www.theprincetonsun.

com
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
FREE
Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . 18-19
Editorials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Police report . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
INSIDE THIS ISSUE
New service
Police department switches to new
communications service. PAGE 17
Holy Week: A transformative journey of faith and hope. PAGE 13
Happy Easter!
Once again, Terhune
Orchards is offering its popu-
lar Bunny Chase to families
from 1-3:30 p.m. on Saturday,
March 30, and Sunday March
31.
It’s a free celebration of
spring on the farm, suitable
for children ages 2 to 8.
Follow the treasure hunt
clues and find a spring sur-
prise at the end of the hunt.
Each child can handicraft a
bunny to take home and
enjoy a Terhune Orchards
bunny cookie.
There’s always lots to do at
Terhune. Foods available for
purchase. No registration is
necessary. The event is
weather-dependent, howev-
er. If in doubt, call (609) 924-
2310 or visit terhuneor-
chards.com.
Terhune Orchards is locat-
ed at 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrence.
PRINCETON
SPOTLIGHT
Bunny Chase
Special to The Sun
ABOVE: A panel
of poets dis-
cusses written
works at the
Princeton Poet-
ry Festival, held
at the Lewis
Center for the
Arts from March
15-17. Poet
Jorie Graham,
far left, and poet
Stephen Dunn,
left, presented a
reading during
the event.
Princeton Poetry Festival
Library
budget
proposes
increase
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
The Princeton Public Li-
brary board of trustees has
submitted a budget proposal to
the council, asking for an in-
crease in municipal funds.
The 2013 municipal request
totals $4,030,619. With the addi-
tion of funds the library re-
quested for capital projects,
projected 2013 spending totals
$5.6 million, a 4.6 percent in-
crease from last year.
According to library Execu-
tive Director Leslie Burger, 80
percent of the library’s operat-
ing costs are paid with munici-
pal dollars.
“That 80 percent is primari-
ly used for salaries and associ-
ated benefits,” she said. “We
use that money for health ben-
efits, pension contributions –
all of the things that go along
with employing someone. It
please see COUNCIL, page 7
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Riverside Elementary School
has been named a Reward School
by the state Department of Edu-
cation. Riverside is one of only
two schools in Mercer County
and 57 in the state to receive the
designation, which is reserved for
schools that have demonstrated a
level of high overall performance.
Reward schools are defined by
the state DOE website as “schools
with outstanding achievement or
growth over the past three years.”
Within the Reward School catego-
ry, there are High Performing and
Highest Progress schools.
High Performing schools like
Riverside demonstrate test scores
that are consistently in the top 10
percent of the state for every cate-
gory of students, as well as an
overall proficiency rate of 90 per-
cent or higher in addition to high
graduation rates.
“You get this designation
through your performance on
state tests like the NJASK and so
forth,” Bill Cirullo, Riverside Ele-
mentary principal, said. “They
track you over a three-year period
to see if you’re consistent and if
you meet a high standard.”
Cirullo credited the Riverside
students for the Reward School
designation.
“This is a result of well-de-
signed curricula and expert
teaching,” he said. “But obviously
we didn’t take those tests, the
kids did. It’s a great group of di-
verse learners and we’re very
proud.”
Cirullo said the Princeton pub-
lic schools curriculum is well de-
signed to promote learning and
retention in the student popula-
tion.
“The people in this district
crafted a curriculum that’s mean-
ingful for kids,” he said. “We’re
very fortunate to be one of four
very powerful elementary schools
in Princeton. The curriculum is
based on state core content stan-
dards, but a really fine curricu-
lum evolves from there, and it’s a
district-wide effort. It’s also about
how our teachers interpret that.
Princeton’s curriculum provides
the base, and through our teach-
ers’ eyes, that is filtered into a
successful thing.”
Cirullo said he feels the teach-
ing staff at Riverside is unique
because the teachers make an
extra effort to understand the in-
dividual learning styles of their
students.
“What we’re striving to do in
Princeton’s public schools is to re-
member that our expertise as
teachers should be knowing how
children learn,” Cirullo said.
“Our job is to make adjustments
to help students do that. That’s
one of the big differences I’d like
to think we have in our school
system. We do a masterful job
with connecting with how a child
thinks, and therefore how a child
learns. It’s about customizing
learning for kids, and if you have
a rich, well-thought-out curricu-
lum to do that, and you’ve got tal-
ented teachers who are able to
guide that process, then you’ve
got something.”
Cirullo said that while he is
proud of the Reward School
designation, he does not encour-
age Riverside’s teachers to focus
on preparing students for state
tests.
“There’s no area of concentra-
tion in our school that focuses on
tests,” he said. “It virtually has
nothing to do with us thinking
about a test. It has everything to
do with how kids learn and how
teachers create that environment
for kids to be successful. We seem
to get these kids fully invested in
their learning, and the results are
showing.”
2 THE PRINCETON SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Riverside named Reward School
Primary application deadline nears
The deadline to file an applica-
tion to run in Princeton’s pri-
mary elections is April 1. There
will be two council seats available
in the November election.
Individuals interesting in run-
ning for council must file a nomi-
nation petition for public office,
which can be found at
www.princetonnj.gov/clerk/Prin
cetonPetition2013.pdf.
In addition to the nomination
petition, candidates must fulfill a
signature requirement. In Prince-
ton, Democrats need 50 signa-
tures, and Republicans need 23
signatures.
Candidates nominated for the
general election by direct petition
need 100 signatures.
The signature requirements
can be viewed at www.princeton-
nj.gov/clerk/PARTY_CANDI-
DATE_SIGN_REQUIRE-
MENTS_2013.pdf.
All forms must be filled out and
returned to the Princeton Munic-
ipal Clerk’s office at 400 Wither-
spoon St., Princeton by 4 p.m. on
April 1.
In addition, if any individual
wishes to change their part
affiliation for the primary
election, they must do so by April
10. Change of party affiliation
forms are available in the Prince-
ton Municipal Clerk’s office,
and must filed with the Mercer
County Clerk prior to the dead-
line.
The Lewis Center for the
Arts’ Program in Visual Arts
presents an exhibition of photo-
graphs by Eliot Gee and paint-
ings by Megan Karande, both
seniors in the program March 27
through 31 in the Lucas Gallery
at 185 Nassau Street. An opening
reception will be held on Thurs-
day, March 28 from 7 to 9 p.m. in
the gallery. Gallery hours are
Monday through Friday from 10
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The exhibition and reception
are free and open to the public.
Gee is an anthropology major,
doing his senior thesis on educa-
tion issues in rural areas. He
has taught English for two sum-
mers in the rural Hunan
province in China, where he has
conducted much of his research
on the subject.
His senior thesis project in vi-
sual arts is a parallel to his work
in his major in which he will
present a series of more than 60
photographs of the town of
Jishou and surrounding region
where he taught. The photo-
graphs were taken using 35 mm
film and presented as black and
white digital images.
After graduation Gee plans to
return to Asia to teach.
Karande’s paintings are large-
scale, measuring four feet by six
feet and explore portraiture and
memory. She uses acrylic paint
on acetate, a thin transparent
film, and paints on both sides,
creating a dimensional quality
to the work.
Karande’s exhibition is enti-
tled, “I Don’t Have the Words,”
emphasizing the power of a vi-
sual medium to express what
words cannot about the people
who are the subjects of her
work.
Karande is majoring in Ecolo-
gy and Evolutionary Biology.
To learn more about this
event, the Program in Visual
Arts, and the more than 100
other events presented each
year by the Lewis Center visit
princeton.edu/arts.
Student works part of exhibit
4 THE PRINCETON SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
87 Federal City Road • Lawrenceville, NJ, 08648
609-818-1140 • www.oasisgardencenternj.com
EASTER FLOWERS
Custom Easter Plant Baskets, Arrangements, and Decor
Fresh Cut Flowers: Bouquets and Arrangements
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For over 100 years conventional salt-based water softeners have
stripped out healthy minerals like calcium and magnesium from
water to prevent scale. While effective, salt-based water softeners
have many undesirable side effects including: hauling heavy salt
bags, briny taste, slimy-feeling showers,
health concerns, and flushing thousands
of gallons of salty waste water into our
sewers and our environment.
‘The Winter’s Tale’ at McCarter
McCarter Theatre, in associa-
tion with The Shakespeare The-
atre Company, will present
William Shakespeare’s “The Win-
ter’s Tale,” directed by Rebecca
Taichman, April 2 through April
21. Opening night is Friday, April
5.
Tragic, romantic, hilarious,
and uplifting, “The Winter’s
Tale” is a genre-bending master-
piece and one of Shakespeare’s
most elegant and haunting plays.
Directed by Rebecca Taichman
(“Sleeping Beauty Wakes,”
“Twelfth Night”), this gorgeous,
music-filled, and magical classic
celebrates redemption, reconcili-
ation, and the mending of broken
hearts. Princes and princesses,
disguised identities, jealous
kings, oracles, pickpockets, and
one ravenous bear – if you
haven’t seen “The Winter’s Tale”
before, don’t miss this opportuni-
ty.
The cast features Sean Arbuck-
le, Todd Bartels, Brent Carver
(Tony Award-winner for “Kiss of
the Spider Woman”), Mark Hare-
lik (Broadway: “The Light in the
Piazza,” “The Normal Heart”),
Nancy Robinette, Tom Story, Ted
van Griethuysen, Heather Wood,
and Hannah Yelland (Tony nomi-
nee for “Brief Encounters”).
“The Winter’s Tale” design
team includes sets by Christine
Jones, costumes by David Zinn,
lighting by Christopher Akerlind,
sound by Matt Tierney, original
music by Nico Muhly, and chore-
ography by Camille A. Brown.
about the work, director Rebecca
Taichman said, ‘ “The Winter’s
Tale’ is a study in tonal collision –
sliding from tragedy to comedy
and back again. We careen
through the dangerous, moneyed
Sicilian court, into the comic Bo-
hemian countryside, and back
again. The play contains multiple
and ever-shifting webs of mean-
ing. As a director, the visual and
theatrical challenges are, well, ab-
surdly difficult and wonderfully
exciting.”
Tickets for “The Winter’s Tale”
range from $20-$67, and are avail-
able online at www.mccarter.org,
by phone at 609-258-2787, and in
person at the McCarter Theatre
ticket office (91 University Place,
Princeton).
For a complete schedule, visit
www.mccarter.org.
Send us your Princeton news
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an interesting video? Drop us an email at
news@theprincetonsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the edi-
tor at 609-751-0245.
in our opinion
Remembering Woodrow Wilson
Princeton marks milestone of the centennial of Wilson’s inauguration
6 THE PRINCETON SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
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PUBLISHER Steve Miller
EXECUTIVE EDITOR Tim Ronaldson
VICE PRESIDENT OF SALES Joe Eisele
MANAGING EDITOR Mary L. Serkalow
COMMUNITY EDITOR Michael Redmond
PRODUCTION EDITOR Kristen Dowd
PRINCETON EDITOR Katie Morgan
ART DIRECTOR Tom Engle
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Russell Cann
CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Barry Rubens
VICE CHAIRMAN Michael LaCount, Ph.D.
ELAUWIT MEDIA GROUP
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD Dan McDonough, Jr.
EDITOR EMERITUS Alan Bauer

In the last analysis, my fellow
countrymen, as we in America
would be the first to claim, a peo-
ple are responsible for the acts of their
government.” ~ Woodrow Wilson, 1919
March 4th marked the centennial of
Woodrow Wilson’s inauguration as the
28th president of the United States.
Wilson’s connection to Princeton
runs deep. He was a member of the
Princeton University Class of 1879. He
joined the faculty in 1890, teaching ju-
risprudence and political economy. He
coined the university’s original motto,
“Princeton in the Nation’s Service,” in
1896. He became university president
in 1902. It was from Princeton that he
became governor of New Jersey, in
1910, as a progressive and a reformer.
Then onward he moved, to the White
House.
Princeton has already marked the
milestone through a series of public
events, coordinated by the Wilson Cen-
tennial Committee, a citizens’ group
representing collaborative action by
the Historical Society of Princeton,
the Nassau Club (Wilson was a mem-
ber), the Princeton Public Library, the
university, of course, and Westminster
Choir College of Rider University,
among others.
Unlike Princeton’s other presiden-
tial resident – Grover Cleveland, a sim-
ple, dutiful man, of simple tastes, who
never graduated college – Wilson was
a brilliant intellectual, a compelling
scholar and writer, the only Ph.D. (his-
tory and political science) among
American presidents. As university
president, he declared war on “the
gentleman’s C” and led the institution
into the academic distinction it has en-
joyed ever since. He had a fun side, too
– baseball (he became the first presi-
dent to throw out the first ball at a
World Series game), bicycling, auto-
mobiles (he was partial to the Pierce-
Arrow), golf.
With his first wife, Ellen Axson Wil-
son (1860-1914), and their three daugh-
ters, Wilson lived on Library Place and
Cleveland Lane, and in Prospect
House on campus. Ellen Wilson was a
talented painter whose canvases,
viewed last year during an exhibition
at the Historical Society of Princeton’s
Updike Farm, were described by art
critic Ilene Dube as “magnificent
works of early 20th-century American
Impressionism.” Ellen Wilson de-
signed stained glass for Prospect
House and landscaped the Prospect
Garden, too.
Wilson is remembered for a progres-
sive legislative agenda that few presi-
dents can match, and for having led
the United States into “the war to end
all wars … a war to make the world
safe for democracy.” World War I failed
to do that, and so has every subse-
quent war we’ve fought, including, it
seems safe to predict, the conflicts
we’re fighting today. But Wilson’s fun-
damental vision was of a world where
all nations, large and small, would sit
around a table and settle their differ-
ences in a spirit of friendship and fair-
ness.
It’s a dream, but it’s a dream worth
dreaming.
Special to The Sun
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 7
Council to introduce budget April 1
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also goes to pay for building oper-
ations, including gas, electricity,
telephone and postage.”
Burger said the other 20 per-
cent of the library’s funding
comes from a combination of fees
and donations.
The budget proposal includes
$150,000 to be used to pay for pa-
trons’ two-hour parking. Burger
said this is an expense that has
been split between the township
and the borough in previous
years.
“It’s been on the books for
years and years, but it’s very up
in the air this year,” Burger said.
“Since the two towns are now
one, it will have to be handled dif-
ferently. How the town chooses to
deal with the reimbursement for
parking has not even been dis-
cussed yet.”
Separate from the budget re-
quest, the library has asked the
municipality for $412,077 in capi-
tal funds to “support building and
technology infrastructure im-
provements and other miscella-
neous projects,” the proposal
said.
Burger said the capital request
is higher than in past years be-
cause there was no capital budget
last year.
“Our capital request is larger
than is typical because we rolled
over what we would have asked
for last year,” she said. “So it may
seem a little wacky, but that’s why
it’s higher this year.”
Burger said the capital amount
would go toward several long-
term projects, including a $91,077
project to replace the carpeting.
“Our building is 10 years old,”
she said. “That may seem like not
much time, but there have been
about 8 million feet on the carpet.
We clean it regularly and it’s held
up pretty well, but it is beginning
to show wear and tear in places.”
In addition to the carpeting,
Burger said the capital funds
would go to upgrading the li-
brary’s technological capabilities.
“We planned the building 12
years ago,” she said. “Just think
about how much technology has
changed in the last 12 months. We
are at capacity on our wireless
network. We felt that very acutely
after Super Storm Sandy, when
people came in and tried to con-
nect their devices. We simply
run out of network. We can only
accommodate 500, when we need
to accommodate 1,000. Our
bandwidth is becoming inade-
quate to carry the amount of
viewing and downloading that’s
happening.”
The council is scheduled to in-
troduce the municipal budget,
which will contain the library
funding, on April 1.
COUNCIL
Continued from page 1
WEDNESDAY MARCH 27
Art Exhibitions: Princeton Univer-
sity Art Museum. 1. “Revealing
the African Presence in Renais-
sance Europe.” 2. “Picturing Pow-
er: Capitalism, Democracy, and
American Portraiture,” portrait
collection of the New York Cham-
ber of Commerce, assembled
over a 200-year period beginning
in 1772. 3. “The Year of Mod-
ernism,” 100th anniversary of
modern art and literature. On
view through June 23. Free. 609-
258-3788, artmuseum.prince-
ton.edu.
At the Arts Council: Robeson Cen-
ter, 102 Witherspoon. Arts Coun-
cil of Princeton: “Perseus Slays
Medusa: A Greek Myth Retold as
Self-Portraits,” photography by
Barbara Warren. On view through
April 13. 609-924-8777,
www.artscouncilofprinceton.org.
At the Greenway: D&R Greenway
Land Trust, Johnson Education
Center, 1 Preservation Place (off
Rosedale), 609-924-4646. 1.
“'Perspective,” a photography
show by members of the Stony
Brook Garden Club of Princeton.
Awardees include Cindy Besse-
laar, Gail Denis, Jennifer Figge
Nell Haughton, Leslie Kuenne,
Lisa Marttila, Molly Schneider. On
view through April 4. 2. “Sky Gaz-
ing,” group art exhibition featur-
ing works by Deb Brockway, Mer-
rillee Drakulich, Lora Durr, Donna
Gratkowski, Ann Guidera-Matey,
Donna Levinstone, Charles
McVicker, Lucy McVicker, Paul
Mordetsky, Stefanie Silverman,
Neil Thompson, and Mary
Waltham. On view through May 2.
Art Exhibition: Cafe 44, 44 Leigh
Ave. “Water, Water, Everywhere
…,” exhibition featuring photogra-
phy by Tasha O'Neill and paint-
ings by Mary Waltham. Free. On
view through April 15.
Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale:
10 a.m.-9 p.m., Princeton Day
School, 650 Great Road.
www.bmandwbooks.com.
Cornerstone Community Kitchen:
5 to 6:30 p.m., Princeton United
Methodist Church, Nassau at
Vandeventer, 609-924-2613. Hot
meals served, prepared by TASK.
Free, www.princetonumc.org.
Public meetings: 7:30 p.m. Environ-
mental Commission; Zoning
Board of Adjustment.
Princeton Country Dancers: 7:30
p.m, Suzanne Patterson Center,
45 Stockton. Contra Dance, les-
son followed by dancing. $8,
609-924-6763, www.princeton-
countrydancers.org.
Author, author: 6 p.m., Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau. Jeremiah
Ostriker, professor of astrophysi-
cal sciences at Princeton Univer-
sity, author of “Heart of Dark-
ness: Unraveling the Mysteries of
the Universe,” and Michael
Lemonick, author of “Mirror
Earth: the Search for Our Planet's
Twin.” Free.
Central Jersey Sierra Club: 7 p.m.,
Princeton University, McCosh 46.
Pipeline Education and Empower-
ment. Panel discussion about
local pipeline projects with Kate
Millsaps, state Sierra Club; Faith
Zerbe, Delaware Riverkeepers;
Jennifer Coffey, Stony Brook-Mill-
stone Watershed Association;
Alice Baker, Eastern Environmen-
tal Law Clinic. Free. Moderated by
Terry Stimpfel, CNJ Sierra: 609-
731-7016, www.sierraclub.org.
Healthy Living: 7 p.m., Whole Earth
Center, 360 Nassau. Discussion
co-hosted by Palmer Uhl and V.
Bea Snowden. Register, regis-
ter@healthylivingprinceton.org.
Free. 609-924-8021,
www.wholeearthcenter.com.
Repeats March 29, 9:30 a.m.
Musical theater improv: 8 p.m.,
McCarter Theatre’s Berlind
Stage. Lewis Center for the Arts
presents 'Baby Wants Candy,'
musical theater improvisational
troupe. Register. $15. 609-258-
1500, www.princeton.edu/arts.
THURSDAY MARCH 28
Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale:
10 a.m.-7 p.m., Princeton Day
School, 650 Great Road. Half
Price Day.
www.bmandwbooks.com.
Religion & medicine: 4:30 p.m.,
Princeton University, McCormick
101. Center for the Study of Reli-
gion, Princeton University pres-
ents “Paging God: Religion in the
Halls of Medicine,” discussion
with Elizabeth Mitchell Arm-
strong, department of sociology;
Rev. Tina H. Nummela, clinical
pastoral educator at Robert
Wood Johnson University Hospi-
tal; Allison Smith, associate direc-
tor of health professions, plus
response by Wendy Cadge,
author and associate professor of
sociology at Brandeis University.
Free, 609-258-2943,
www.princeton.edu.
Public meeting: 5:30 p.m., Shade
Tree Commission.
Author, author: 6 p.m., Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau. Neil Rudens-
tine, author of “The House of
Barnes: The Man, the Collection,
the Controversy,” and president
emeritus of Harvard University.
Free. 609-497-1600.
‘It Takes a Village’: 8 p.m., Lewis
Center for the Arts, 185 Nassau. 8
p.m. Workshop production of a
new musical. Free. Reception fol-
lows the performance. 609-258-
1500, www.princeton.edu/arts.
Repeats March 29, 30,
Tango!: 8 p.m., Suzanne Patterson
Center, 45 Stockton. Argentine
Tango with Viva Tango. Milonga
lessons with Lesley Mitchell. $12,
including refreshments. 609-
948-4448, vivatango.org.
FRIDAY MARCH 29
Good Friday: Municipal offices
closed.
Professional Service Group: 10
a.m., Princeton Public Library.
Support, networking for unem-
ployed professionals. Free,
www.mercopsg.net.
Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale:
10 a.m.-3 p.m., Princeton Day
School, 650 Great Road. Box Day.
www.bmandwbooks.com.
Women's History Month: 7 p.m.,
Princeton Public Library screens
“Oranges and Sunshine,” based
on Margaret Humphreys' “Empty
Cradles.” Free. 609-924-9529
www.princetonlibrary.org.
SATURDAY MARCH 30
Sharpening the Quill: 10 a.m. to 3
p.m., Camillo's Cafe, Princeton
Shopping Center, 301 N. Harrison.
Writers’ workshop conducted by
novelist Lauren B. Davis, open to
all levels of experience. Lecture
CALENDAR PAGE 8 MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
WANT TO BE LISTED?
To have your meeting or affair listed in the Calendar or Meetings,
information must be received, in writing, two weeks prior to the
date of the event.
Send information by mail to: Calendar, The Sun, 1330 Route 206,
Suite 211, Skillman, NJ 08558. Or by email: news@theprinceton
sun.com. Or you can submit a calendar listing through our website
(www.theprincetonsun.com).
We will run photos if space is available and the quality of the photo
is sufficient. Every attempt is made to provide coverage to all
organizations.
Lic #10199 • Cont Lic #13VH01382900
Let us show you how to save money on this year’s
utility bill by upgrading your equipment!
We still do FREE ESTIMATES!
Monday through Friday 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
please see CALENDAR, page 10
and writing exercises, review and
critique. $85, including lunch.
Register:
lauren@laurenbdavis.com.
www.laurenbdavis.com. 609-
430-0321.
Out of doors: 10 a.m., Princeton
Canal Walkers, Turning Basin
Park, Alexander Road. Three-mile
walk on the Towpath. Bad weath-
er cancels. Free. 609-638-6552.
‘Nano Days’: Noon to 4 p.m , Prince-
ton Public Library. Explore the
minuscule world of atoms, mole-
cules, nanoscale forces through
hands-on activities. Princeton
University faculty and graduate
students will present programs
and demos. Free. www.princeton-
library.org
Bunny Chase!: 1-5 p.m., Terhune
Orchards, 330 Cold Soil Road,
Lawrence. Family fun: pony and
wagon rides, crafts, music. Free.
Food available for purchase.
Weather-dependent. 609-924-
2310, www.terhuneorchards.com.
Repeats March 31.
PCYH concert: 8 p.m., Princeton
Center for Yoga & Health,
Orchard Hill Center, 88 Orchard
Road, Skillman. David Brahinsky
and Friends in “Singing for Our
Souls,” plus sing-along. $15,
www.princetonyoga.com.
SUNDAY MARCH 31
Out of doors: 2 p.m., Walking Tour,
Historical Society of Princeton,
Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau.
Two-hour walking tour of down-
town Princeton and Princeton
University includes stories about
the early history of Princeton, the
founding of the university, and
the American Revolution. $7; $4
for ages 6 to 12, 609-921-6748,
www.princetonhistory.org.
MONDAY APRIL 1
‘World within Worlds’: 12:30 p.m.,
Princeton Day School, The Great
Road. First day for exhibition of
sketches and finished work by
David Wiesner. Artist's reception
April 18, 11:30 a.m. On view
through April 24. Free. 609-924-
6700, www.pds.org.
Second Chance Cinema: 7:30 p.m.,
Princeton University, Friend Cen-
ter Auditorium, Computer Sci-
ence Building. Presented by
Princeton Adult School, hosted
by Bill Lockwood. Screening of
“Margaret” (USA, 2011). Register:
$8, 609-
“Not In Our Town”: 7:30 p.m.,
Princeton Public Library. Discus-
sion on race presented by interra-
cial and interfaith social action
group. Free. 609-924-9529,
www.princetonlibrary.org.
Hip hop concert: 8 p.m., Princeton
University’s Frist Campus Center.
The Lewis Center for the Arts
presents Dam, Palestinian hip
hop group. Free. 609-258-1500,
www.princeton.edu/arts.
TUESDAY APRIL 2
Author, author: 6 p.m., Labyrinth
Books, 122 Nassau. Simon Morri-
son, professor of music at Prince-
ton University, author of “Lina
and Serge: The Love and Wars of
Lina Prokofiev'.” Free. 609-497-
1600.
Shanti Meditation: 6 p.m., Fellow-
ship in Prayer, 291 Witherspoon.
Friends of Conscious Evolution
present Acharya Girish Jha, a
spiritual counselor from the
Himalayas. First class free; then
$30. Register by email guru-
ji220@gmail.com 732-642-8895,
www.authenticyogatration.com.
Princeton Folk Dance: 7 p.m.,
Riverside School, 58 Riverside
Drive. Ethnic dances using
authentic music. Beginners wel-
come. $3, 609-921-9340,
www.princetonfolkdance.org.
Princeton Sound Kitchen: 7:30
p.m., Princeton University
Department of Music presents
new music by graduate student
composers. Taplin Auditorium.
Free. 609-258-2800,
princeton.edu/music.
‘The Winter's Tale’: 7:30 p.m.,
McCarter Theatre. Rebecca
Taichman directs Shakespeare's
genre-bending play. $20 -$67.
Through April 21. 609-258-2787,
www.mccarter.org.
Myanmar documentary: Princeton
University, McCosh 10. Cetana
Educational Foundation presents
screening of Robert Lieberman’s
“They Call it Myanmar: Lifing the
Curtain,' 2012 documentary. Co-
sponsored by Princeton in Asia, a
program affiliated with Princeton
University that provides experi-
ences in Asia to young graduates
and older adults. $10 donation,
609-683-4435, www.cetana.org.
JobSeekers: 7:30 p.m., Trinity
Church, 33 Mercer. Networking
and job support. Free., 609-924-
2277, www.trinityprinceton.org.
10 THE PRINCETON SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
Sponsored by the American CoIIege of Orgonomy
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CALENDAR
Continued from page 8
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Holy Week still relevant today
By THE REV. PAUL JEANES III
Rector, Trinity Church
Holy Week … What’s that? Part
of March Madness? The lead-up
to the Super Bowl?
In Kentucky, my home state,
Holy Week is Derby Week.
Churchill Downs is sacred space,
indeed. With a mixture of nostal-
gic tears and joy we sing our fa-
vorite hymn, “My Old Kentucky
Home.” There is a beautiful array
of holy vestments in one-of-a-kind
derby outfits and jockey silks. The
liturgical procession, as horses
make their way from the paddock
onto the track, is as grand as one
will ever see. And what is a holy
occasion without a holy drink?
The Mint Julep for a Kentuckian
is sacred nectar.
We are living in a world where
notions of the holy and sacred are
becoming more and more foreign.
Now all too often, we hear the
word “holy” followed by an exple-
tive. In this generation, many
young people have never even
been in a sacred space, never been
in a synagogue, mosque, or
church.
We hear and see stories of
Passover, Ramadan and Easter,
but for far too many people these
are thought of as antiquated and
irrelevant ritual acts and prac-
tices of superstitious, uneducated
and fragile people.
Yes, rooted in history and tradi-
tion, but by no means an artifact –
as relevant today as always, or
even more so – this week Chris-
tians around the world enter a
most holy and sacred time. We
will walk the Way of the Cross.
We will experience a transforma-
tive journey of promise, hope, be-
trayal, fear, death, silence, and re-
joicing – the most celebrated week
of our faith.
Through the days of Holy
Week, we gather on Palm Sunday
for Christ’s triumphant entry into
Jerusalem. On Maundy Thurs-
day we meet in the upper room for
the Last Supper. We wash one an-
other’s feet as a symbol of humble
service and an expression of lav-
ish love. We hear the words, “I
give you a new commandment,
that you love one another. Just as I
have loved you, you also should
love one another. By this everyone
will know that you are my disci-
ples, if you have love for one an-
other" (John 13:34-35). We go to the
garden and see our Lord betrayed.
We keep vigil until dawn. We
weep at the foot of the cross. The
cry of our Lord, the cry of hu-
manity, echoes in our souls, “My
God, my God, why have you for-
saken me?” (Matt. 27:46). We wait
in the darkness and silence of
death. We awake on Easter morn-
ing to the glorious sound of joy,
“Alleluia! Christ is risen. The
Lord is risen, indeed.” (The Book
of Common Prayer, p. 294).
In this most holy season, Chris-
tians experience yet again the
powerful and transformative
story of the life, death, and resur-
rection of our Lord Jesus Christ.
We experience God’s promise of
life conquering death and hope
overcoming despair, reminding us
that darkness and death do not
have the last word. Light does.
Life does.
Without Easter there is no
Christian faith. Easter defines us.
We are an Easter people. We are a
resurrection people. Because of
Easter, we, as Christians, are sent
forth to proclaim good news to all
the world, to be a people of light
and life.
This week, as Christians, we
live into the fullness of Holy
Week. And I invite my friends, my
sisters and brothers of all faiths,
to live into the fullness of their
own traditions. Let us together
live into the fullness of all that is
sacred and holy. Let us be united,
showing mutual respect and “holy
envy” (a wonderful phrase I just
heard – thank you, Rabbi Justus
Baird) for all that is wonderful
and life-giving in our holy and sa-
cred stories, living our faiths with
integrity and with the utmost re-
spect and love for others.
Let us live in such a way as to
expand the notion of what is sa-
cred and holy, knowing that Holy
Week is not just one week in early
spring limited to those of the
Christian faith. Every week is
holy, every day is sacred, every
moment is an opportunity to open
ourselves to the possibilities of all
that is holy and sacred in our
world, all that is of God.
Holy Week … What’s that? It’s
the week that tells the story of the
human condition, reminds us of
God’s unconditional love for all of
humanity, and calls us to be peo-
ple of life and love. It’s a week not
just for Christians, but for all of
us. Blessed Holy Week to all.
The Rev. Paul Jeanes III is rec-
tor of Trinity Church (Episcopal)
in Princeton. He is a graduate of
Wake Forest University, cum laude.
He received a MDIV and MAMFT
from Louisville Presbyterian Semi-
nary. He also earned a Diploma in
Anglican Studies from General
Theological Seminary, New York
City. For more information about
Trinity Church, visit trinityprince-
ton.org. Father Jeanes blogs at
pauljeanes.blogspot.com.
INTERFAITH VIEWS
From Wagner’s monumental
opera “Der Fliegende Hollander”
(“The Flying Dutchman”), star-
ring Metropolitan Opera baritone
Mark Delavan, to the music of
Trinidad, medieval Europe, and
American jazz, the ninth season
of the Princeton Festival promis-
es its audiences a voyage around
the world. The festival will run
from June 8 to 30 at various ven-
ues throughout the area.
On the schedule:
• Lustigdancetheatre, Satur-
day, June 8, McCarter Theatre.
• Greater Princeton Youth
Orchestra, Saturday, June 8,
Princeton University’s Richard-
son Auditorium.
• Jazz: The Bruce Barth Trio,
Sunday, June 9, Clark Music Cen-
ter, the Lawrenceville School.
• World Music: Liam Teague
and Robert Chappelle perform
Trinidadian steelpan, Friday,
June 14, Clark Music Center.
• A cappella jazz: ‘Round
Midnight, Keystone A Cappella,
and Around Eight, Saturday, June
15, Clark
Music Center.
• Bernar-
dus, medieval
music ensem-
ble, Sunday,
June 16,
Miller Chapel,
Princeton
Theological
Seminary.
• Piano
recital: Gulsin Onay, Friday, June
21, Clark Music Center.
• Opera: Wagner’s "The Fly-
ing Dutchman," Saturday, June
22, and Sunday, June 30, McCarter
Theatre.
• Organ recital: Matthew
Middleton, Sunday, June 23,
Princeton University Chapel.
• 2013 Young Musicians
Piano Competition Finals, Sun-
day, June 23, Clark Music Center.
• Choral concert, Friday,
June 28, Miller Chapel.
• Concordia Chamber Play-
ers, Saturday, June 29, Miller
Chapel.
On June 8, Lustigdancetheatre
will be performing three dance
pieces based on jazz (with a live
jazz sextet), classical Indian
music and dance, and “Six Pi-
anos.” There will be more jazz on
June 9 with the heralded Bruce
Barth Trio.
On June 14, Liam Teague and
Robert Chappell perform steel-
pan, an art form hailing from
Trinidad. On June 15, three a cap-
pella vocal jazz groups, the award
winning ‘Round Midnight joined
by Keystone A Cappella and the
local Around Eight, will bring
Festival audiences to Clark Music
Center. Rounding out the week-
end on June 16, Bernardus, a me-
dieval music ensemble, will per-
form its multimedia production
of “The Eternal Flame, Love
Throughout the Medieval World.”
On Friday, June 21, acclaimed
Turkish pianist Gulsin Onay re-
turns to Princeton with a pro-
gram of Beethoven and Chopin,
plus Preludes by Ahmed Adnan
Saygun. On Saturday “The Flying
Dutchman” opens, and on Sun-
day, June 23, the rising young or-
ganist Matthew Middleton per-
forms Wagner, Liszt,
Mendelssohn, Schumann, and
Brahms.
The June 28 choral concert will
be the culmination of a weeklong
choral conducting master class
open to conductors, auditors and
singers, led by Dr. Jan Harring-
ton, professor emeritus of Indi-
ana University’s Jacobs School of
Music. The Concordia Chamber
Players, always a highlight of The
Princeton Festival season, will re-
turn on June 29 with a program
of Beethoven, Liszt, Wagner, and
Schubert. A matinee perform-
ance of “The Flying Dutchman”
on June 30 will close the season.
For more information and tick-
ets, visit
www.princetonfestival.org or call
609-759-0379 or McCarter Theatre
at 609-258-2787.
14 THE PRINCETON SUN —MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
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Didier Fassin, James D.
Wolfensohn Professor in the
School of Social Science at the In-
stitute for Advanced Study, will
deliver a public lecture, “The Ar-
duous Path of Refugees in the
Changing Landscape of Asylum”
on Wednesday, April 3. Drawing
on 10 years of research, the lec-
ture will examine significant
changes in the conception of the
right to asylum in recent decades
and the ordeal faced by asylum
seekers as they go through com-
plex administrative and judiciary
procedures in order to have their
status acknowledged. The lecture
will take place at 4:30 p.m. in
Wolfensohn Hall on the Institute
campus.
An institution dating from An-
tiquity and formally recognized
with the 1951 Geneva Convention
on Refugees, asylum has been
confronted with a dramatic in-
crease in applicants during the
past century. This burden has
been unevenly distributed:
refugees are massively concen-
trated in camps of the global
South, particularly Sub-Saharan
Africa and Central Asia. In the
global North, asylum seekers are
selected on a case-by-case basis,
under pressure of growing suspi-
cion toward so-called bogus
refugees.
This lecture will look at efforts
of asylum seekers and contempo-
rary societies to place responsi-
bility for protecting the victims of
violence.
Fassin is the author of Human-
itarian Reason: A Moral History
of the Present (University of Cali-
fornia Press, 2011; translated
from the French edition pub-
lished by Gallimard-Seuil in
2010); La Force de l’Ordre: An-
thropologie de la Police des
Quartiers (Le Seuil, 2011); The
Empire of Trauma: An Inquiry
into the Condition of Victimhood
(with Richard Rechtman, Prince-
ton University Press, 2009, win-
ner of the William A. Douglass
Prize for Best Book in Euro-
peanist Anthropology; translated
from the French edition pub-
lished by Flammarion in 2007);
and When Bodies Remember: Ex-
perience and Politics of AIDS in
South Africa (University of Cali-
fornia Press, 2007; translated
from the French edition pub-
lished by La Découverte in 2006).
Call (609) 734-8175, or visit the
Public Events page on the Insti-
tute website,www.ias.edu.
The following public informa-
tion was provided by the Prince-
ton Police Department.
Feb. 28, Nassau and Washing-
ton: During a motor vehicle stop,
a 56-year-old Trenton man was
found to have an outstanding
warrant for $165 from Mullica
Township. He was released on
bail.
March 1, State Road (Route
206): During a motor vehicle stop,
a 38-year-old Manalapan man was
found to have an outstanding
warrant for $1,000 from Elmwood
Park. He was arrested and re-
leased on his own recognizance
by authority of the Elmwood
Park Municipal Court.
March 2, Olden Street: A sum-
mons was issued to a 21-year-old
Princeton man for providing alco-
hol to an underage person and a
summons was issued to a 19-year-
old Princeton man for underage
possession of alcohol.
March 2, Bertrand Drive: Two
Trek bicycles, worth some $1,600,
were reported stolen from a shed
sometime between Feb. 22 and
March 1.
March 2, Washington Road:
During a motor vehicle stop, a 30-
year-old Princeton man was
found to have an outstanding traf-
fic warrant for $190 from Prince-
ton Municipal Court. He was re-
leased on bail.
March 3, Nassau Street: Two
girls, age 15 from Princeton and
age 14 from Cranbury, were ar-
rested for concealing merchan-
dise taken wrongfully from sever-
al stores. They were released to
the custody of their parents.
March 4, Robeson at Bayard:
During a motor vehicle stop, a 39-
year-old Trenton man was found
to have outstanding warrants
from several jurisdictions, total-
ing $850. He was turned over to
the Hamilton Township police fol-
lowing inability to post bail.
March 9, Bertrand Drive: A
house burglary was reported,
with some $700 in jewelry miss-
ing, sometime between Jan. 17
and Jan. 27. Police are investigat-
ing.
March 9, Princeton High
School: A student reported the
theft of a laptop computer valued
at $2,200 sometime during the day
on Feb. 26.
March 9, State Road (Route 206)
at Valley Road: During a motor
vehicle stop, a 49-year-old Whar-
ton man was found to have an out-
standing criminal warrant for
$285 from Newark. He was re-
leased on bail.
March 11, Red Oak Row: Patrol
executed an arrest warrant for
a resident. He was released on
bail.
March 12, Benjamin Rush
Lane: A 57-year-old Princeton
woman who had been involved in
a minor motor vehicle accident
was issued summonses and ar-
rested for drunken driving. She
was later released pending a
court date.
March 14, Washington Road at
William Street: A 21-year-old Rob-
binsville woman was stopped for
a traffic violation, was issued
summonses and placed under ar-
rest for drunken driving. She was
later released pending a court
date.
March 15, Hale Drive at
Worths Mill Lane: During a
motor vehicle stop, a 50-year-old
Lawrence woman was arrested
for drunken driving. She was
released to the custody of a rela-
tive.
March 16, Nassau at S. Tulane:
A 29-year-old Princeton man was
observed consuming an alcoholic
beverage in a public place. He
fled on foot. He was arrested and
issued summonses for the alcohol
violation and for interfering
with a criminal investigation. He
was released pending a court
date.
16 THE PRINCETON SUN — MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013
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police report
Please recycle this newspaper.
Professor to deliver public lecture
MARCH 27-APRIL 2, 2013 – THE PRINCETON SUN 17
Police department switches communication services
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
The Princeton Police Depart-
ment announced on March 18
that it would be switching to a
new “instant” communications
service.
According to a police press re-
lease, the service, called the Nixle
Community Information Service,
“allows the police to send impor-
tant, valuable community infor-
mation directly to residents using
the latest technology.”
The department officially
began using the service on March
20.
Through the Nixle service,
community members and resi-
dents can receive messages from
the police regarding traffic alerts,
weather announcements, safety
information or community event
information instantly via text
message or email.
Nixle is only the latest techno-
logical service the department
has employed. It also utilizes
Facebook and Twitter to remain
connected to the community.
“We’re very excited about
adding Nixle to our inventory of
social media tools,” Capt. Nick
Sutter said in a release. “The
great part of Nixle is that it will
allow us to get information to
members of the Princeton com-
munity who may not have imme-
diate Internet access. Ultimately,
this will do nothing but benefit
the community.”
Sgt. Mike Cifelli said that, for
the time being, the department is
using a free, basic version of
Nixle.
“We’re at the base level right
now,” he said. “For the public and
for the department, Nixle is free.
We’ve been aware of Nixle for
some time. We’ve had Facebook
and Twitter, and this has always
been something we’ve wanted to
incorporate. Now that the depart-
ment and the towns are together,
we thought the opportunity was
there for us to do this.”
Residents who want to use
Nixle must register for alerts at
www.nixle.com. Once they have
registered and specified their pre-
ferred method of communica-
tion, users will begin receiving
pertinent information via text
message, email and web.
“Nixle has the ability to send
things in a degree of urgency,”
Cifelli said. “One is like a commu-
nity message. Community mes-
sages reach residents by email
unless they opt to get them by text
message. There’s also an advisory
category, for if there’s a road clo-
sure, detour or a storm coming.
And then there are alerts, used
for severe weather warnings,
missing children or gas leaks.
Those alerts are sent to residents
via email and in a text message.”
Cifelli said the service is very
easy for residents to use. A tutori-
al on the Nixle website explains
how to use the service. The audi-
ence receiving Princeton’s alerts
already numbers nearly 1,700.
“It works through the zip
code,” Cifelli said. “West Windsor
and South Brunswick both use
Nixle, and both towns have areas
that use the 08504 zip code. There
are 1,700 people already signed up
for that zip code, so we’re already
reaching them. There’s already
that limited reach, and we’re hop-
ing that when we publicize this
that number will only increase.”
Cifelli said Nixle is a great tool
for the police department, and he
feels the technology update will
boost communication with resi-
dents.
“In this day and age, social
media and electronic media in
general are the future,” he said.
“We need to keep up with the
times, and we’d be doing a dis-
service to the community if we
didn’t have those things at this
point.”
In a related matter, the PPD is-
sued an appeal urging residents
to participate in its Community
Survey, which the PPD’s Safe
Neighborhoods Unit has been
conducting since earlier this
month. Residents can complete
the five-question survey by visit-
ing the town website, princeton-
nj.gov, or directly at surveymon-
key.com/s/ZYWF6JK.
Police chief not in office
since allegations made
By KATIE MORGAN
The Princeton Sun
Princeton police chief
David Dudeck has not been in
the office since allegations of
misconduct were leveled
against him earlier this
month, according to officials.
The allegations, according
to unnamed sources within the
department, are based on inap-
propriate comments and jokes
it is alleged Dudeck made to
other officers and staff mem-
bers.
At present, Captain Nick
Sutter is running the day-to-
day operations of the depart-
ment.
The allegations against
Dudeck are being examined by
the Mercer County Prosecu-
tor’s Office, but a formal inves-
tigation has not been
launched.
“Attorney general guide-
lines require us to conduct all
investigations where a police
chief or director is implicat-
ed,” Casey DeBlasio, spokes-
woman for the prosecutor,
said.
“It is in that capacity that
the prosecutor’s office is cur-
rently reviewing allegations of
administrative misconduct by
Chief Dudeck.”
Lewis Center presents ‘Transmission’
The Lewis Center for the Arts'
Program in Dance presents
“Transmission,” an evening of
original choreography created by
Sarah Simon and AJ Brannum,
seniors in the program, on March
29 and 30 at 8 p.m. in the Patricia
and Ward Hagan '48 Dance Studio
at 185 Nassau Street. The per-
formances are free and open to
the public.
Simon is a Comparative Litera-
ture major who, in addition to
pursuing a certificate in Dance, is
also earning a certificate in the
Program in Creative Writing at
the Lewis Center. As a result of
her studies in dance, creative
writing, and literature, Simon
has explored the relationship of
form to meaning and how this re-
lationship can be expressed
across those different disciplines.
In her piece, Simon experi-
ments with the limits of express-
ing ideas through movement and
ways of creating narrative in
dance. The interplay of dance
and music is another point of in-
terest for Simon, who seeks to dis-
cover ways to bring musicians
into the dance and dancers inside
the music. “In making this work,
we have experimented with ele-
vating the importance of form in
communication, playing with
how we interpret meaning from
movement, sound, language and
shape,” she explains. A number of
other student dancers form her
cast, in addition to student musi-
cians who will be providing live
music during the performance.
Dancers are Emily Hogan ’15,
Sarah Howells ’16, and Asawari
Sodhi ’15. Musicians, who will
perform live on saxophone, vio-
lin, guitar, ukulele, and piano, are
Molly Bolten ’14, Divya Farias ’15,
and Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar
’14.
Brannum, an English major, is
writing his senior thesis on Sir
John Davies' famous poetic work
entitled Orchestra, or a Poem of
Dancing, in which the author
contemplates the merits of dance
and how dance relates to other ac-
tivities.
For his dance thesis, however,
Brannum is contemplating other
aspects of the artistic discipline.
While studying in the program,
Brannum found that there is a
somewhat strained relationship
between contemporary choreog-
raphers and popular music.
Speaking in regard to pop music,
he explains that, “When it shows
up in a dance it's usually playing
a predictable role: it turns stark
or deadpan action into something
ironic or amusing.” As a choreog-
rapher, Brannum desires to
reevaluate things that have in the
last few decades been considered
antithetical to affirming expres-
sion in dance, such as codified
technique, theatricality – and his
particular interest – popular
music.
Brannum has chosen to focus
on the music of the well-known
rock/pop band Maroon 5 because
he believes that their music per-
fectly embodies his current atti-
tude toward “sincerity” and
irony, enjoyment and detach-
ment. Guided by an interest in
what he calls “expressive hybridi-
ty,” his creative process has tack-
led such questions as how to
dance to such music without forc-
ing the former to serve the latter,
and how he can enjoy dancing to
the music he loves while avoiding
overindulgence.
To learn more about the Pro-
gram in Dance and the more than
100 events offered annually by the
Lewis Center visit
princeton.edu/arts.
Send us your Princeton news
Have a news tip? Want to send us a press release or photos? Shoot
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news@theprincetonsun.com. Fax us at 856-427-0934. Call the edi-
tor at 609-751-0245.
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