd-seeded Shahriar Seyed-Emami. Andrew Leahy bested his brother by only allowing a combined one game to his 3 opponents. Freshman Leahy defeated Nelson 6-1, then 6-0 and 6-0. Junior Cameron Lorek was the only Wolfpack singles player to drop a set on the day. Lorek won 6-0 against Seyed-Emami, then 6-2 against Nelson. He then faced Keye, who fought back to 5-5, then won the final 2 games of the set to win, 7-5. Claremont doubles partners Morgan and Rodgers had a strong day. Morgan/Rodgers defeated #3 Indians pairing Jake Stebbins/Jon Frayon in a marathon set, 6-4. They then sealed Claremont’s tenth and winning set against the Indians’ Sigi Gonzalez/Jared Bongcaras. The rest of Claremont’s matches were a formality, as Claremont had enough to win by the second round of sets. Palm Springs’ top doubles team Gil Capistrano and Brandon Reese won all of their sets to provide consolation. The Wolfpack’s schedule will likely be easier from now on, as coach Rees made a point of securing early season matches against difficult teams to prepare for another Sierra League title. “Our league matches are usually not as tough as our preseason, so it should get easier for us. We have one guy who is out for a little longer, Konrad [Lorek], and Harsh [Rambhatla] who is also not here today.” The Wolfpack travels to South Hills on Tuesday to begin league play. Check out Friday’s COURIER for an update on that match.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High Schoolʼs number-one doubles player Naveen Mohideen returns a shot during boys varsity non-conference play Friday at CHS. AT LEFT: Claremont High Schoolʼs new varsity boys tennis coach Clint Rees talks with freshman player Andrew Leahy during the Packʼs match against Palm Springs at CHS. Claremont defeated Palm Springs, 10-8, largely on the strength of their singles play.

SPORTS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

29

Girls track and field shines at relays
CHS
BASEBALL Wolfpack baseball dropped the first league game of the season, a 6-2 loss to South Hills. Claremont then rode a 10run first inning to beat Arlington, 21-3. Finally, on Tuesday the Pack travelled to Damien for their second league game. After putting up 2 runs, Claremont eventually lost the game 10-4. The Wolfpack will travel to Charter Oak on Tuesday, March 26 at 3:30 p.m. for another tough Sierra League encounter. TRACK AND FIELD Claremont track and field raced in the Nicholson Relays last Saturday. The girls team performed extremely well, placing in 14 events and winning the small schools team championship. The boys team also put in a strong showing, placing in 8 events. The Relays provided a tune-up for the Pack, who will compete in the California Relays a Cerritos CC this weekend beginning Friday, March 22 at 3 p.m. BOYS GOLF The Wolfpack have begun the season on a tear, most recently defeating Chino Hills and Charter Oak in league matches. Claremont will square off against Hacienda Heights Wilson on Tuesday, March 26 at 3 p.m. at Marshall Canyon CC, the home course. The Wolfpack’s 5th Sierra League match will also be at home against South Hills on Thursday, March 28 at 3 p.m. SWIMMING AND DIVING The Wolfpack swimming and diving team defeated Los Altos for their first team win of the season. Both the boys and girls squads won their respective matches to push Claremont to the victory. Swim and dive will take to the pool again on Wednesday, March 27 at 3:15 p.m., when they take on Damien and St. Lucy’s at Damien. SOFTBALL The Wolfpack finished the Charter Oak Tournament last week. After a disappointing loss to Los Altos, Claremont bounced back to defeat Montebello, 7-4. The Pack has a couple of weeks off, and will feature again on April 9 when they travel to South Hills for their first Sierra League game. BOYS VOLLEYBALL Claremont boys volleyball beat Glendale last week in 3 sets in a non-conference match, then went on to win 5 matches in a row in the Edison Tournament over the weekend. The Wolfpack finally lost to J Serra in the Edison final, 2 sets to none, after defeating Lakewood,

COLLEGE SCOREBOARD

Marina, Mission Viejo, Canyon, and WOMENS LACROSSE Beckman. The Pack face Crescenta Valley at home on Wednesday, March 27 at C-M-S 14, Washington & Jefferson 6 C-M-S 17, Birmingham Southern 4 6 p.m. P-P 20, Puget Sound 14

Webb Schools
The Gauls have enjoyed mixed results to start the spring 2013 sports season. Baseball enjoys a 4-1 record following 5-2 wins over both Rio Hondo and La Verne Lutheran. Coed badminton has come flying out of the blocks with 5 wins and a loss. Boys golf is a scintillating 5-0 after winning by 35 strokes at Flintridge. Track and field is also off to a strong start with the boys team winning one meet and finishing second in their 2 Prep League meets. Girls track and field finished second and fourth in 2 league meets. The other Webb teams need to improve to give themselves a chance at playoffs. Softball is 4-7, having beaten Chadwick 10-9 at home last week. Boys tennis is 2-5 after a loss to Whitney. Boys volleyball is 1-3, and picked up their first home win against Sacred Heart. Swimming and Diving gears up for 4 league meets in a row in the next month.

WOMENS GOLF
C-M-S finishes third out of 21 at Collegiate Invite P-P finishes seventh out of 8 at Augustana Spring Fling

MENS GOLF
Santiago Canyon def. Citrus, 375-405 C-M-S finishes tenth out of 30 at Collegiate Invite

WOMENS TENNIS
C-M-S 7, Dallas (TX) 2 P-P 6, Vassar 3 P-P 5, Case Western 4 Bowdoin 7, P-P 2

MENS TENNIS

C-M-S 9, Case Western 0 C-M-S 9, Kenyon 0 C-M-S 8, Emory 1 Hawaii Pacific 7, C-M-S 2 —Chris Oakley C-M-S 7, Whitman 2 sports@claremont-courier.com P-P 8, Rochester (NY) 1 Bowdoin 6, P-P 3 Swarthmore 6, P-P 3 P-P 6, Skidmore 3 P-P 8, Hardin-Simmons 1 Williams 6, P-P 3

WOMENS WATER POLO
P-P 6, La Verne 2 Azusa Pacific 12, P-P 11 P-P 11, St Francis (NY) 6 P-P 15, Washington & Jefferson 3

WOMENS TRACK AND FIELD
C-M-S 90, Cal Lutheran 73 C-M-S 104, Redlands 59 P-P 78, Occidental 52

MENS TRACK AND FIELD
C-M-S 113, Cal Lutheran 44 C-M-S 99, Redlands 64 P-P 103, Occidental 60

SOFTBALL
Citrus 8, LA Valley 6 LA Valley 2, Citrus 1 Cypress 9, Citrus 1 SD Mesa 5, Citrus 3 Santiago Canyon 9, Citrus 1 Citrus 4, LA Mission 3 C-M-S 9, La Verne 1 C-M-S 8, La Verne 0 C-M-S 7, Occidental 3 C-M-S 15, Occidental 0 P-P 4, Cal Lutheran 3 Cal Lutheran 3, P-P 2 P-P 3, Puget Sound 2 P-P 2, Puget Sound 1

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High Schoolʼs number-one doubles players Naveen Mohideen, left, and Alex Zhang are ready for a serve during their game against the number-one players from Palm Springs on Friday in Claremont.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, March 22, 2013

30

TRUER WORDS WERE NEVER SPOKEN Rep. Michele Bachmann came under fire for her comments at the Conservative Political Action Conference, CPAC, held last week. The Washington Post’s fact-checker, Glenn Kessler, gave Ms. Bachmann “Four Pinocchios” for what he characterized as outrageous accusations made against President Barack Obama, including that the president employs 5 chefs on Air Force One as well as 2 projectionsists to operate the White House movie theater. “[The movie projectionists] regularly sleep at the White House in order to be readily available in case the first family wants a really, really late show,” Ms. Bachmann related to the CPAC crowd. “And I don’t mean to be petty here, but can’t they just push the play button?” A recent book by a Republican lobbyist titled The $1.4 Billion Man was referenced by Ms. Bachmann, who also purported that “We are also the ones who are paying for someone to walk the president’s dog, paying for someone to walk the president’s dog?” Mr. Kessler noted that the White House groundskeeper helps take care of the Obamas dog, “just as the same guy has done for every presidential dog since Richard Nixon’s Irish Setter, King Timahoe.” Mr. Kessler also noted that the annual cost of operating the White House during the George W. Bush years was $1.6 billion. Suprisingly, Ms. Bachmann did-

n’t mention this in her speech. The whopper of the day, according to Mr. Kessler, was Ms. Bachmann’s chastising of the egregious financial waste within the federal food stamp program. She suggests that 70 percent of the food stamp funding goes to “bureaucrats.” Mr. Kessler’s fact-check resulted in his comment, “That’s one particularly lean anti-poverty program in which less than 6 percent of the program is spent on administrative costs.” As of yet, neither Ms. Bachmann nor her staff have publicly responded. STRANGE BREW Espiau’s on Yale Avenue and First Street posted a warning to tipsy drivers leaving their establishment on St. Patrick’s Day. A sign taped to the inside of the door read, “Check point: South on Indian Hill.” CLEAN WATER, CLEAN BEACHES MEASURE TABLED The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted 4-1 to table the Clean Water, Clean Beaches Measure after receiving comments from cities, residents and businesses. The Claremont City Council urged residents to write in voicing their opposition to the measure, which purported to raise property taxes. It was projected that 40 percent of the proposed tax returns would go to the city, 50 percent of the fee would be allocated to an appointed watershed authority group established for water quality improvement programs

BACK PAGE
and the remaining 10 percent of the fee revenues would be used by the Los Angeles County Flood Control District for water quality monitoring, research, technical assistance and administration. The LA County Flood Control District already collects fees from residents, some of whom maintained the measure was an attempt at double-dipping. FOR WHOM THE BELL TOLLS Jurors in the city of Bell corruption trial have reached a verdict in the case against 6 former council members accused of misappropriating public funds. Defendants Luis Artiga, Victor Bello, George Cole, Oscar Hernandez, Teresa Jacobo and George Mirabal, who drew annual salaries of nearly $100,000, were found guilty. They await sentencing.

Defense attorneys claimed that former city administrator Robert Rizzo controlled the city and was the mastermind of the alleged corruption. Mr. Rizzo’s annual compensation was $1.5 million, with an estimated $650,000 a year expected from CalPERS and more than $1 million a year overall after a second pension from the city of Bell was included. CalPERS, in 2011, cut Mr. Rizzo’s pension, and that of his assistant city manager Angela Spaccia, after an audit determined that their pensions were “improperly inflated,” according to the Los Angeles Times. To add insult to injury, Mr. Rizzo had also cashed out 107 vacation days and 36 sick days in one year. The city of Bell, where residents have an average income of $40,000 per year, pay the second-highest property tax rate in Los Angeles County.
Until next time, Sammy sammy@claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 03-22-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

31

CLASSIFIEDS
rentals............31 legals...............32 services...........34 real estate.......37
RENTALS
Condo for rent
ONE bedroom, one bathroom condo in gated community. Garage, A/C, refrigerator and pool. $1065 monthly, water and trash included. 228-7362. IMMACULATE beautifully remodeled condo. Two bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, 1304 sq. ft. Claremont schools. Stainless steel appliances. 548-0044. CLUB Terrace, 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2 car garage. Fresh paint, community pool. No pets. $1950 monthly. WSPM 621-5941.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

RENTALS
House for rent
NORTH Claremont furnished, single story, 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home. Great schools. $2400 monthly. Agent 969-1914. CLAREMONT, newly renovated 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, pool home. Walk to schools and parks. $2100 includes gardener and pool service. Small pets ok. Available now. Call agent, 455-3203.

MARKETPLACE
Announcements
DID you know that 10 million adults tweeted in the past month, while 164 million read a newspaper in print or online in the past week? Advertise in 240 California newspapers for one low cost. Your 25 word classified ad will reach over 6 million plus Californians. For brochure call Elizabeth, 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) “MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN) THE business that considers itself immune to advertising, finds itself immune to business. Reach Californians with a classified in almost every county! Over 270 newspapers! ComboCalifornia daily and weekly networks. Free brochures. elizabeth@cnpa.com or 916288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

MARKETPLACE
Garage sales
CLAREMONT yard sale. 7 a.m., Saturday, March 23 and Sunday, March 24. Includes furniture, antiques, art, household items, old tools, records, collectables and lots more. 738 W. Eighth St.

BULLETINS
FOR SALE AND IMMEDIATE REMOVAL FROM SITE:
Historic Pitzer Ranch Foremanʼs River Rock Residence located at 926 E. Base Line Road, Claremont, is available for sale. Leave a message at 949.341.1207 for a viewing appointment. All appointments must be made in advance, as a release of liability will be required prior to entry due to the physical condition of the building. All viewing appointments will be held on April 12 between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. All CASH only offers (minimum $5.00) to be received NO LATER THAN 5:00 p.m., April 19, 2013 with building removal from site required NO LATER THAN APRIL 22, 2013.

For sale
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) SAWMILLS from only $3997. Make and save money with your own bandmill. Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. Free information/DVD. www.NorwoodSawmills.com. (Cal-SCAN) EdenPURE Portable Infrared Heaters. Join the 3 million beating the cold and winter heating bills. Save $229 on our EdenPURE Model 750. Call now while supplies last! 1-888-752-9941. (Cal-SCAN)

Studio for rent
CLAREMONT studio with eating, sleeping area. Carpet, A/C, window coverings, stove, refrigerator, washer, dryer. 462 Grinnell Drive. $750 monthly. 626-327-8436.

MARKETPLACE

Townhome for rent
CLAREMONT townhome for lease. Two bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, washer, dryer, dishwasher, shared garage. $1395 monthly. Please contact Danielle at the Renken Company, 482-1060.

It's Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale in Upland! Saturday, March 23 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
1540 Rosewood Street Upland, 91784
Beautiful furnishings and decorative accessories! Newer washer and dryer. Patio furniture and plants. Newer Samsung flat screen television. Lovely things throughout the home. BYOB (bags/boxes). I'll have the paper.

House for rent
DARLING Claremont adjacent home. Completely renovated 3 bedroom, one bathroom, with ceiling fans in every room. Big yard. 1388 sq. ft. New tile, carpet, cabinets. No dogs, smoking. $1600. 217-0526. THREE bedroom house, 1.75 bathrooms, 2-car garage. Walking distance to Village. $2275 monthly. First and last payment. 985-6668. CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, one bathroom. Walk to Village, park. Detached garage, hardwood floors, fireplace. $1850 monthly. Call 624-6547. THREE bedroom, 2.5 bathroom, 2002 sq. ft. beautiful house. Near Club, Colleges. $2100 monthly. Call 626-8318106. SPACIOUS north Claremont home. Three bedrooms, 1.75 bathrooms, fenced yard, 2 car garage. Pool, central air, new paint and carpeting. No smoking. $2000 monthly. Agent 624-5662. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin, 714-402-0034.

REAL ESTATE
House for sale
TWO 5 bedroom homes in preforeclosure starting at $1000 per month! Stop renting and own! Bad credit ok! Income verification only! Just take over payments! Call 1866-949-7345. (Cal-SCAN)

Antiques
A barn and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! 593-1846. La Verne. Kensoldenoddities.com. AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628.

BULLETINS
Business
MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888865-0271. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (CalSCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help wanted
DRIVERS: Inexperienced? Get on the road to a successful career with CDL training. Regional training locations. Train and work for Central Refrigerated. 877-369-7091.
www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com.

Donations
DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN)

Selling, Buying or Renting? Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

BULLETINS
Education
AIRLINES are hiring. Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified. Housing available. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance, 877804-5293. (Cal-SCAN) ATTEND college 100 percent online. Medical, business, criminal justice, hospitality, web. Job placement assistance. Computers available. Financial aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888210-5162. www.CenturaOn line.com. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Business
HIGHSPEED internet everywhere by satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! 200 times faster than dial-up. Starting at $449.95 a month. Call now and go fast! 1-888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN)

(Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Daily or weekly pay. One cent increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. Three cent per mile enhanced quarterly bonus. Requires 3 months OTR experience. 800-4149569. www.driveknight.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Apply now! Twelve drivers needed. Top 5 percent pay. Class A CDL required. www.ad-drivers.com. Call 877258-8782. (Cal-SCAN)

Financial
EVER consider a reverse mortgage? At least 62 years old? Stay in your home and increase cash flow! Safe and effective! Call now for your free DVD! Call now 888-6983165. (Cal-SCAN) GET free of credit card debt now! Cut payments by up to half. Stop creditors from calling. 888-416-2691. (Cal-SCAN)

Health
DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-9042372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene All-Natural Testosterone Supplement. (CalSCAN)

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-10414611-RM Order No.: 100791939-CA-BFO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/27/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): DEREK HEISEY AND JENNIFER LYNN HEISEY, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 7/5/2007 as Instrument No. 20071599857 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/5/2013 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale: By the fountain located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $360,416.77 The purported property address is: 698 SYCAMORE AVE, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8315-029-027 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-10414611-RM . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-730-2727 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA10-414611-RM IDSPub #0047146 3/15/2013 3/22/2013 3/29/2013 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC Sec. 6105) Escrow No. 086257-PH NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is about to be made. The name(s) and business address(es) of the seller(s) is/are: ANNIE HUYNH NGUYEN, MAILING ADDRESS: 2266 S. GAREY AVE, POMONA, CA 91766 Doing business as: CHINA WOK All other business name(s) and address(es) used by the seller(s) within the past three years, as stated by the seller(s), is/are: NONE The name(s) and business address of the buyer(s) is/are: AMY VY AND ENG TEH, MAILING ADDRESS: 2266 S. GAREY AVE, POMONA, CA 91766 The assets being sold are generally described as: FURNITURE, FIXTURES, EQUIPMENT, TRADENAME, GOODWILL, LEASEHOLD INTEREST & IMPROVEMENT, COVENANT NOT TO COMPETE and is located at: 2266 S. GAREY AVE, POMONA, CA 91766 The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: DIAMOND GLOBAL ESCROW, INC., 22632 GOLDEN SPRINGS DR, STE 160, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 and the anticipated sale date is APRIL 10, 2013 The bulk sale is subject to California Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2. The name and address of the person with whom claims may be filed is: DIAMOND GLOBAL ESCROW, INC., 22632 GOLD SPRINGS DR, #160, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 and the last day for filing claims by any creditor shall be APRIL 9, 2013, which is the business day before the anticipated sale date specified above. Dated: 3/18/13 AMY VY AND ENG TEH, Buyer(s) LA1279849 CLAREMONT COURIER 3/22/13 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr. Ste 114 Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: March 15, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: P POST INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 211 W 1ST ST CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4702 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761. Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 100116083 Doc ID #0001705563392005N Title Order No. 10-8-428135 Investor/Insurer No. 1704094444 APN No. 8313-010-060 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED, IF REQUIRED BY THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 2923.3 OF THE CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/20/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SHEILA P WALKER, A SINGLE WOMAN, dated 06/20/2007 and recorded 6/27/2007, as Instrument No. 20071538843, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 04/25/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 602 ASBURY DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CA, 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $527,784.48. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 22, 2013
insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 100116083. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 12/14/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-0194 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. AFN4371035 03/22/2013, 03/29/2013, 04/05/2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 052863 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Planning Cloud Nine, 522 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Apt. 103, Claremont, CA 91711. Niña Villarin Gruezo, 522 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Apt. 103, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Niña Gruezo This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/15/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 22, 29, April 5 and 12, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 050027 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as DENT EVO, 1038 Moab Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Joseph Garcia, 1038 Moab Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/01/2013. /s/ Joseph Garcia This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/13/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 22, 29, April 5 and 12, 2013

32

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 1284104-31 APN: 8281-002-044 TRA: 010049 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx5229 REF: Perez, Estela B IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED March 11, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 11, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded March 18, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 0624342* in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Estela B. Perez, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 24361 Vista Buena Dr Diamond Bar CA 91765-1836 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $339,239.36. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1284104-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: March 06, 2013. (R-427054 03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13)

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Hotlines
PROJECT Sister Sexual Assault Crisis Prevention Services. If you have been sexually assaulted or victimized by child sexual abuse and need help for yourself or your children, call the 24-hour hotline 626-HELP (4357). HOUSE of Ruth Domestic Violence Services. If you have been abused or beaten by your intimate partner and need help for yourself or your children, please call our 24hour hotline, 988-5559. NAMI HELPLINE National Alliance on Mental Illness, Pomona Valley Chapter, provides information and referral in a supportive spirit. Call any day or time. 399-0305.

ANIMALS
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Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E Upland 1800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

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REPORT local bear sightings! Contact Jessica at 621-4761 or classified@claremont-cou rier.com.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 036554 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as HK Investments, HK Financial Services, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. Heran Kim, 420 Heidelburg Lane, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Heran Kim This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/22/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013

LEGAL TENDER

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fendant, respondent, or citee if his address is ascertained before expiration of the time prescribed for the publication of this summons or citation and declaration of this mailing or of the fact that the address was not ascertained be filed at the expiration of the time prescribed for the publication. /s/ GILBERT G. OCHOA, Judge Dated: September 10, 2012 Filed: Superior Court, County of San Bernardino Rancho Cucamonga District 8303 Haven Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 /s/ Jeanne Zour, Deputy Dated: September 10, 2012 Attorney For: John Carr Mitchel J. Ezer SBN: 30100 LAW OFFICE MITCHEL J. EZER 1153 Lachman Lane Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 Ph.: 310-347-4608 Publish: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 T.S. No.: 1003732CA Loan No.: 0000014082 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/20/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the notes(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: AMANDA ROBINSON, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Seaside Trustee, Inc. Recorded 10/3/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2377192 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of Los Angeles County, California, Date of Sale: 4/2/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, Ca. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $970,629.73 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 870 LAWRENCE CIRCLE CLAREMONT, CA 91711 A.P.N.: 8671-041-042 As required by California Civil Code Section 2923.5, the current beneficiary has declared to Seaside Trustee Inc, the original trustee, the duly appointed substituted trustee, or acting as agent for the trustee, that the requirements of said section have been met by one or more of the following: 1. Borrower was contacted to assess their financial situation and to explore the options for the borrower to avoid foreclosure 2. The borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary or authorized agent 3. Due diligence to contact the borrower was made as required by said Section 2923.5. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder al the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and dale for the sale of this property, you may call 800-50-SALES Sale line or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com using the file number assigned to this case 1003732CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/27/2013 Seaside Trustee, Inc. Trustee Sales Information: 800-50-SALES www.priorityposting.com Seaside Trustee Inc. P.O. Box 2676 Ventura, Ca. 93014 Melissa B. Olmos, Admin Assistant P1024349 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013 Trustee Sale No. 250665CA Loan No. 1596871266 Title Order No. 837785 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02-262007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 04-02-2013 at 9:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 03-02-2007, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20070458719, , and as modified by the Modification of Deed of Trust recorded on 10-02-2009, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20091501930 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California, executed by: PATRICK SULLIVAN AND DEBBIE SULLIVAN, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: BEHIND THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED IN CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA Legal Description: PARCEL 1: LOT 56 OF TRACT NO. 50568, IN THE CITY OF CLAREMONT, COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER MAP RECORDED IN BOOK 1274 PAGES 20 THROUGH 46, INCLUSIVE, OF MAPS IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. PARCEL 2: NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENTS FOR USE, INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, REPAIR, DRAINAGE, ENCROACHMENT, OR OTHER PURPOSES ALL AS DESCRIBED AND/OR DEPICTED IN THE ''DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS, AND RESERVATION OF EASEMENTS FOR STONE CANYON'', RECORDED ON OCTOBER 21, 2003, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 03-3139167, AND THE ''NOTICE OF ANNEXATION FOR PHASE 2 OF STONE CANYON'' RECORDED ON APRIL 28, 2004, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 041042744, BOTH IN THE OFFICIAL RECORDS OF LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, AS SAME MAY BE AMENDED, MODIFIED, AND/OR RE-RECORDED FROM TIME TO TIME (''DECLARATION''). PARCEL 3: A NONEXCLUSIVE EASEMENT APPURTENANT TO SUCH LOT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS, ACCESS, USE AND ENJOYMENT ON, OVER, AND ACROSS THE COMMON AREA WITHIN THE PROJECT, AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND OR DEPICTED IN THE DECLARATION. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,317,280.70 (estimated) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 1389 FERGUS FALLS CLAREMONT, CA 91711 APN Number: 8673-040-011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the following methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting. DATE: 03-05-2013 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee FRED RESTREPO, ASSISTANT SECRETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800892-6902 For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-280-2832 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 22, 2013
present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale information) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 5731965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale information), or auction.com at 1-800-280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1024005 3/8, 3/15, 03/22/2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PATRICIA LEE STOUT CASE NO. KP 015005 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PATRICIA LEE STOUT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by DAVID ELLIS STOUT in the Superior Court of California, County of Los Angeles. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that DAVID ELLIS STOUT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: Date: 03/28/13 at Time: 8:30 a.m. in Dept. A located at: Superior Court Of California, County of Los Angeles, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766. EAST DISTRICT IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within four months from the date of first issuance of letters as provided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing date noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of the estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner In Pro Per: David Ellis Stout 736 West 12th Street, Claremont, CA 91711 Phone # 951-663-5288 Publish: March 8, 15 and 22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 046834 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as California Shaved Ice, California Sno, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Michael Zaid Sweis, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Michael Zaid Sweis This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/08/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 044068 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Inland Energy Service, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O. Box 995, Claremont, CA 91711. Alan Medak, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/11/13. /s/ Alan Medak This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/06/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence ad-

33

dress of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-12532042-JB Order No.: 120346424-CA-GTI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/31/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): TY HASHIOKA, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Recorded: 2/3/2006 as Instrument No. 06 0265658 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, California; Date of Sale: 4/5/2013 at 9:00 A.M. Place of Sale: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza Pomona, CA 91766 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $126,316.01 The purported property address is: 177 LIMESTONE RD, CLAREMONT, CA 91711 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 8671017-047 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-12-532042-JB . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-6457711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA12-532042-JB IDSPub #0047007 3/15/2013 3/22/2013 3/29/2013

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034167 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as REAL EXERCISE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 2980 First St., Unit A, La Verne, CA 91750. Mailing address: 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. Roy A. Nystrom, 424 N. Neil St., West Covina, CA 91791. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Roy Nystrom This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/20/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 034881 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. ETANA inc. dba Made 4 Museum, 5050 Arrow Hwy., Montclair, CA 91763. This business is conducted by a Corporation. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in December, 2012. /s/ Walter Ebrahimzadeh Title: CEO This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 02/21/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 1, 8, 15 and 22, 2013 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SAN BERNARDINO ORDER FOR PUBLICATION OF SUMMONS OR CITATION Case Number: CIVRS1202404 PLANTIFF (S)/PETITIONER(S): J.A. CARR vs. DEFENDANT(S)/RESPONDENT(S): THOMAS REES, et al. Upon reading and filing evidence consisting of a declaration as provided in Section 415.50 CCP by Douglas Sloan, and it satisfactorily appearing therefrom that the defendant, respondent, or citee, “All persons unknown claiming any legal or equitable right, title, estate, lien or interest in the property described in Plaintiff’s Complaint adverse to Plaintiff’s title, or any cloud upon Plaintiff’s title thereto.” cannot be served with reasonable diligence in any other manner specified in Article 3, Chapter 4, Title 5 of the Code of Civil Procedure, and it also appearing from the verified complaint or petition that a good cause of action exists in this action in favor of the plaintiff, petitioner, or citee therein and against the defendant respondent, or citee and that the said defendant, respondent, or cited is a necessary and proper party to the action or that the party to be served has or claims an interest in, real or personal property in this state that is subject to the Court or the relief demanded in the action consists wholly or in part in excluding such part from any interest in such property: NOW, on motion of Mitchel J. Ezer Attorney for the Plaintiff(s), Petitioner(s), or contestant(s), IT IS ORDERED that the service of said summons or citation in this action be made upon said defendant, respondent, or citee by publication thereof in CLAREMONT COURIER a newspaper of general circulation published at Claremont, California, hereby designated as the newspaper most likely to give notice to said defendant; that said publication be made at least once a week for four successive weeks. IT IS FUTHER ORDERED that a copy of said summons or citation and of said complaint or petition in this action be forthwith deposited in the United States Post Office, post-paid, directed to said de-

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 03-22-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

Electrician
MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience. ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Handyman
A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

Antiques
ANTIQUES wanted. Fair prices for the following old items: Hollywood, comics, toys, watches, medals, coins, badges, jewelry, postcards, books, magazines, military, photos, tools, sports, fishing, Disneyland, medical, historic documents, autographs, holiday decorations and other interesting items. 909-2389076. micklet@earthlink.net.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243 JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128.

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Hauling
Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149 Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

909-599-9530

Hayden’s Services Inc.

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929.

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

Drywall

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Childcare
AFFORDABLE childcare. Families with multiple children welcome. Large Claremont home. Miss Carmen, 909621-3108 or 909-367-3560.

Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761.

DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360. Claremont Handyman Service All your handyman needs. Carpentry, lighting, painting. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 921-6334

Aikido

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Programs for adults and children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 03-22-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

Landscaping

Painting

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Tutoring
AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Plumbing
RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484. STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-9821604.

Upholstery

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

Tile

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Weed Abatement
JOHNNIES Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

Please call 909-989-9786.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

Learn Japanese
AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770 CHARLES' Landscape. 30 years experience. Drought tolerant design. 909-217-9722. TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls. Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.839835

Pet Sitting
PET SITTER/DOG WALKER
Reliable, friendly, knowledgeable. Local references available.

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099. HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. PRIVATE tutor. Reading, writing and vocabulary. Experienced teacher over 40 years. Contact Allen, agross91768@yahoo.com or 909-629-6007.

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

AMANDA, 818-219-3268

Yoga

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Pilates

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

909.621.4761
Friday 03-22-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOUSE CLEANING

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

909-621-5626
LANDSCAPING SPECIALTY SERVICE

909.234.5766
SPECIALTY SERVICE

Kandi Ford

Dick Oosterheert
Landscape Services
Donʼt Landscape…Renovate! Lic. #C-27 876953
• Save money by designing with drought tolerant materials! • Conserve water by converting existing irrigation to low flow!

Free E-Waste drop-off facility!

909-579-0248 • 1551 W. 13th Street, Upland CA 91786
10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

Legal ease. Keep it local.
We can publish your LA County legal.

Call Vickie, 621-4761
legalads@claremont-courier.com

ourier C
Claremont
claremont-courier.com

909.621.4761
Friday 03-22-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

37

REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
2-5 p.m. 1466 Ashland Ave., Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

Sunday, March 24

2-5 p.m. 939 Deep Springs Drive, Claremont.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

2-5 p.m. 1122 N. Euclid Ave., Ontario.
Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

HISTORIC UPLAND HOME
Fabulous home built in 1918. Old world charm updated with new wiring, copper plumbing, insulation, drywall, central heat/AC, roof and more. Mountain and city views. Sparkling pool and spa. Four car, 1050 sq. ft. garage. Situated on an expansive corner lot. $589,000 (T645)

CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE
Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo. Approximately 1563 sq. ft. with vaulted ceilings, sky lights, laminate flooring and private balcony off master bedroom. Lots of storage. Community pool and spa. $435,000. (A1831)

FOR LEASE: 2 Bedroom Claremont House - $1,525 2 Bedroom "West Arms" condo - Claremont - $1,600 3 Bedroom - 3 Bathroom Condo - $1,800 3 Bedroom Pool Home - Claremont - $1,925

Carol Curtis, Broker
Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

SELLING, BUYING OR RENTING? Advertise in the
Claremont COURIER! Call Jessica at 621-4761.

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 22, 2013

38

D.R.E. #00997900

Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property.

GEOFF HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

Geoff is #1 in Claremont Sales & Listings since 1988

“Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time”
909.621.0500 Geoff@GeoffHamill.com

CONGRATULATIONS TO...
CHARLENE BOLTON
COLDWELL BANKER TOWN & COUNTRY

#1 in Sales in 2012

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

Call Charlene at (909) 621-0895
Coldwell Banker Town & Country proudly recognizes Charlene Bolton as the top producing Sales Associate for 2012. She received the International President's Elite award for outstanding performance. This honor places Charlene's production record in the top two percent of Coldwell Banker Agents across the United States. Charlene holds both a Bachelor and Masters degree. She served in the Peace Corp and is fluent in Spanish. She has lived in Claremont for over 40 years. She is an organist at Faith Lutheran Church in San Dimas and a member of the Mountainside Master Chorale.

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com
250 West First Street, Claremont

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, March 22, 2013

39

948 Brandeis Drive, Claremont. $1,195,000.
M O C . IS E ND A BR 8 4 .9 W W W

P

restigious Claremont custom estate located in Blaisdell Ranch with beautiful north facing views of the foothills. An open floor plan on a half acre lot are among the highlights of this single story home. A gated courtyard leads to the magnificent double door entry with beautiful wood floors and is open to the formal living room and adjacent dining room. Coffered ceilings create an open feeling, while several sets of French doors allow natural light to filter in throughout the day. This one level home boasts 5 generous bedrooms, 5 bathrooms, 2 fireplaces, a dry sauna and approximately 3,890 sq. ft. of living space. Spacious family room with river rock fireplace and a full wet bar. The elegant master suite has a private entry to an outdoor patio. Bright kitchen with plentiful counter space and cabinets is open to a large breakfast nook for casual dining. Side loading 3-car garage plus room for possible RV parking. Situated on a nicely landscaped 23,505 sq. ft. lot with 9 different types of fruit trees to enjoy year round and a comfortable patio with built-in BBQ and fire pit. When you come to visit this home you will not want to leave.

9 09 - 228 - 88 6 2 9 09 - 8 21 - 326 9

w w w .c o stanti n o g r o up. co m

Mason was excellent starting from the beginning, to the end of the sale. He was very professional, respectful, had timely good communication, and understood our expectations and difficulties. One great thing is he never pushed us. I would strongly recommend him to my colleagues. We wish him good luck and have no doubt he will prosper.
—Samy & Radha M.
To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 P .M. 1466 ASHLAND AVENUE, CLAREMONT $575,000
Custom built and designed by Ralph and Goldie Lewis. Beautiful single story, nearly 2,500 sq. ft., 4-car garage with RV parking. Perfectly located at the top bend of the street on a sweeping over sized lot filled with grassy yard areas, fruit trees and flowering gardens. (A1466) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 P .M. 939 DEEP SPRINGS DRIVE, CLAREMONT
Prestigious Blaisdell Ranch home. Coveted northeast Claremont estate area near the Claremont foothills. Situated on approximately half acre park-like grounds with pool and spa. Great one story open floor plan exudes warmth and comfort for friendly living. (D939) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

NEW LISTING! OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-5 P .M. 1122 N. EUCLID AVENUE, ONTARIO - $398,000
Colonial Revival style home plus guest house. Main home custom built circa 1922. Beautiful lush grounds with multiple garden and patio areas plus tall mature shade trees. (E1122) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

CLARABOYA CONTEMPORARY SHOWCASE VIEW HOME - $1,250,000
Panoramic valley, city lights, canyon and mountain views! Newly rebuilt and expanded to showcase your favorite art collection. This classic one story residence boasts an open floor plan with extensive architectural built-ins. (M2556) Geoff Hamill www.geoffhamill.com - 909.621.0500

2420 SAN ANTONIO CRESCENT EAST, UPLAND - $975,000
Classic San Antonio Heights custom home. Serene setting among pine and birch trees with views of the valley below. Three bedrooms plus a bonus room, remodeled kitchen and bathrooms, salt-water pool and a 3-car garage. 4000-4500 sq. ft. (S2420) Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com – 909.670.0322

2206 VALLEJO WAY, UPLAND NORTH UPLAND CUL-DE-SAC
Sprawling single story home with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms and a totally remodeled interior. Wood and stone flooring, granite counters, 3,025 sq. ft. and a 3-car garage.Value range price $655,000-$668,800. (V2206) Jeannette Ewing jeannette.ewing@sothebysrealty.com – 909.670.0322

Juliet Camacho 909.447.8258

Susan Emerson 909.447.7710

Jeannette Ewing 909.670.0322

Diane Fox 909.447.7709

Geoff Hamill 909.621.0500

Rose Ishman 909.624.1617

Bernadette Kendall 909.670.1717

Cheryl Knight 909.447.7715

Betty Leier 909.262.8630

Chris Macaulay 909.227.0162

B.J. Nichka 909.625.6754

Heather Petty 909.447.7716

Mason Prophet 909.447.7708

Madhu Sengupta 909.260.5560

Maria Silva 909.626.1188

Rob & Amy Titus 909.450.7415

Eurydice Turk 909.447.8258

Ryan Zimmerman 909.447.7707

Paul Steffen Broker/Owner

909.624.1617

500 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont

wssir.com

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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