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OREGON OBSERVER

The
Thursday, March 21, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 37 • Oregon, WI • ConnectOregonWI.com • $1
Vote April 2
rd
for School Board
Authorized and Paid for by Dan Krause for School Board, Suzanne Cowan, Treasurer
KRAUSE
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Oregon School Board
Three vie for two School Board seats
SETH JOVAAG
Unified Newspaper Group
On a cold, rainy Saturday ear-
lier this month, Rae Vogeler spent
five hours at the Town of Oregon
dump, sporting a rain poncho as
she greeted residents dropping off
their recycling.
The unusual campaign stop was
emblematic of Vogeler’s drive to
earn a seat on the Oregon School
Board on April 2.
“If I get elected, and I hope I
am, I’m going to be a civil ser-
vant to the community,” she said.
Vogeler and fellow challenger
Dan Krause, along with two-time
incumbent Lynda Farrar, are wag-
ing a spirited campaign for two
seats on the board. Incumbent
Pam Hughes will appear on the
ballot, too, but has dropped out of
the race (see related story).
All three candidates say they’re
motivated by a chance to give
back to the community and school
district where they have raised
their children.
“My priority is the kids,” said
Farrar, a retired optometrist first
elected in 2007 before winning a
2010 contest between three can-
didates for a second, three-year
term. “It’s important that they
have an education that prepares
them for the 21st century.”
Krause, an estate planning
attorney and military veteran,
notes that he’s the only candidate
who will still have kids in Oregon
schools after this three-year term
is up.
“There’s nothing that makes
you care about something more
than having your kids involved,”
he said.
Town of Oregon
Oregon Youth Wrestling numbers triple in just one year
Fifth grader Tanner Sergent
(right) and second grader Tyler
Wald represent the Oregon
Youth Wrestling program at
state this year as numbers
nearly tripled on the mat.
Photo by Anthony Iozzo
ANTHONY IOZZO
Assistant sports editor
It has been a couple of years
since the Oregon Youth Wres-
tling program sent athletes to
state, but this year it is sending
two, fifth grader Tanner Ser-
gent and second grader Tyler
Wald.
But that success is not the
only promising thing for the
program, which also had eight
wrestlers finish third at region-
als to just miss a spot at state.
With numbers down at Ore-
gon High School this past sea-
son and only 23 children signed
up for the youth program last
year, wrestling was in danger
of a decline in Oregon. That
changed this season as numbers
nearly tripled to 61.
Yout h head coach Chad
Niday, who has been a coach
for two years and with the pro-
gram for three, said it comes
down to retention.
“If we lose kids, that doesn’t
help us but we have a great
retention rate. And those kids
are telling friends and bring-
ing friends, and we are really
getting a big push in the young
level,” Niday said. “At the kin-
dergarten and first-grade level,
we had a big jump this year and
retained all of those kids. We
hardly had any losses this year,
so it is really exciting to think
about where we will be next
year.”
But numbers were down the
last few years, which Niday
said is due to the lack of aware-
ness in the community. To
change that, he and the other
coaches wanted to not only
increase its presence but also
unite its goals at all levels and
treat Oregon wrestling as a kin-
dergarten through high school
program.
“We don’t want to be the
youth program and a middle
school program and have gaps
in between,” he said. “We all
want to be on the same page as
coaches. We want to be teach-
ing the same philosophies, so
when kids do transition it is
easy for them.
“There is work to get done
there, but we think we are
going in the right direction. “
But success, like Sergent and
Turn to Numbers/Page 10
If you go
What: Wisconsin Wrestling
Federation Kids Folkstyle State
tournament
When: 5 p.m. Friday and
8:30 a.m. Saturday, March
22-23
Where: Alliant Energy Center
in Madison
On the
Rise
Inside
Candidate profiles and
Hughes leaves race
Page 11
Current supervisor
takes on town chair
in spring election
Turn to OSB/Page 11
Four candidates seek two
supervisor seats on board
MARK IGNATOWSKI
Unified Newspaper Group
V o t e r s
wi l l s oon
head to the
polls in the
T o wn o f
Oregon t o
decide on a
town chair
a n d t wo
supervi sor
seats.
Each race
this year is
cont est ed,
wi t h f our
people vying
for the two
supervi sor
s eat s and
a c ur r e nt
supervisor,
Chris John-
son, hoping
t o uns e a t
i ncumbent
chair Darryl
Weber.
C h a l -
lenger Chris
Johnson said she’s “up to the challenge” of
leading the town after serving as a supervi-
sor for the last six years.
Johnson said there weren’t any specific
issues that brought her to run for the seat
held by Weber, but that she would be look-
ing to realize some efficiency with town
operations and connect with residents.
“I f eel l i ke I can engage t he
Ace Kay
Weber Johnson
Clark Spear
Turn to Town Board/Page 2
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March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Congratulations to the State Bank
of Cross Plains – Oregon Office
for receiving the 2012 President’s Award
by the Oregon Area Chamber of Commerce.
The State Bank of Cross Plains is a proud supporter of the Oregon community.
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Dane County. With 10 locations to serve you, we believe
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Photo by Julia Meyers
Shamrock shake
The Oregon Area Senior Center put on a St. Patrick’s Day celebration early Friday with performer
Jeannette Crosswait. The singer, songwriter and musician serenades attendees and many did enjoy a
special meal, as well.
Photo by Clarice Dewey
Photo by Bill Livick
Senor Peppers opened Wednesday in its new location at 106-108 Janesville St. in downtown Oregon.
Senor Peppers
reopens after
2-month hiatus
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
The Village Board Mon-
day approved outdoor din-
ing permits for two down-
town restaurants.
Senor Peppers Mexican
Restaurant, which closed
in late January and moved
from its South Main Street
location across the street
to 106-108 Janesville St.
in the Netherwood Build-
ing, will have four or five
tables on a front patio area
overlooking the World
War I monument in down-
town Oregon.
The board also approved
outdoor seating for Alberi-
ci’s Deli at 135 S. Main St.
Owner/operator Theresa
Alberici-Yttri said she’ll
have room for only two
tables in the area approved
by the Planning Commis-
sion last week and the Vil-
lage Board on Monday.
The deli also has a dining
room inside the restaurant.
Senor Peppers reopened
Wednesday, almost two
mont hs aft er i t s l ease
expi r ed and was not
renewed on South Main
Street. The restaurant will
occupy 1,852 square feet
on the first floor of the his-
toric Netherwood Build-
ing.
Owner Maggie Rich-
ter said building the new
40-seat restaurant, with
two dining rooms, took
more time than expected.
But with some new spe-
cials to go alongside old
favorites, she anticipates
good things this year and
into the future.
She’s been approved
to serve alcohol in the al
fresco dining arrangement
and said the area will also
have the same recorded
music that plays in the din-
ing room.
The restaurant will now
be wheelchair-accessible,
Richter said, something
she didn’t have in her for-
mer building.
“I just want to thank
my customers for their
patience and promise them
good food and service in
our new restaurant,” she
said.
Restaurants get outdoor seating OK
community more,” Johnson
told the Observer.
Weber has served as town
chair for six years and has
received support from past
town chair Gerald Jensen.
Weber said his experi-
ence working with contrac-
tors, equipment and erosion
control make him a good fit
for the next term. He said
he’s familiar with the town’s
budget issues and wants to
continue to help the township.
The town will also see two
supervisors up for election
this year.
Current supervisor Wayne
Ace will seek his seat again,
while newcomers Sheila
Spear, Arlan Kay and Fred
Clark, Jr. look to join the
board.
Ace is a 16-year town
board supervisor who oper-
ates a dairy fair and school
bus business.
Spear has a background in
economics and public policy.
She has lived in the town
since 2004 and previously
served on a school board in
Massachusetts.
Kay, an architect, has lived
in the town since 1969. He
has served on the Dane Coun-
ty Board of Adjustment and
the Village of Oregon Histor-
ic Preservation Commission.
Clark, 42, has lived in Ore-
gon all but nine years of his
life and has spent 21 years in
the construction industry.
Voters will also get to
weigh in on a race for town
constable and assessor.
Thomas Wiedenbeck will
face Andy Blomstrom for
the assessor position. Gary
Wackett and Kurt Maher are
running for constable.
Town Board: Many candidates running
Continued from page 1
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March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT
Saturday March 23, 2013
1 1 1 -- - 5 PM 5 PM 5 PM
1350 S. Fish Hatchery Road Oregon, WI

Hospital ToursNew Deluxe Cat CondosImproved Surgical Options for Pets
Hands-On Equine Bandaging Lab
Preventive Health Screening Information
Learn About Equitarian Work—The Haiti Project
Live Dog Training Demonstrations
Accepting Western Tack Donations for the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
Stuffed Animal Triage—bring your favorite toys in for repair
Refreshments Available
Please leave four-legged friends at home
It’s Springtime...

DOGS and CATS it is time for Annual Heartworm Testing
HORSES it is time for Spring Vaccines, Dental Checks, and
Coggins Testing
www.countryviewvets.com
(608) 835-0551
SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT
Saturday March 23, 2013
1 1 1 -- - 5 PM 5 PM 5 PM
1350 S. Fish Hatchery Road Oregon, WI

Hospital ToursNew Deluxe Cat CondosImproved Surgical Options for Pets
Hands-On Equine Bandaging Lab
Preventive Health Screening Information
Learn About Equitarian Work—The Haiti Project
Live Dog Training Demonstrations
Accepting Western Tack Donations for the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
Stuffed Animal Triage—bring your favorite toys in for repair
Refreshments Available
Please leave four-legged friends at home
It’s Springtime...

DOGS and CATS it is time for Annual Heartworm Testing
HORSES it is time for Spring Vaccines, Dental Checks, and
Coggins Testing
www.countryviewvets.com
(608) 835-0551
SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT SPRING OPEN HOUSE EVENT
Saturday March 23, 2013
1 1 1 -- - 5 PM 5 PM 5 PM
1350 S. Fish Hatchery Road Oregon, WI

Hospital ToursNew Deluxe Cat CondosImproved Surgical Options for Pets
Hands-On Equine Bandaging Lab
Preventive Health Screening Information
Learn About Equitarian Work—The Haiti Project
Live Dog Training Demonstrations
Accepting Western Tack Donations for the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
Stuffed Animal Triage—bring your favorite toys in for repair
Refreshments Available
Please leave four-legged friends at home
It’s Springtime...

DOGS and CATS it is time for Annual Heartworm Testing
HORSES it is time for Spring Vaccines, Dental Checks, and
Coggins Testing
www.countryviewvets.com
(608) 835-0551
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Search For Local Cars.
Village of Oregon
First step toward a ‘civic campus’
Study will consider
feasibility of
combined village-
owned properties
Bill livick
Unifed Newspaper Group
Village officials are tak-
ing initial steps to decide
what downtown Oregon
should look like in 20 or 30
years.
The Village Board last
week voted unanimously to
seek bids for an expert to
guide the creation of a mas-
ter plan for village-owned
properties downtown.
Officials want a plan-
ning and engineering study
to look at whether a “civ-
ic campus” area – which
coul d i ncl ude vi l l age-
owned properties such as
the senior center, library,
Village Hall, post office,
parks, police, public works,
fire station and youth center
– is feasible to build down-
town.
But don’t expect major
changes any time soon.
“There i s $15, 000 i n
this year’s budget (for the
study), but we’re not going
to make that much head-
way on it this year,” vil-
lage administrator Mike
Gracz told the Observer
on Monday. “In the capital
improvement plan, we are
saying we’ll spend $5,000
this year and really get into
it next year and complete it
in 2015. And the board at
that time will decide what
to do with the plan.”
If officials decide in a
few years to go ahead with
a plan to create a civic cam-
pus, the actual project work
probably wouldn’t begin
until at least 2017, Gracz
said.
He noted there are a lot of
stakeholders involved.
“It’s a big deal and could
possibly shape the future of
the downtown,” he said.
According to language
in the village’s downtown
mast er pl an, t he st udy
should “include a discus-
sion of the reconfigura-
tion of parking in the area,
including streetscaping,
facility expansions, review-
ing existing facility needs
which may involve improv-
ing the accessibility of vil-
lage-owned buildings and
potential redevelopment.”
The issue came up at
last week’s meeting, as the
board discussed aspects
of t he vi l l age’s capi t al
improvement plan. Oth-
er items discussed were
improvements to the Oak
Street tennis courts, rede-
velopment of Jaycee Park-
West and installing perma-
nent restrooms at Bethel
Greenacre Park.
But Gracz said the cre-
ation of a downtown civ-
ic campus was the most
important because of its
impact on the rest of the
CIP.
He told the board it needs
to decide on the long-term
future for the properties the
village owns.
“What do we do with all
these buildings?” he asked
rhetorically. “Do we build a
combination municipal cen-
ter somewhere?”
In a strategic planning
process the village conduct-
ed a couple of years ago, a
survey of residents “made it
clear that people want these
buildings to remain down-
town,” Gracz said.
Two l oomi ng i s s ues
putting pressure on the
decision are flooding of the
lower level at Village Hall
and the June 2014 expira-
tion of the village’s Post
Office lease.
“There is no way we can
stop this downstairs from
fl oodi ng wi t hout doi ng
some remodeling of the
front of the building,” he
said. “So long term, if we
are going to be in this build-
ing, we need to decide what
to do.”
Rent payments from the
Post Office generate about
$44,000 per year for the vil-
lage’s general fund.
“If the Post Office might
be doing something dif-
ferent with their lease next
year,” said trustee Randy
Way, “maybe it doesn’t
hurt to get started on this
(civic campus plan) and
have some opt i ons for
them.”
He then made a motion to
have staff prepare an RFP
for the board to consider.
Gracz said that will take
some time, “which is why
we’re saying most of the
planning work would hap-
pen next year.”
For the second time
in just over three weeks,
Oregon police searched a
local school after a school
employee found a .22-cali-
ber rifle shell.
An associate principal at
Rome Corners Intermediate
School found the shell at
12:25 p.m. Monday on the
cafeteria floor, superinten-
dent Brian Busler said in an
email to parents and staff.
Classrooms were tem-
porarily locked as police
were called in to sweep the
building. Authorities found
“no other items of concern”
and reported that it was safe
to continue classes, Busler
said in the e-mail.
“It is believed the shell
was accidentally in a stu-
dent’s coat/pant pocket
and fell out during today’s
lunch period,” the e-mail
said.
A s i mi l ar i nci dent
occurred Feb. 21, when a
custodian at Oregon Mid-
dle School discovered a
.22-caliber rifle shell near
a school locker around 5:30
p.m. Again, police found no
other shells or evidence and
school the next day was not
affected, Busler said.
“We understand that
students may accidentally
bring items to school that
are not school appropri-
ate,” he wrote in the e-mail.
“Therefore, we are ask-
ing parents … to have a
developmentally appropri-
ate conversation with their
child to make sure their
coats/clothing pockets or
backpacks do not con-
tain any items that do not
belong on school property.”
- Seth Jovaag
Bullet found in school
again within a month
Oregon School District
Online applications for mortgages
www.ub-t.com
Judy Knutson
NMLO # 865997
jknutson@ub-t.com
Sheri Karns
NMLO # 561859
skarns@ub-t.com
883 N. Main Street
(608) 835-2265
Get a mortgage
you can live with
from a local lender
you can trust.
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Two Oregon High School
teachers were recently hon-
ored for their work.
Randall Smith, alterna-
tive education instructor
at OASIS, was recognized
by the National At-Risk
Education Network for his
contributions working with
struggling learners and those
deemed “at-risk.” Smith has
been with OASIS since it's
inception within OHS in
2008.
Charles Slusser, a social
studies teacher at OHS,
recently earned entry into
the James Madison Memo-
rial Fellowship Founda-
tion to earn recognition as
a “Teacher-Scholar of the
Constitution.”
OHS teachers honored for work
Submitted photo
Dodgers
Forty Oregon High School students and eight teachers participated
last Friday in a dodgeball tournament that raised $230 for the stu-
dent council, which organized the event.
The winning team, the “Thugs,” included (front, from left) Sam
Frederickson, Nick Hepner, Corey Vogel, (back) Ian De Wild, Collin
Schmidt, Max McDonald, Zach Ragels and Dylan Anderson.
4
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to
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Phone: 608-835-6677
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Thursday, March 21, 2013 • Vol. 129, No. 37
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Opinion
We support and recommend
Darryl Weber for re-election to
the office of chairperson of the
Town of Oregon. Over the last
six years Weber has proven him-
self worthy to be re-elected.
Weber has been a good steward
of our tax dollars. While cities,
villages, and other towns have
experienced fiscal problems, he
has kept our taxes low without
needing to borrow additional
funds.
The town has recently expe-
rienced some turnover in road
pat rol men. Weber creat ed a
search and screen committee to
review applications and make
recommendations to the town
board. The commi t t ee was
advised of the needs of the town-
ship and the search was very suc-
cessful, with the hire of two well-
qualified employees.
Weber has extensive expe-
rience with various types of
machinery and equipment. He
is able to get highly competitive
bids from equipment vendors and
relays these recommendations to
the board.
As chair of the plan commis-
sion, Weber oversaw the final
approval of the town’s Land Use
Plan. This plan has proven to
control growth while respecting
the rights of landowners.
Most importantly, Weber is
very open and accessible to the
residents of the town. He treats
everyone who appears before
the town board with respect and
allows everyone to speak, even at
contentious public hearings.
The Town of Oregon has been
fortunate to have Weber’s leader-
ship and we urge the citizens of
the township to mark their ballot
for Darryl Weber.
Ruth Klahn, Phil Peterson
and Jerry Jensen
Town of Oregon
Reelect Darryl Weber as Town of Oregon chairperson
Letters to the editor
Letters to the editor
OEA supports Vogeler and Krause
The teachers of the Oregon
School Di st ri ct are proud t o
endorse Rae Vogeler and Dan
Krause for school board.
The Oregon Education Associa-
tion invited all candidates to par-
ticipate in an interview process so
that we could hear first-hand how
each of the candidates stand on
serious issues facing our district:
being a student-centered district,
attracting and retaining high-qual-
ity teaching staff, using communi-
ty and staff input to guide leader-
ship decisions, addressing the cli-
mate of fear and uncertainty, and
maneuvering through the chal-
lenges facing public education.
Rae and Dan have cl earl y
shown the depth of their passion
and support for public education
as the only two candidates willing
to talk with our interview commit-
tee and seeking opportunities to
meet with both teachers and com-
munity members over the past few
months.
The teachers of our school dis-
trict feel that our school board
needs to refocus and open up com-
munication and meaningful two-
way dialogue to the betterment
of our students, and Rae Vogeler
and Dan Krause provide the best
opportunity for that process to
take place.
Jon Fishwild, teacher
President, Oregon Education
Association
Vogeler is the right choice for school board
We have known Rae Vogeler
since both of our now college-
age children started kindergarten
together at Netherwood Knoll.
We know Vogeler to be a devot-
ed mother and hard-working pro-
fessional who applies her whole
heart, integrity and tenacity to her
commitments. As a school board
member Vogeler will devote her-
self to being a respectful listener
to our concerns.
Rae understands that the teach-
ers are professionals that should
be able to participate in class-
room management decisions. As
a school board member she would
have respectfully listened to our
teachers input on this new concept
of not grading homework at the
high school level.
We know that Vogeler will lis-
ten with respect to the concerns
of the parents in our community.
Right now she is actively doing
just that. She bundles herself up –
goes out into the freezing cold and
knocks on door after door and lis-
tens to parents’ thoughts and opin-
ions about our educational system.
She is also respectfully listening
to the voice of the students them-
selves. She is currently review-
ing the data of an Oregon student
opinion poll concerning the no
grade homework policy.
Vogeler is a highly intelligent,
thoughtful person who cares deep-
ly about our community.
Please join us in proudly voting
for Rae for School Board on April
2.
Sam and Kaye Cooke
Fitchburg
I encourage Oregon School
Board community members to
vote for Rae Vogeler for Oregon
School Board on April 2.
Vogeler will bring something
that is missing from the current
school board – more open com-
munication and collaboration
with members of the community
and the Oregon Education Asso-
ciation (OEA).
She is committed to work-
ing with the community by get-
ting input on topics related to the
Oregon School District through
public listening sessions. One
of her goals is to increase the
amount of time for community
input during regular school board
meetings. Our current board
doesn’t consistently offer enough
opportunities for listening to
community members on impor-
tant issues. Vogeler will make
her decisions by considering the
voice of the community and car-
rying those ideas forward.
She is interested in collaborat-
ing with educators to improve
learning for all of our students.
Our current board has not collab-
orated with the OEA or listened
to concerns of educators over the
past few years while developing
the current employee handbook.
I see Rae Vogeler as someone
who will bring her strengths to a
board that needs to improve the
quality of education our students
and our community receives.
Kelly Sullivan
Oregon
I am writing to encourage resi-
dents of the Oregon School Dis-
trict to vote for Rae Vogeler for
the Oregon School Board.
In my experience as an edu-
cator, school board members
need to have effective skills of
communication and be willing
to listen to the viewpoints of all
stakeholders (parents, students,
teachers, administrators, support
staff, and residents).
Rae has excellent communica-
tion skills and has a history of
working collaboratively to reach
the best decision possible.
Rae is a person who is respect-
ful, thoughtful, honest, caring,
hard-working, and considerate
of all. She has the skills to be
an exceptionally effective school
board member and I encourage
you to vote for her in the April 2
election.
Steve Staton
Oregon
Vogeler brings communication, collaboration to board
Vogeler will listen to all stakeholders as board member
The Oregon Observer encourages citizens to engage in discussion through letters to the editor. We take
submissions online, on email and by hard copy. All letters should be signed and include addresses and
phone numbers for verification. Anonymous letters will not be printed.
Special rules apply during election season or other times of high letter volume, and the editorial staff
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ly printed authors. Please keep submissions under 400 words.
Deadline is noon Monday the week of publication. For questions on our editorial policy, call editor Jim
Ferolie at 845-9559 or email ungeditor@wcinet.com.
Submit a letter
I’m a resident of Goodland
Park for 38 years. On Wednes-
day, Feb. 27, around 4 a.m., I was
driving up the hill and got stuck.
I called my husband Art right
away - he said he'd be right over.
Instead, the snowplow came first.
He got out with his shovel and
shoveled all around the whole
car.
Bless his heart - his name was
Dale. I shook his hand and asked
if he likes homemade bread. He
said yes - banana. I told him he'll
be getting his bread, and a gift
certificate would be nice, too.
Thanks again and best of luck
to you!
Bonnie Meyer
Oregon
Town of Dunn plow operator comes to driver’s aid
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
5
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Silver Coins 1964 and older
Kennedy Clad Half Dollars(1965-1970)
Silver Dollars- Morgan and Peace Dollars
Certified Coins-PCGS, ANC, NGC and Others
Large and Small Coin Collections
GSA Carson City (CC) Silver Dollars
Indian Head Pennies
Wheat Pennies
V, Buffalo and War Nickels
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Mint and Proof Coins – US and Foreign
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Commerative Coins
Coins in Plastic Holders
All Types of Coins

OLD MONEY
Paper Money – 1929 and Older
National Currency Fractional Currency Confederate Currency
Silver and Gold Certificates Old Currency With Bank Names On Them
$1000 and $500 Bill
GOLD AND SILVER BULLION
American Eagles
Canadian Maple Leafs
Krugerrands
Gold Art Bars
.999 Silver – 100 oz., 10 oz. and 1 oz. Bars
Franklin and Danbury Mint Coins and Bars
Sterling Coins and Bars
GOLD AND JEWELRY
Dental Gold, Scrap Gold, 10K, 14K, 18K, 22K
Nugget Jewelry Old Class Rings
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Industrial Gold Sterling Flatware
Broken Jewelry
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Filigree Rings
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Old Garnet Jewelry Old Postcards
Old Mountings Bracelets and Necklaces (1920’s and older)
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WW II or Older War Items Marbles
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KURT GUTKNECHT
UNG correspondent
Construction of a long-planned
splash pad at McKee Farms Park
can go ahead after the city gave its
approval.
The council approved construc-
tion of the splash pad March 12,
which means it should be open by
July. A groundbreaking ceremony
will be held at 10:30 a.m. on March
26 at McKee Farms Park.
The $655,000 project includes
$170,000 from the Fitchburg Opti-
mists Club, $235,000 from the City
of Fitchburg and $250,000 from
Dane County.
Under the agreement with the
county, Fitchburg will construct
a road in the Town of Madison
(which will eventually annexed
by Fitchburg) in exchange for the
$250,000 donation. The agreement
was necessary because the county
cannot legally pay for a road in a
township.
Optimist member and project
leader Joan Mohr said without that
funding, “it would not have hap-
pened this year.”
She said the group aims to keep
fundraising to buy more water jets,
shade structures, benches, bike
racks, and other amenities.
“This is going to be such a great
facility for children of all abilities,”
she said. “I am so proud that we can
do this for all the kids.”
Optimists are shooting for a July
4 grand opening, Mohr said.
*Victoria Vlisides contributed to
this article
City of Fitchburg
Fitchburg Splash Pad construction OK’d, could be open as early as July
Courtesy of SAA Design Group
Another rendering of the Fitchburg Splash Pad shows the overall view of the McKee Farms Park addition.
A render-
ing of part
of Phase
1 that’s
expected
to be
completed
by July
shows an
overhead
view of
the Splash
Pad.
Courtesy of SAA Design Group
6
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Church Listings
BROOKLYN LUTHERAN CHURCH
101 Second Street, Brooklyn
(608) 455-3852
Pastor Rebecca Ninke
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Holy Communion
10 a.m. Fellowship
COMMUNITY OF LIFE
845 Market St., Oregon
(608) 835-9030
www.communityofife.us
Pastor Eric Wenger
Weekly Life Groups
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Celebratory Worship
COMMUNITY UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Brooklyn
(608) 455-3344
Pastor Gail Brown
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Worship
FAITH EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
143 Washington Street, Oregon
(608) 835-3554
Pastor Karl Hermanson
SUNDAY
9 a.m. Worship
Holy Communion 2nd & last
Sundays
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
408 N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)
Oregon, WI 53575
608-835-3082
fpcoregon.org
Pastor Le Anne Clausen de Montes
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Blended Worship
10:30 a.m. Coffee Bar/Fellowship
11 a.m. Adult Inquiry Class
11 a.m. Youth and Family Worship
Service.

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC
5705 Lacy Road, Fitchburg
(608) 273-1008
www.memorialucc.org
Pastor: Phil Haslanger, Leah
Lonsbury
SUNDAY
8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN
CHURCH ELCA
Central Campus: Raymond Road and
Whitney Way
SATURDAY
5p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship
West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD
and Nine Mound Road, Verona
SUNDAY
9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship
(608) 271-6633
HILLCREST BIBLE CHURCH
752 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor
(608) 835-7972
www.hbclife.com
SUNDAY
8:30 & 10:15 am Worship service at
the Oregon High School PAC
HOLY MOTHER OF CONSOLATION
CATHOLIC CHURCH
651 N. Main Street, Oregon
Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl
(608) 835-5763
holymotherchurch.41pi.com
SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship
PEOPLE’S UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Pastor Jason Mahnke
(608) 835-3755
www.peoplesumc.org
Communion is the 1st & 3rd
weekend
SATURDAY
5 p.m. Worship
SUNDAY
9 and 10:30 a.m. Worship
ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN CHURCH
625 E. Netherwood, Oregon
Pastor Paul Markquart and Pastor
Emily Tveite
(608) 835-3154
5 p.m. Saturday evening Worship
8 a.m. Traditional Sunday Worship
9:15 a.m. Sunday School & Coffee
Fellowship
10:30 a.m. New Community
Worship (10:00 a.m. Summer)
VINEYARD COMMUNITY CHURCH
Oregon Community Bank & Trust, 105 S.
Alpine Parkway, Oregon
Bob Groth, Pastor
(608) 835-9639
SUNDAY
10 a.m. Worship
ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST - Paoli
At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB
Rev. Sara Thiessen
(608) 845-5641
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m. Family Worship
• 7 p.m. Alcoholics
Anonymous meeting
at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
and Friday
• 7 p.m., Al-Anon meet-
ing at First Presbyterian
Church, every Monday
• 7 p.m., Alcoholics
Anonymous closed
meeting, People’s United
Methodist Church, every
Tuesday
• 6:30-7:30 p.m.,
Diabetes Support Group
meeting, Evansville
Senior Center, 320 Fair
St. Call 882-0407 for
information. Second
Tuesday of each month
• 6:30-8 p.m., Parents
Supporting Parents,
LakeView Church,
Stoughton. Third
Tuesday of every month
Support groups
Call 835-6677 to advertise on the
Oregon Observer Church Page
Egg talk
Join the Dane County
UW-Extension at 9:30 a.m.
Friday, March 22, to learn
whether you are consuming a
good egg or a bad egg.
No registration required—
walk-ins welcome at this Ore-
gon Senior Center program.
Senior job search
Seniors can learn job
search techniques at 2 p.m.
Friday, March 22, at the Ore-
gon Senior Center.
Thi s week’s cl ass i s
“Advanced LinkedIn.” The
advanced LinkedIn workshop
will help you create your own
professional LinkedIn net-
working account and learn to
navigate its many features.
You must have basic comput-
er skills and an email account
to attend this session.
The workshops, led by the
Dane County Job Center, are
free for those over the age of
50.
Call Anne at 835-5801 to
register for these free classes.
Holy Land talk
Dennis Jenkyns will give a
brief history and showcase the
holy places of the four mono-
theistic Abrahamic faiths at 2
p.m. Thursday, March 28, at
the Oregon Senior Center.
Each has connections to the
Holy Land, which includes
the state of Israel, the Pales-
tinian territories, Jordan and
parts of Lebanon. He will also
explain why many religious
philosophers, academics and
social scientists believe that
peace in the Holy Land is not
only possible, it is inevitable!
There will be plenty of time
for questions as we examine
the view that the world is one
country and humanity its citi-
zens.
Call 835-5801 to sign up
for this free program.
A to Z Farm
Spring is lambing time. A
to Z Farms will be bringing
some darling little lambs and
other adorable baby animals
to the Oregon Senior Center
for guests to meet, pet and
hold.
Come and enjoy this free
hands-on program at 10 a.m.
Friday, March 29.
Coming up
Thursday, March 21
• 7 p.m., Artisan cheese class, Firefly Coffeehouse,
wicheeseclass.com
Friday, March 22
• 9:30 a.m., UW-Extension egg class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-8501
• 2 p.m., Senior job workshop, Oregon Senior Center,
835-8501
Monday, March 25
No school - OSD spring break
• 9:30-11:30 a.m., A to Z Farm visit, Oregon Public
Library
• 2-4 p.m., Sharpie tie-dye session, Oregon Youth
Center
Tuesday, March 26
No school - OSD spring break
• 9:30 - noon, Field trip to Aldo Leopold Nature Center
• 10-10:30 a.m., Preschool dance party, Oregon
Public Library
• 1:15- 2 p.m., Continuing piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 1:30 or 3:30 p.m., Candy and cake pop class,
Netherwood Knoll Elementary School
• 2:15- 3 p.m., Beginning piano class, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 3-5 p.m., Drawing and cartoon workshop,
Netherwood Knoll Elementary School
Wednesday, March 27
No school - OSD spring break
• 9:30 - 11 a.m., Mythical creature face painting and
crafts, Oregon Public Library
• 1:30 or 3:30 p.m., Fairy and gnome gardens,
Netherwood Knoll Elementary School
• 2-4 p.m., Crocheting class for youth, Oregon Youth
Center
Thursday, March 28
No school - OSD spring break
• 10 a.m. - noon, Free LEGO play time, Oregon Public
Library.
• 2 p.m. Holy lands religion talk, Oregon Senior
Center, 835-5801
• 1:30 or 3:30 p.m., Woodworking Rube Goldberg
machine workshop, Netherwood Knoll Elementary
Community calendar
Thursday, March 21
Oregon Village Board
Meeting (of Mar. 18)
Friday, March 22
Oregon Chamber of
Commerce Awards (of Mar.
16)
Saturday, March 23
Oregon Men’s Bowling
Tournament (of Mar. 21)
Sunday, March 24
Worship Service: People’s
United Methodist Church
Monday, March 25
“Meet the Candidates” (of
Mar. 21)
Tuesday, March 26
“Dealing With Grief” Talk @
Oregon Senior Center (of Mar.
12)
Wednesday, March 27
U.S. Army News
Thursday, March 28
“Meet the Oregon School
Board Candidates”
WOW 98 & 983
Activities
Monday, March 25
AM—Reflexology
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
1:00 Get Fit
1:00 RSVP Sewing
1:30 Bridge
Tuesday, March 26
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
9:30 Bingo
12:30 Sheepshead
12:30 Stoughton Shopping
1:15 Piano Class
2:15 Piano Class
Wednesday, March 27
AM—Foot Care
9:00 CLUB
9:15 Zumba Gold
1:00 Get Fit
2:00 Knit/Crochet Group
Thursday, March 28
AM—Chair Massage
9:00 Pool Players
9:15 Stretch & Strengthen
12:30 Bills Shopping
1:00 Cribbage
2:00 The Four Monotheistic
Religions in the Holy Land
Friday, March 29
9:00 CLUB
9:00 Wii Bowling
9:30 Blood Pressure
10:00 A to Z Farm Visit
1:00 Get Fit
Menu
Monday, March 25
Tatar Tot Casserole,
Chuck Wagon Corn, Pear
Half, Corn Bread, Cookie
VO: Tatar Tot Casserole
w/Soy

Tuesday, March 26
Baked Chicken /Gravy,
Mashed Potato, Mixed
Vegetables, Mandarin
Oranges, Multi Grain Bread
VO: Veggie Patty
Wednesday, March 27
Meat Balls w/Sauce,
Spaghetti, Green Beans,
Pineapple, W.W. Bread,
Parmesan Cheese
VO: Soy Beef Sauce
Thursday, March 28
Beef Stew, Fruit Cocktail,
Biscuit, Easter Cookie
VO: Stew W/ Soy
SO: California Cob
Friday, March 29
Lemon Cod Fish
Fillet, Cheesy Potatoes,
Asparagus, Ambrosia Salad,
Banana Cream Pie
VO: Cheesy Casserole
ORE 95 & 984
Thursday, March 21
OHS Orchestra Concert (of
Mar. 19)
Friday, March 22
OHS Choir @ WI Capitol
Rotunda (of Mar. 15)
Saturday, March 23
OHS Chorus Concert (of
Mar. 21)
Sunday, March 24
“Normal Development in
Children” (of Mar. 9)
Monday, March 25
“Meet the Oregon School
Board Candidates” / 6:30 pm-
LIVE--Oregon School Board
Meeting
Tuesday, March 26
“Meet the Candidates” (of
Mar. 21)
Wednesday, March 27
PVE Science Fair (of Mar. 9)
Thursday, March 28
Oregon School Board
Meeting (of Mar. 25)
Village of Oregon Cable Access TV program times same for all channels. A
new program begins daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and at 1, 4, 7
and 10 a.m. 900 Market St., Oregon. Phone: 291-0148;
email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net, or visit www.OCAmedia.com.
Community cable listings
Senior center
Time is a Spring
Every day is a new day! Each day is literally a new creation,
the unfolding of something divine. The sun rises and sets with
only slight variations every day, just as the seasons return at their
appointed time each year. Time literally pulses or oscillates, like a
perpetual spring. Even the longer periods of time appear to have
this characteristic oscillation. The universe is expanding, and
will eventually reach the point of maximum expansion and start
contracting, only to contract back to the point of a giant cosmic
implosion, which will set the universe expanding again. But, time
is also like a spring from which life-giving water flows. That is,
time is a never-ending source of being. It continually flows and
all beings arise within the fabric of time. Only the ultimate Being,
God, is outside of time. As finite, temporal beings we cannot wrap
our minds around the nature of time, and we might feel a bit like
Einstein when he remarked that “the only reason for time is so that
everything doesn’t happen at once.” Presumably for God all things
are experienced simultaneously, but we can only imagine what
that might be like. Time is truly a spring, a never-ending source of
wonder.
“Whatever is has already been, and what will be has been before;
and God will call the past to account.”
Ecclesiastes 3:15
Spring break
programs
Many events are planned in
Oregon for spring break.
A to Z Farms is bringing
live animals to the library
from 9:30 - 11:30 a.m. Mon-
day, March 25.
Turn that boring white
T-shirt into something excit-
ing with Sharpies.
Children in grades 5-8 can
bring their own white T-shirts
to the Oregon Youth Center
to make some new duds.
This free workshop takes
place from 2-4 p.m. Mon-
day, March 25.
On Tuesday, March 26,
there will be a Preschool
Dance Party from 10-10:30
a.m. at the Oregon Public
Library
There will also be an Aldo
Leopold Nature Center Field
Trip from 9:30 a.m. to noon.
Indulge a sweet tooth at the
Candy and Cake Pops class at
1:30 or 3:30 p.m. at Nether-
wood Knoll
Ki ds i n ki ndergart en
through fourth grade can
have fun with fruits, nuts,
etc., and also use molds to
make special creations.
A Drawing and Cartoon-
ing Workshop will be held
from 3-5 p.m. at Netherwood
Knoll.
On Wednesday, March 27,
there will be Mythical Crea-
tures Crafts and Face Paint-
ing from 9:30 - 11 a.m. at the
Oregon Public Library.
Netherwood Knoll will
host a Fairy and Gnome Gar-
dens at 1 or 3 p.m.
Ki ds i n ki ndergart en
through fourth grade can
landscape with plants, rocks,
and characters to create a tiny
paradise.
Kids in grades 5-8 can
enjoy an afternoon of cro-
cheting with friends from 2-4
p.m. at the Youth Center.
On Thursday, March 28,
kids can enjoy free LEGO
play from 10 a.m. - noon at
the library.
There will be a program
where light woodworking
meets Rube Goldberg. Bring
your playful, creative energy
to design and build a com-
plex machine at 1 p.m. or 3
p.m. Thursday, March 28, at
Netherwood Knoll elemen-
tary School.
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
7
American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its Subsidiaries
American Family Insurance Company
Home Office – Madison, WI 53783
© 2011 002131 – Rev. 6/11
We’re proud to celebrate 25
years of service.
And we’re happy to be part of this
community. Thank you for your
business and your trust. We look
forward to many more successful
years together.
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville St
Oregon, WI 53575
Bus: (608) 835-5100
dsliter@AmFam.com
U
N
2
7
4
6
6
7
Experienced
Trusted
Independent
Dedicated
Vote April 2, 2013
Paid for by Lynda Farrar for School Board Dennis Farrar, treasurer
Re-eLect
LynDA FARRAR
oregon School Board
U
N
2
6
7
6
1
5
Photo by Mark Ignatowski
Community Supported Agriculture
While snow still covers the ground, farmers are looking forward to a hearty growing season. The
Fair Shares Community Supported Agriculture group held an information fair at Netherwood Knoll
Elementary School where prospective buyers could meet farmers and sign up for CSA shares.
Sophomores
3.2 - 3.59
Jordan Anderson, Joseph
Andriacchi, Anissa Bar-
ron, Ryan Barry, Clayton
Boehm, Jessica Boley, Lau-
ren Brown, Avery Carpen-
ter, Ariel Colin, Mitchell
Condon, Brennen Deegan,
Daniel Dombrowski, Teana
Gombar, Parker Griebel,
Tyler Hake, Jordon Hauge,
Cole Hefty, Derrick Hen-
richs, Michael Heyn, Brett
Hinesh, Samuel Horsnell,
Zackary Jensen, Mary Jen-
son, Hannah Joswig, Syd-
ney King, Hunter Klus,
Lucas Knipfer, Victoria
LaBrosse, Benjamin Leake,
James Lemke, Stephanie
Li echt y, Garret t Mai er,
Sven Mar nauzs, Ni ko-
lay McGilligan-Setmire,
Chr i st opher McGui ne,
Madeleine Meeker, Mitch-
ell Morhoff, Izaac Nelson,
Andr ew Nel son, Zach-
ary Novotny, Megan Pear-
son, Riley Peckham, Kyle
Petras, Caroline Rice, Nico-
las Romero, Omar Sacra-
mento, Abby Schmitt, Dan-
ielle Schroeder, Nicholas
Steidemann, DeEtte Talley,
Markus Tobias, Alexander
Tucker, Benjamin Vogt,
Valerie Walowit, Kayla
Whip, Mason Wyland
3.6 – 3.99
Nicholas Adler, Sarah
Anderson, Kyle Barron,
Kaci Bausch, Nina Bran-
denburg, Ashley Brech-
lin, Brenna Burke, Austin
Busler, Allison Chapman,
Al exandra Chri st ensen,
Joshua Christensen, Jar-
rett Cina, Camilina Diaz,
Mackenzie Farris, Paityn
Fleming, Quintin Gaus,
Er i ca Ger ow, Shel bey
Hagen, John Hermus, Colin
Hughes, Hannah Hyames,
Sean Hynek, Andrew Igl,
Li ndsey Jaeggi , Kel sey
Jahn, Peter Kane, Wilhelm
Kessenich, Peter Kissling,
Zachary Klementz, Aliza-
beth Kramer, Cassandre
Krier, Caylan Laundrie,
Bai l ey Lubi nski , Tasha
Mart i n, Cl ai re Massey,
Kyle Moen, William Paltz,
Spencer Pearson, Brenna
Petersen, Rosilyn Phillips,
Riley Rosemeyer, Yanique
Rowe, Kaela Ryan, Wil-
l i am Sanford, Cameron
Schel l er - Sui t or , Ter yl
Schmidt, Ethan Schulting,
Emily Schwartzstein, James
Skiles, Miles Stoffel, Peter
Stoffel, Raegan Tervort,
Carson Torhorst, Mack-
enzie Torpy, Alexa Usel-
mann, Ana Walker
4.0
Daniel Griffith, Brendan
Lawry, Hannah McAnulty,
Elliot Moravec, Claire Pfef-
fer, Alida Weidensee
Juniors
3.2 – 3.59
Bailey Adkins, Benja-
min Allen, Jordan Bales,
Jennifer Baron, CarolAnne
Baryenbruch, Jere Bauer,
Dustin Brashi, Kyle Cari-
gnan, Alison Christensen,
Amanda Douglass, Taylor
Espich, Maxwell Farness,
Carly Foor, Emily Gefke,
Maddi son Gi t s, Aar on
Gochberg, Daniel Gorman,
Thomas Grady, Al l i son
Greene, Megan Guthmiller,
Mason Higgins, Danielle
Ironmonger, Isaac Jacobs,
Ashl ey Jacobson, Troy
Johnson, Valerie Jones,
Hannah Kane, Meaghan
Kelly, Alexander Knight,
Jack Krueger, Mi chael
Kundert, Cameron Kursel,
Jessica Kutz, Erin Lalor,
Katherine Ligler, Kristin
Marshall, Mariah Martin,
Abraham Maurice, Mor-
gan McKenna, Abi gai l
Meier, Danielle Moore,
Tyler Mortensen, Samuel
Mosiman, Logan Mrozen-
ski, Ethan Muehlenbruch,
Nicholas Murkve, Bryce
Murphy, Alex Neal, Tay-
lor Nyman, Halie Osborne,
Mitchell Paltzer, Jonathan
Peterson, Jonathan Pow-
ers, Bryan Putnam, Bradley
Rehrauer, Claire Reimer,
Will Reinicke, John Rhin-
er, Marl ee Rol fsmeyer,
Jackson Schneider, Sarah
Schultz, Kyle Shillingstad,
Hayley Stensaas, Nicho-
las Strycharske, Morgan
Szabo, Dakota Tollakson,
Chad Walsh, Jackson Wil-
helm, Ian Williams, Lauren
Wysocky, Aleksandra Yun-
yayeva
3.6 – 3.99
Carly Bausch, Katelyn
Boehnen, Katie Borden,
Megan Br ugger , Col i n
Byron, Ruby Carpenter,
Kayl a Cat l i n, Jonat han
Conduah, Shane Coo-
per, Katie Donner, Helen
Feest, Jason Fourdraine,
Lara Frankson, Cari ssa
Goodwick, Rachel Guen-
ther, Rachel Hakes, Ryan
Hale, Natalie Hall, Elinor
Higgins, Rachel Hughes,
Maya Irvin-Vitela, Madi-
son Kl onsi nski , Nat a-
lie Knox, Audrey Kratz,
Chl oe, LaFever , Chi -
Ching Lam, Megan Lowe,
Anne McBride, Alexandra
McCann, Anna McCartney,
Morgan McCorkle, Caro-
line McCormick, Nathan
McWilliams, Miranda Mel-
len, Nicholas Miller, Abi-
gail Milski, Arielle Molot,
Emily Moran, Madeline
Morgan, Hanna Morhoff,
Shannon Ol son, Lance
Peterson, Michelle Peter-
son, Pierce Peterson, Gabri-
elle Proto, Colton Purdy,
Daniel Rau, Chaylee Sch-
nabel, Hai l i e Schnabel,
Geneva Seeger, Madeline
Smith, Cosette Sommers,
Mi randa Swi t zky, Kyl e
Webber, Bradlee Wien-
holtz, Jamie Wood, Jennifer
Zernick
4.0
Jenna Ainsworth, Hayley
Christensen, Thomas Eit-
hun, Emily Jost, Mallory
Krumrei, Eliza Neidhart,
Kassandra Nelson, Kayla
Nytes, Alec Onesti, Regan
Paul s, Megan Schmi t t ,
Rebekah Zerbe
Seniors
3.2 – 3.59
Weslee Andersen, Tay-
lor Anderson, Taylor Ash-
worth, Jeffrey Behl i ng,
Kasondra Bertz, Kelsey
Beyler, Klara Bulickova,
Juan Cardenas, Rebecca
Corcoran, Brooke Cros-
sen, Br ooke Debr oux,
Andrew Dow, Emily For-
ster, Courtney Frederick,
Aaron Goldberg, Katiya
Gombar, Greta Greisinger,
Charles Groenier, Robyn
Haggerty, Nicholas Hep-
ner, Nicholas Hubler, Emi-
ly Igl, Amber Jacobsen,
Christian Jacobson, Kara
Jahn, Emily Johnson, Brian
Johnson, Sarah Kahl, Jacob
Kleitsch, Jacob Kluever,
Emma Ledin, Kyle Lopez,
Mackenzie Maier, Han-
nah Markquart, Heather
McAnulty, Tayler McCann,
Christiana McClurg, Colin
McReavy, Haily Morhoff,
Ros s Mus s ehl , Dyl an
Noeske, Jared Novinska,
Derek Owen, Wyatt Paltz-
er, Sidney Peach, Page Pou-
zar, Zachary Ragels, Ethan
Rausch, Tess Reimer, Jes-
sica Reukema, Lydia Rus-
sell, Daniel Schmid, Collin
Schmidt, Anna Schwartzs-
tein, Natalie Shirk, Alexis
Smith, Kurt Stetzer, Dani-
el l e Tanner , El i zabet h
Temte, Aimee Urben, Ava
Wagner, Cordel Weber,
Sara Wendlandt, Gabrielle
Wunsch, Rebecca Wyland,
Annie Zavoral
3.6 – 3.99
Alex Bandt, Adam Besse-
mer, Nathan Bissen, Alexis
Boumstein, Adam Brauns,
Morgan Buchanan, Tawnee
Christians, Amanda Cody,
Jennifer Deegan, Kayla
Evans, Zachary Eyers, Tim-
othy Fallon, Katrina Fisch-
er, Elizabeth Frauchiger,
Heidi Gempeler, Lauren
Hughes, Sar ah Jacobs,
Andrew Jend, Lisa John-
son, Claire Joyce, Mikayla
Kaeppler, Allen Kannal,
Ethan Karls, Sarah Kutz,
Alex LeBrun, Danielle Lee,
Kyle Lessner, Nanfa Likit-
panyachote, Kirbie Luther,
Ryan McGui ne, Hai l ey
Morey, Alexander Nasser-
jah, Alexa Nelson, Blake
Nikolai, Minji Olson, Brit-
tany Peckham, Erica Peters-
en, Zachary Petrie, Alan
Pflaum, Claudio Potenti,
Emily Pressprich, Allison
Prew, Maranda Ri cker,
Al i ce Ri pberger, Tessa
Ryan, Daniel Schwartz,
Cai t l i n Shi rk, Madi son
Slepica, Danielle Slusser,
Danielle Steinberg, Kaitlin
Tushoski, Cole Vaccaro,
Madeline Vogt, Jacob Wall
4.0
Courtney Brien, David
Hallinan, Jeffrey Jaeggi,
Si mon Maur i ce, Scot t
Odorico, Danielle Rock-
we l l , An n a Wa n g e n ,
Michelle Wood
*Edi t or ’ s not e: The
freshmen section of the
honor roll was printed in
last week’s edition of the
Oregon Observer.
Oregon High School honor roll semester 1*
Academic awards
Got a story idea?
We welcome story ideas and photo submissions. Please go to our website and sub-
mit a photo or story idea at ConnectOregonWi.com.
Call or email Jim Ferolie at 845-9559 or ungeditor@wcinet.com with any questions.
8
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Outdoor enthusiasts who
visit southwest Wiscon-
sin’s Driftless Area, which
includes parts of Verona
and Fitchburg, for fishing or
other kinds of outdoor rec-
reation are invited to share
ideas to improve fishing
access and management of
state lands.
As the Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
begins the process of pre-
paring a master plan for
these state properties, it will
hold public input meetings.
Four meetings are scheduled
for DNR’s South Central
Region, including one in
Fitchburg March 28 from 4-7
p.m. at Fitchburg City Hall,
5520 Lacy Road.
People attending the meet-
ings can see a decade’s worth
of information showing fish
populations in the affected
streams, view maps of exist-
ing public access, and learn
how climate change is pro-
jected to impact the future
distribution of trout and
bass throughout the Driftless
Area.
In Wisconsin, the Drift-
less Area occupies the west-
ern and southwestern por-
tion of the state that escaped
the last glacial period and
is characterized by rugged
topography, springs, cold-
water streams and rock out-
croppings. The public meet-
ings are part of a long-term
master planning process for
more than 200 properties
that will guide DNR’s habitat
management and land acqui-
sition efforts in the Driftless
Area over the next 15 years.
Most of the properties are
narrow strips along some
of the most desirable trout
and smallmouth bass fishing
waters in Wisconsin. Local
fisheries biologists will be
on-hand at the meetings to
make short presentations and
answer questions.
DNR currently owns about
28,000 acres in the Driftless
Area and holds easements on
more than 8,000 acres of land
that allow anglers access to
more than 300 streams.
As a first step in the devel-
opment of the master plan,
DNR staff created a back-
ground report describing the streams, the size and
abundance of trout and bass
in different watersheds, the
relative resilience of streams
to climate change and a host
of other issues.
The report is
available on the DNR web-
site, dnr.wi.gov, by searching
for “master planning” and
clicking on the Driftless Area
link.
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For Easter & Mother’s Day!
For Reservations
BarB Feeney and Charles
UphoFF
Special to the Observer
Candidates who will be
on the ballot for the upcom-
ing elections, April 2, spoke
at a Candidate Forum spon-
sored by the Oregon Area
Progressives March 12 at
the Oregon Village Hall.
Or egon Hi gh School
seni or, Ryan McGui ne,
was the moderator for the
forum.
Local school board candi-
dates were introduced first
and answered questions
submitted by the audience.
Dan Krause and Rae
Vogeler were present and
gave opening statements
and talked about why they
were seeking election to
the school board. Candidate
Linda Ferrar was unable to
be present but sent a state-
ment, which was read to the
audience.
Pam Hughes also sent in
a statement indicating that
she would be moving out of
the state in the near future
and thus would be unable to
serve, though her name will
still be on the ballot.
The school board candi-
dates responded to ques-
t i ons about ant i ci pat ed
funding shortages, their
positions on a proposed ref-
erendum and the removal
from the District’s Employ-
ees Handbook of a “just
cause”requirement for dis-
cipline or termination of
District employees.
Whi l e Or egon Town
Boar d Chai r candi dat e
Chris Johnson was present,
incumbent Darryl Weber
was unable to be due to his
wife’s recent surgery.
All of the Oregon Town
Board candidates Sheila
Spear, Arlan Kay, Wayne
Ace and Fred Clark, Jr.
spoke about their qualifica-
tions and reasons for run-
ning for office.
The candi dat es wer e
asked questions about the
Town’s role in planning
and maintaining the pro-
posed Anderson Park and
plans for a bike path con-
necting the Village of Ore-
gon to Fish Hatchery Road.
Al t hough unopposed,
Village of Oregon Trustee
candidates Darlene Groe-
nier and Jeanne Carpenter
also gave brief statements
about their qualifications
and reasons for running for
office.
Eric Poole and Village
Board President candidate
Steve Staton, who are also
running unopposed, were
unable to attend the forum.
The upcoming elections
will include races for a seat
on the Wisconsin Supreme
Court and for Dane County
Circuit Court.
Local candidates speak on issues at forum
Photos submitted
Darlene Groenier is a candidate for Village Board who’s running unopposed. She along with other local candidates for the spring election
spoke at the candidate forum March 13.
WDNR holds public meeting on Driftless Area fishing access in Fitchburg
A map of
Wisconsin’s
Driftless
Area.
Photo courtesy
of WDNR
SportS
Jeremy Jones, sports editor
845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Thursday, March 21, 2013
Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor
845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com
Fax: 845-9550
For more sports coverage, visit:
ConnectOregonWI.com
The Oregon Observer
9
Girls basketball
Gits drives to first team
Juni or forward Maddy Gi t s
made her third straight first-team
All-Badger South Conference
squad this season.
Gi t s l ed Or egon wi t h 356
points (14.8 per game) and 219
rebounds (9.1 per game) this sea-
son. She shot 49 percent from the
field and also collected 35 steals
and 31 assists.
Also making the list was honor-
able mention senior guard Maran-
da Ricker, who finished with 150
points this season. Ricker also
had 21 steals and 40 assists and
shot 73 percent from the free-
throw line.
Ricker signed a
National Letter of
Intent to play bas-
ketball for Clarke
(Dubuque, Iowa)
Uni ver s i t y next
year.
Sophomore for-
ward Riley Rose-
me y e r d i d n o t
make the list, despite scoring 170
points.
Oregon finished 12-12 overall
(5-7 conference) and won i t s
WIAA Division 2 regional quar-
terfinal game before falling to
Stoughton in the regional semifi-
nals.
Ot her fi rst -t eamers j oi ni ng
Gi t s are seni ors Tessa Mers-
ber ger ( St ought on) , Amanda
Kelm (Madison Edgewood), JoJo
Chryst (Madi son Edgewood),
Morgan Bl umer (Mi l t on) and
Lauren Pfeifer (Fort Atkinson);
juniors Sam Foti (Madison Edge-
wood), Taylor Nelson (Monona
Grove), Alexa Kelsey (Monona
Grove); and sophomore Emma
Meriggioli (Madison Edgewood).
Other honorable mentions join-
i ng Ri cker are seni ors Emi l y
Bongard (Madison Edgewood),
Liz Westrick (Milton), Ashley
Werner (Monona Grove), Kelly
Calhoun (Monona Grove), Heath-
er Barta (Monroe) and Megan
Robson (Stoughton); and juniors
Sydney Harms (Milton), Patricia
Dumas (Stoughton) and Maren
Schultz (Stoughton).
–Anthony Iozzo
File photo by Anthony Iozzo
Junior forward Maddy Gits (with ball) led Oregon with 14.8 points per game and 9.1 rebounds per game this season to make the first-team All-Badger South for the third
time. Senior guard Maranda Ricker also made the team as an honorable mention.
Ricker
Photo submitted
The Oregon Community Swim Club Tigersharks sent 13 swimmers to the 12 -and-under state meet Feb 22-24 at the
University of Wisconsin- Madison Natatorium.
Tigersharks swim at state
Oregon club swimming
Thirteen Oregon Community Swim
Club Tigersharks participated in the
2013 12-and-under Wisconsin State
Championship swim meet Feb. 22-24
at the University of Wisconsin- Madi-
son Natatorium.
Maddy Kelley, 10, swam six individ-
ual events and two relays, swimming
personal best times in all events and
placing 10th in the 50 free and 18th in
the 50 butterfly.
Ian Charles, 12, swam three individ-
ual events and placed 39th in the 100
backstroke, 38th in the 50 free and 27th
in the 100 free. All of his times were
personal bests.
Grace Roemer, 12, placed 45th in the
100 backstroke, 48th in the 50 back and
36th in the 50 butterfly.
Hanna Rohrer, 10, dropped 7.26 sec-
onds in the 200 individual medley to
finish 41st and placed 48th in the 50
Butterfly.
Hailey Rothwell, 10, placed 18th
in the 100 butterfly, 52nd in the 100
breaststroke, 30th in 50 butterfly and
54th in the 50 free.
Her older sister Jordy Rothwell, 12,
placed in the top 50 in the 50, 100 and
200 breaststroke.
Taylor Semenic, 12, swam personal
best times and placed 31st in the 50 but-
terfly and 37th in the 100 butterfly.
Jenna Dobrinsky, 10, with nine state
cuts and ranked in the top 16 in those
events in the state, could not swim at
the meet because of a season-ending
shoulder injury.
Two Tigersharks competed at the
2013 13-and-older Wisconsin State
Championship swim meet March 1-3 at
Brown Deer.
Jackson Marsden, 13, finished
38th in the 50 freestyle, 22nd in the
100 backstroke and 51st in the 100
Turn to Swim/Page 10
Track and field
Carpenter,
Matthews
pace Panthers
Jeremy Jones
Sports editor
Junior Ruby Carpenter and
Lucas Mathews led the Ore-
gon boys and girls track teams
in the large school division of
Saturday’s Nelson-Daniels
Classic inside UW-Whitewa-
ter’s Kachel Fieldhouse.
The first meet of the sea-
son, Carpenter led all scorers
for the Panthers, taking eighth
place with a clearance of 8-6
in the pole vault. Carpenter
went on to finish ninth in the
55-meter hurdles, just missing
the finals with a time of 9.72
seconds.
“I think both the boys and
girls teams have promising
seasons ahead of them,” said
first-year head coach Kathy
Mentink, who was an assistant
with the Panthers since 2006.
Junior Valerie Jones turned
in a ninth-place finish in the
high jump (4-10).
Cary-Grove (Ill.) (65.5)
held off Milwaukee King (64)
for first place, while Oregon
finished last out of 25 teams
with one point.
“Nelson Daniels is certainly
a competitive meet,” Mentink
said. ”Having a few Illinois
schools present certainly con-
tributes to that, but the number
of athletes competing in gen-
eral (30 plus in most events)
increases the level of competi-
tion.”
Oregon’s boys team was
not at full strength for Friday’s
JV meet or Saturday due to
some athletes having prior
co-curricular commitments,
while some were just banged
up from the first two weeks
of practice head coach Ned
Lease said.
Matthews was the Panthers’
top finisher, tying for ninth in
the high jump with a height of
5-10.
Oregon’s 4x200 relay
of Lucas Knipfer, Brennen
Turn to Track/Page 10
10
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
Deegan, Jawon Turner and
Mathews took top honors for
the Panthers, finishing ninth in
1:38.85.
Oconomowoc (54) and
Arrowhead (51) separated
themselves from the rest of
the field.
Lease said the first compe-
tition of the season is impor-
tant from a coaching stand-
point because it is a real ‘live
action’ situation.
“The past two weeks of
practice have shown a little of
what could be hiding inside
of an athlete, but when the
gun goes off, that truly tells
the tale,” he said. “It’s also an
opportunity for the athletes
to go out there and knock the
winter rust off or showcase
their preseason gains.”
Wald’s, doesn’t hurt. Niday
said athletes like them are
telling their friends and
demonstrating how fun and
rewarding wrestling can be.
And that only makes next
year even more exciting than
this one.
“A very high percent-
age of the parents said they
had a positive experience.
They saw personal growth
in their kids, and that is what
we are looking for,” he said.
“Hopefully, those kids all
bring a friend next year, and
we are going to have to try
and figure out what to do for
space. And we will have a
problem that we are looking
forward to handling.”
State grapplers
Sergent, 11, (69 pounds)
and Wald, 8, (120) said they
are both looking forward to
state Friday and Saturday at
the Alliant Energy Center in
Madison.
“It feels good because
the last three years, I have
been trying to make it. So to
make it this year is a good
experience,” Sergent said. “I
just want to have fun and be
good.”
Wald, who has wrestled
since he was two, took it one
step further.
“I want to get first at
state,” he said.
But for both wrestlers, the
program has been more than
success. They both said they
like to be with friends and
learn the sport while still
being able to have fun.
And both wrestlers have
dreams to one day wrestle
for the Oregon High School
varsity team, which is what
Niday said the program is all
about.
“It is nice to have kids
going to state this year, and
we always celebrate when
we have kids go to state,” he
said. “But really, our goal is
to feed the high school. My
goal would be to have all
these kids be on the podium
at high school and not grade
school. Not many people
remember the fifth-grade
state champ.”
Both Sergent and Wald
are in the advanced program
with youth wrestling, but
there is also a beginner’s
program that is a little less
intense.
Niday said the advanced
program is not unlike a high
school practice session,
some athletes working two
to four nights a week to pre-
pare.
“They are very dedicated
to it,” he said. “They are
coming here, working hard
and are very disciplined.
Making the state tourna-
ment at this age, with all the
amount of kids out there, is
just as much of an accom-
plishment as at the high
school level.”
Starting young
While Niday said it is
important to start younger
children to prepare them
for wrestling success in the
future, he doesn’t want to
burn kids out either.
In order to continue the
growth in the program, he
wants to not only teach fun-
damentals and discipline but
also keep the sport fun.
“If we can start them that
young and keep them com-
ing back, then we are doing
the right thing,” he said.
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Numbers: Retention of younger wrestlers increases as program triples in size
Continued from page 1
Several area children participat-
ed in the 2013 Youth Archery
Tournament Saturday at the
Oregon Sportsman’s Club.
Above, an archer pulls his
arrow out of the target after
shooting.
Upper right, Ben Dillman of
Brooklyn readies his bow to hit
a target in the outlaw 12-and-
over bracket. He finished
fourth.
Left, a girl aims carefully to hit
her target.
Photos by Victoria Vlisides
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Local archers shoot to success
Steele Mellum, Jenna
Weis and Matt Weis of
Oregon al l pl aced Sat -
urday at the 2013 Youth
Archery Tournament at
the Oregon Sportsman’s
Club.
Tyler Gerwig and Gar-
rett Maier of Brooklyn
also placed.
The tournament utilizes
National Field Archery
Association (NFAA) blue
and white 5-spot or single-
spot targets and allows
shooting 60 arrows from
10 or 20 yards (depend-
i ng on age / bracket ),
for a total of 300 points,
according to the Oregon
Sportsman’s Club website.
Mellum took first in the
Tier 2 of the 12-14 unlim-
ited bracket and second in
Tier 2 of the 12-and-over
outlaw bracket.
Jenna Weis took first in
the 9-11 unlimited brack-
et, while Maier was first in
the 12+ outlaw bracket.
Maier also took second
in 15-18 unlimited.
Matt Weis and Gerwig
each took second. Matt
Weis was in the 12+ out-
law bracket, while Gerwig
was in the 12-14 bare bow
bracket.
For full results, go to
oregonsport smans. com/
archery/youthtournament.
html.
Here is a list of defini-
tions to understand the
types of archery at the
tournament.
• Bare Bow - Fi nger
shooting, no sights
• Li mi t ed - Fi nger
shooting, no restrictions
on sights/stabilizers
• Unlimited - Release
shooting, no restrictions
on sights/stabilizers
• Outlaw - 12 years old
and older any equipment
10 yards
• Advanced Under 12 -
Any equipment 20 yards
– Victoria Vlisides
freestyle; all events were per-
sonal best times.
Tess Frey, 17, advanced to
finals in 4 of her 5 events and
placed 12th in 200 free, 14th
in the 50 free, 16th in the 200
backstroke, 10th in the 100
backstroke and 24th in 100
free.
Frey advanced to the US
Central Zone Sectional Spring
Speedo Championship meet
in Waukesha.
Jake Larson, 13, also a
member of the 13-and-older
state team with three state
cuts, could not swim at the
meet because of a season-end-
ing knee injury that required
reconstructive surgery.
The OCSC Tigersharks
begin the 2013 spring season
April 9-12 with a Tigershark
Swim Camp at the Oregon
Pool for kids interested in
joining the team.
For camp and club informa-
tion, please visit oregon swim-
club.org.
Continued from page 9
Swim
Track
Continued from page 9
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
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Teachers ’ role
But beyond the candi-
dates’ shared commitment
to better local schools, dif-
ferences remain.
Krause last year ran a
write-in campaign that gar-
nered more than 1,000 votes
despite not having his name
on the ballot.
He’s back this year, he
said, with a similar mission
– to improve the relation-
ship between Oregon teach-
ers and administrators.
Teachers, he said, “feel
kind of powerless” in the
district, in part because of
state laws that have under-
cut public unions but also
because they’ve had a mini-
mal role in some major local
decisions.
“We’ve got to find a way
to bring the teachers and the
employees into the deci-
sion-making process.”
Li k e wi s e , Vo g e l e r
emphasizes the need for
more “communication and
collaboration” between the
district and its staff, resi-
dents and students.
While knocking on “hun-
dreds” of doors duri ng
her campaign, she’s heard
too often that residents
felt uninformed about last
year’s failed $33 million
referendum t hat sought
major improvements to Ore-
gon High School, Oregon
Middle School and the ath-
letic fields south of OHS,
she said.
St udent s, parent s and
teachers have also com-
plained that a controversial
grading policy, first imple-
mented in the fall of 2010,
isn’t working, she said.
Krause also questioned
that policy that says most
homewor k or i n- cl as s
assignments shouldn’t count
toward a students’ final
grade. Instead, those “for-
mative” assignments should
give students a chance to
practice skills, while their
grades would be based on
“summative” assessments –
such as final exams, essays
or projects.
“I t ’ s not wor ki ng, ”
Vogeler said of the grading
policy. “Some students are
really falling through the
cracks. … That’s something
we cannot allow to continue
to happen.”
Both said the policy takes
away a teachers’ discretion
on how to educate kids.
“You’re tying (teachers’)
hands in yet another way,”
Krause said. “I think that’s
unnecessary.”
‘The overall picture’
Neither challenger lev-
eled criticism directly at
Farrar. But Farrar counters
the notion that the board
hasn’t done its best to com-
municate with residents and
staff.
“I think that’s wrong,”
she said.
The board hosted hours of
tours and listening sessions
before the failed referendum
last year, and met many
times with staff before the
grading policy was passed.
In recent months, it relied
on staff input to create a
“master list” of potential
construction projects, too.
She also noted that con-
stituents call her at home,
stop her in the grocery store
and are free to speak at any
public meeting – but don’t
always show up.
“I think we do listen, we
do give opportunities,” she
said.
Farrar backed the grading
policy, saying it’s central
goal – that grades should
reflect what students know,
rather than how hard they
worked – is a good one that
needs time to work out the
kinks before it’s judged a
success or failure.
Farrar had been lukewarm
to both the 2012 referendum
and the grading policy but
eventually supported both.
That speaks to her ability to
“listen to all angles” before
making “snap decisions,”
she said.
“You have to see the
overall picture to know
what you can afford to give
the best education for the
buck,” she said.
Duri ng t he t wo years
the board has discussed
potential referenda, Farrar
has constantly said it must
judge whether projects are
“needs” or “wants.”
“Can we give a good
education without it?” she
said. “That’s how I judge a
need.”
Krause sai d he vot ed
for last year’s referendum,
though – like many, includ-
ing Farrar – he supported
some aspects of it more
than others. He’s glad the
board recently postponed
any decision on future ref-
erenda, though he feels “it’s
important to do a referen-
dum soon.”
Vogeler voted against last
year’s proposal, though she
says school buildings do
need improvements. Again,
she feels the board first
needs to take more time to
hear from constituents first,
who will feel “invested” if
they have a say in decisions.
Different perspectives
Al l t hr ee candi dat es
blasted the recent state
budget proposal that would
freeze spending for public
schools yet increase funding
for vouchers. Krause and
Vogeler commended the
board for penning a letter
earlier this month that blast-
ed Gov. Scott Walker’s pro-
posals as an “all-out attack
on public education.”
But Krause and Vogel-
er also said they want the
board to revisit its “employ-
ee handbook,” passed last
year, that replaced collec-
tive-bargaining agreements
between staff and adminis-
trators in a post-Act 10 era.
Krause said the handbook
here is mostly fine, though
he’d like the district to roll
back a change that made it
easier to terminate or disci-
pline employees, something
he spoke publicly about last
year.
Vogeler, a former Green
Party candidate for U.S.
Senate in 2006, and Krause
– who describes himself
as a “left-leaning progres-
sive” - both earned endorse-
ments from the local teach-
ers’ union and two regional
employers’ unions, AFSC-
ME and the South Central
Federation of Labor. Farrar
said she didn’t seek those
endorsements to “remain
independent.”
If elected, Krause said
he’d like to push the district
to pursue more eco-con-
scious “green” curriculum
and seek ways to reduce the
district’s carbon footprint.
Both Krause and Vogeler
also oppose how the district
has “outsourced” several
evening cleaning jobs over
the past three years to pri-
vate firms after local staff
retired or left.
“I think we should keep
the jobs local,” Vogeler
said. “This is public edu-
cation. We need to keep it
public.”
The son of a teacher and
an appl i ance sal esman,
Krause joined the Peace
Corps in 1992 and taught
English for two years in
Kenya, where he was also a
school administrator. After
the Peace Corps, he earned
a law degree from New
York University.
Vogeler says she’d bring
a fresh perspective to the
board based on her expe-
rience as a social worker
and technical writer who
has developed curriculum,
designed online courses and
led trainings.
Of the three candidates,
Farrar has lived in Oregon
the longest. Among her
priorities if she were re-
elected, she said the district
should continue exploring
how to train staff and fund
schools to expand the effec-
tive use of technology in
classrooms. But she said her
experience on the board has
taught her to be mindful of
both students and taxpayers.
“You have to look at what
your outcomes are going to
be for what you’re paying,”
she said.
OSB: One candidate drops out of race, 3 still vying for two spots
Continued from page 1
Hughes drops out, name remains on ballot
Seth Jovaag
Unifed Newspaper Group
The April 2 ballot for the Oregon
School Board will still have four
names on it, but one candidate has
apparently dropped out of the run-
ning.
In a voice message last Tuesday,
incumbent Pam Hughes told the
Observer she will be moving, pos-
sibly after April, and won’t seek re-
election, but did not elaborate. Phone
calls seeking further comment from
Hughes were not returned.
Unofficially, that makes the four-
way race for two spots on the school
board a three-way contest. But it’s too
late to remove Hughes from the bal-
lots.
As of early this week, Hughes had
not informed district officials of her
plans. If she garners
enough votes to finish
first or second April 2
and decides not to ful-
fill her term, the board
could appoint someone
to fill a one-year term,
then that seat would be
up for re-election next
April for a two-year
term, said Jayne Wick, district admin-
istrative assistant.
Hughes was elected to a three-year
term in 2010 and represented the vil-
lage of Oregon on the 7-member
school board.
Hughes, 51, joined the board in
2010 by finishing second in a three-
way race for two seats, ousting one-
time incumbent Guy Trgo. A mother
of three, she worked as a substitute
teacher and had previously taught
special education and English in mid-
dle schools, as well as at the elemen-
tary school level, in several states.
During her three-year tenure on the
board, Hughes was often the lone vote
against the majority. She opposed
a board policy that most homework
– dubbed “formative assessments” –
shouldn’t factor into students’ final
grades. She also opposed a letter
from the board in 2011 to Gov. Scott
Walker that criticized how the state
funds public schools and the one-year
extension of teachers’ collective bar-
gaining agreement shortly after Walk-
er proposed what became Act 10.
And she voted against holding a $33
million referendum last February that
was ultimately defeated by voters.
Candidates had to file nomination
papers for the school board race Jan.
3.
Hughes
Lynda Farrar (incumbent)
Age: 65
Hometown: LaValle
Current Address: 298 Waterman
St.
Occupation: retired Optometrist
Education: two Bachelor degrees
and a Doctor of Optometry
Family: husband Dennie, children Erin, Erik and
Elin and four grandchildren
Public office experience: school board since
2007, former chair of Wisconsin Optometry
Examining Board and Wisconsin Professional
Engineer Examining Board
Community service: past president of Oregon
Preschool, Inc., past chair Oregon Summer Fest
parade, Delta Phi philanthropic sorority, church
board of trustees, hunter safety course vision
screening, Oregon Chamber of Commerce member,
DECA judge
Dan Krause
Age: 46
Hometown: Various towns in the
Midwest
Current address: 144 Hickory Ct.
Occupation: Attorney
Education: bachelor’s degree, UW-Stevens Point,
master’s and law degree from New York University
Family: wife, Nancy Ciambrone; two kids, Nate,
14, and Jane-Isabella, 8.
Public office experience: none
Community service: Two years in the Peace Corps
(Kenya), 1992-94; member of Oregon Rotary Club,
Knights of Columbus council; volunteer at Holy
Mother of Consolation Church; attorney volunteer
for the Foreclosure Answer Clinic and Veteran’s
Law Center of Madison
Military experience: 18 years in the U.S. Military,
including active Army, Army National Guard and
Army Reserves. A medic in the 1980s and 1990s;
later rejoined as a JAG attorney in 2000 and still
serve as a Reserve Officer (Major). Mobilized twice
(stateside) for a total of 26 months since 2004.
Rae Vogeler
Age: 57
Hometown: Milwaukee
Current address: 299 N. Main St.
Occupation: technical trainer and
technical writer
Education: Bachelor’s in social
work, and A.A.S. in electrical engineering
Family: husband Michael Wunsch, two sons,
Jesse and Carlos Vogeler-Wunsch
Public office experience: none
Community service: member of Oregon Rotary
Club, Oregon Area Chamber of Commerce, Friends
of Oregon Library, Oregon Area Historical Society,
and Oregon Garden Club. Has volunteered for NINA
fund, the Oregon/Brooklyn Food Pantry and as a
mentor at local schools. Past work also includes
working with women, children, families and the
disabled through groups like Meals on Wheels,
Easter Seals and the Laubach Literacy Center.
12
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Rose Day
April 20, 2013
Have fresh flowers delivered to
someone you care about. Only
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on Saturday morning, April 20,
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To order, complete and mail
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No orders taken after April 5.
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or e-mail ajmilestone@charter.net
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Academic honors
Fall 2011 Dean’s List
UW-Whitewater
Alison A Blanchard; Andrew
H Bliefernicht; Kristen M
DuPuis; Elizabeth M Klahn;
Mackenzie C Korpela; Katie
A Landerud; Patrick J Motiff;
Lauren A Strand; Jordan B
Tway; Jacob D Westenberger;
UW-Madison
Fitchburg
Brody Deer Olson, School of
Pharmacy, Honor Roll
Oregon
Emily Margot Biersdorf,
College of Letters and Science,
Dean’s List; Isadore Edward
Branch, School of Business,
Dean’s List; Joshua David
Brauns, College of Engineering,
Dean’s Honor List; Anne Louise
Brethauer, College of Letters
and Science, Dean’s List; Joel
Matthew Bryhan, College of
Engineering, Dean’s Honor List;
Hilary Rose Carpenter, School
of Education, Dean’s List;
Sloan Frances Davis, College
of Letters and Science, Dean’s
List; Tessa Arminda Davis,
College of Letters and Science,
Dean’s List; Bryan Allison
Dow, College of Engineering,
Dean’s Honor List; Whitney
Margrethe Erwin, School
of Pharmacy, High Honor
Roll; Marie Faust, School of
Education, Dean’s List; Lydia
Mary Ginther, School of
Business, Dean’s List; Caitlyn
Hiveley, School of Education,
Dean’s List; Alexandra Kay
Holznecht, College of Letters
and Science, Dean’s List;
Joseph Michael Jaeckels,
College of Engineering, Dean’s
Honor List; Katherine Grace
Jeffris, College of Engineering,
Dean’s Honor List; Lauren
Colleen Jernegan, School of
Human Ecology, Dean’s Honor
List; Taylor Michael Johnston,
College of Engineering, Dean’s
Honor List; Jacqueline Joan
Kursel, School of Education,
Dean’s List; Jessica Leanne
Mayry, College of Agricultural
and Life Sciences, Dean’s
List; Erin Elizabeth Mcallister,
School of Pharmacy, High
Honor Roll; Lauren Miller,
College of Letters and Science,
Dean’s List; Zachary Louis
Niemeyer, College of Letters
and Science, Dean’s List;
Stephanie Lynn Nutt, School
of Education, Dean’s List;
Lindsey Erin Nytes, College of
Letters and Science, Dean’s
List; Paul C. Olson, College
of Engineering, Dean’s Honor
List; Andres Perdomo, College
of Engineering, Dean’s Honor
List; Diana Perdomo, College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences,
Dean’s List; Alexandra
Christine Slepica, School of
Human Ecology, Dean’s Honor
List; Madison Marie Snider,
College of Letters and Science,
Dean’s List; David Michael
Stone, College of Engineering,
Dean’s Honor List; Danielle
Ruth Trudell, School of
Education, Dean’s List; Erik
Keith Vandersanden, College
of Engineering, Dean’s Honor
List; Aaron Michael Zagrodnik,
School of Education, Dean’s
List; Alex Lance Zimmer,
College of Letters and Science
UW-Eau Claire
Mitchell Blazek, Business,
management; Taylor
Brummond, Education and
Human Sciences, music; David
Debano, Business, account-
ing; Stuart Gullick, Business,
accounting; Jason Hinz,
Business, marketing; Jacob
Hustad, Arts and Sciences,
biology; Samuel Krueger, Arts
and Sciences, geography;
Tamra Swinehart, Nursing and
Health Sciences, nursing;
UW-La Crosse
Fitchburg
Austin Richard Janssen,
Finance Major; Matthew I
Karls, Management Major;
Samuel James Karls, Physics
Major;
Oregon
Christina Marie Brugger,
Undeclared Major - CLS;
Gina Marie Harlow, Sociology
Major; Joel J Knuesel,
Exercise and Sport Science
Major: Fitness; Morgan L
Lynch, Sociology Major;
Hannah Marie McAllister,
Archaeological Studies Major;
Eva Ingrid Meyer, Mathematics
Education Major; Matthew
Evan Mosiman, Exercise and
Sport Science Major: Exercise
Science - Fitness Track; Rachel
Naomi Rockwell, Middle
Childhood through Early
Adolescence Education Major;
Elizabeth M Tennyson, Physics
Major: Astronomy Emphasis;
UW-Oshkosh
Jacey Holcomb, Honor Roll;
Jennifer Kaderabek, All A’s;
Krystan Klimke, Honor Roll;
Iowa State University
Daniel A. Schwartzstein,
Kinesiology and Health;
University of Minnesota-
Duluth
Tara S Coberly-Horrall,
College of Liberal Arts, SR,
Geography B A;
Minnesota State University
Mankato
Bradley Weber, SR;
Edgewood College
Jon Bargren of Fitchburg
Upper Iowa University
Fitchburg
Justin Lawrenz, Dwight
Shelton,
Carthage College
Kayleen Hannigan;
St. Norbert College
Alexandra Renee Bresser
Your opinion is something
we always want to hear.
Call 835-6677 or at
connectoregonwi.com
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Let us know
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March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
13
Great Lakes Roofing has an exciting opportunity to
perform calls to local businesses promoting our high
quality roofing services. Hourly wage! Commissions
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INSIDE SALES
Photo submitted
The Oregon DECA chapter members who participated at DECA Regional Conference are as follows in no particular order: Anika Sande, Alex Breitbach, Jessica Jacobs, Madison Klonsinski, Samuel Phelps, Haley
Engelhart, Caroline Rice, Daniel Griffith, Alexandra Christensen, Colin McReavy, Cameren Swiggum, Ryan Barry, Brittany Peckham, Jessica Nankivil, Avery Carpenter, Kyle Moen, Clayton Boehm, Andrew Pliner,
Alex Tucker, Cassandre Krier, Yanique Rowe, Madeline Bjeke, Parker Griebel, Taylor Anderson , Danielle Moore, Nicholas Hepner, Hannah Lowery, Brendan Lawry, Christopher McGuine, Taggart Morley, Sean
Hynek, Erica Gerow and Lauren Tower.
Oregon High Students advance to state DECA conference
Oregon marketing stu-
dents competed at the Dis-
t ri ct DECA Conference
held at Sun Prairie High
School.
The conference was held
in January, with approxi-
mately 35 students from
Oregon participating. More
than 500 students from the
Badger Conference com-
peted and we have a total
of 16 qualifiers who will be
representing Oregon high
school at DECA state for a
shot at Nationals held this
year in California.
The high school students
competed in multiple busi-
ness events covering topics
in economics, finance, mar-
keting/business math, and
management.
The si mul at i on (rol e-
play) events related direct-
ly to a student’s interest
in business and market-
i ng. St udent s had t he
opportunity to choose from
several different categories
that matched their choice in
business simulations.
Topics included busi-
ness law, marketing man-
agement, communications,
hospitality and tourism to
name a few. A total of 19
students managed to win
multiple awards, 34 med-
als in all, in their selected
events as well as in both
economic and career cluster
exams.
These events allow stu-
dents to apply different
compet enci es from t he
classroom in a real-world
setting. Approximately
100 business professionals
from around the area were
involved in judging these
young business profession-
als.
Moreover, Oregon DECA
will be sending 16 students
to DECA State. From these
16 students Oregon DECA
will move onto National
competitions in Califor-
nia. Oregon DECA would
like to extend congratula-
tions to all who competed.
Th e Or e g o n DECA
chapt er member s who
par t i ci pat ed at DECA
Regional Conference are
Anika Sande, Alex Breit-
bach, Jessica Jacobs, Madi-
son Klonsinski, Samuel
Phelps, Haley Engelhart,
Car ol i ne Ri ce, Dani el
Griffith, Alexandra Chris-
tensen, Colin McReavy,
Cameren Swiggum, Ryan
Barry, Brittany Peckham,
Jessica Nankivil, Avery
Carpent er, Kyl e Moen,
Clayton Boehm, Andrew
Pliner, Alex Tucker, Cas-
sandr e Kr i er , Yani que
Rowe, Madel i ne Bj eke,
Parker Gri ebel , Tayl or
Anderson , Danielle Moore,
Nicholas Hepner, Hannah
Lowery, Brendan Lawry,
Christopher McGuine, Tag-
gart Morley, Sean Hynek,
Erica Gerow and Lauren
Tower.
Photos submitted
Jammin’ man
Bob “Bahama Bob” Milan brought the Caribbean Islands to the Oregon Area Senior Center Feb. 26 with his handmade steel drum.
Bahama Bob, of Fort Atkinson, set the mood with beach props, professional lighting and a seven-piece band back tracking. Over his
30-year career, Bahama Bob has performed in over 13 countries and throughout the U.S.
March 20 – April 6
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Home Improvements/
Repairs, LLC
Kitchens/Bathrooms
Wood & Tile Flooring
Decks/Clean Eaves
*Free Estimates* Insured*
*Senior Discounts*
Home 608-873-8716
Cell 608-576-7126
e-mail zipnputts@sbcglobal.net

RECOVER PAINTING Currently offering
spring discounts on all painting, drywall
and carpentry. Recover urges you to join
in the fight against cancer, as a portion of
every job is donated to cancer research.
Free estimates, fully insured, over 20
years of experience. call 608-270-0440
SENSIBLE PAINTING 20 years
experience. Great quality at a
sensible price. Free estimates,
Insured, Polite, Professional.
608-873-9623
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
TOMAS PAINTING
Professional, Interior,
Exterior, Repairs.
Free Estimates. Insured.
608-873-6160
550 inSurance
SAVE MONEY On Auto Incurance $$$.
No forms. No hassle. No stress. No
obligation. Call READY FOR MY QUOTE
now! 888-708-0274 (wcan)
554 landScaPing, lawn,
tree & garden work
AFFORDABLE QUALITY Services LLC:
Lawn Mowing & trim, Spring Clean-up.
Landscaping, Reseeding, Aeration,
Mulch, Decorative Stone, Shrub Trim-
ming, Dethatching & Gutter Cleaning.
Call Matt Nardi for estimate, 608-609-
3600 or snowplowing@tds.net. Experi-
enced and Fully Insured.
ARTS LAWNCARE- Mowing, trimming,
rototilling ,etc. 608-235-4389
LAWN MOWING Residential and com-
mercial. 608-873-7038
SNOWMARE ENTERPRISES
Property Maintenance
Bush Trimming
Powerwash Houses
Spring/Fall Clean-Up
Lawncare, Gutter Cleaning
608-219-1214
560 ProFeSSional ServiceS
BOOKKEEPING SERVICES: Free Gift
w/Service. Personal/Business. Never
pay bill late. Avoid late/overdraft fees.
Joy's Bookkeeping Services 608-712-
6286
COMPUTER PROBLEMS? My Com-
puter Works - Viruses, Spyware, Email,
Printer issues, Bad Internet Connections
- FIX IT NOW! Professional, US Based
Technicians. $25 off service. Call for
immediate help. 888-885-7944.(wcan)
576 SPecial ServiceS
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED! Are you
a 2-parent family over age 25 with 1
stay-at-home parent able to work with
youth 10-17 years of age?
Call 866-776-3760 or
CommunityCareResources.com/now-
recruiting. (wcan)
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS
NOON MONDAY FOR THE OREGON
OBSERVER
Bill Newton, Ron Outhouse
835-5201 or 835-5970
We recommend septic
pumping every two years
B & R
PUMPING SERVICE
U
N
2
7
3
6
2
2
• Driveways
• Floors
• Patios
• Sidewalks
• Decorative Concrete
Phil Mountford 516-4130 (cell)
835-5129 (office)
Al Mittelstaedt 845-6960
U
N
2
7
5
8
8
2
PAR Concrete, Inc.
Increase Your sales opportunities…
reach over 1.2 million households!
Advertise in our
Wisconsin Advertising Network System.
For information call 845-9559 or 873-6671.
FOR SALE- MISCELLANEOUS
SAWMILLS from only $3997.00- MAKE/ SAVE
MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:
www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N
(CNOW)
HELP WANTED- SKILLED TRADES
Contractor hiring the following: Carpenters, Electricians,
Concrete Labor, Steel Erectors, local and traveling
Welders, Fitters, Millwrights. For Milwaukee: 262-650-
6610, Madison: 608-221-9799, Fox Valley: 920-725-
1386, Wausau: 715-845-8300. (CNOW)
HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER
Owner Operators: $5,000 Sign-On Bonus & Paid tolls.
Home Daily. Excellent Pay, plus paid FSC. Fuel &
Tire Discounts. Third Party Lease Purchase available.
CDL-A with 1 year tractor-trailer experience required.
Call 888-703-3889 or apply at www.comtrak.com
(CNOW)
WANTED: Owner Operators Steps-Flats-RGN, Also Fleet
Drivers. 2 yrs. Current Flatbed, 4 yrs. total OTR exp. Bennett
Motor Express, LLC 800-367-2249 www.drive4be.com (CNOW)
Drivers - OTR positions. Up to 45 CPM. Regional runs
available. $1,000 - $1,200 Sign On Bonus. Pet Policy
O/O’s Welcome! deBoer Transportation 800-825-8511
www.deboertrans.com (CNOW)
Drivers: Inexperienced? Get on the Road to a Successful
Career with CDL Training. Regional Training Locations.
Train and WORK for Central Refrigerated (877) 369-
7893 www.centraltruckdrivingjobs.com (CNOW)
MISCELLANEOUS
THIS SPOT FOR SALE! Place a 25 word classifed ad
in 180 newspapers in Wisconsin for $300. Call 800-227-
7636 or this newspaper. Www.cnaads.com (CNOW)
DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation!
CALL Now! 1-800-437-4489 (CNOW)
Village of oregon
Public Hearing on
comPreHensiVe Plan
amendment
notice is hereby given that the Vil-
lage of oregon Village board and Plan
commission will hold a joint public hear-
ing on april 22, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. at Vil-
lage Hall, 117 spring street, Village of
oregon, dane county, Wisconsin.
the public hearing will be held to
gather public input on amendments to
update the Village of oregon comprehen-
sive Plan. the comprehensive Plan is a
blueprint for the short-range and long-
range growth, development, redevelop-
ment, and preservation of the Village. the
comprehensive Plan is designed to be
used by Village offcials as a policy guide
to develop or preserve appropriate areas
of the Village over the next 20 years. the
amendments address changes that have
affected the Village since the Plan was
originally adopted in 2004 and amended
in 2007, availability of updated demo-
graphic data, and changes in Village
policy. the amendments also include
changes to the Planned land use map.
information regarding this compre-
hensive Plan amendment is available on
the Village’s website at www.vil.oregon.
wi.us. the proposed comprehensive
Plan amendments may be inspected and
copies may be obtained at Village Hall,
117 spring street, Village of oregon,
dane county, Wisconsin. Village Zoning
administrator mark below can provide in-
formation regarding the proposed com-
prehensive Plan amendments. Written
comments on the comprehensive Plan
amendment should be submitted prior to
the public hearing to mark below at 117
spring street or via email at mbelow@vil.
oregon.wi.us. all written comments will
be forwarded to the Village board and
Plan commission members.
Published: march 21, 2013
WnaXlP
* * *
notice to toWn of
oregon residents
Public test of
electronic Voting
eQuiPment
notice is HerebY giVen that a
Public test of the automatic tabulat-
ing equipment will be held on tuesday,
march 26, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. at the town
Hall located at 1138 union road. this
equipment will be used at the spring
election to be held on tuesday, april 2,
2013. this public test is open to the gen-
eral public and includes a demonstration
of the optech and automark electronic
voting systems.
denise r. arnold
town of oregon clerk
Posted: march 5, 2013
Published: march 21, 2013
WnaXlP
Legals
Carol Segebrecht
A dear heart st opped
beating Monday, March 11,
2013, as Carol Segebrecht
entered eternal life sur-
rounded by her loving fam-
ily. Carol was born Feb.
12, 1934, in Stoughton, the
daughter of Arleigh, Sr. and
Marguerite (Custer) Stal-
ey. After graduating from
Stoughton High School, she
married Roger Segebrecht
March 5, 1955. The couple
moved to Germany for a
year, where Roger was sta-
tioned while serving in the
U.S. Army. Upon return-
ing, Carol was employed
with the Kellogg and Duk-
ershein Clinic for many
years. She was a member
of Christ Lutheran Church
i n St ought on and was
involved in the Daughters
of the Nile and a lifetime
member of the Order of the
Eastern Star, having served
as Worthy Matron and in
various other state East-
ern Star offices. She also
belonged to the Sunshine
Club. Carol had a variety of
interests, including, world
travel, especially to Swit-
zerland, needlework, fish-
ing, playing cards, Gaither
gospel tapes, music and col-
lecting Hummels and glass.
In addition to her beloved
husband, Roger, survivors
include, son, Rick; her spe-
cial canine friend, Heidi;
brother, Arleigh (Betty)
Staley , Jr.; beloved trav-
el i ng compani on, Rut h
Marty; dear friends, Jeanne
Schwas s - Long, Dor o-
thy Larson and Sue Ellen
Knutson; and sister-in-law,
Carol Hoveland (Jim Kes-
senich).
She was preceded i n
death by her parents and,
brother John “Jack” Staley.
Funeral services were
held at Gunderson Oregon
Funeral Home Saturday,
Mar. 16, 2013, with the
Rev. Scott Geister-Jones
presiding. Burial was at
Prairie Mound Cemetery
The family would like to
extend a special thank you
to her caregivers, Mary
LaCroix, Carol Kaiser, Lou
Ann Marby and Andrea
Gausmann; her hospi ce
nurse, Nicole R.N.; and
her social worker, Ann, for
their loving care. Memori-
als may be made to Christ
Lut her an Chur ch, The
Order of the Eastern Star
and Agrace HospiceCare.
Online condolences may be
made at gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Henry “Hank”
Hierlmeier
Henry G. “Hank” Hierl-
meier, age 85, of Oregon,
passed away on Saturday,
March 16, 2013, in hospice
at William S. Middleton
Memorial Veterans Hospi-
tal.
He was born on March
21, 1927, in Medford, the
son of Glendon and Ann-
adell (Sewell) Hierlmei-
er. He married Virginia
Grosskreutz on May 22,
1948, in
E d g a r .
H a n k
l o v e d
sports. He was a boxer at
West High School and in
the U.S. Army while he
was stationed in Germa-
ny during World War II.
Hank also played baseball,
was involved in track, and
was an avid bowler. He
also enjoyed teaching and
coaching both bowling and
youth basketball. Hank was
also an avid outdoorsman;
he especially enjoyed fish-
ing and hunting. He also
had a love of playing crib-
bage, euchre, and sheeps-
head. Hank was known to
be an extraordinary athlete
and he fortunately passed
his many talents onto his
children and grandchildren.
Hank is survived by his
wife of 65 years, Virginia;
five children, Judy Cof-
fey, Carol (David) Bor-
land, Betty (Gary) Larsen,
Sam Hierlmeier, and Gordy
(Angela) Hierlmeier; 12
grandchildren; nine great-
grandchildren; brothers,
Lawrence Hierlmeier and
Gl en Thomas, mar r i ed
to Ruth Ann Hierlmeier;
sisters, Beverly (David)
Appleyard, Ann Hierlmeier,
Shirley (Steve) Bateman,
and Patricia Lee Brooks;
s i s t er - i n- l aw, Pat r i ci a
Hierlmeier; brother-in-law,
Roger Nelson; and he is
further survived by many
nieces, nephews, other rela-
tives, and friends.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; great-grand-
daughter, Tabitha Hiller;
brothers, Wayne and Robert
Hierlmeier; sisters, Phyl-
lis and Marilyn Hierlmeier,
and Virginia Nelson; and
sister-in-law, Judith Carl-
son.
Memorial services will
be held at Gunderson Ore-
gon Funeral, 1150 Park
Street, Oregon, at 3 p.m. on
Saturday, March 23, with
Glen Thomas Hierlmeier
officiating. Visitation will
be held at the funeral home
from 1 p.m. until the time
of service on Saturday. In
lieu of flowers, memori-
als may be made to Oregon
High School Sports Depart-
ment. A special thank you
to the caregivers of CLC
HospiceCare Center at the
Veteran’s Hospital.
Fisherman’s Prayer
I pray that I may live to
fish
Until my dying day.
And when it comes to my
last cast,
I then most humbly pray:
When in the Lord’s great
landing net
And peacefully asleep
That in His mercy I be
judged
Big enough to keep.
Directions and online
condolences may be found
at www.gundersonfh.com.
Gunderson Oregon
Funeral & Cremation
Care
1150 Park St.
835-3515
Henry Hierlmeier
Carol Segebrecht
Obituaries
MT197328
Come on in...the door is open!
Bike Trails, Antiques, Parks, Museums, Golf and
More in Northwest Illinois
Request a FREE 2013 FREEPORT/STEPHENSON
COUNTY, IL Visitors Guide
Call 800-369-2955 or email stephcvb@aeroinc.net
Name _________________________________________________
Address _______________________________________________
City, State, Zip __________________________________________
Mail to: Freeport/Stephenson County CVB, 4596 U.S. Rt. 20 East, Freeport, IL 61032
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Hourly wage + Commissions & Bonuses!
Part/Full Time Flexible hours!
To apply visit the careers page at
www.greatlakesroofing.net
TELEMARKETING
Call or visit us online for more information
800. 225. 2591 • waltersbuildings.com
Quality Buildings Since 1958
Suburban . Commercial . Agricultural . Horse Barns & Arenas
March 21, 2013 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com
15
586 TV, VCR &
ElECTRoniCs REpaiR
SAVE ON Cable TV-Internet-Digital
Phone- Satellite. You've Got A Choice!
Options from ALL major service provid-
ers. Call us to learn more! 888-714-5772
(wcan)
590 WanTEd: sERViCEs
NEED HOST Parents for German/Swiss
High School Students, for all or part of
2013-14 school year. Reflections Int'l
608-583-2412 www.reflectionsinterna-
tional.org (wcan)
143 noTiCEs
ROTARY INTERNATIONAL BUILDS
PEACE & understanding through
education. For more info visit www.
rotary.org. This message provided by
PaperChain & your local community
paper. (wcan)
WCAN (Wisconsin Community Ad Net-
work) and/or the member publications
review ads to the best of their abil-
ity. Unfortunately, many unscrupulous
people are ready to take your money!
PLEASE BE CAREFUL ANSWERING
ANY AD THAT SOUNDS TOO GOOD
TO BE TRUE! For more information, or to
file a complaint regarding an ad, please
contact The Department of Trade, Agri-
culture & Consumer Protection 1-800-
422-7128 (wcan)
150 plaCEs To Go
WAUPACA GUN SHOW March 22-23.
Fri: 3-8pm, Sat: 8am-4pm. Waupaca
Ale House Cpnference Center, 201 Fox-
fire Dr - Adm. $5 BUY-SELL-TRADE-
BROWSE; We pay cash for guns and
any related items. Gun Buyer Shows
608-548-4867 (wcan)
163 TRaininG sChools
AIRLINE CAREERS: become an Avia-
tion Maintenance Tech. FFA approved
training. Financial aid if qualified. Hous-
ing available. Job placement assistance.
Call AIM 888-242-3193 (wcan)
DENTAL ASSISTANT Be one in just 10
SATURDAYS! WeekendDentalAssistant.
com Fan us on FACEBOOK! Next class
begins 3/30/ 2013. Call 920-730-1112
Appleton (Reg. WI EAB) (wcan)
602 anTiquEs & CollECTiblEs
MILLER HOUSE ANTIQUE
RESTORATION
Restoration antique & wood
furniture. Stripping doors,
woodwork, kitchen cupboards. Pickup/
delivery available.
Call 608-873-1652
606 aRTiClEs FoR salE
AFFORDABLE MATTRESS Sets. T/D/
Q/K. Starting at $89. Warranty, delivery.
Call 608-438-3900.
BEDROOM SETS Cherry! 4-pc. Starting
at $250. Delivery available. 608-438-
3900
BRIDAL GOWN SALE $200-$500 off
100's of Gowns By Pronovias, Mag-
gie Sottero, Mori Lee and Many More!
EDITHS 9 S. Main St Fond du Lac www.
ediths.com (wcan)
NEW CARPET PAD 22 YARDS, $44.
Below wholesale. 608-449-2515
NEW MATTRESS Sets from $89 All
Sizes in Stock! 9 Styles.
PlymouthFurnitureWI.com 2133 Eastern
Ave Plymouth, WI Open 7 days A Week
(wcan)
618 buildinG suppliEs:
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I&H BEAMS $3/ft & up Pipe-Plate-Chan-
nel-Angle-Tube-ReBar-Grating-Expand-
ed-Ornamental-Stainless Steel & Alumi-
num. NEW-USED-SURPLUS. 12 acres
usable items Pal Steel Co 262-495-4453
Palmyra WI (wcan)
648 Food & dRink
100% GUARANTEED Omaha Steaks
- Save 69% on the Grilling Collection.
Now Only $49.95. Plus 2 Free Gifts &
to-the-door-delivery in a reusable cooler.
Order today. 1-888-676-2750 Use Code:
45102DJW www.OmahaSteaks.com/
gcoffer83 (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES- delight all of your
Valentine's with our freshly dipped straw-
berries, decadent truffles and hand-craft-
ed sweets! SAVE 20% on qualifying gifts
over $29! Call 888-479-6008 or visit
www.berries.com/happy (wcan)
SHARI'S BERRIES: order mouthwater-
ing gifts! 100% satisfaction guaranteed.
Hand-dipped berries from $19.99 + plus
s/h. Save 20% on qualifying gifts over
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ries.com/happy (wcan)
DANE COUNTY’S MARKETPLACE.
The Oregon Observer Classifieds. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
652 GaRaGE salEs
STOUGHTON HUGE Kids & Maternity
Sale! April 5 10am-7pm, April 6th 10am-
4pm 400 Mandt Pkwy at Stoughton Fair-
grounds.
666 MEdiCal &
hEalTh suppliEs
ATTENTION JOINT & Muscle Pain Suf-
ferers: Clinically proven all-natural sup-
plement helps reduce pain & enhance
mobility. To try HydrAflexin Risk Free for
90 days. Call 888-550-4066 (wcan)
ATTENTION SLEEP APNEA SUFFER-
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Replacement Supplies at NO COST, plus
FREE Home Delivery! Best of all, prevent
red skin sores & bacterial infection! 888-
797-4088 (wcan)
MEDICAL ALERT FOR SENIORS - 24/7
monitoring. Free Equipment. Free ship-
ping. Nationwide Services. $29.95/month
Call Medical Guardian today. 877-863-
6622 (wcan)
672 pETs
STATE LICENSED- #248476-D.S. Shel-
ties, Pekinese, Pek-a-Pom, Pomera-
nians, Morkies, Yorkies, Shihtzu. Shots,
Vet checked, $200.-300 ea. Sherry 608-
996-2793
676 planTs & FloWERs
PROFLOWERS ENJOY SEND FLOW-
ERS for any occasion! Prices starting at
just $19.99. Plus take 20% off your order
over $29! Go to www.Proflowers.com/
ActNow or call 877-592-7090 (wcan)
680 sEasonal aRTiClEs
PERSONAL CREATIONS - Deluxe All-
in-One Easter Basket! Includes wicker
keepsake basket with polka dot liner,
personalization, plush bunny and many
Easter treats. To Redeem this offer, visit
www.PersonalCreations.com/Best or call
888-716-3361 (wcan)
688 spoRTinG Goods
& RECREaTional
WE BUY Boats/RV/Pontoons/ATV's &
Motorcycles! "Cash Paid" NOW. Ameri-
can Marine & Motorsports Super Center,
Shawno. 866-955-2628 www.american-
marina.com (wcan).
690 WanTEd
DONATE YOUR CAR-
FAST FREE TOWING
24 hr. Response - Tas Deduction
United Breast Cancer FOUNDATION
Providing Free Mammograms
and Breast Cancer Info.
866-343-6603 (wcan)
692 ElECTRoniCs
DISH NETWORK STARTING at $19.99/
mo for 12 mos. High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where available)
SAVE! Ask about SAME DAY installa-
tion! Call 888-719-6981(wcan)
HIGHSPEED INTERNET EVERY-
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SAVE ON CABLE TV, Internet, Digital
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696 WanTEd To buy
WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell
used parts. Monday through Friday 8 am
- 5:30 pm. Newville
Auto Salvage, 279 Hwy 59,
Edgerton, 608-884-3114.
705 REnTals
2 BEDROOM Townhouse apartment w/
full basement on Racetrack Rd-Stough-
ton $775/mo includes utilities. No Pets.
Security deposit and references are
required. Available Now for an approved
applicant. Call 608-241-6609
BROOKLYN 4 BR, 2 1/2 BATH
1850 sq. ft. DUPLEX. Custom built w/
Amish cabinets, L/R & F/R, private deck.
Master BR/BATH, high end appliances,
2 car gar, corner lot country sub-division.
Pet & smoke free. $1150 mo 608-647-
7355
GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apart-
ments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1
& 2 Bedroom Units available starting at
$695 per month, includes heat, water,
and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at 139
Wolf St., Oregon, WI 53575
STOUGHTON 721 S Monroe. Upper of
2-flat. 2-bdrm, hardwoods, washer-dryer
in unit, lrg yard, lrg kitchen. Cats/Dogs
ok. Available now. $790. incl heat and
electric. Call Jim 608-444-6084
THE OREGON OBSERVER CLASSI-
FIEDS, the best place to buy or sell. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
STOUGHTON EASTSIDE upper 2 bed-
room in quiet historic neighborhood avail-
able May 1st. Huge sunny living room
and master bedroom, hardwood floors
and charming details throughout, big
yard, deck, washer and dryer, tons of
storage space in attic, 1 block from park,
minutes to downtown, off street parking,
references, non smokers only, small pet
considered, $725 mo.+ some utilities
719-7227.
STOUGHTON-LARGE 2-BDRM units in
quiet, owner managed 10 unit. D/W,
range, fridge, A/C, decks/patios. Close to
shopping. Off street parking, large yard.
Laundry in building. April 1-$665/mo plus
gas/elec. Cats/small dogs ok-fee. Call/
text 608-772-0234
VERONA 1 BDRM/1 BATH. Private laun-
dry/storage. New flooring, paint, light fix-
tures. Private entrance, close to schools,
shopping and Epic. $675. pr/month 608-
274-1735
VERONA 3 BDRM/1 BATH Private laun-
dry/storage, 1200 sq/ft. All new carpet,
flooring, light fixtures. Close to schools,
shopping and Epic. $1100. pr/month 608-
274-1735
VERONA DUPLEX 2 bedroom, 1
bath, Living room, Family room, Kitchen,
full basement, 1 car garage. Rent
4898 per month plus utilities. No pets.
Available April 1, 2013 845-7630
VERONA NICE 2 Bedroom Duplex.
Appliances, A/C, No Pets/Smoking.
$750/Mo. Available 3/1/13. 608-845-
7397
VERONA-RARELY AVAILABLE 2 bed-
room, no smoking, H/W included, A/C,
laundry hookups, appliances, quiet
neighborhood, $765/mo., 608-558-7017
720 apaRTMEnTs
OREGON-2 BDRM, 1 bath. Available
spring/summer. Great central location,
on-site or in-unit laundry, patio, dish-
washer and A/C. $700-$715/month. Call
Kelly at 608-255-7100 or visit www.ste-
vebrownapts.com/oregon
ROSEWOOD APARTMENTS for Seniors
55+, has 1 & 2 bedroom units available
starting at $695 per month. Includes
heat, water and sewer. Professionally
managed. 608-877-9388 Located at 300
Silverado Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589
740 housEs FoR REnT
STOUGHTON HOUSE 2-bdrm, 1-bth, all
appliances, main level W/D, family room
w/gas fireplace, 2-car garage, security
fenced backyard, A/C, $950. pets extra.
Available May 1st 608-798-3087 - 608-
843-2671
750 sToRaGE spaCEs FoR REnT
ALL SEASONS SELF STORAGE
10X10 10X15 10X20 10X30
Security Lights-24/7 access
BRAND NEW
OREGON/BROOKLYN
Credit Cards Accepted
CALL (608)444-2900

C.N.R. STORAGE
Located behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Convenient Dry Secure
Units in all sizes
5x10 thru 10x30
Lighted with access 24/7
Bank Cards Accepted
Off North Hwy 51 on
Oak Opening Dr. behind
Stoughton Garden Center
Call: 608-509-8904
THE OREGON OBSERVER CLASSI-
FIEDS, the best place to buy or sell. Call
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
DEER POINT STORAGE
Convenient location behind Stoughton
Lumber
Clean-Dry Units
24 HOUR LIGHTED ACCESS
5x10 thru 12x25
608-335-3337
FRENCHTOWN
SELF-STORAGE
Only 6 miles South of
Verona on Hwy PB.
Variety of sizes available now.
10x10=$50/month
10x15=$55/month
10x20=$70/month
10x25=$80/month
12x30=$105/month
Call 608-424-6530 or
1-888-878-4244
NORTH PARK STORAGE
10x10 through 10x40, plus
14x40 with 14' door for
RV & Boats.
Come & go as you please.
608-873-5088
RASCHEIN PROPERTY
STORAGE
6x10 thru 10x25
Market Street/Burr Oak Street
in Oregon
Call 608-206-2347
UNION ROAD STORAGE
10x10 - 10x15
10x20 - 12x30
24 / 7 Access
Security Lights & Cameras
Credit Cards Accepted
608-835-0082
1128 Union Road
Oregon, WI
Located on the corner of
Union Road & Lincoln Road
801 oFFiCE spaCE FoR REnT
BEST LOCATION in Stoughton. Retail
space for rent. 211 E Main 4,000+ sq
ft. Beautifully renovated. Available Now
$1900/mo.Call Connie 608- 271-0101
VERONA- OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
1000 Sq Ft.$500 +Utilities.
608-575-2211 or
608-845-2052
805 CoMMERCial &
indusTRial loTs
VERONA INDUSTRIAL Park 2600 sq ft.
shop, warehouse, office space. Available
April 1, 2013 845-7630
820 MisC. inVEsTMEnT
pRopERTy FoR salE
2.0 ACRE lot. Dunkirk Area. 2 miles
South of Stoughton, Hwy-N wooded-lot
private drive. Taking offers 608-609-
9607
870 REsidEnTial loTs
ALPINE MEADOWS
Oregon Hwy CC.
Call for new price list and availability.
Choose your own builder!
608-215-5895

402 hElp WanTEd, GEnERal
EXPERIENCED SERVICE WANTED.
Apply at Sunrise Family Restaurant 1052
W. Main, Stoughton
FAIRWAY AUTO AUCTION is now hiring
for shop help. Must have good driving
record. Apply in person. Across from
Coachman’s Golf Resort
CLASSIFIEDS, 845-9559, 873-6671 or
835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.
FARM SERVICE Agency in Madison
looking for short term temporary help.
Farming experience and office skills
are preferred. $11.95-$13.41/hour. Call
608-224-3767 for an application packet.
Applications due by 4:30 pm, April 1,
2013. USDA is an equal opportunity
provider and employer.
FULL-TIME CNA needed for PM shift.
Includes every other weekend and holi-
days. PT PM/NOC shift position available
also. Excellent benefits including: Health,
Dental, ST Disability, Life Insurance,
401K, Flex Spending Plan and generous
PTO. Apply in person or send resume to:
Four Winds Manor, Inc. 303 South Jef-
ferson St. Verona, WI 53593
OAKWOOD VILLAGE, a nationally rec-
ognized retirement community, is seek-
ing Production Cooks for our Univer-
sity Woods location on Mineral Point
Rd. Responsible for the preparation
of nutritious, attractive and tasty food.
Various schedules. Prior experience in
quantities production cooking preferred.
High School education or equivalent. To
learn more and apply online visit www.
oakwoodvillage.net.
RESIDENTIAL CLEANER needed to
work 2 to 3 days per week. $8.50 per
hour. Days only . Experience helpful.
Non smoker 835-0339
SUPER 8 Verona is seeking Front desk
associates and Housekeepers. Experi-
ence preferred but willing to train the right
people. Apply in pe son at: 131 Horizon
Drive Verona
423 WoRk WanTEd
WILL DO Experienced Office Cleaning.
With references. 608-214-4884
441 salEs & TElEMaRkETinG
ADVERTISING SALES- Full or Part-time
Position Selling Advertising in the Annual
Lakes Edition. Newspaper, magazine
or radio experience preferred however
not necessary. What is necessary is a
proven track record in sales. Commission
plus travel stipend (draw available) Posi-
tion March 20 - June 1. Must have valid
drivers license and a reliable vehicle.
Other projects possible afterwards. Only
experienced applicants apply. Send letter
and/or resume with experience to: Diane
Everson, 21 N Henry, Edgerton WI. or
e-mail ereport@ticon.net Questions, 608
884-3367
447 pRoFEssional
OTR DRIVERS Needed
* Above Average Mileage Pay
*2500-3500 Miles per Week
* Flexible Home Time
* 100% No Touch/Drop&Hook
* Full Benefit Pkg CDL/A
* 12 Months Exp. Preferred
1-888-545-9351 Ext. 13
Jackson WI
www.doublejtransport.com (wcan)
449 dRiVER, shippinG
& WaREhousinG
KLEMM TANK LINES is now hiring Class
A CDL company drivers & Owner-Oper-
ators out of Madison, WI! We offer local,
home daily pos tions, competitive pay,
medical benefits for you and your family,
paid training on product handling, paid
uniforms, paid vacations, 401K & MORE!
We require 2 years recent, verifiable
tractor-trailer experience, tank & hazmat
endorsements (or ability to obtain) & safe
driving record. Apply now at TheKAG.
com or call recruiting at 800-871-4581 for
more information.
WANTED STRAIGHT Truck Driver for
seasonal employment. CDL and non-
CDL positions available. Call 608-882-
5756. The Delong Co, Inc. Evansville.
451 JaniToRial & MainTEnanCE
JANITORIAL AREA Manager Stoughton
Area. Leading janitorial company is inter-
viewing for an area manager to oversee
accounts in the Stoughton Area. The
ideal candidate will be highly skilled in the
areas of hiring/firing, training, employee
motivation, customer service, quality and
safety. Previous service industry man-
agement experience a plus, but will train
the right candidate, start at $30,000
+ expenses + benefits. Please submit
resume to Mail: Director of Operations,
P.O. Box 736, Streator, Il 61364, Email-
bmoroni@dsicorporation.com Fax: 800-
672-2593
453 VolunTEER WanTEd
HAVE FUN being a child care volun-
teer for Literacy Network. We need
2 volunteers during our Saturday ESL
class who are able to commit to com-
ing in every Saturday for the rest of the
semester. We require our volunteers to
be over 18 years old, reliable, respon-
sible, mature, friendly, patient and have
experience working with children and
diverse populations. The North/Eastside
Senior Coalition is looking for reliable
volunteers to pick up and deliver pet
food from St.Paul’s Lutheran church to
seniors’ homes on the third Tuesday
or Wednesday of each month. Volun-
teers need their own transportation. City
of Madison Parks Division Dog Park
Cleanup is an event that will be held
March 30th from 10am-noon. Give a few
hours of your day to keep our off-leash
parks clean and open to all. Participating
dog parks with projects are: Quann War-
ner, Brittingham, Sycamore, Detramal
and McCormick. Volunteers are asked
to bring scoopers; bags and gloves will
be provided. Call the Volunteer Center
at 246-4380 or visit www.volunteeryour
time.org for more information or to learn
about other opportunities.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon
Friday for The Great Dane and Noon
Monday for The Oregon Observer
unless changed because of holiday work
schedules. Call now to place your ad,
845-9559, 873-6671 or 835-6677.
ImmedIate OpenIngs!
CleanPower is looking for part-time
cleaner in Oregon. Work from 5:00
p.m.-10:00 p.m.; Mon.-Fri.
apply online at
www.cleanpower1.com or call
(608) 242-1500, ex. 102
EOE/AA employer
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TOWN OF MONTROSE - $35,500. Elaine Holpin, (608) 278-4180. MLS# 1660776.
TOWN OF BROOKLYN - $109,000. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1665437.
OREGON - $129,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677794.
OREGON - $130,000. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677392.
BROOKLYN - $147,000. Marge Van Calligan, (608) 219-8918. MLS# 1672498.
OREGON - 4 bed, 2 bath - $192,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1669712.
OREGON - $199,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-4199. MLS# 1677773.
OREGON - $236,900. John Norwell, (608) 698-5246. MLS# 1666649.
OREGON - $236,900. John Norwell, (608) 698-5246. MLS# 1666650.
OREGON - $295,500. Marge Van Calligan, (608) 219-8918. MLS# 1672050.
FITCHBURG - $299,000. Sharon O. Christensen, (608) 843-9185. MLS# 1671705.
FITCHBURG - MVP $299,900 - $312,900. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS#
1672480.
WHISPERING OAKS, TOWN OF OREGON - $324,900. Brenda Cuta, (608) 278-
4199. MLS# 1675027.
OREGON - $339,900. Julie Bollig, (608) 225-2324. MLS# 1677744.
OREGON - $189,900. Jennie W. Post, (608) 276-5206. MLS# 1670761.
OREGON - $240,000. Annette Tande Riemer, (608) 772-0322, Kristin Weber Nick,
219-8960. MLS# 1673955.
OREGON - $269,000. Barb Dawson, (608) 575-3290. MLS# 1652766.
OREGON - $310,000. Patricia Sternad, (608) 216-5749. MLS# 1670262.
OREGON - $358,000. Annette Tande Riemer, (608) 772-0322, Emily Christian, GRI,
(608) 276-5232. MLS# 1676346.
VERONA - $375,000. Sarah Deischer, (608) 206-1519, Melissa Hanewicz, (608) 212-
5064. MLS# 1675046.
VERONA - MVP $420,000 - $440,000. Barb Dawson, (608) 575-3290. MLS#
1671411.
VERONA - $439,900. Lisa Mohar, (608) 276-5218, Renee Christman, (608)
278-4166. MLS# 1674634.
FITCHBURG - $489,000. Renee Christman, (608)278-4166, Lisa Mohar, (608) 276-
5218. MLS# 1677788.
MIDDLETON - $550,000. Kristin Weber Nick, 219-8960, Annette Tande Riemer,
(608) 772-0322. MLS# 1673340.
OREGON - $825,000. Laurie Howard, (608) 469-6710. MLS# 1674715.
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Genesis HousinG inc.
230 S. Oak St. (lower level), Oregon, WI 53575
835-8600 • Fax 835-8601 • Mobile 608-516-3553
Affordable/subsidized Housing for elderly &
Disabled Adults
• 1 & 2 Bedrooms
• Openings In Brooklyn & Oregon
• Uppers & Lowers Available
• Pets Welcome
• Free Community Room Usage
• Non-Smoking Buildings
• Request for Reasonable Accommodations Considered
GHi does not discriminate on basis of disability.
UN277409
** DRIVERS **
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
FOR REGIONAL WORK
Tractor-trailer drivers needed for the Walgreen’s
Private Fleet Operation based in Windsor, WI.
Drivers make hand deliveries to Walgreen’s
stores within a regional area (WI, IL, IA, MN, ND,
SD). Workweek is Tuesday-Saturday. All drivers
must be willing & able to unload freight.
• Earn $21.25/hour (OT after 8 hours) or $0.4650/mile
• Full Beneft Pkg. includes Life, Dental, Disability, &
Health Insurance with Prescription Card
• 401k Pension Program with Company Contribution
• Paid Holidays and Vacation
• Home every day except for occasional layover
Drivers must be over 24 years old, have a min.
2 yrs. tractor-trailer exp. & meet all DOT require-
ments. Send resumé to:
b.kriel@callcpc.com
or call CPC Logistics at 1-800-914-3755.
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