National Association for Teaching English and Community Languages to Adults

Book reviews

SCREEN EDITION Spring 2013 Issue 100 Page 7 of 23

Two books are reviewed in this edition: ‘Innovations in English language teaching to migrants and refugees’ and ‘Teaching Languages to Students with Specific Learning Differences’
Innovations in English language teaching to migrants and refugees
ed. David Mallows British Council (2012) Since receiving “Innovations in English language teaching for migrants and refugees”, which is co-authored by some of the very best of ESOL teachers and is published as part of the Innovations Series for the British Council, I have literally read it cover-to-cover. This book aims to share various ideas and information pertinent to the teaching of ESOL in various contexts. The book is divided into different sections depending relating to various ESOL teaching contexts: Primary, Secondary, 16-19 Further Education and Adult ESOL. and “Developing vocabulary in a multilingual classroom”. Although written for a Primary audience, the articles available provide wonderful practical teaching ideas, techniques or points to consider for any teacher. When I was last at secondary school, taking my GCSE’s, the majority of students were British with a minority from other countries. I am sure it is very different twenty years on with greater diversity of learners in the classroom. The first contribution in the Secondary section, by Dimitrina Kaneva, focuses upon “Teaching and learning in diverse school contexts” with a case study of three new students who arrived at her school. The profile of these three students shows the truly diverse picture of students attending secondary school, and how they are provided with support for their academic work, as the students are from Poland, Somalia and Czech Republic. They share their aspirations and interesting experiences of education in the UK. Kaneva shares the development of the “New arrivals programme” and the implications for ESOL in Secondary education. Other articles related to ESOL in Having never taught English as an Additional Language (EAL) in a Primary context, I read with keen interest these particular chapters. For example, Clare Wardman, Judith Bell and Emma Sharp decide to share primary classroom experience of home languages in the classroom, potential barriers for encouraging home language use, as well as the grouping of language users. The article highlights the barriers within Primary schools for those individuals keen to develop a multilingual classroom. This contribution is also complemented by the other articles and chapters available in the current “Innovations in ...”. Other articles focused on Primary education include “Writing bilingual stories” The next section of “Innovations in ...” focuses upon ESOL in the 16-19 Further Education context. The only article in this section, written by Richard Gresswell and James Simpson, centres on the use of blogging projects for the classroom. This contribution, called “Class blogging in ESOL”, provides an insightful opportunity for any reader to learn about how students view digital technology and gives examples of class blogs, as well as touching on the development of literacy through the Previous page Next page Secondary education focus upon learner engagement and curriculum innovations, as well as creativity and arts in the ESOL classroom.

CONTENTS
ESOL funding under threat NATECLA News: The first 100 NATECLA meets BIS Book reviews UKESOLchat: 100 teaching tips LARF Project Report News NATECLA London day conference NATECLA and ESOL in Scotland National Conference preview A note from Jenny Roden Contacts Diary dates Noticeboard 1 2 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 18 21 22 23

National Association for Teaching English and Community Languages to Adults

Book reviews
use of blogging and technology. It is a very interesting article and the ideas highlighted throughout could be incorporated in other language institutions or contexts.

SCREEN EDITION Spring 2013 Issue 100 Page 8 of 23

Teaching Languages to Students with Specific Learning Differences
Judit Kormos and Anne Margaret Smith Multilingual Matters Textbooks (2012)

The final section of the book focuses upon teaching within an “Adult ESOL” context, of which I have previous experience with a local charity in Eastbourne which delivers lessons for migrants and refugees. There are six articles written for this part of the book, with each contribution looking at various aspects of teaching ESOL. The first contribution, written by Thomas L Lloyd, explores potential issues facing teachers when adult ESOL learners share potentially traumatic experiences which they have faced. Thomas shares some ideas and techniques to deal with emotional support for ESOL (and possibly EAL) students. The other articles which piqued my interest cover topics such as mobile technology in the classroom, responsive teaching and learner centredness, and reading circles. However, one contribution by John Sutter which I was immediately interested in reading, was the on use of Dogme ELT in the ESOL classroom. I previously taught a term based upon the principles of Dogme ELT with absolute beginners for my ESOL lessons.

In each teaching group, around 10% of the students will experience barriers to their learning. If their ‘learning differences’ are understood, then the perception of these barriers is likely to be changed.

CONTENTS
ESOL funding under threat NATECLA News: The first 100 NATECLA meets BIS Book reviews UKESOLchat: 100 teaching tips LARF Project Report News NATECLA London day conference NATECLA and ESOL in Scotland National Conference preview A note from Jenny Roden Contacts Noticeboard Diary dates 1 2 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 18 21 22 23

This book is a highly accessible resource of both theory and practice to provide an understanding of the nature of SpLDs and how they affect general learning processes and the mechanisms of second language acquisition. As such, it would be equally useful to experienced teachers or those in training.

Each chapter presents a topic area – such as ‘Views of Disability in Education’ and ‘What is Dyslexia?’ which is explored thoroughly. There is then a summary of key points, suggested activities and further reading. This format allows easy access for the reader to specific areas of interest.

Overall, the latest British Council “Innovations in ...” series for ESOL is a worthy read for those that are involved in or seeking to specialise in ESOL. The book is currently available to download free of charge from the British Council ESOL website as a PDF. Review by Martin Sketchley, who has experience teaching in Romania, South Korea and the UK. He holds an MA in ELT from the University of Sussex and blogs about ELT-related thoughts, reflections and experiences at www.eltexperiences.com

It is a fascinating insight into the discourses of disability – the history and current thinking. It offers advice on accommodating differences, teaching methods and techniques and an overview of key concepts in language assessment: an invaluable learning resource. Reviewed by Chloe Hindmarsh, NATECLA National Coordinator Previous page Next page

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