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© Pearson Education Limited 2007
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1988.
First published 2007
Fourth impress ion 20 I 0
Printed in Malaysia (CTP·VVP)
ISBN 978· 1·4058·33 17·2
Layou< by Ken Vail Graphic Design, Cambridge (kvgd.com)
Photo acknowledgements
We are grateful to the folJ owing for permission to reproduce copyright
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Teacher's Handbook
Pat Mugglestone
Contents
Sludents' Book conlents pages
Teacher's notes
Sludent AlB activities
Sludents' Book answer key
Time Out answer key
Students' Book tapescript
Workbook tapescript
= Siudenis' Book moleriol
ii
iY
4
105
105
107
114
115
122
126
132
ii
Introduction
About the Students' Book
The course has ten main modules. At the end of the book there is a magazine section related to [he units with
fun activities like puzzles, games and reading for pleasure. Each module starts with a Get Ready page which
introduces the module topic. There are then three main lessons. In odd- numbered modules, there arc Across
Cultures lessons and in even-numbered modules, there are Your Challenge and Understanding Grammar spots.
Each module finishes with a Language Check and a Study Corner with learner development activities to help
students become better learners.
How to use this Handbook
Thi s handbook contains reduced pages from the Students' Book, together with teaching suggestions, background
information on the content of the Unit, tapescripts, answers to exercises and ideas for extra activities; it also
includes the answers for the Workbook.
The Handbook will help you plan your lessons and is handy for use during lessons.
Features in Students' Book 4
Speak Out
These sections give students the chance to express their personal views about topics and ideas presented in the
Units. For example, in Module 1 students are asked to give their opinions about teenagers' use of computers and
mobiles (page 5, exercise 6) .
Word Bank
The Word Bank (pages 122-128) provides a study and reference resource, organised by lexical features (mul ti-
part verbs, prepositions, compounds) . Students use the Word Bank during lessons and for revision purposes. It
lists and expands vocabulary from the Module under headings such as Multi-part verbs, Collocation, Prepositions,
Compounds and Word Building as well as grouping vocabulary in word families, e.g. talk (Module 1).
Vocabulary is presented with definitions and exampl e sentences using the words or phrases in context, e.g. die out :::
disappear completely. Two types of tiger have died out in Indonesia. (Module 1, Multi-part verbs)
During lessons, students are referred to the Word Bank to develop their word-buil ding skill s (e.g. Modul e 2, Unit
5, exercise 8, page 19), to expand word families (e.g. Modul e 3, Across Cultures, exercises 5-7, page 33) and to
check their answers to an exercise (e.g. Module 1, Across Cultures, exercise 6, page 13).
Helps
These sections offer advice that students then put into practice in reading, writing, listening and speaking
activities. The Help sections cover reading ski ll s such as reading headlines (Module 2, page 18), writing skill s such
as planning e-mails and letters (Module 2, page 22), listeni ng ski ll s such as working out meaning (Module 3, page
31) and speaking skill s such as giving presentations (Module 5, page 51 ).
The Study Hel p sections in the Study Corners give study skills advice, e.g. on using the Internet (Modul e 1, page
14) and using dictionaries to increase knowledge of informal and formal language (Module 2, page 24).
Everyday listening
These sections give students the opportunity to li sten to English in everyday situations, such as short informal
conversations (e.g. Module 1, Unit 3, page 11), extracts from radio programmes (Module 3, Unit 9, page 31) and
shopping dialogues (Module 4, Unit 12, page 41). The exercises train students to li sten as we do in rea l life, for
example for specific facts and key information.
Text builder
These sections occur in Your Challenge (Modules 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10). They build on the sentence level ski lls that
students practised in the Sentence builders in Challenges 1, 2 and 3. Text builders focus on important features of
whole 'texts', such as discourse functions of paragraph (Module 2, page 22), sequencing (Module 4, page 42) and
linkers (Module 8, page 82) .
Fact or Fiction?
The Fact or Fiction provide short real-life contexts related to the module topic. Students decide whether they
think informat ion is true or false. Someti mes students can use their general knowledge (e.g. page 49, the highest
waterfall in the world). Sometimes, students have to guess (e.g. page 9, the number of blogs on the Internet).
Encourage students to discuss and give reasons for their guesses.
The Time Out magazine
At the back of the Students' Book there is the Time Ollt section, a set of fun activiti es and puzzl es in a magazine
format. There a re 30 activities in the magazine, one for each of the 30 core units in the Students' Book. Students
can do the acti viti es working indi viduall y, in pairs or in small gro ups.
The magazine acti viti es a rc designed to be used when there is time after students have completed a related acti vi ty
in the Unit, at the end of a Unit or at home. The magazine recycl es language and topi cs of the Units in new
contexts and authentic, moti vat ing activities such as puzzles (e.g. Acti vity 23, page 117), qui zzes (e.g. Acti vity 11,
page 112) and stories ' (Acti vi ti es 7-9, pages 110- 111 ).
Using the Teacher's Handbook in the classroom
Module objectives
The module obj ecti ves arc listed at the top of the first page of each Module in the Students' Book.
When starring a Modul e, read through the object ives with the students and check that they understand any
new voca bulary, e.g. auction in Module 4, otters in Modul e 5. If appropriate, ask students to di scuss any of the
acti viti es they have done, using their own language or Engli sh, e.g. 'writing blogs' (Module 1). Encourage students
to say what they remember about a ny of the grammar points they have studi ed in the past, e.g. Present tenses
(Module 1).
At the end of a Modul e, ask students to read the objecti ves aga in. Help students assess how well they have
achieved the obj ecti ves and to say which objecti ves they found easy or more difficult to achi eve.
Background information
Backgrou11d information provides facts and information about aspects of the social and cultural content of the
Units. It is intended primaril y for the teacher but is helpful when students ask about events, peopl e and places
ment ioned in a Unit, e.g. online radio in the UK and the city of Bri stol (Module 1, Get Ready, page 4 ). The
Backgrotmd information sections a lso give links to the Challenges website where further information is ava il able.
Ways of checking answers
Students can work in pairs or small groups.
Try to vary how you check students' answers to exercises:
- If spelling is important, ask students to spell the words for you to write on the board or invite students to come
to the board and write the answers on the board.
- Alternativel y, ask students to read aloud the answers. If necessary, correct any serious pronunciati on probl ems.
- At times, you may prefer to write the answers on the boa rd yourself for students to check their own answers.
- Students self-check the answers to some exercises, such as pa ir acti vities (e.g. page 17, exercise 10) and qui zzes
(e.g. page 55, exercise 5) by referring to the answers given in their book and to the Language Check by listening
to the cassette or CD.
Extra activities
Use the shorr extra acti viti es if there is time in the lesson. These activities develop from the content of the
Students' Book and are intended to give a change of focus and help student motivation and concentrati on.
Extra acti viti es include:
• activiti es developing from a reading text, e.g. Module 1, Unit 2, after Exercise 4, page 8
activiti es developing from a listening text, e.g. Modul e 5, Unit 15, after Everyday listening Exerci se 2, page 51
• acti vities practising a language point from the lesson, e.g. Module 1, Unit 2, after Exerci se 8, page 9
The Challenges website
The Challenges website is another va luabl e resource for both teachers and students. More background information
on the topics and themes of the Modules is provided on the website. For every unit at each level there is a
photocopi able acti vity for the teacher and an interactive test for the student. In addition, there a re module-specific
webli nks for both teachers and students, and regul ar competiti ons.
Challenges CD-ROM
The CD-ROM is to enable further practi ce of all of the skills and ropics covered in the students' book. There is
a range of fun, interacti ve acti vities in whi ch students ca n practi se their li stening, reading, writing and spea king
skills through the medium of games, videos, li stening and ga p-fill s. There is also a focus on pronunciati on, with
acti viti es which enable students to record themselves in interact ive dialogues. The CD-ROM fo rms a fun and
valua bl e additi on to the Students' Book, providing both extra practi ce and consolidation.
iii
iv
Contents
Unit/Page
(jet Ready (pp. 4-5)
Animal Tal k (pp. 6-7)
2 The Blog Generation
(pp.8-9)
3 www,radi'ochill.org
(pp.10-11)
Across Cultures 1
(pp.12-13)
Study (orner 1 (po 14)
Get Ready (p. 15)

5
6
Wacky News (pp, 1 b-1 7)
Breaking News
(pp. 18-19)
Finding News
(pp. 20-21)
Your Challenge (p. 22)
Language
Key Words: Communication
(irammar: Present tenses review
Word Builder: Multi -part verbs (l )
Sentence Builder: since and lor
Sentence Builder: Negative questions
Key Expressions: Opinions
Listen Closely: stress in common expressions
Word Builder: Opposites
Key Words: Media
Grammar: Past tenses review; Pa .. l Pellett
Word Builder: Compound adjectives
Sentence Builder: linking with ofter / before
+ ·ing + clause
Key Expressions: Personal news
Listen closely: Confusing word boundari es
Text Builder: Organisation; informal language;
ellipsi s in informal wri tten language
Understanding Grammar (p. 23) Verb patterns
Study (orner 2 (po 24)
Get Ready (p. 25)
7 Scouts
(pp. 2&-27)
8 Getting Involved
(pp.28-29)
9 The Ri ver
(pp.30-31)
Across C u l t u ~ 2
(pp.32- 33)
Study Corner 3 (po 34)
Get Ready (p. 35)
10 Auct ion (pp. 36-37)
11 Funny Money
(pp.38-39)
12 Value for Money
(pp. 40-<1)
Your Challenae
(p. 42)
Key Words: Communities
Grammar: Present perf ect and Present
Perfect Continuous
Word Builder: Multi-part verbs (2)
Sentence Builder: Transitive mul ti -part verbs
Key Expressions: Making arrangement s
Sentence Builder: I'd rather go / I'd rather not
Pronunciation: /-;)0/, lau/, h:J1 and lall
Word Builder: Verbl noun coll ocations
Key Words: Money
Grammar: The Passive
Key Words: Mat erials Word Builder: Parti t i ves
Sentence Builder: so ... that / such 0 .. _ thot
Key Expressions: Compl aining
Pronunciation: Probl em consonant sounds
Ted Builder: Reason li nkers because, btcouse 01,
since, as
Understanding Grammar (p. 43) Art icl es: the
Study Corner .. (p. 44)
Get Ready (p. 45)
13 Underwater Treasure
(pp. 46-47)
,.. Natural Wonders
(pp. 48-19)
15 Bri stol Zoo
(pp. 50-51)
Across Cultures 3
(pp. 52-53)
Study Corner 5 (p. 54)
Key Words: Fi gures e.g. decimals, estimates,
fracti ons
Grammar : Modals for present and past
speculation
Key Words: Landscape
Word Builder: Collocat ions
Sentence Builder: although and despite
Key Expressions: Gi ving a Presentation
Pronunciation: Sounds for the spelling ' ea':
1i:/, leI, Ir.,/, leal, 13:/, lell
Word Builder: Adverbs and intensifi ers
e.g. extremely, quite, rother
Skills
listening: The Challenges characters Reading: An advert
Speaking: Teenagers and communication
Reading: Art icl e on animal communication
Reading: Article on blogs; examples of blogs
Writing: Interactive class blog
Reading and Listening: The Chollenges sl ory
Speaking Help: Class Discussions Speaking: A discussion
Everyday Listening: Shorl conversations
Reading: Smoke signal s, drums and a whistling language
Speaking: languages and codes
Project: An arti cle on communication ~
Study Help: Using the Internet
List ening: The news Speaking: The media
Readinc; Unusual news stori es
Reading Help: Headlines
Reading: Imagi nary news stori es from hi story
Speaking: What's i n the news?
Reading & Listening: The Chol/enges story Speaking: Roleplays
Everyday Listening: Personal news and gossip
Writing: An E-mail P
Writing Help: Planning E-mai ls and Letters
Study Hel p: Informal I Formal Language
Listening: Community survey Speaking: Your communi ty
Writing: A relationship network
Reading: Articl e about scouts around the world
Reading: leiter to a newspaper
Speaking: Communi ty invol vement
Reading and Li stening: The Challenges story
Speaking: Roleplays Everyday Listening: Radio programme
Listening Help: Working Out Meaning
Reading: Clan Macrae and the Maoris
Speaking: Fami l y get-togethers Project: A celebration
study Help: Unknown Words
Listening: Radi o programme about t eenagers and money
Speaking: Pocket money
Reading: An eBay aucti on
Reading: Article about t he hist ory of money
Speaking: Negot iat ing
Reading and Listening: The Challenges st ory
Speaking Help: Being Poli t e Speaking: Shop roleplays
Everyday Listening: Shoppi ng Situations
Writing: A Letter of Compl aint [El
Writing Help: Formal E-mail s or Letters
Study Help: Communicat ion Probl ems
Listening: Documentary on the world's wat er
Speaking: How much water do you use?
Reading: Article about underwat er treasure
Reading Help: Descripti ons of Patagoni a, the Victoria Fall s
and the Everglades
Speaking: Describing a pl ace
Reading and Listening: The Challenges story
Speaking Help: Giving Presentations
Everyday listening: Class presentati on about olters
Reading: Article about the history of tea and coffee
Speaking: Questionnaire Project: A post er [fJ
Study Help: Writing Tasks
Unit/ Page
Get Ready (p. 55)
16 Going Green
(pp. 56--57)
17 Fair Trade
(pp. 58-59)
18 Local Hero
(pp.61Hi1)
Your Challenge (p. 62)
Language
Key Words: The environment
Grammar: Future Continuous
Word Builder: get and take
Sentence Builder: Prepositions + -iog
Sentence Builder: get with the passive
Key Expressions: Interviews
Lislen Closely: Shifting word slress
Text Builder: Organisation; linking review:
purpose: 50 that, in cose, in order to
Understanding Grammar (p. 63) Modals referring to the past
Study (orner 6 (po 64)
Get Ready (p. 65)
19 Roaring Twenties
(pp. 66-67)
20 Desert Flower
(pp.68-69)
21 Fashion Show
(pp. 7()-71)
Across Cullures 4
(pp. 72-73)
Study (orner 7 (po 74)
Get Ready (p. 75)
22 Magic Moments
(pp.76-77)
23 The Olympics
(pp.78-79)
24 The Police Station
(pp.8<Hl1)
Your Challenge (P. 82)
Key Words: Clothes
Grammar: used to and would
Word Builder: Prepositions in (ommon phrases
Sentence Builder: look like and be like
Key Words: looks Sentence Builder: loob
looks like ... , look ... Key bprMSions: Describing
people listen closely: Intonation in questions
Sentence Builder: have something done
Word Builder: Verbs and preposit ions
Key Words: Sports
Grammar: Reported statements
Word Builder: Multi-part verbs (3)
Sentence Builder: as well as, apart from,
instead of + noun
Key Expressions: Giving advice
listen closely: Changing mea ning with stress
Text Builder: Organisation; linking review
Understanding Grammar (p. 83) Talking about quantity
Study (orner 8 (p. 84)
Get Ready (p. 85)
25 Hi story Detecti ves
(pp. 86-87)
26 Sherlock Holmes
(pp.88-89)
27 The Factory
(pp. 9()-91)
Across Cullures 5
(pp.92-93)
Study Corner 9 {po 94}
Get Ready (p. 95)
28 Mad Genius?
(pp.96-97)
2. The Hitchhiker's
Guide to the Galaxy
(pp.98-99)
30 Success!
(pp. l00-l01)
Key Words: Crime
Grammar: Report ed questions
Word Builder: Idiomatic expressi ons
Sentence Builder: Hoving done .
Sentence Builder: Indirect questions
Key Expressions: Requests
Li sten (Iosely: Word boundaries in quest ions
Word Builder: Word famili es e.g. big, enormous,
massive, vast
Key Words: for paintings
Grammar: Past Conditional
Word Builder: Noun and adjectival suffixes
Sentence Builder: Prepositions at the end of
relati ve clauses
Key Expressions: Conversation - interrupting,
changing topic, etc
listen (Iosely: Word boundaries
Contents
Ski lls
listening: Two points of view Speaking: Environment questionnai re
Reading: Article and dialogue about 'going green'
Reading: Gift brochure Reading Help: Facts and Opinions
Speaking: Information gap
Reading and listening: The Challenges story Speaking: Rol eplays
Everyday listening: Weather foreust for 2080
Writing: A For/Against Essay
Study Help: Noticing language
listening: Street survey about style Speaking: Survey
Reading: Article about fashion in the 1920s
Reading Help: Sentence Gaps Reading: Life story of waris Oirie
Speaking: Guess the celebrity game
Reading and Listening: The Challenges story
Speaking: Describing people in photos
Everyday Listening: Short dialogues
Reading: Body art in history Speaking: Body decoration
Project : Description of a famous person
Study Help: Dictionary Skills (1): phonetic symbols
Listening: TV programme about sport Speaking: Your sport
Reading: Great sporting moments
Reading: Article on the Olympics
Reading Help: Taking Notes
Speaking: The Olympics
Reading and Listening: The Challenges story
Speaking: Roleplays Everyday Listening: Sports news
Writing: A Sport s Survey and Report Writing Help: Checking
Study Help: Engli sh Outside School
listening: Famous fictional detectives Speaking: Talking about qua lities
Reading: Interview with an archaeologist
Reading: Story - The Hound 0/ the Boskervilles
Speaking: Information gap
Reading and listening: The Challenges story Speaking: Rolepl ays
Everyday listening: Two crime scenes
Reading: A Mystery Solved·- Easter Island Speaking: Environmental issues
Project: An articl e about an unsolved hi storical mystery
Study Help: Revision for Exa ms
listening: Descriptions of paintings; musical extracts
Speaking: Imagining and describing a scene suggested by music
Reading: Article about gifted artists
Reading: Douglas Adam's The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Speaking: Inventing a fantasy world
Reading and listening: The Challenges story
Speaking: Guided conversation Everyday Listening: Conversations
listening Help: Answering Questions
Your Challenge (p. 102) Text Builder: Time linking review; organisation Writing: A Story Writing Help: Planning
Understanding Gramm.u (p. 103) wish
Study Corner 10 (p. 104)
St udent A Activities (p. lOS), Student B Activi ti es (p. 107)
Questionnai re answers. Fact or Fiction answers (po 106)
Study Help: Dictionary Skills (2): non-literal language
• TIM,OUT! (pp. 108-121) WORD BANI( (pp. 122-128)
Irregul ar Verb Li st (p. 128) II = For your port foli o
v
4
Get Ready
Background
Online radio has taken
off massively in the last
few years. There are two
types: conventi onal radio
stations that also ha"e their
programmes 'streamed' on the
Net; small local stations that
a re just online and often run
by very young peopl e.
Bristol is a city in the west of
England with a populat ion
of about 400,000. It was a
very important port in the
eighteenth and nineteenth
centuries, but now the port is
a few miles outside the city at
Avonmourh. The centre was
bombed badly in the Second
World War bm there are still
some historic buildings. The
most beautiful area in Bristol
is Clifton with its eighteenth-
century streets and squares.
The Clifton Suspension Bridge,
probably the most famous
construction in Bri stol, was
designed by Isambard Brunei
and compl eted in 1864.
~ Exercise 1 (COl Track 2)
• Pl ay the recording for
students [Q listen and
repeat the Key Words. Pay
particular attenti on to the
main stress in expressions
such as face-to-face
conversation. Check that
students understand that
'SMS' Stands for 'Short
Message Service'.
• Students work in groups
or as a whole class,
saying what forms of
communicat ion they use.
They can find out the
most popul ar form of
communicat ion for their
class and if there is any
form of communication
that none of them uses.
Exercise 2

Give students time to
b Talk about communicati on and give opinions.
(i, Read about ani mal communication, blogs
and unusual languages.
Listen to short conversations.
Write bIogs and a project about communk ation.
Get Ready
1 look at the Key Words. What forms of
communication do you use1
Key Words: Communication
blog, body language, computer network. e-mail,
face to face conversation, instant messaging,
mobile pho'1e (US = cell phone), postal service,
sign language. telephone (land line), telegraph,
I texting (SMS messages)
/
I
I
2 Work in pairs. Complete the information with
the Key Words. Check your answers on page 106.
900 IC Earl y , ___ in China. Messages are
carried on horsesback.
18« The fi rst 2 ___ message is sent in the
USA using the Morse Code.
1874 A.G. Bell has the first su(cessfuI
1
__ _
conversation.
1969 The first computer 4 ___ links
universities in the USA.
1972 The first 5 ___ is sent. The message
explains how to use the @ symbol.
1983 Motorola make their first , _ __ . It
measures 25 cm x 8 cml
1991 The World Wide Web is developed and
surfing the Net becomes possible.
1996 7 ___ is invented. You can now chat to
your friends on your computerl
listen to the peopl e in the photo. Match their
names with the information (A = Abi, E = Ellie, etc).
1 (£) and [LJ had the idea for an online radio station.
2 ~ seems quite artistic.
3 III is interested in 'green' issues.
.. 0 and Idl were not born in Bristol.
5 ~ and [J like football .
Answers _ student page
Extra
Ask individuals to read aloud the sentences.
Correct any serious pronunciation errors.
Encourage students to say what they know
about the people or things, e.g. A.G. Beli,
Morse Code.
• Give students rime to read through
the sentences before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording once for students t o
listen and match the names with the
information. Tell students not to worry
about understanding everything on rhe
recording at rhi s srage.
Answers - student page

read t hrough the gapped
sentences and check the
meaning of any new words.
Students do the exercise ~ Exercise 3 (COl Track 3)
working in pa irs then
check their answers on
page 106 of the Students'
Book.
• Ask students to look at and talk about
the four people in the photo, e.g.
appearance and clothes, where they
are, what their banner is about.
4 Read the advert for ' radiochi ll.org'. What
programme would you like to li sten to?
Extra
TIle beS1 musIC
in toWn UlltII
BrIStOl's hottest
neUJ bOnds.
Doily news about
whot's really
happening in BriStoL
Divide the class into four groups. Ask each
group to listen carefully to one of the speakers
and make a note of extra information about
the person. Play the recording.
Each group then tells the class their extra
information.
Check that students understand any new
vocabulary.
Exercise 4
5 Work in pairs. Read these questi ons and then
tell your part ner about yourself.
1 What do you use your mobile phone for most?
a} phoning b} texting c} taking photos
d) downloading music e} playing games
2 How do you prefer to chat to your friends?
a) face to face b) on the phone c) by texting
d) by instant messaging e) by e-mai l
3 What do you use the Internet for?
a) e-mail b) instant messaging c) buyi ng things
d) homework e} sending e-greetings
4 Which of these things do you send by post?
al postcards bl birthday cards c} personal letters
d) Valentine cards e} formal letters
• Give students time to read the
advert . Encourage students to guess
the meaning of hottest new bands
(latest and very exciting) and check
understanding of any new vocabulary.
• In turn, students say which programme
t hey would like to li sten to.
Extra
• Encourage students to say \"lhat they
know about Bri stol. If you have a large
map of the UK, display it for students
ro find Bristol.
Encourage students to discuss rheir
favourite radio stations and radio
programmes. Ask: What local radio
stations do YOH listen to? Do you listen
online?
Exercise 5
• Read through the questions
wirh the class. Check that
students understand any
new vocabulary.
• Students work in pairs,
discussing their answers to
the questions. Tell the pairs
to remember their answers
because they will need
them in Exercise 6.
Extra
The pairs tell the class some
of their answers, e.g. 'I use my
mobile phone most for texting
but (Anna) uses hers most for
playing games. (Anna) and
I both prefer to use instant
messages to chat to our
friends.'
Students can find out which
is the most popular answer to
each question for their class.
Exercise 6
• Ask one of the students to
read aloud the statement.
• Give students time to
think of their answers and
reasons.
• Students work in groups or
as a class, saying whether
t hey agree with the
statement and giving their
reasons.
• Encourage students to
think of situations when
they would choose to
e-mail or text rather than
phone or speak face to face
and vice versa.
r
6
This Unit
Shoct of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 8, 9 and 10). Shorren
the feedback in Exercise 12.
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
Anim;1 1 communicati on i s
a fasc inating phenomenon.
Anima ls use va ri ous means
of communication: smell
(pheromones produced with
urine or by special glands by
the majority of animals), sound
(sounds char can be hea rd by
people as well as very hi gh
fr equency sounds that we can't
hear, e.g. produced by bars and
whales), movement or position
(bee dances, tai l wagging in
dogs), etc.
For more information students
can consult these websites:
http://www.yprcnc.org.uk
hrrp:/len. wik i ped ia .org/wi k it
Anima l_communication
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Give students a few
minutes to work in small
groups, discussing what
rhey know about the
animals.
• The groups then share
their informa ti on as a
class. Help with vocabul ary
where necessary.
2 (CDl Track 4)
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
for genera l comprehension.
• Students work individuall y,
reading the text and noti ng
down how the six ani mals
communicate.
• When checki ng answers,
ask students to read aloud
the section of t he text that
gives the answer.
Extra activity on Website
1 look at the animal s on this page.
do you know about them? Think about :
• where they li ve • what they eat
• their size and wei ght • characteri stic features
2 Read the text about animal communication.
How do these animals communicate?
• ants • rats • bees • elephants
• whal es • frogs
<il '/1Y dog is sitting in front of IllY desk, wagging
his tail and looking at me intenselY. What is he
tlYing to tell me?' Jane Roberts investigates.
People have alwqys been interested in how animals
communicate and scientists are doing a lot of research
in this area.
Most animals communicate smell; produce
chemical substances called 'pheromones: Scientists
have discovered that a rat can identifY another rat
its age, sex and social status, just smelling its urine.
Ants spread pheromones to guide other ants to a
food source. Bees not onlY use pheromones but
also 'dance' to tell other bees where to find food.
For example, if a bee fl ies straight upwards, it
means tf1<;f should IlY directlY towards the sun
Evel)'One has heard birds si ngi ng. Research has
shown that mal!)' other animals use sound to
communicate. Some male frogs make two-part
calls: the fim part can onlY be heard other male
3 Have you got a pet? How does it
communicate?
Grammar: Present tenses
4 Identify the tenses in the exampl es (1-6):
Present Simple, Present Continuous or Present
Perfect. Then match them with the uses (a-f).

1 Ants spread pheromones. a)
2 We know li"le about how whales hear. c)
3 Scientists are doing a lot of research in
this area. ()
4 What is he trying to tell me? tI)
5 S<ientists have discovered that a rat can
identify another rat. h)
6 Everyone has heard birds si nging. e)
Uses
a) an activi ty that happens regularly
b) a past event with consequences in the
present
c) a present state
d) an activi ty happeni ng now
e) an event that happened in the past but it
doesn't matter when
f) an activity happeni ng around now
frogs, and it is a warning. Females onlY hear the second part,
which is a mating call!
Scientists have known for some time that ma'lY animals, like
bats, whales and elephants, communicate with sounds t hat
people cannot hear: Their calls produce waves that travel
through the ground, water or air: We know that elephants
probablY receive these signals with their feet or trunks.
However, we know little about how whales hear.
Ecologists sc!y that nowadqys loud noise from ships
is interfering with whales' communication.
Answers
ants: By smell - spread pheromones
rats: By smell - smell of uri ne
bees: By smell and by ' dance'
elephants: Wi t h sounds that people
ca nnot hear. Elephants probabl y receive
these sounds wi th their feet or trunks.
wha les: With sounds that peopl e ca nnot
hea r
frogs: By making two-parr call s
Exercise 3
• St udents discuss t he questi ons in
groups or as a whole class . If some of
them haven't got a pet, encourage them
to ta lk about pets that their friends or
relati ves have.
,
Grammar: Present tenses
Exercise 4
• Students ca n compare answers in pairs
before checki ng answers as a class.
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 5
Answers
Meaning a)
Exercise 6
Answers
1a 2b
5 Read t he sentence. ( hoQ,Se the meaning
(a or b) for the verb i n bold.
Scientists have known for some time that many
animal s communi cate with sounds that people
ca nnot hear.
a) situation that started in the past and cont inues
up till now
b) situation that happened in t he past
6 Read the sentences and match
them with the timelines.
1 I've had a cat for two years.
2 I had a cat for two years.
·1
bl
Practice
X
2002
X
2 years ago
X
2004
-----
now
now
7 Match the sentences with the pictures.
1 1 have led the ani mals. b)
2 I' m feeding the animals. oj
1 I feed the animals. c)
Extra
After checking answers, draw the two
timelines on the board. Ask individuals to
draw circles on the timeline and say pairs
of sentences about themselves, e.g. 'I've
li ved in this city for five years. I lived in
a very small vi ll age for three years when T
was a chi ld.'
Practice
Exercise 7
Answers -+ student page
Grammar
( omplete the text with the verbs in brackets
in the Present Simpl e, Present Continuous or
Present Perfect.
1 1 ~ (have) two dogs, (hoc and Ginger.
Ginger 2 ~ (be) in our family for seven years
and ( hoc 3 ~ (be) just two years old. They
4 ~ (not li ke) each other very much. ( hoc
5 ~ (sleep) in my bedroom and I 6 think
(think Ginger 7 (be) jealous. Ginger
sh i (bite) ( hoc a few t imes and she often
9 ~ (bark) at her. At the moment , we
10are trpn.,a (t ry) to train them. I 11 havr:fouml
(find) a good dog trai ner and 1 1 2 ~ (take)
the dogs to her three times a week. She's reall y
great!
9 Use the cues to write about Catherine,
who studi es elephant behaviour.
Exampl e
1 She has lived in Africa for ten yeors.
live in Africa I lor ten years
2 love animals I always
3 have a pet I never
4 i nvest igate elephants' fami ly li fe I this summer
5 take photos of elephant calves ! now
6 wri te her observations ! every day
7 observe the ani mals at night I oft en
8 not publi shed many articles I yet
Your Turn
to Use the cues to writ e a
questionnaire about how
peopl e feel about animals.
Use the correct tenses.
Exampl e
1 Are you afraid of any animols?
1 you I be afraid of any ani mals?
2 you! get on well wi th ani mals?
3 you I ever I be bitten by
an ani mal?
4 you I ever I have a pet?
5 How often I you I watch
programmes about animals?
6 you ! look after an animal I now?
7 you I be allergic to any animals?
8 you I enjoy thi s lesson about ani mals?
11 Work i n pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
12 Report your partner's answers to the class.
........ "IM.OUT! Page 108, Exercise 1
Exerci se 8
• Advise students to read quickl y
t hrough the text for general
understanding before t hey start
complet ing it.
• Check answers by aski ng individuals to
read aloud the sentences.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 9
• Eli cit the answers to items 2 and 3
before students work indi viduall y,
completi ng t he exercise.
Answers
2 She has always loved
ani mals. 3 She has
never had a pet. 4 She
is investigati ng I has
invest igated elephants'
fami ly li fe t hi s summer.
S She is taking photos of
elephant calves now.
6 She writes her
observations every day.
7 She often observes rhe
animals at night.
8 She hasn' t published many
art icl es yet.
Your Turn
Exercise 10
• Students write the questions
worki ng indi viduall y.
• Check the quest ions
before students do the pair
acti vity in Exerci se 11.
Answers
2 Do YOll get on well with
animals? 3 Have you ever
been bitten by an animal?
4 Have you ever had a pet?
5 How often do you watch
programmes about ani mals?
6 Are you looking after an
animal now? 7 Are you
allergic to any ani ma ls?
8 Are you enjoying thi s
lesson a bout animals?
Exercise 11
• Tell students to remember
t heir partner's answers.
• Moni tor the pair acti vity
and make a note of any
general probl ems to
go over wit h the class
after wa rds.
Exerci se 12
• In turn, students report
their pa rtner's answers to
the cl ass.
• Choose two or t hree
questi ons and find our
how many students
have answered ' yes', e.g.
quest ion 1 and question 3.
..... TIMI OUT! Page 108,
Exercise 1
Photocopiable Activity 1,
TTP, Page 48
8
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3, 4 and 6).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
A useful reference website
about the blogging
phenomenon is:
http://en . wi k i pedia .orglwi k i!
Blog
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Tn turn, students tell the
class which things in blogs
they would like to read or
write.
Extra
Find out how many of the
students write their own blogs.
Encourage them to tell rhe class
about them.
Ask srudents to say which blogs
they enj oy reading and why.
Reading
~ Exercise 2 (COl Track 5)
• Students work individually,
reading the article and
noting the types of blog
that are mentioned.
Answers
personal diaries, cooking,
politics, pets
Exercise 3
• When checking answers,
ask students to correct the
False sentences.
Answers
1 NI 2 F (Most bloggers are
teenagers) 3 T 4 F (Most
teenagers write about their
everyday lives) 5 NI 6 T
Exercise 4
• Tell students not to worry
about understandi ng every
word but to read for gist
comprehension in order
to match the texts and
photos.
Answers
lc 2a 3b
The Blog Generation
Extra
Warm-up
1 look at the things you can find in blogs.
Which would you like to read or write?
• personal diaries • diaries about pets/ babies
• messages between fr iends
• chats to meet new friends
• chats about interests (music, sport, cooking, etc)
• discussions about politics • news
• novels a nd stories • jokes
• homework questions and answers
Reading
2 Read the article. Whi ch types of blog from
Exercise 1 are mentioned?
There are blogs about overythmg from computers
to cookmg, trom politics to pels Families use them
to keep In touch with Gach other Mosl teenagers
wn!a diaries about thelf eVQrvdav tlVOS
You don't need spacial computor skills If YOli want
to start blogging, you jusl register with a company
like MySpace, MSN or X8ngas, log on and start
writing or uploading photos. It's easy and it's free!
But ramember - nevor give away your real name,
address or phone number, because you don't
know who might read your blog.
3 A.re these statements true (T). false (f ) or is
there no information (NI)?
1 0 Justin Hall still writes a blog.
2 0 Most bloggers are adults.
3 0 You can read someone's blog and write
to them.
.. 0 Teenagers usually write about their pets.
5 0 Blog companies get their money from
advertising.
6 0 It 's easy to wri te blogs and add photos.
Ask students to look ar rhe blogs and
find informal words and expressions with
these meanings: 1 nice-looking (blDg 1
cute ), 2 friend (blog 2 pal ), 3 fantastic
(blog 2 awesome ), 4 a long time (blog
3 ages), 5 attractive (blog 3 50000 nice).
Check that students understand that the
spelling of 'soooo' (meaning 'so') reflects
the emphasis given to the word when it is
spoken in this context.
Exercise 5
Students work individuall y or in pairs,
finding the verbs and completing the
expressions with somebody or something.
4 Read the blogs (1-3) and match them with the
photos (a-c).
o My name's Maggi e. I'm a fast runner and I'm very cute. My
first owner abandoned me but I' ve been wi th a new owner
for two weeks. Now I'm happy_ I get on with her really wel l.
Do you want to see some ~ of me with her?
links: www. ;ldoptapcLcom
• Hopper
I saw The Kaiser Chiefs last night. Thanks
for the ticket. Pat - you' re a real pal. @
Sim I went, too. The first band were terrible
but KC were AWESOME.
1---1
Who was the first band?
Satu,.day I got up late and played tenni s with Mel.
We met up with Tom at the sports centre
and chatted a bit. I haven't seen him for ages - not
since Mel's party in March. He's soooo nice - but he
got a girlfriend ® ! I !
Answers _ student page
Exercise 6
Answers
1 hand in 2 meet up with 3 get down
to 4 gave away 5 kept in touch with
5 Find the verbs in the article and the blogs.
Complete them with somebody or something.
Word Builder
two words
hand somdltiH§ in
2 give samdltiH§ away
four words
1 three words
3 get down to 50mrihinq
4 get on with SQmehor(V
5 meet up with sqmehodj
6 fall in love with 5Omrbot/y
7 keep in touch with $omebaJ,y
6 Complete the sentences using the verbs from Exercise 5
in the correct form.
1 Tomorrow, I've got to ___ that project.
2 This evening, I'm going to _ _ _ a friend.
Come on. let's stop talking and ___ some work.
• On Saturday, I ___ the secret of my mum's surprise
fortieth birthday party.
5 I have ___ a lot of my friends from primary school.
Exercise 7
• Give students time to read through
the verbs. Elicit one or two sentences
from the class.
• Give students time to look at the
Multi -parr Verbs section in the Word
Bank before they write their own
sentences.
• Working individually or in pairs,
students write as many sentences as
they can. If you wish, give a time limit
of two minutes . Monitor and check
students' sentences.
• Students read aloud two or three of
their sentences to the class.
Skills
7 Verb Game How many sentences
can you make with the verbs below?
get in, get off, get on, get to,
get on with, take off, take up
Word Bank, page 122
B look at the Sentence Builder. When
do we use for and since - with a
period of time or a point in time?
Sentence Builder '"
I' ve been with her for two weeks.
I haven't seen him for ages.
Blogs have been around since 1994.
I haven't seen him since March.
9 Write true sentences with for or since
and these time expressions .
two hours, eight o'clock, Tuesday,
a few days, three years, 2005,
Christmas, ages
Example
I haven't eaten for two hours.
Writing and Speaking
to Work in groups and write some
blog entries.
Think of a topic for a blog (see
Exercise 1). Write your name, the
time, and the first entry on a sheet
of paper.
Pass your paper to the next student.
Write your name, the time, and the
next entry on the 'blog' you receive.
Continue until your blog returns
to you.
11 Read your blog to
the class.
- Fact or Fiction? -
There are over
seventy mlhon blogs
on the Internet
Exercise 9
• Read through the
expressions in the box and
the example sentence with
the students. Elicit two or
three more sentences from
the students.
• Students work individually,
writing eight sentences
containing the expressions.
Monitor and point out
any errors for students
to correct. Help with
vocabulary where necessary.
• In pairs or small groups,
students exchange and read
each ot her's sentences.
Writing and
Speaking
Exercise 10
• Read aloud the stages of
the activity. Check that
students understand what
ro do.
• Students may find it
helpful to work through an
example as a class, building
up three or four blog
entries on the board.
• Students then work in
groups, agreeing a topic
and writing their blog
entri es.
Exercise 11
• After students have read
their blogs to the class,
they can vote for the
Page 108. Exercise 2 funniest / most interesting /
Exercise 8
Answers
for - a period of time
since - a point in time
Extra
Elicit three or four more expressions with
for or since to use in the sentences, e.g.
'I've been with her for four years'. 'I' ve
been with her since Apri l. '
most unusual blog.
Fact or Fiction?
• After checking the answer,
encourage students to
speculate about the reasons
why so many people
wri te blogs . Do students
think that most blogs are
interesting?
..... TlMI OUT! Page 108,
Exercise 2
Photocopiable Activity 2,
TIP, Page 49
9
This Unit
Short of time: set some of
the exercises for homework
(e.g. Exercise 4). Shorten the
discussion in Exercises 1 and 7.
More time: do .the Extra
activities.
Background
The radiochil l.org team meet
in the radio's headquarters in
Ellie's house and discuss the
first broadcasts of 'radiochill'.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Ask students to look at
and talk about the picture,
saying where the people
are, how they are feeling
and what rhey could be
talking about.
• Give students time to
work in pairs, looking at
the body language of the
people and answering the
questions .
• Students tell the class their
answers and see how much
general agreement there is.
Reading and
Listening
~ Exercise 2 (COl Track 6)
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and check their answers
from Exercise 1.
Answers
lA 2 S 3 E 4 T
Extra
10
Play the recording for students
to focus on pronunciation,
stress and intonation patterns.
Students work in groups of
four, reading the dialogue and
changing parts.
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the expla nat ion
to the class.
• Ask 'students to repeat the
questions after you. Check
that they use a rising
intonation at the end of the
questions.
~ www.rodiochi1l.org
3 look at the Sentence BUilder We use negatIve
questions when we want the listener to agree
with us or to show surpri se.
Warm-up
1 Look at the body language of Ellie, Steve, Tanya
and Abi in the photo. Who do you think
0 l ikes looking cool?
2 0 doesn't say much?
3 0 is very enthusiastic?
4 0 has a good sense of humour?
Reading and Listening
~ 2 Read and listen to the dialogue. Check your
answers from Exercise 1.
The group meet at the radiochill.org studio in
Ellie's house.
Ellie: Okay, we' re ready to start next week.
We'll do an hour a day at fi rst.
Abi: I don't think an hour's very much.
Steve: It's a long time on the radio.
Ellie: That's true. We could start the first
programme with an introduction about
ourselves.
Abi: What about music? If you ask me, music's
much cooler than chatting.
Tanya: I don't think so. I agree with Eltie. An intro
would be good. What do you think, Steve?
Steve: Fine.
Sentence Builder
Don't you think so?
4 Complete the dialogue with negative questions.
Use the cues in brackets.
A: I think that CO's great. (you / Iike / it?)
B: Yeah, but I prefer Green Day's new album.
A: I've heard it's good but I think Foo Fighters are
better. (you I think / so?)
B: Yeah, I do. They' re great. They were on TV last
week. (you I see I them?)
A: No, I didn't. I was on holiday.
B: Reall y?
A: Yeah, (you I know I that?)
Ellie: What about news? Didn't we agree on that before?
Abi: We haven't got any news yet! We've got to
find some.
Tanya: ' Radio reporter, 16, pushes girl into fountain in
Milienium Square.'
Abi: Yeah, that was funny, wasn't it?
Tanya: Yeah, it was for you but not for me!
Ellie: Come on you two, let's get back to the subject.
Tanya: Welt, there's an athletics competition in Bristol
next week. I think it'll be interesting. Don't you
think so?
Extra
Steve: Yeah, definitely.
Ellie: I think so, too. We can have that later
with the neViS. So we have the intra and
then some musi c. Then the news, then
more music.
Tanya: Yeah. We can add more programmes later.
You've got plenty of music, haven't you Abi?
Abi: Lots of cool stuff!
Ellie: Okay, let 's get down to some work!
Write cues on the board for students to
make into negative questions, e.g.
1 ..... you born in this country?
2 ..... you like pop music?
3 ..... you done your homework yet?
4 ..... you got a computer at home?
5 ..... you ride a bike?
6 ..... you coming to my party this
evening?
Answers
1 Weren't 2 Don' t 3 Haven't
4 Haven't 5 Can'tlDon't 6 Aren't
Exercise 4
• Students work individually, complet ing
the dialogue.
• AfteT checking answers, students work
in pa irs, reading the dialogue aloud.
Answers
Don't you like it? Don't you think so?
Didn't you see them? Didn't YOll know
that?
Speaking
5 look at the Key Expressions. Classify them.
a) agreeing b) disagreeing c) giving opinions
d) asking for opinions
IKey Expressions: Opin.ions :\"
What do you think? •
Don't you think so?
I think (that) .
I don't think (that) .
If you ask me, .
I think so, too. / Yes, definitel y. I don't think so.
LThat's true. / 1 agree with.
G look at the Speaking Help.
Speaking Help: Closs DIscussions
• fIkuays use €ngIsh etttepl: hi" names in your
_ (e.g. TV progrommes. nms. IJOUPS).
• UsII!n 10 \IOU< portnets. _ and wail for
""'"' 10 slop -. \100 _
• Ask Itoe 0IfleI>; ..... _ . 100.
Speaking
Exercise 5
Skills
7 Work in groups. Use the advice in the Speaking
Help and Key Expressions from Exercise 5 and
talk about t hese things.
• the best football teams • the best films
• the best radiolTV programmes at the moment
• the best websites/blogs • the best tennis stars
• the best pop groups/ singers
Example
Tom: I think (helsea afe the be5t team.
Ann: Yeah, definitely. Don't you agree, Tim?
Tim: No, I don't think so. I think Liverpoof
are better.
Everyday Listening
QYt Listen to six short conversations. Choose
the correct answer (a, b or c).
1 Where is Tim on holiday?
a} on the coast b} in the mountains @ m a boat
2 What are Roxy's favourite blogs about?
@)films b} pop music c} football
3 What homework has Kelly not done?
a) maths b} chemistry @geography
4 How does Tom to school?
a} by bus b} on foot f.S)by car
5 What instrument can Susan play?
a} piano @)flute c) guitar
6 How did Cath wish her cousin
a} by mobile phone b} wi th a card @by e·mail
Listen Closely Lislen to the sentences below
and underline the stressed word or words.
1 It's not fair. 5 You're late
2 How's it &Qin.g? 6 I couldn't he.l.D. it.
Exercise 6
7 I can't play .any, actually.
8 He's a !§Uy nice guy.
• Read aloud the advice.
• Students can compare answers in pairs
before checking answers as a class.
• Ask students if they enjoy and feel
confident when taking part in discussions
in English and in their Ll. Encourage
them to discuss any difficulties they have
in cl ass discussions in English.
Answers
What do you think? d)
Don't you think so? d)
I think so too. Yes, definitely. a )
That's tr ue. I r agree with ... a)
I think (that) ... c)
I don't think (that) ... c)
If you ask me, ... c)
I don't think so. b)
Exercise 7
• Ask two students to read aloud the
example dialogue.
• Give students time to think about each
of the topics.
• Students work in groups
of 3-5, discussing each
topic in turn. Monitor bur
do not interrupt students'
fluency. Make a note of
any general problems to
go over with the class
afterwards.
Everyday Listening
1 (COl Track 7)
• Give students time to read
through the questions and
answers.
• Play the recording once
for students to listen and
answer the questions.
• Play the recording again
and pause it after each
conversation to check the
answers.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Play the recording for more
intensive comprehension.
Pause the recording after each
conversation and ask one or two
comprehension questions, e.g.
Conversation 1: Where is the
boat? (in the Mediterranean),
How long will Tom and his
friend be on the boat?(for three
weeks)
Conversation 2: What sport
does the boy like? (football),
Why doesn't Roxy like
personal diary blogs? (They're
boring)
2 (COl Track 8)
• Play the recording, twice
if necessary, for students
to listen and underline the
stressed word or words.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Play the recording again for
students to listen and repeat
the sentences, stressing the
words correctly.
TlMI OUT! Page 108,
Exercise 3
11
Across Cultures I
Background
Silbo-like whi sdi ng has been
found in pockets of Greece,
Turkey, China and Mexico,
but none is as as
Silbo Gomero.
For information on
communi cation websites, visit
the Challenges Website.
C@WWW.Challenges-ell.com )
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Ask students to look at
and talk about the pictures,
guessi ng where the people
are and what is happening.
• Students work indi vi duall y
or in pairs, reading the
sentences and guessi ng if
they are true or fa lse.
Reading
2 (COl Track 9)
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and check their guesses
from Exercise 1.
• \Vhen checki ng answers,
ask students to correct the
false sentences.
Answers
1 T 2 F (You can only send
simple messages.)
3 F (You can hear them up
to eight ki lometres away.)
4 F (They were first used in
West Afri ca.) 5 T
Extra
Give students time to read the
text again. Explain or encourage
them to guess the meaning of
any new vocabulary.
Play the recording for students to
read and listen, paying particular
attention to pronunciation.
Exercise 3
• Students say what
advantages and
disadvantages are
menti oned in the texts .
• Encourage students to thi nk of
advantages and disadvantages that are
not mentioned in the texts, e.g. you
don't need special equi pment to send
smoke signals (adva ntage).
Exercise 4
• Students work individually, readi ng the
text and compl et ing the table.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 5
• Read through the cues with the class.
Ask one of the students to read aloud
the example sentences.
• Tell students ro write at least twO
sentences about each of their four
chosen topics. Monitor and hel p
students correct any language er rors.
Exercise 6
• Ask t wo students to read aloud the
example quest ion and answer.
• Ask indi vid uals to read aloud the
words in the box.
1 unknown
2 drorl
l tpmo!itaW
• ;'reful
s uselw
6 loud
7'_ """,---
5 Write sentences about four of these things using words
from the Word Builder.
• an animal • heavy music • a street • a singer
• a maths problem • a calculator • a carpenter
Exa mple
Giraffes have got long necks. They are common in A/rica.
6 Adjective Quiz Work in pairs. Test your partner on the
opposites of the words in the box.
........ Word Bank, page 125
Example
A: What 's the opposite 0/ 'correct'?
B' 'Incorred' What's the opposite 0/ ...
correct, hard·working, patient, happy, kind, outgoing,
dangerous, tidy, taU, pleaS<lnt , st rong, experi enced,
comfortable, lucky, healthy, fair, rich
Speaking
7 Work in pairs. Ask and answer these questions.
How many foreign languages ca n you understand a bit of?
2 How many languages can you say ' hello' in?
3 What other foreign language would you like to learn? Why?
4 Have you ever made up a secret code? If so, how did it work?
5 Are there any words that only you and your fr iends use?
6 If you spoke a secret language, when would you use it?
FOR YOUR __ __
Project: An article
Work in groups. Choose an important type of communication
for each student (see the Key Words on page 4).
2 Find out more detail s about your type of communication
and make notes.
say when and where it started
show an example of it
explain the advantages and disadvantages
3 Write your article and ask your group to check it.
4 Give your article to other students to read.
The artciertt E
9y
ptia rt S' had a system of picture
INritil19 called hiero9JyphS'. Each hiero91yph
repres-ef')ted a tJ.,irt9 or af') idea. For example
l
thiS'
J,;.,09IyPJ, rep,e,eoted ...
• Give students time to check the
opposites in the Word Bank on
page 125.
Speaking
Exercise 7
• Students work in pairs, taking t urns to
ask and answer questions.
Extra
In pairs, students write six to eight
sentences using some of the adjectives.
The pairs then form groups of four
students to read each other's sentences.
• Read t hough t he questions with the
cl ass. Check comprehension of any
new wotds, e.g. (to) make up.
• After the pair act ivi ty, students tell the
class some of t heir answers. Students
may like to see how many languages
they can say ' hell o' in.
Extra
Write two or three sentences
on the board, each using
a different secret code to
communicate the message 'My
name is Mike', e.g.
YM EMAN 51 EKIM =
My name is Mike,
13 25 14 1 13 5 9 19 1
3 9 11 5 = My name is Mike.
NB MZNV RH NRPV
=: My name is Mike.
Students work in pairs,
working out the three codes.
Answers
1 letters in the words are
reversed 2 sequence of
numbers matches sequence
of letters 3 letters are
counted from the beginning
and the end of the alphabet.
• Students t hen work in
pairs, wri ting their own
short sentence in code.
They ca n use one of the
three exa mple codes or
t heir own code.
• The pairs write their
sentence on the boatd for
the rest of the class to
decode.
Project
• Read through the stages of
rhe project so that students
understand what to do.
• Students work in groups
of four to five. Each
student in the group
chooses a di ffere nt type of
communicati on to find out
about.
• Give students time in class
or at home to research
their topic.
• Tell st udents to write
four to seven sentences
and include all the points
from Stage 2. Each group
checks grammar, spelling
and punctuation in thei r
articles. They can ask you
if t hey are unsure about
any corrections.
• The groups excha nge and
read each other's articles.
13
Language Check
Exercises 1-6
Answers -+ student page
Track 10)
14
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spelli ng
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at agai n.
• Gi ve students ti me in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 12 of the
WOtkbook.
Study Help: Using
the Internet
• Read aloud the advice in
the Study Help. Check that
students understand any
new words.
• Ask students which Internet
sites they fo und most useful
for their Proj ect in Across
Cultures 1.
• Encourage students who
use the Internet a lot to
add some of their own rips
to the advice in the Study
Help.
• Give students rime to
read through the li st of
tOpics and choose a ropic
to find out information
about. Check that students
understand what ' F.e.'
stands fot (Football Cl ub).
• El icit possible key words
for two or three of the
topics.
• Gi ve students time in class
or at home (if they have
access to the Internet )
to find out information
about their topic. Remind
them ro keep a li st of the
websites where they find
their information. Tell
students to copy useful
parts of the websites onto
their computer or print
them out.
Study Corner 1
Language Check
1 Match the words with the definitions (a-d).
• blog l JL • e· mail • texting 3--Bl-
• instant messaging 4-'1-
aJ sending writt en messages by mobile phone
b) an online diary or chalroom
c) a message sent by computer
dJ chatting to friends online
2 Complete each gap with one word.
5 I get on with most people in my class.
6 I' ve got to hand
m
my homework
tomorrow.
7 My brother recentl y took
un
judo. ,
8 She says she fell in love f£ilh a boy on
holiday.
9 You must get down to some work.
10 I met up with an old friend on Saturday.
11 Do you keep in touch
boyfriend?
With your old
3 Compl ete each sentence with the opposite of
the underli ned word.
12 I' m very with my clolhes but I' m a bit
W
dw
with my (Os.
13 She was .I.!.ll.knmm before she won the
compet ition; now she's a well-KHoWI1 singer.
14 I thought thi s homework would be s.i.!n.e.k but
it's quite wrjp/itatp/ .
15 I had nine answers and only one
il1coyred answer in t he maths test.
Vocabulary 0 / 15
Feedback
C; . Listen and check your answers to the
Language Check. Write down your scores.
• l ook at the table below. Then do the
exerci ses on page 12 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers:
Numbers 1- 4
Numbers 5- 11
Numbers 12- 15
Numbers 16- 21
Numbers 22- 25
look again at:
Get Ready - Key Words
Unit 2 - Word Builder
Across Cultures 1 - Word
Builder
Unit 1 - Grammar
Unit 2 - Sentence Builder
Numbers 26- 30 Unit 3 - Key Expressions
• Students who chose the same ropic can
compare whi ch websites they found
most useful.
Extra
In turn, students tell the class what they
found out about their topic. The rest
of the class listen and say if any of the
information is surprisi ng.
Module 1 Test, TTP Page 69
4 Complete the text
with the verbs in
brackets in the
correct tense: Present Simple,
Present Continuous or Present Perfect .
Blind people 16 have usul (use) the Braille
system for reading since the 19th century. Braille
17 fOH,Sists (consist) of a series of raised dots
which 18 (represent) letters of the Latin
alphabet. There are about two mill ion people
in the UK with sight problems but only twenty
thousand 19 read (read) with Braille. tn the
last few years, many young people 20 ha
v
utarled
(start) to use electronic text instead of Braille.
At the moment, experts 21 aa diW#5il1§ (discuss)
how to make Braille more attracti ve for young
people.
5 Complete the sentences with for or since.
22 He hasn' t phoned me for two weeks.
23 We' ve li ved here sinu 2004.
24 I haven' t seen her 51;""
25 She's taught in our school
Friday.
,lor si x
years.
Grammar 0 / 10
6 Underline the correct alternative.
Sue: I 26thinklbelieve their new CD is great.
Mel : I don' t think I prefer the first one.
Pat: I agree 28with/in Sue. It 's better for dancing.
Don't you think 29thotllll?
Sue: Yes, thaI'S 30sol true.
Key Expressions 01 5
Study Help: Using the Internet
First, write key words in a search engine like
Google (e.g. ancient Egypt + language).
If you can't find any good sites, change the key
words (e.g. ancient Egypt + hieroglyphics).
When you find a good site, don' t try to
understand everything. Bookmark the site
(Favourites) so you can return to it.
Copy useful parts of a website onto your
computer or print them out. Then you can read
them more slowly and take notes.
Always put a list of the websites where you got
the information from at the end of your work.
• Use the study help to find out information
about one of these people or thi ngs.
• sign language • Bristol • liverpool F.e.
• Avril Lavigne • Fernando Alonso
Get Ready
1 Where do you read or hear the things in the Key
Words: in I magazines or on TV I radio?
Key Words: Media
advice on fas hi on I health, art ides, cartoons, chat
shows, crosswords, documentaries, game shows,
gossip about celebrities, letters, headlines, horoscopes,
international news, interviews, problem page, puzzles,
questionnaires, book I CD I film reviews, sports reports,
quizzes, weather forecasts
listen to the radio news and take notes about the
items (1-5). Compare answers with a partner.
1 Hurricane: Where? When?
2 Bank robbery: Where? Police phone number?
1 Actress: Why in hospital? Husband's job?
4 New goalkeeper: Where from? Begins training?
5 Weather: Today? Tomorrow?
Get Ready
Background
This introduces the topic of news and the
media. There may be some di fferences
between the answers for Ex 1 in the UK
and students' countries.
c;J Exercise 1 (COl Track 11)
• Ask students to look at the photos
from the front cover of a teenage
magazine. Encourage students to say
what they know about the people and
whar they think the magazine articles
will be about.
3 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the
questions below.
look at the magazine (over. What would
you like to read about?
2 What other things in the Key Words do
you enjoy reading?
3 What things in magazines (e.g. puzzles)
do you like doing?
4 Out What do you think
about the statements below? Tell the
class.
Teenage magazines should have more
serious topics.
2 There are too many adverts on TV.
3 Reality TV shows like Big Brother should
be banned.
• Read through the Key Words with the
class. Check that students understand
any new vocabular y.
• Ask st udents to look at the first two or
three Key Words and say if these things
are in newspapers and magazines or on
TV and radio.
• Students work in pai rs or small groups
of three, matching the Key Words to
Group A (newspapers or magazines) or
Group B (TV or radio). Tell students
there may be more than one possibl e
answer in some cases.
• If students disagree about an answer,
ask them to give reasons for their
answer.
Suggested answers
Newspa per/magazi nes:
advice on fashion/health,
articles, crosswords,
headlines, horoscopes,
letters, problem page,
puzzles, questi onnaires,
booklcd/film reviews
TVlradio: chat shows,
documentaries, game shows
Newspaper/magazines
and TV/radio: cartoons,
gossip about celebrities,
international news,
intervi ews, sports reports,
quizzes, weather forecasts
2 (COl Track 12)
• Give students time to read
through the items and
questions so they know what
information to listen for.
• Play the recording, twice if
necessary, for students to
take notes about items ]-5.
• Students compare their
notes wirh a partner before
checking answers as a class.
Answers
1 south coast of Cuba,
10 o'clock tonight
2 near Piccadill y Station in
Manchester, 0161 876 543
3 she is expecting a baby
boy, footballer
4 Australia, tomorrow
5 grey and rainy today,
sunny and bright tomorrow
morning
Exercise 3
• Students work in pairs,
discussi ng the questions.
• The pairs then form groups
of four or six and exchange
ideas.
Exercise 4
• Read through rhe
statements with the cl ass.
Give students time to think
about the statements and
their responses to them.
• Students tell the class
what they think about the
statements. They can see if
there is general agreement
or if there is a wide range
of opinion in their class.
15
II
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 8 and 9).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students wor k in pairs
or small groups, guessing
what the stories are about.
• Students discuss their
ideas as a class . Help
with vocabulary where
necessary.
GExercise 2 (CDl Track 13)
16
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and check their guesses
from Exercise 1.
• Encourage students to give
reasons for their choice of
the strangest story.
• Explain or encourage
students to guess the
meani ng of any new words
in the stories.
Exercise 3
• It will probabl y be helpful
if you give an example
yourself by telling the class
a 'strange' story from the
news or about a friend or a
member of your family.
• Write question cues on the
boa rd and give students
time to think about their
story.
Who? When? Where?
What happened?
• Students tell the class their
story.
Grammar: Past tenses
Exercise 4
• Check answers by drawing
the timeline on the board.
Ask one of the students
to write the names of the
on the timeline on
rhe board.
Wacky news
Warm-up
1 look.t the photos (0-<) and the headlines (1- 3) In
the text. What do you think the stories are about?
2 Read the news items and check your guesses for
bercise 1, Which story is the strangest?
"'lIlfll l o Couple celebrate with 50-year-old
iii chicken
SPORT
POLITICS
HEALTH
A Monchostor couple celobrated 50 years of marriage
by eating {I tin of chicken they were gillon on their
wedding day, Thoy hid k.pt It .s {I memory of their
big day In '956, They had promllM each other to eat
It on tholr golden wedding annillerlary, When the
big day Clme, they oponed the tin - and found the
chicken was still good, A food expert said, 'l1nned
food can last fOl'OlIer and thi s tin hid oblliously bHn
closod properly,'
. Cat
A IIlIlago In China o,-;anlsod " fish party for more
than 200 Clts, Tho IIllIoQOfS hid bought tho cats to
control tho fats on their land. The mOllo WitS it gfoat
success and tho IIlIIagers decided to reward the cats
for thei r good work.
.. .. .. "." ........ " ......
Two passengers stopped ft pocked 80elng 767 Just
before Torry and Susan Smith wore slUing
the plAnt when thoy IIW tholr spaniel, Poppy. chased
by I'lrport security ataff. They shouted for the pilot
to Itop tho plane and rushed out to help cotcn their
pot, Thoy hid put Poppy In I: CAQO on tho CAfgO dock
but sho somehow oscl ped as tho plano wla going to
tho runway, Ellon with tnt holp of tho owners, It took
mofO thin ton mlnutos to elteh the terrified dOQ,
3 Whot ,t .. nlo n.,.. h .... you h .. rd or rood .bout lately?
Ten the el.".
Grammar: Past tenses
4 Read the sentence and put the names
of the tenses on the timeline: Past
Simple. Past Continuous.
Terry and Susan Smith were sittln. on the
plane when they saw their spaniel. Poppy,
a) . .f..,i.,w,.(,.\
... I
'\ b) Pfklt.","/,iJ .. ",
5 Complete the sentences from the
text with the correct forms of the
Past Perfect. Then look at the text
alaln and complete the rule,
The villagers ___ the cats to
control the r.t,.
They ___ I'oppy In • e.ge on the
earao deck.
We use the Past Perfect to talk about an
... nl that hoppened bt/o", I ojte, other
events in the past.
G look It the two events in each
sentence (a-b). ynd@rl1ne the event
thlt hoppencd IIrst.
I) When the big day come, they opened
the Un.
b) When the big d.y (lme, they hid
opened the tin,
• After checking answers, ask students to
find another example of this verb pattern
in text C ( .. , she somehow escaped as
the plane was going to the runway).
• After checki ng answers, point out the
Past Perfect verbs in bold in the texts.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 5
• Students work individuall y, completing
the sentences and the rule.
Answers
1 had bought 2 had put
Rule: before
Exercise 6
Answers
a) 1 When the big day came
b) 1 rhey had opened
Exercise 7
• Students do the exercise wor king
individually. They can compare answers
in pairs before checking answers as a
class.
Answers -+ student page
Practice
7 Match the sentences wi th the pictures.
When they started singi ng, everybody left t he room. h)
When they started singing, everybody had left the room. a)
3 We saw that someone had been in the kitchen. tI}
.. We saw that someone was in the kitchen. c)
8 Match events (1-3) with reasons (a-f). There are two
possible reasons for each event. Use the Past Perfect
for the reasons.
Example
1 Terry failed his moths test because he hadn't
studied enough.
What happened? Why?
1 Terry failed his maths test. a) didn't study enough
Grammar
9 Compl ete t he texts with t he verbs in
the Past Si mpl e, Past Continuous or
Past Perfect.
People in the Sea Garden park in
Varna, Bulgaria , ___ (enjoy) their
afternoon when an escaped tiger
, _ __ (come) through the gates.
Everybody 3 _ __ (run away) in
panic. The tiger 4 ___ (escape) from
i ts cage at t he zoo. The poli ce 5 __ _
(catch) the animal and 6 ___ (take)
it back to the zoo.
A cow 7 ___ (jump) into a
neighbours' swimmi ng pool duri ng a
heatwave in Brazi l. The owner of the
house said: " 8 ___ (cook) l unch
when I 9 ___ (hear) a noise. ,
10 ___ (go) out to check what
" ___ (happen) and I 12 __ _
(see) a cow in the swi mming pool ! It
,, ___ (get) over t he fence and
14 _ __ (go) straight to the pool .'
Fire fighters 15 ___ (get) the animal
out of t he pool and 16 ___ (take) it
back to Ihe farmer.
Your Turn
to Work in pairs. l ook at the pictures.
A
Student A go to page 105, Student
B go to page 107.
b) caused a tragic accident
2 Josh was taken to hospital. c) went to a party the night before
d) stole dothes from a shop
3 A pop star was put into prison. e) a dog bit him
f) fell off a horse
Exerci se 8
• Read through the instruction and the
example sentence with the class. Elicit
the second sentence to explain why
Terry fai led his maths test.
• Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud the sentences.
Answers
1 Terry failed his maths test because he
had gone to a party the night before.
2 Josh was taken to hospital because a
dog had bitten him. Josh was taken to
hospital because he had fallen off a horse.
3 A pop star was put into prison because
he/she had stolen clothes from a shop. A
pop star was put into prison because hel
she had caused a tragic accident.
........ TIM. OUT! Page 109, Exercise 4
Extra
Write cues on the board, e.g.
She went to the doctor's because ...
(e.g. she had hurt her arm)
Our teacher was pleased because ....
(e.g. we had all worked hard)
He didn't get to this interview on time
because ....
(e.g. he had missed the bus)
My little sister was upset because . .. .
(e.g. she had lost her teddy bear)
Elicit several reasons for each situation
from the class.
Exercise 9
• Advise students to read
quickly through each text
for general understanding
before completing it.
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
Answers
1 were enjoying 2 came
3 ran away 4 had escaped
5 ca ught 6 took 7 jumped
8 was cooking 9 heard
10 went 11 was happening!
had happened 12 saw
13 had got 14 had gone
15 got 16 took
Your Turn
Exercise 10
• Students work in pa irs,
taking turns to ask and
answer the questi ons .
• Check a nswers by asking
pairs of students to ask and
a nswer the questions.
Answers
2 Because the security
camera had filmed the
robber's face. 3 Because he
had left the mask at home.
4 Yes, because the robber
had left his fingerpri nts in
[he ba nk. 5 Yes, because
the robber had hidden the
money in his house.
6 Because he had seen a
cow in the road. 7 No,
but he hadn' t slept well t he
night before. 8 Yes. He had
won a few amateur drivi ng
competi ti ons. 9 No, beca use
he had dropped his gi rl friend
at the bus stop. 10 The
owner of the cow had called
the police.
~ ,.IMI OUT! Page 109,
Exercise 4
Photocopiable Activity 3,
TIP, Page 50
18
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exerci ses for homework (e.g.
Exercises 5, 8 and 11).
Background
Cleoparra (69-30 BC) was an
Egyptian queen, faI]l OllS for
her beauty. Of Greek descent,
she became joint rul er with
her brother Ptolemy XIIl at
seventeen, but lost power two
years later.
Christopher Columbus (1451-
1506), born in Genoa (modern
Ital y) is popularly regarded
as the discoverer of America.
He believed that the ea rth was
round and that Asia could be
reached by sa iling west.
Guy Fawkes (1570-1606)
was angered by James ['s
oppression of catholics. He
plotted with several others to
blow up the House of Lords
while the king was there.
For informati on about these
people, visit the Challenges
Website.
c:0www.Cha li engeS-elt.com )
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Read through the pieces of
information (1-6) with the
class. Check thar students
understand any new
vocabulary.
• Students work indi viduall y
or in pairs, matchi ng each
picture with two pieces
of information before
checking t heir answers on
page 106.
Reading
Exercise 2
• Read aloud the Reading
Help.
• Ask students if headlines in
newspapers in the students'
Ll mi ss out words and use
difficult vocabulary.
Exercise 3
• Students wor k in small
groups or as a class,
guessing the meaning of t he
headlines on page 106.
Breaking Rews
Warm-up
1 Match each person in the pictures with
two pieces of information (1-6).
ruled Egypt in the first century &c.
2 sailed from Spain to America in 1492.
3 tried to blow up the British Parliament
and King in 1605.
4 was born in Genoa (modern Italy).
S was executed in 1606.
6 was ki lled by a snake.
Check your answers on page 106. PLOT FOILED
c _ ,605 Our home affairs correspondent.
5th Noveml}'Cf, . .
Reading
. . anon mOUS from is helpi ng police
Alter receIVing all Y. . h their enquiri es. Experts
phone call \:lst night, that Fawkes is part of a
the t c: rou of extremists who plotted
parliament bUlldmg and g hiP up Parliament. f:lwkes is a
2 Look at the Reading Help.
-. ...... 11 SIB
• ....... 11\8 ...... ...-111
bo b A suspectc;u 10 ow ,
a four-ton m. k (3S) ww::1I_known critic of me Kings ...
terrorist. Guy Faw es
ilJllis,,--_
.... _ ... ---,..
·'lvID_al\lll __ ..
_ too. ..,a.InIll5_QaIII=
Ten Pf!IJI*_InCl_ araasll'"

3 Turn to page 106. Use the Reading Help
to guess the meaning of the headlines.
4 Look at the headlines on this page.
Guess what they mean. Then read the
articles and check your guesses.
5 Read the three articles again. Answer
these questions.
1 How did Cleopatra kill herself?
2 Why did she do it?
3 Why does the headline refer to ' paradise
island?
4 What surprised Columbus about the
natives?
5 What did Fawkes want to do?
6 Why did he want to do it?
• When checking answers, point out that
it is usuall y the sma ll words that are
left out of headlines, such as articles
(e.g. an, the), prepositions (e.g. in, of),
pronouns (e.g. their) and verb forms
(e.g. is, has been).
(ill Exercise 4 (COl Track 14)
• Ask students to read the t hree
headl ines and guess what each means.
• Play the recording for students to read
and listen and check their guesses.
Suggested answers
1 A terrible plot has been stopped.
2 Cleopatra ki ll s herself with a snake.
3 Columbus thinks the island he has
found is like paradise.
Exercise 5
• Students work individuall y, reading the
articl es and answering the questions.
• If students di sagree a bout any of the
answers, ask t hem to read aloud the
section in the art icl e that gives the
answer.
ADMIRAL'S PARADIS£ ISLAnD
October 12, 1492. OUr speciQI correspondent on t he Sallita Moria .
After being at sea for three months, Christopher
Columbus (41) has finally reached an unknown
island, somewhere near the coast of China.
After landing on the island, Columbus claimed
it for Spain and named it 'San Salvador'. It is a
beautiful place with a lot of plants and brightly-
coloured fruit . The locals are dark-skinned and
completely naked. Before leaving the island,
Columbus and the natives exchanged presents. In
a ten-minute press conference on the Santa Mario
this afternoon, the Admiral said: 'These people
are very easy-going and peaceful - in fact, they
don't hove any weapons.' This well-organised
expedition is the first to cross the ocean. 'The
voyage seemed never-ending but we've made i t:
said Columbus to reporters .
6 look at the Word Builder. Complete the
compound adjectives (1-1 0) from the texts.
Then classify the adjectives: a) numbers
b) third forms c) ·ing forms.
Word Builder
1 thirty· nine· S dark· 9 well·
2 easy- 6 ten· 10 never·
3 good- 7 four-
4 brightly- 8 well-
7 Use six of the adjectives from Exercise 6 in
sentences about your own life.
Example
Sometimes, moths lessons seem never-ending.
- - - Fact Dr Fiction? ---
The newspaper is the Japanese
YomlUn Shlmbun. It sells ten million copies a day!
Ch8Ck yoor ".$WlIr on page 106
Answers
1 with a poisonous snake 2 Because
she had been depressed since the death
of her love, Mark Anthony. 3 Because
the island is beautiful and the people
are easy-going and peaceful. 4 They
don't have any weapons. S To blow up
Parliament 6 He is a critic of the King.
Exercise 6
• Check answers by asking individuals to
write the compound adjectives in three
groups on the board - a) numbers, b)
third forms, c) ' ing' forms.
Skills
Game How quickly ca n you make the seven
compound adjectives?
Example world-famous
world- , after-, air· , English· , five·, long· , hard. j
conditioned, haired, famous, school,
speaking, working, star
-+- Word Bank, page 126
9 look at the Sentence Builder.
Sentence Builder
After Col umbus landed
on the island,
After landing on the
island,
Before Columbus left
the island,
he claimed it for
Spain.
Columbus claimed it
for Spain.
he gave the natives
presents.
Before leaving the island. Columbus gave the
natives presents.
10 Rewrite these sentences. Use the structures
from the Sentence Builder.
Example
Before getting up, Fred listened to the radio ..
Before he got up, Fred listened to the radio for
ten minutes.
2 After arriving at school. Susan did her
homework in the library.
3 Before we had lunch on Saturday, we did some
shopping.
4 After I got home, I had a shower.
S Before going to bed, Sam watched a film.
6 After he finished the exam, Simon went for
a run.
Speaking
11 Work in groups. Talk about these things.
the main international news yesterday
the main news in your country
a celebrity in the news
the most important sporting event this week
Example
The main news in our country was about the
floods in the north.
........ TIM.OUT! Page 109, Exercise 5
Suggested answers
1 thirty-nine-year-old I a)
2 easy-going Ie) 3 good-looking I c)
4 brightly-coloured I b)
5 dark-skinned I b) 6 ren-minute I a)
7 four-ron I a) 8 well-organised I b)
9 well-known I b) 10 never-ending I c)
Exercise 7
• Students wor k individuall y, writing
their sentences. Monitor and point out
any errors for studenrs to correct.
• In groups of 3-4, students read each
other's sentences.
Exercise 8
• Ask students to pur up
their hand when they have
matched the compound
adjectives.
• After checking answers,
eli cit one or two sentences
for each answer.
Answers
after-school air-conditioned
English-speaking five-star
long-haired hard-working
Exercise 9
• Students work individually
or in pairs, reading through
the pairs of sentences in the
box.
Exercise 10
Answers
2 After Susan arrived
at school, she did her
homework in the library.
3 Before having lunch on
Saturday, we did some
shopping. 4 After getting
home, I had a shower.
S Before Sam went to bed,
he watched a film. 6 After
finishing the exam, Simon
went for a run.
Speaking
Exercise 11
• Remind students of
the advice about class
di scussions from Lesson 3.
• Give students time to
think about the topics
before they discuss them in
groups.
• Monitor the activity but
do not interrupt students'
fluency. Make a note of
any common language
difficulties to go over with
the class afterwards.
Fact or Fiction
• Ask students to guess
whi ch is the best-selling
newspaper in their country.
They can use the Internet
to check the answer.
-+- TIMI OUTI Page 109,
Exercise 5
Photocopiable Activity 4,
TIP, Page 51
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 4).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
In this episode, Ellie and
Steve go out looking for local
news stories while Abi and
Tanya make their first online
broadcasts.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• If students don't know
people who have been on
local TV or radio, widen
the discussion and ask if
rhey or anyone they know
have been in the local
newspaper.
• After checki ng answers,
explain or encourage
students to guess the
meaning of any new
vocabulary, e.g. mugging.
Reading and
Listening
2 (COl Track 15)
20
• Give students time to read
the questions before you
play the recording so they
know what information
they need.
Answers
1 a boy who goes fishing
2 There are some dead fish
in the river. 3 She feels
awful because she was so
nervous that she dropped
her papers on the floor.
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Students wor k individually
or in pairs, reading [hrough
[he semences in the box.
Advise [hem CO look a[ [he
dialogue to check which is
the reaction to good news.
Answer
Grea[!
,I; Finding
Warm-up
1 Have you ever been on local TV or radio?
Do you know anyone who has?
Reading and Listening
2 Read and listen to the dialogues. Answer
Extra
the questions.
1 Who do Ellie and Steve interview?
2 What do they find out about the river?
3 How does Tanya feel after the first
programme? Why?
Steve and Ellie go out to find a story.
Ellie: Hi. We' re reporters from radiochill.org.
Can we ask you a couple of questions?
Boy: Okay. Go ahead.
Ellie: We've heard there was a mugging
near here yesterday. Do you know
anything about it?
Boy: Sorry, I don't.
Steve: So how's it going? The fishing. I mean.
Boy: Not very well, I' m afraid.
Steve: That's a pity - I like fishing, too, you know.
Boy: Well, the river's useless these days.
I saw a couple of dead fi sh. They
should do something about it.
Ellie: Did you say ' dead fish'? That
sounds interesting. Where exactly
did you see these fish?
Afterwards, Elfie comes back to the studio.
Tanya: Oh, hi there, Ellie. How are things?
Ellie: Not bad. Pretty good reaUy. I think
we've got a story.
Tanya: Great! What did you find oul?
Ellie: We talked to this boy who was fishing.
He found some dead fish in a river.
We're going down there tomorrow. What
about you? How did everything go?
Tanya: Oh, the programme was a nightmare.
Ellie: I'm sure it wasn't that bad.
Tanya: It was. Honestly. I was so nervous, I
dropped my bits of paper on the floor.
Ellie: Oh, no! I' m sorry about that, Tanya.
Don't worry about it.
Tanya: I feel awful.
Ellie: Never mind. It' ll be better next time.
Tanya: I hope so!
Play the recording of the dialogue from
Exercise 2 again for students to focus on
the stress and inconation patterns used in
the Key Expressions.
Students work in groups of four (Ellie,
Steve, the boy and Tanya), reading the
dialogue aloud and changing parts.
Monitor, paying particular atcention to the
pronunciation of the Key Expressions.
Some of the groups can act out the
dialogue in front of the class.
Exercise 4
• Elicit one or two examples for each
topic from the class.
• Give students time to think of their
own examples, inventing things if
necessary. Students can make brief
notes of their events, if they wish.
----
Exercise 5
Skills
Speaking
3 look at the Key Expressions. Which of the reactions Is
to lood news?
Key Expressions: Personal News .'.
Asking for news Replying
How's it going1 Not very well , I'm afraid.
How are things? Not bad.
How did everything go? Pretty good really.
It was a nightmare,
Reacting to news
That 's a pity. Don't worry about it.
Great! Oh, no!
I'm sure it wasn't that bad. Never mind.
I'm sorry about that. It wi ll be better next lime,
4 Thi nk about your life last week. You can make things up
if necessaryl
• good things that happened • things that went wrong
• interesting peopl e you met
5 Exchange news with your partner, Use the Key Expressions
from Exercise 3.
Example
A: How's it going?
8: Prttty good. GUt5S what! I mtt Ali ytsterdoy.
A: Grtot/ Did you get his phone number?
B: Ytah, and I gave him mine. What about you? How did
everything go at the wtekend?
A: It was a nightmare. We lost 8- 2 in the hockty. I was awful.
B: I'm surt it wasn't that bad.
Everyday Listening
listen to four conversations and answer tnese questions.
1 Do .. Gary feef ok.yl Why or why nol7
2 Do tne women like tne new neignbours? Wny or why not?
3 Did the mm go weill Why or why notl
4 Did Terl', date with Colin go weill Where did they gal
Listen Cfosely Listen and choose the correct option
in italics.
Have you met the new neighbours I two neighbours?
2 I was fifteen minutes I fifty minutes late.
3 floaked and I Luckily they iet me in.
4 You want to I won't believe it.
S And what about the actual I factual exam?
....... TIM.OUTI Page 109, Exercise 6
Extra
• Ask two students to read aloud the
exa mpl e di alogue, lI sing appropriate
stress and intonation patterns.
To give students more practice in using
the Key Expressions, ask them to change
partners and exchange their news from
Exercise 4 with their new partner.
• Students wor k in pairs, exchanging and
reacti ng to their news from Exercise 4.
Monitor but do not interrupt students'
fluency. Ma ke a note of any common
problems to go ovet wi t h the class
afterwards.
Each pair then says two or three of their
exchanges for [he cl ass to hear.
Everyday Listening
1 (CD1 Track 16)
• Give students time to read
through t he questions
before you play rhe
recording.
• Pl ay rhe recording once
and check if smdents have
answered all the questions.
If necessary, play the
recording aga in.
Answers
1 No. Because he played
badly in rhe march .
2 They like rhe woman. She
seems nice and sociable.
They don'r like rhe husband
or rhe dog. The husband is
odd and never says a word.
The dog is big and ugly and
looks dangerous .
3 No. He was late, he' d
forgotten hi s pen and the
exam was difficult.
4 Yes. They went to see a
film.
Exercise 2 (COl Track 17 )
• Gi ve students time to read
through the sentences
before you play rhe
recording.
• After checking answers,
play rhe recording for
students to listen and
repeat the sentences.
Answers
1 new neighbours
2 fifteen minutes
3 Luckil y 4 won'r 5 actual
Extra
Di vide the class into 4
groups. Ask each group to
listen carefull y to one of the
dia logues and make a nOte of
extra information.
The groups rhen rell rhe class
their extra information.
...... TIMI OUT! Page 109,
Exercise 6
21
22
Your Challenge
Writing: An e- mail
Exercise 1
• Students work indivi dua ll y,
reading the e- mail and
answeri ng the questions.
Encourage t hem to guess
the meaning of any new
words from the context
and Steve's style of writ ing.
Tell stud crus they will
study new words and
expressions in Exercise 3.
• Students can compare
a nswers in pairs before
checking answers as a cl ass.
Answers
1 exams 2 doesn't li ke
3 Tanya
Text Builder
Exercise 2
• After checking a nswers, ask
students if t hi s is how they
organi se infor mation in
their e-mails to friends.
Answers
1 b 2e 3a
Exercise 3
Answers
good - cool
silly person - nerd
as us ua l - typical
try it - check it out
get interested in - get into
Exercise 4
• Students work in pa irs,
reading rhe e-mai l and
ma king a note of sentences
with words missing.
• When checking answers, ask
students what the complete
sentences could be.
Answers
([lWe) hope peopl e get into it
(Can you) imagine t hat!
(I) must go now
(I've) got to take some photos
Your Challenge .
Writing: An E-mai l
1 Read Steve's e-mail. Choose t he correct options
in italics.
GCSEs and A-levels are exams! projects.
2 Steve likes ! doesn't like his sister's boyfriend.
3 Steve fancies Ellie! Tanya.
From... I stevejbjones@hotmall.com
To,:... II damgreenwood@tophat.com
SLtliect: I BIG NEWS!
Hi Damian,
1
How's it going? Di d your GCSEs go all right? Mine were okay but I think: I failed
Physics! I j ust hope I pass enough to do Art, Engli sh and French for my A-levels
next year. What do you want t o do?
Everything's cool here. Annie is still going out w ith Charl i e. (What a nerd he is!)
2
I did quite well in athl eti cs at school - came second in the 400 metres. Anyway,
the BIG NEWS is that last week we started an online radio station! There are four
of us - Ellie, Tanya, Abi and me. Tanya's really ni ce but I think she's got a boyfriend.
Typical! You can listen to us at www.radiochil l.org check it out! We do three hours
a day of music and local news. Hope people get into it. I' m a report er (imagine that !)
and I al so take photos f or our website (that's more 'me'). ©
Well , must go now. Got to take some photos for aUf website. Wri te back soon!
Love t o everybody! FOR YOUR PORTFOLIO '-_____________ ---,
Steve
Text Builder
2 Match the paragraphs (1-3)
with what they do (a-<).
a) fi nish off
b) ask about the other person
c) give t he main news
3 Find colloqui al words or
expressions in the e-mail that
mean:
• good • silty person • as usual
• try it • get interested in
4 Find sentences in the e-mail
wit h words missing. Thi s onl y
happens in postca rds and
informal letters.
Exa mple
(I) come second in the 400 m.
(That's) typical!
Exercise 5
5 Write an e-mail to a friend or someone in your family
who lives in another town. Tell them your news (real or
imaginary!).
~ 1
l ook at the Writing Help and pla n your e-mail.
Writing Help: Planning E-malls and letters
• Think about the person you Ole wnting to. How well do
you Itnow himlher?
• What IIJIlUd helshe be IntetesII!d to hear abOut? Family
news? SChool news? Your social life?
• What do you wool: to know mout hirnJhec? Think rl some
Questions to osk.
~ 2 Write notes for three paragraphs (see Exercise 2) .
"' 3 Write your e-mail. Try to write in a n informal style (see
t;:; Exerci ses 3 and 4).
~ 4 Check for spelling. gra mmar and punctuation.
G Work in groups. Read each other's e-mails. who has the most
interest ing news?
Understanding Grammar
• Rea d through the Writing Help and
Steps 1-4 so students understand what
to do.
Exercise 1
• St ud ents skim the text fo r genera l
understandi ng and to find out what the
writer t hinks of teenage magazines.
• Help st udents wi th voca bulary and
in for mal exp ressions, if necessary.
• When students are checking theif
e-mai ls, t hey can ask you if they ar e
unsure of a ny correctio ns.
Exercise 6
• After each gro up has chosen t he most
interest ing news in t he if e-mails, they
can tell the class a bout the news.
• Encourage students to refer back to the
text to support their a nswers.
Understanding Grammar: Verb patterns
Read the text. What is the author's opinion about magazines
for teenagers?
A
lai of us like buying magazines, don't we? We enjoy
reading about films, fashion and sport. And for us girls,
magazines are also a good place to find out about important
things and birth control.
From learn to put on make-up and
how to stop biting your nails. They suggest having a
healthy lifestyle and give practical tips: how to give up
eating sweets,how to avoid smoking and start doing
exercise at home.
They advise us to do these things but the advice comes
with adverts which tell us to buy various things: body
lotions that witl help us lose weight, shoes that wil! make
us look more attractive and energy drinks that promise to
keep us active all night.
One jeans ad says, 'In a world where you can be anything,
be yourself.' The problem is that companies only want us
to 'be ourselves' with the help of their product. They never
offer to show us how to be more creative or more involved
in community life. They ask us to wear their brand names
and try to convince us that this will let us express 'who
we really are'. In fact, they just want to sell us as much as
possible. And we shouldn't agree to buy it any more!
Of course, advertisers know that we are important
customers. We love going shopping and, on average, we
spend $38.55 each time we go. But I think we should stop
to think about what we are buying. We should refuse to
let companies manipulate us We should decide to really
be ourselves!
2 Complete the table with the verbs in bold.
verb + to infinitive want to do something
verb + object + 10 infinitive wont somebody to do something
verb + object + infinitive
verb + -ing
lei somebody do something
enjoy doing something
3 Read these sentences from the text and match them
with the meanings of the verb stop.
1 We should stop to think about what we are buying.
2 You can learn how to stop biting your nails.
a) interrupt an activity in order to do somethi ng else
b) give up the thing you are doing
4 Circle two correct verbs that
can be used to complete the
sentences.
Mike ___ to bring some CDs
to the party.
@ offered b) suggested
@)nomised
2 Children should _ _ _
watching horror films.
a) refuse @ avoid @ stop
3 My mother ___ me to wash
up.
@)asked b) made @)hetped
4 The teacher _ __ me to join
a sports club.
b) enjoyed
@)wanted
5 I've ___ reading the
newspaper.
b) agreed
@gLvenup
5 Complete the sentences with
the correct forms of the verbs
in brackets.
Teenage magazines are a load of
rubbish so I stopped , __ _
(read) them a tong time ago.
My history teacher advised me
, _ __ (start) 3 ___ (read)
newspapers, which can help me
' ___ (understand) the world
better. He suggested 5 ___ (t ry)
The Guardian and offered
, ___ (lend) me his copy every
day. I loved 7 ___ (read) the
sports pages but tried 8 _ _ _
(go) through political and economic
news as well. I had promised my
teacher 9 ___ (read) everything.
After some time, I learnt 1o __ _
(find) interesting news quickly.
Now I want 11 _ __ (buy) some
magazines, li ke Newsweek or Time,
and see if I wi ll enjoy 12 __ _
(read) them as well.
Suggested answer
Exercise 2
Magazines give advice about health etc.
but this always comes with adverts for
products. / Magazines say they want young
people to be themselves, but companies
only want you to do this by buying their
product. / Magazines don't show their
readers how to be more creative or more
involved in community life.
Extra
Ask students which teenage magazines
they like. Do students agree with the
opinions in the text?
• Read through the table with the class.
• Elici t one or two more answers using
some of the ver bs in bold from the
text.
• Students work individuall y, completing
the table. They can compare answers
in pai rs before checking answers as a
class.
Suggested answers
verb + to infinitive: learn,
promi se, offer, try, want,
agree, stop, refuse, decide
verb + object + to infinitive:
advise, tell , want, ask
verb + object + infiniti ve:
help, make, let
verb + -ing: like, enjoy, stop,
suggest, give up, avoid, start,
love
Exercise 3
Answers
1a 2b
Exercise 4
Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud the
pairs of sentences.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Elicit sentences containing the
verbs that are not the answers
in the exercise (1 suggested
2 refuse 3 made
4 enjoyed 5 agreed).
Exercise 5
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
• Encourage students to say
what sort of newspaper
they thi nk 'The Guardian'
is and what sort of
magazines 'Newsweek' and
'Time' are.
Answers
1 reading 2 to start
3 reading 4 to understand
5 trying 6 to lend
7 reading 8 to go 9 to read
10 to find 11 to buy
12 reading
Extra
Students work indi vi duall y,
writing 6-8 sentences of
their own, using some of the
verbs from Exercises 2 and
3. Monitor and check the
sentences_
Language Check
Exercises 1-4
Answers .... student page
(CDl Track 18)
24
• Students listen to' the
recording to check theif
answers. Check spelling
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book rhey need
to look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home [0 do the
exercises on page 22 of the
Workbook.
Study Help: Informal!
Formal Language
• Read aloud the advice in
rhe Study Help. Encourage
students to discuss when
it is appropriate to use
informal language, e.g.
depending on who you are
talking to and the topic of
conversation.
• Gi ve students time in
class or at home to make
a list of informal words
and expressions from this
module.
• Students then work in
small groups, comparing
their lists.
Module 2 Test, TIP, Page 70
StudlJ Corner 2
Language Check
1 Complete the compound adjectives in the
news stories with these words.
looking, known, year, kilometre, going,
coloured, hundred, minute, third, organised
Professor Hu, a scientist at
Essex University, recently developed the world's
first robotic fish. He gave a 2thi rty·...1t1..U:u!tL
demonstrat ion which was
very and
interesting to watch.
The
robot moved just like
a real fish.
A
driver from Belgium
was given a discount
by his insurance
company yesterday after
an period
without an acci dent . Mr Delacauw
sti ll makes the tr ip to the shops
every day. He plans to keep driving until he is 110.
Orlando Fonseca, 29, is an man
but he got angry about the noise from the flat
upstai rs. He leaned out of his window and caught
his neighbour, Kim Koen. She
had fallen through her broken
window and was hanging on to the window with
her fingers.
Vocabulary 0/ 10
2 Complete the news story wit h the verbs in the
correct tense - Past Simple, Past Continuous
or Past Perfect,
last week, police in Germany (go) to
a man's house to arrest hi m. They 12har/reaivY/
Feedback
\1- listen and check your answers to the
language Check. Write down your scores.
- look at the table below. Then do the
exercises on page 22 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers: Look again at:
Numbers 1-10 Unit 5 - Word Bui lder
Numbers 11-20 ; Unit 4 - Grammar
==='-- -
Numbers 21-25 Understanding Grammar
Numbers 26-30 Unit 6 - Key Expressions
(receive) an anonymous phone call the night
before. Apparentl y, the man 13 bad stolen (steal)
several cars in the city. However, whi le the police
'-4 were!JPina (go) in through the front door of the
suspect's h6use, he (escape) out of the
back door and 16--l1U:1...- (run) into b::;'i?¢bOUr'S
garden. Unfortunately for him, he 17
(leave) hi s dog, Lumpi , in his house. One of the
police officers (te, the dog to find its
owner. When lumpi 19 un (find) the man, he
20was hi4"nJ (hide) behind some bushes!
3 Choose the correct word.
21 You should avoid sitting I sit I to sit at the
computer for too long,
22 Heather offered helping I help I me
with my homework.
23 My parents make me tidying 11iJ!:t I to tidy my
room every weekend.
24 She stopped buying I buy I J9..JuI1 a magazine
on the way home.
25 I enjoy reading / read I to read music
magazines.
Grammar 0 / 15
4 Complete the dialogue,
A: Hi there, how are ?
B: Not very well, I'm 27.....afr.siiL. ' My maths exam
was a nightmare.
A: Never . I'm sure you'll pass.
B: , hope . And how about you? How
did the match 30--j2- ?
A: We won, 3-1. I scored a goal.
B: Great!
Key Expressions 0 I 5
When you look up words in good dicti onari es, you
can see if they are informal.
Example
auy /gat! noun informal a MAN (from l onaman
Wordwise Dictionary)
When you write down new words and expressions,
note if they are informal or formal.
Example
Hi, Chris. How's it going? informal
Good morning. How are you, Mr Tal/en? formal
• Make a list of informal words and expressions
from this module.
Use the Key Words to describe the photos (a-c)_
Key Words: Communities
Homes: block of flats (US = apartment bu ilding),
bungalow, cottage, detached house, mobi le home
(US = trailer), semi·detached house, terraced house
Areas: the city centre (US = downtown), a rural area,
an inner city area, the suburbs
Local faci lities: corner shop. park, sports centre,
village shop, youth dub
2 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
What kind of area do you live in? Is it a
friendly area?
2 What kind of home do you and your family
live in?
What local facilities are there in your area?
.. How many of your relations live near you?
5 Where do you know your friends from?
3 Listen to a boy talking about his community.
Answer the questions in Exercise 2 for him.
Gel ReadlJ
Background
This looks at different communities
in terms of the physical places and
the networks of relations that people
have. Relationship networks show the
relationships that people have with other
people. They are used by social scientists
ro study how peopl e interact.
1 (COl Track 19)
• Students listen and repeat the Key
Words after the recording, paying
particular attenti on to word stress.
• Students work in small groups, using
the Key Words to talk abollt the photos.
Listen again. Identify the people (1-10)
in the relationship network.
----
football friends I history teacher I
football coach I cousins I best friend I
sister I neighbour I close school friends I
friends from Devon I brother
) Now draw your own relationship network.
Answers
a) block of flats (apartment building),
the city cenrre, an inner city area
b) rural area, vill age, detached house
c) terraced house, the suburbs
Exercise 2
• Students wor k in pairs, raking turns to
ask and answer the questions.
• Ask some of the pairs to say the questions
and answers for the class to hear.
Exercise 3 (COl Track 20)
• Play the recording, twice if necessary,
for studenrs [Q listen and answer the
questions in Exercise 2 for Robbie.
• When checking answers,
encourage students to
answer as fully as they can.
Tell them not to worry
about the names of the
people. (The names are
given in Exercise 4).
Answers
1 the suburbs of south
London. It isn't friendly.
(There are some nice people
but everyone's a bit distant.)
2 a terraced house (four
bedrooms, a small back
garden) 3 a corner shop, a
park. His school is quite near.
He gets the bus to the sports
centre and youth club. 4 Not
many. An aunt Uan) lives in
London but he doesn't see
her very much. 5 his street,
his school, friends he plays
football with and friends from
his primary school in Devon.
4
• Give students time to read
the names in the network.
Check that students know
how to pronounce the
names (e.g. 'Sean' ) to
ensure that they recognise
the names when they hear
them on the recording.
• Play the first pa rt of the
recording to the end of the
section about the number
of bedrooms. Check that
srudenrs have idenrified
'Sue' and ' Dan' correctl y.
• Continue playing the
recording for students to
identify all the people in
the relationship network.
Answers
1 sister 2 brother 3 cousins
4 best friend 5 close school
friends 6 football friends
7 friends from Devon
8 neighbour
9 history teacher
10 football coach
Exercise 5
• Students ca n use Robbie's
network as a model. Tell
them to include the type
of relationship for each
person (e.g. brother, school
friend, auntie) as well as
the name of each person.
1
This Unit
Shon of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 8, 9 and 10).
More time: do the Extra
act ivities.
Background
The ropic of the lesson is
Scours. The Scout Movement
was founded in 1907 by
Robert Baden-Powell , a retired
Li eutenant General in the
Brirish Army. The aim of rhe
movement is to devel op young
people physicall y, spirituall y
and mentally so rhar rhey
may take a constructi ve place
in society. Thi s is achieved
through informal educati on
with emphasis on practical
activiti es, often orga ni sed
outdoors. For informati on
about the Scout Movement,
visit the Challenges Website.
)
Warm-up
1 (CO2 Track 21)
• Students di scuss what they
know about the Scout
Movement and then read
the introduction.
Exercise 2 (COl Track 22)
• Students read the text. Tell
students not to wor ry about
understanding every word
at this stage, bur ro focus
on answering the questi on.
Answers
Zolran (Hungary), Joan
(Austra lia), Marek (Poland)
Extra
Play the recording for students
to listen and read the text and
make a note of new vocabulary.
Explain or encourage students
ro guess the meaning of any
new words.
Exercise 3
• Students work in small
groups, di scussi ng the
questi ons.
• The groups then feedback
ro rhe class. If any of
the students are (or have
been) scouts, encourage
the rest of the class ro ask
26 them questions about their
acti vities.
Scouts
Warm-up
t look at the photos. What do you
know about the Scout Movement?
Read the introduction to the text
to check your knowledge.
The Scout Movement was founded in 1907 in the
+
United Kingdom by Sir Robert Baden·Powell.
The mission of the movement is to help young
people develop as individuals, citizens and
members of their local, national and international
communities. There are 28 million scouts worldwide.
Famous former scouts include Paul McCartney,
Stephen Spielberg and David Beckham.
2 Read the text. Which scouts do
something for their local community?
I've been a scout for two years and it's
been a lot of fun. This year we'\·e been
learning to survive in the forest. I've
learnt to find my way using a map and
the sun. We'\·e been studying forest
plants but [ haven't learm to recognise edible ones
yet. I've also learnt some first aid.
In my scout group, we focus on our
environment. We collect litter, clear our
local river, monitor water pollution and
feed wild birds in wimer. This year we've
been planting new trees in our area. I've
planted more than a hundred mysclfl
My scout group works with old and
handicapped people. This year we've
been checking how easy life is for
people in wheelchairs in our town.
We've been taking photos of street
Grammar: Present Perfect and
Present Perfect Continuous
4 Complete the sentences from the text wit h
the (orrect verb forms.
Present Perfect Continuous
We , ___ been studying forest plants.
We' ve 2 ___ collecting money for their
restoration.
We've been 3 ___ photos of street signs.
5 Read the sentences from the text and
match the columns (1-2) with the uses
of the tenses (a-b).
1 Present Perfect
Continuous
2 Present Perfect
Simple
signs, entrances to shops and public buildings and
the pavements. We've been talking to bus drivers
and police officers. \Vhen we fini sh, we'll prepare
We've been collecting
money for their
restorat ion.
We've collected £300
so far.
a rcpOrt for the local coundl.
My scout group is interested in history.
We are looking after memorials from
World War II in our town. For two years
now, we'vc been collecting money for their
restoration. \'\fe' vc colkctcd £300 so far.
Are you a scout? Would you like to join? What
activities would you like to be involved in?
Grammar: Present Perfect and
Present Perfect Continuous
The Present Perfect Cont inuous is
commonly presented as a tense referring
ro acti vit ies that started in the past and
haven' t finished. However, thi s is true onl y
in some cases (e.g. I' ve been working on
this proiect for ages.) [n most cases the
functi on of the Present Perfect Continuous
is to draw the listener's attention to the
activity itself, regardless of whether it
has been completed or nor. That's why
the sentence I'm completely knackered,
I've been marking essays could be uttered
in two possible contexts - when all the
essays have been marked and when t he
We' ve been planting
new trees in our area.
I've planted more
than a hundred trees
myself !
We' ve been learning I've learnt to find my
to survive in the forest. way using a map.
a) the focus is on the activi ty
b) the focus is on the achievemenl / the result of
the activity
ma rking wasn' t fini shed. Often, the
Present Perfect Continuous is used to
explain what has led to a present state of
affai rs ' Why is there water everywhere?'
'Gina has been washing up. '
Exercise 4
Answers
1 have 2 been 3 raking
Extra
Ask students to read Joan's text and find
two more exa mples of Present Perfect
Conti nuous verbs (we've been checking,
we've been talking).
G Complete the sentences with the verbs
in the Present Perfect Continuous.
I haven't slept for two nights. I
{think about} the gi rl I met at the summer camp.
Mike is exhausted. {he I cut} wood
for the fire?
What's the latest news? We
(nol watch) TV all week.
Our group is going to win the best team
competition. We (col lect) all the
litter in the area.
Why do you want to join the Scouts?
___ (you I read) about them?
Choose the correct sentence for the
people (a and b) in the pictures.
3 I've washed up.
4 I've been washing up.
I've cooked a
meal for my
scout troop.
2 I've been
cooking a
meal for my
scout troop.
8 Read the situations and use the cues to write
one sentence in the Present Perfect Simple
and one in the Present Perfect Continuous.
Example
1 She's been watching TV for four hours.
She's watched three films.
Mary is watching TV. {watch TV for
four hours, watch three films}
2 We are in the garden. {work very hard, plant
ten new plants}
My parents are tired. (jog, run five miles)
Pete's hands are dirty. (collect litter, not wash
his hands)
Exercise 5
Answers
1a 2b
Practice
Exercise 6
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the sentences. Encourage
students to use short verb forms where
appropriate when saying the sentences,
e.g. I've been ... , We haven't been ....
9 Put the verbs in brackets in the Present
Perfect or Present Perfect Continuous.
Parent: Hi Jim. How is camp?

(you I do)?
Scout: I (learn)
some useful
things: map reading,
cooking .'
Parent: Is the food good?
Scout: Well. we 3 ___ (eat) mainly bread
and tinned meat. I don't like it so I
(lose) some weight.
Parent: 5 ___ (you I eat) all the apples I
gave you?
Scout: Sure. And I (give) some to
my friends.
Parent: 7 ___ (you I wash) properly?
Scout: Not really. The water in the lake is very cold.
Parent: 8 ___ (you I wash) the dishes in the
lake, too?
Scout: No, we don't want to pollute it. There
, ___ (be) a lot of rain this week so
we (clean) them with sand and
rainwater.
Your Tum
10 Write about the things you have been doing
and have done recently.
Example
I've been learning first aid.
I've learnt how to treot Q bee sting.
-+- TtMaOUTl Page 110, Exercise 7
Answers
1 have been thinking about 2 Has he
been cutting 3 haven't been watching
4 have been collecting 5 Have you been
reading
Extra
Write cues on the board:
1 1 haven't I My fr iend hasn't slept for
two nights .......
2 I'm I My friend is exhausted. .. ...
El icit one or two suggestions for the second
sentence in each situation, e.g. I've been
worrying about the exams. I I've been
playing football all afternoon.
Students work in pairs,
writing two sentences for each
situation.
Exercise 7
• Students do the exercise
working individually. They
can compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
Answers
Ib 2a 3a 4b
Exercise 8
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the example
sentences.
• Students work indi vidually,
completing the exercise.
Answers
2 We've been working very
hard. We've planted ten new
plants. 3 They've been jogging.
They've run five miles. 4 He's
been collecting litter. He hasn't
washed his hands.
Exercise 9
• Advise students to read
though the dialogue before
they start completing it.
Answers
1 have you been doing
2 've been learning
3 've been eating 4 've lost
5 Have you eaten 6 've given
7 Have you been washing
8 Have you washed 9 has
been 10 've been cleaning
Your Turn
Exercise 10
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the example
sentences.
• Students work individuall y,
writing four or five pairs of
sentences about what they
have been doing and what
they have done recentiy.
• Students then work in small
groups, taking turns to read
aloud their sentences.
.... TIM. OUT! Page 110,
Exercise 7
Photocopiable Activity 5,
TTP, Page 52
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3, 4 and 7).
More time: do the Extra
act ivities .
Background
A recent survey in the UK
showed thar seventy per
cent of press coverage of
teenagers shows them in
a negative light. For more
informat ion about teenagers
and voluntary work in Britain,
see www.youth-action.org. uk
which has a list of links to
volunta ry organisations.
For information about Multi -
part verbs, visi t the Challenges
Website.
c::@www.Chali enges.elt.com )
Fact or fiction: Thi s comes
from a national survey of
problem behaviour and
associated risk and protective
factOrs among young people
(2002) by the otgani sation
Comnllf'ndies that Care. Most
young people liked their
neighbourhoods, but around
a fifth felt unsafe going out at
night - girls more than boys.
See: http://www.jtf.otg. uk
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups or
as a class, discussing their
opinions and saying how
they would reply to them.
• Ask students if these
opi nions are common in
their own country.
Reading
Exercise 2 (CDl Track 23)
• Read through the headings
with t he class.
• Students work individually,
reading the letter. Tell
them not to worry about
understandi ng every word
at thi s stage, but to read
each paragraph for gist in
order to match it with its
heading.
Answers
Id 2e 3a 4b Sf
Warm-up
o Teenagers are lazy and out of
con trol thes.:, e.,,:; d;.:. a:;.. y_s._ -:::::--_....,J
• I
I' • I I
G _ J
We should ban teenage 'hoodies'
from our shopping centres.
Reading
2 Read the letter to a newspaper. Match the
paragraphs (1-S) with the headings (a-f).
There is one extra heading.
1 ,\' Speak Out Read the opinions above
(a-<). Which of them have you heard before?
What's your opinion?
a) improving our community d) unfair art icle
b) raising money e) local youth dub
c) teenagers behaving badly f) don't judge us
be victims of street crime than
older people. Surveys like (hat are
soon forgotten and newspapers
just write about inconsiderate
teenagers who behave badly and
don't care about Q(hcr people.
The [ruth is, not all teenagers
are like that. Me and my friends
are nor angels but we don't go
looking for (fouble.
• I've been going to a yout h
club for twO years with some
of my friends. We chill out,
li sten to music and play pool,
but we do things to help rhe
local community as well. Last
summer, we put on a concert
for young kids in our area and
about rhiny of them came along.
We had 3. really good laugh with
(hem.
~ 0 I am wriring to reply to the • This year, a group of us have
article about teenagers in last been volunteers on a community
week's Bristol Evmil1g Post. I am project. We talked to young
a teenager and I thought it was people about local problems,
very unfair. The article gave rhe like crime and drugs and asked
impression (hat all teenagers are for suggestions. Last month,
lazy and JUSt hang around the we met up with some local
streets looking for trouble. But councillors and they're going
accordi ng to a recent survey, to carry out some of our ideas
young people between rhe ages for improvements. For example,
of 16 and 24 are more likely to they're goi ng to start lip a website
Exercise 3 Exercise 5
for young people and put up a
bus shelter outside the school.
., We do things at school, too.
L.'l.St term, we raised £800 for
Comic Relief. a charity which
was set up by comedians. On
II March, ' Red Nose Day',
everybody turned up at school
with red plastic noses and wore
funny wigs. We sold food and
organised fun activities .
• To fin ish, I'd just like to say:
Please don't judge all teenagers
by the bad behaviour of a few
yobs. And by the way - I wear a
hoodie, too!
Yours sincerely,
Harry Pamn (16)
• Students do the exercise working
indi vidua ll y. They can compare
answers in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
• Read through the verb patterns 1-3 in
the box with the class . Point out the
incorrect combinations, e.g. put on +
ptonoun (e.g. it).
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 4
Answers
Id 2a 3c 4f 5h 6g 7e 8b 9i lOr 11i
Exerci se 6
• Read through the examples (1-3) with
the class.
• After checking answers, ask students to
say exa mple a ) in a different way (He
took off his jacket.lHe took it off) and
to use a pronoun in example b) (She
took care of it.)
Ansz.vers
a)l b)2 c)3
l Read the letter again. Choose the best answer
(i, b or c).
1 The newspaper article about was ...
@) negati ve. b) positive. c) both.
1 The boy thinks all teenagers are ...
i) friendly. b) lazy. @different.
The youth dub organises '"
iI) sports. b) voluntar\! work. @}concerts.
.. This year, the boy has worked ...
(ii)with young people, b) on a website.
cr for local town councillors.
S The boy sometimes ...
al acts like a ' hood Ie: @:I looks like a 'haodle:
cj doesn't like 'haodl es.'
4 look at the Word Builder. Find the verbs
(1-11) In red In the text and match them with
Ihe deflnilion. (0-1).
Word Builder
I hang around i) have feelings for
2 tafe about b) begin a project
something/someone
1 chill out c) relax
4 put something on d) stay in one place
doing nothing
5 come along e) put into practice
6 meet up with someone I) organi.e (><2)
7 carry something out g) have a meeting
with
8 start something up h) arrive (x2)
9 put something up I) build
10 sci something up
11 turn up
5 look at the verb patterns (1-3) in the sentence
8ullder.
Sentence Builder
, I put a concert on, put it on
put on a concert, put-on-it
2 meet up with some friends. meet up wit h them
'th, hleet tltelU tip witI'!
1 chill out
(---ract ar rictian? ---1
Over 20% of young people in.Britain feel
unsafe going out at mght.

Extra
Give students time to look at the ver bs in
the Mu)ti-part Ver bs sect ion of the Word
Bank for this Module. Ask students to say
some of the sentences in a different way,
e.g. The government carried their plans
Ollt .•.
Exerci se 7
• Ask one of the srudents to read aloud
the example item. Elicit the answer to
item 2 from the class.
6 Match the examples from the Word Bank (a-<)
with the verb patterns (1-3) from Exercise 5.
a) take something off He took his jacket off.
verb pattern 1
b) take care of someone/something She took
ctlre of my cat.
c) take off The plone took off.
7 Rewrite each sentence in two ways, if possible,
Example
1 The school 0 wtbsire up lost term, The
school set it up last term.
The school set up a website last term,
2 We put on funny wigs for Red Nose Day,
] I get on with my cousins,
4 We put up some shelves in the youth club,
S They looked up the word in the dictionary,
6 They took port in the school concert,
_ Won! Bank, page 122
8 Verb Quiz Use multl·part verbs you know
and the Word Bank to test your partner.
Read out a verb and your partner has to
make a sentence with it.
Example
A: toke something off
B: I took off my hot.
_ Won! Bank, page 122
Speaking
9 Work in pairs. Which of these things would
you do to raise money for charity?
1 Put on a funny wig and a red nose.
2 Run a marathon.
(42 km)
1 00 a bungee
jump.
" Dye your hair
red or purple,
S Shave your
head,
10 Work in
groups, Think
of fun acti vities
to raise money,
-"TIMaOUTf Page 110, Exercise 8
Answers
1 The school set a website/it up last
term. 2 We put funny wigslthem on for
Red Nose Day. 3 I get on with them.
4 \Y/e put some shelves/them up in the
youth club. 5 They looked the word/it
up in the dictionary. 6 They rook part
in it.
Exercise 8
• Ask two students to read a loud the
example item.
• Students complete the exercise working
indi vidua ll y.
• Elicit one or twO more exampl es from
the cl ass, using multi-parr verbs from
the Word Bank.
• Monitor the pair act ivity
and help srudents correct
any errors in their sentence
patterns.
Extra
• Ask students to write 5-6
sentences, using some of
the verbs (1 -11) from the
table in Exercise 4). Check
students' sentences.
• In small groups, students
exchange and read each
other's sentences.
Speaking
Exercise 9
• After the pai r activity,
students report back to the
class and find out which
things would be most
popul ar and which chings
they woul dn' t want to do.
• Encourage students to tell
the class about any other
things they ha ve done to
raise money for cha rity.
Exercise 10
• Students work in groups of
4- 6, listing their ideas.
• The groups then tell the
class their ideas, The class
ca n vote for the best two
or three suggestions.
Fact or FictiOIl
• Ask students if they are
surpr ised by the answer.
• Ask studenes if they feel
unsafe at nigh t in some
places in thei r town or
region. What can they
do to be safer
'
(e.g. go
wi th fr iends, go in well -lit
places, don' t accept lifts
from st rangers).
..... TIMI OUT! Page 11 0,
Exercise 8
Photocopiable Activity 6,
TTP, Page 53
.....
This Unit
Shoct of time: set some of the
exercises for homewor k (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 4). Shorten the
discussion in Exercise 1 and
the roleplay in Exercise 6.
More time: do the ,Extra
activities.
Background
In [his story epi sode, Steve
and Ellie go down to check
out the river. They find a
dead fish. Tanya and Abi
meanwhile prepare and present
a programme of what's on in
Bristol. After rhe programme,
which goes bener, Ellie phones
Tanya and they arrange
to go out at the weekend.
They decide to go to a new
restaurant that has just opened
in rhe area.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups
or as a class, seeing how
much they can remember
of the last episode without
looking back at it.
• Students can then look
back at Lesson 6 and check
that they have remembered
all the important
information.
Reading and
Listening
2 (COl Track 24)
30
• Ask students to look at the
photo and guess what is
happening and how Ellie is
feeling.
• Give students time to read
the questions before you
play the recording.
Answers
1 So he can take a good
picture of it. 2 Because she
did well this time although
she has been nervous before
the programme. 3 Because
she wants to tell Tanya
about the dead fish.
4 At the new place near the
market
Af: The River
Warm-up
1 What happened in the last story episode?
Reading and Listening
G 2 Read and listen to the dialogues. Answer the
questions.
1 Why does Steve want Ellie to move the fish?
2 Why does Tanya feel better when Ellie phones?
3 Why does Ellie want to talk?
-4 Where do Ellie and Tanya arrange to meet?
Steve and Ellie check out the river.
Ellie: look ... over there!
Steve: What is it?
Ellie: A dead fish! Something's killing the fish.
Steve: Can you move it a bit so I can take a good
picture?
Ellie: I'd rather not do that, Steve.
Steve: Come on, use that stick. Remember, you're
a reporter. You'll do anything to get a story.
Ellie: Oh, all right. Yuk.
Abi and Tanya put on the Friday edition 0/
radiochill.arg. Afterwords ...
Tanya: Hi , Ellie.
Ellie: Hi. I heard the show. You sounded great!
Tanya: Thanks. I feel a lot better now. 1 was so
nervous before the programme.
Ellie: listen. We've got a lot to talk about. Steve
and I got photos of dead fish at the rive r.
Tanya: Well done! leI 's meet up.
Ellie: Sure. What about the usual coffee bar?
Tanya: Well, I'd rather go somewhere else. Why
don't we try that new place near the
market?
Ellie: Good idea. We could have something
to eat there, too.
Tanya: Sounds great! What time?
Ellie: Er, I can be there in half an hour.
Tanya: All right, shall we meet at about five?
Ellie: Brilliant.
Tanya: Maybe we could go out later. 00 you
fancy going dancing?
Ellie: Sorry. 1 can't make it tonight. Maybe
tomorrow. We can talk about it later.
Tanya: Okay. See you at five. Bye.
Ellie: Right. Bye.
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Students work indi viduall y, completing
the table.
• Check answers by asking pairs of
students to read aloud the suggestions
and replies.
Answers _ student page
Speaking
3 Complete the Key Expressions from the
dialogues.
Expressions: Making Arrangements
meet up.

usual coffee bar?
4 Why ....t:kn.L we try
that new place?
6
something to eat there.

about five?
9 Do you going
dancing?
11 We --EilL.... talk about
it later.
Replies
3 J'idL . I'd .£fli!tu
go somewhere else.

7 Sounds -§BilL !
Brilliant.

-1J!!.fl1L it tonight.
Okay.
12 you at five.
,..,.,....,i-,.,
Extra
Play the recording of the second
conversation (betvveen Tanya and Ellie) in
Exercise 2 for students to focus on stress
and intonation patterns.
Students work in pairs, reading aloud the
dialogue and changing parts.
Exercise 4
• Check that students understand that'd
stands for would in I'd rather.
Answer
preferences
4 look at the Sentence Builder. Do we use
'd rather for preferences or requests?
Everyday Listening
Skills
Sentence Builder
I'd rather
1 listen to Abi and Tanya. Complete the
I'd rather
5 Work in pairs. Act out.these situations.
Example
1 A: f'If help you with your homework.
B: Thanks, but I'd rother do it myself
A: Offer to help with your partners homework.
B: You don't want any help.
2 B: Invite your partner to go to the cinema.
A: You'd prefer to go dancing.
A: Ask your partner to hold your pet hamster.
B: You hate them!
4 B: Ask your partner to go out for a burger.
A: You'd like to have a pizza.
Work in pairs. Make arrangements for going
out to two places at the weekend. Use
expressions from Exercises 3 and 4.
Example
A: Do you fancy going to the Faa Fighters' concert
on Friday?
Well, I'd rather see Franz Ferdinand.
Exercise 5
• Ask t\\I0 students to read aloud the
exampl e exchange. Point our that it is
polite to thank the other person before
you say what you would prefer to do
instead.
• Elicit suggestions for item 2 from the
cl ass.
• Students then work in pairs, acting
out the situations and changing parts.
Moni tor but do not interrupt students'
fl uency. Make a note of any general
problems to go over wit h the class
aftenvards.
gaps in the adverts.
W •
Exhlbltlotl 1 Oecemce! 18th 1
F,'shllJll Th,ulIqh Th AJl" 3 -('000
Ope I 4 J 30 5
PRJ: FOO FIGHTERS
SAT: FRAJIZ FERDIIWID
:;:) SUJI: PINK FAIRIES
, __ -11.30 IAPPROX)
ALL TICKETS , __ _
2 Read the listening Help.
listen to the programme again. Work out
the meaning of the words and expressions.
stuff from the sixties
a) shirts @ fashions c) ties
bel/bottom trousers
a) ti ght trousers b) baggy trousers
@flared trousers
3 weird, freaky shirts
®Strange b) valuable c) fashionable
Pronunciation Listen and repeat
the words.
no !n':JU! 2 now !nau! 3 near Im'J!
night /nanl
5 Check you can say the words with the
underli ned sounds. Then listen and repeat.
1 We aren' t bowling tomorrow
I wQn't fi t because I don't like
He won abQQt five thQ.!!sand pQ.!!nds!
You could the lQ!!d cheers from the crowd.
My hQ.!!se is qu!te the
She's small but she'll into thQse
clQthes.
-+- TlMSaUT! Page 110, Exercise 9
Exercise 6
• Ask two students to read aloud the
exampl e dialogue. Elicit suggestions for
continuing the di alogue.
• Elicit suggestions from the class of
where to go and what to do at the
weekend.
• Students work in pairs, making
arrangements for going our to tWO
places and agreeing where and when to
meet.
Extra
Students change partners and make a
different dialogue with their new partner.
Everyday Listening
Exercise 1 (COl Track 25)
Answers
1 2"' 2 January 3 1800
4 9.30 5 Monday 69pm
7 £12
Exercise 2
• Read aloud the advice in
the Li srening Help.
3
• Gi ve students time to read
through the questi ons and
answers before you play
rhe recording aga in.
• If srudents d.i sagree abour
any of the answers, ask
them to expl ain their
reasons for their choice of
answer.
Answers - student page
4 (COl Track 26)
• Play the recording several
times for students to li sten
and repeat the words. If
appropriate, point Out
the phonetic tra nscription
and the twO vowel sounds
(diphthong) in each word.
Exercise 5 (COl Track 27)
• Students work in
pairs, saying the words
containing the underlined
sounds quietl y to each
other. You may wi sh to
check the pronunciation
of these words with the
cl ass before playing the
recording for students
to li sten and repea t the
sentences.
• Students li sten and repeat
the sentences chorall y and
indi viduall y. Try to ensure
that each student says at
least two of the sentences.
..... TIM. OUT! Page 110,
Exercise 9
Across Cultures 2
Background
This lesson looks at two
communiti es which have
maintained their traditions and
strong sense of identity.
The Scottish clan system grew
up in the Middle Ages when
the Hi ghlands of Scotland
was very violent and had no
strong, central government.
The clans gave peopl e safety.
The Maori s are now a
minority in New Zea land but
have managed to keep their
own identity and language.
For information about
these communiti es, visit the
Challenges Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in pairs
or small groups, guessing
whi ch things they think
wi ll be mentioned in the
article and giving their
reasons.
Reading
Exercise 2 (COl Track 28)
• Play the recording for
students to listen and check
their guesses fcorn Exercise 1.
• When checking answers,
ask students which section
of the article supports their
answers.
Answers
dancing meetings clothes
musIC history teenagers
Exercise 3
• Students do the exercise
working individually. They
can compa re answers
in pai rs before checking
answers as a class.
Answers _ student page
Exercise 4
• Students work individually
or in pa irs, finding two
si mi larities and two
differences. Tell students
there may be more than
one possible answer.
Warm-up
1 Look at the photos and the title of the article.
Which of these things do you think will be
mentioned?
• holidays • dancing • meetings
• clothes • music • voluntary work
• history • teenagers
Reading
2 Read the article and check your guesses
from Exercise 1.
:5 Read the article again. Which of these
statements are true m. false (F) or there
is no information in t he text (NI)?
1 r You can identify a man's clan from his kilt.
2 Gathering stones are very large rocks.
3 ([I The Macraes are proud of their history.
4 1II Clan gatherings can be noisy occasions.
5 (£] Under 10% of New Zealanders are Maoris.
6 {£] Maori community centres are for all local
people.
7 Maori community centres are called 'Marae'.
8 -0 Hakas can be a bit frightening.
4 List two similarities and two differences
between Maoris and Scottish dan members.
Example
Both 0/ them have 0 strong identity.
5 Look at t he Word Builder. Match the verbs
from the text with the nouns (a-f).
Word Builder
belong to al a performance I a speech
2 attend bl a dance I a song I a play
3 pass on cl a family I a team I a club I
a group
4 hold dl
a meeting I a wedding I
a funeral
5 give el traditions I a message I
information
6 perform II an event (e.g. a competition,
a meeting, a wedding)
Suggested answers
Similarities: 1 Both are large famil y
groups. 2 Both have traditional dances.
Differences: 1 Clans have an nual
gatherings. The Maori tribes meet more
often. 2 Each Maori group has its own
community centre. Clans don't have
community centres.
A
S
cottish 'clans' are groups of people with
the same surname as their clan chief,
for example. Macdonald or Campbell.
Each clan has its own 'tartan' - a coloured
pattern used for kilts. Clans began in the
Scottish Highlands in the Middle Ages
when people accepted the protection and
authority of their local chief.
T
h e Maoris came from Polynesia and colonised
t he uninhabited islands of New Zealand over a
thouS"and years ago. There are now 526,000 Maoris in
New Zealand which has a total population of just over
four million.
Every Maori belongs to a large family group and each
group has its own community centre with various
buildings. The main building is the meeting house
and is decorated in tradi tional Maori style. On the
roof, there is a large carved figure of an important
ancestor. Community centres are the focus of Maori
culture and older Maoris pass on Maori traditions to
young people here: songs, stories, dances, carving
and traditional Polynesian cooking. People
of European origin can only visit them
with permission.
Weddings, christenings and funerals are held
in the meeting house as well as formal
ceremonies. At these events, local elders
give speeches and younger Maoris
perform songs and dances.
Ex tra
Play the recordi ng from Exercise 2 again
for students to listen and read the article.
Explain or encourage students to guess the
meaning of any remaining new vocabulary.
Fi nd out how many students would like to
go to these twO ' gatherings'? Which one
do they think would be most fun?
Nowadays, dan
members live all over
the world but annual
gatherings are still
held in Scotland. For
example, every year
Macraes from different
countries go back to
Scotland. They first
visit the 'gathering
stone' where the clan
met up in the past
before going into
battle. After that, they
tour famous places
where the clan fought
the English.
The next day, they
attend the local
highland games. All the men wear
~ l a c r a e kil ts and carry banners while
the Macrae band plays bagpipe music.
In the eveni ng, a banquet is held
in the magnificent castle at Eilean
Donan. Hnally, there is traditional
Salnish danCing and singing until
bte in the night.
Maori war dances, or ' hakas', are world
famous; the New Zealand nlgby team
performs one before every game.
Hakas can look and
sound aggressive. They
were used in the past
when one tribe met
another to find out
if the other tri be was
peaceful or was looking
for a fight!
Exercise 5
Answers
Ie 2f 3e 4d Sa 6b
Exercise 6
G Write six sentences about yourself with the verbs from the
Word Builder.
Example
I belong to the chess club at school.
7 Verb Quiz Draw networks with these verbs and nouns. Some
nouns can be used more than once.
do
have
make
play
+
Exa mple
games a favour an accident money
a mistake an illness the piano
your homework a good laugh chess sport
dinner a noise something to eat
the washing up
...... Word Bank, page 127
Speaking
8 Work in groups. Ask and answer the questions.
How often do you have family celebrations (e.g. birthdays)? Do
you enjoy them?
2 How often do you see your grandparents and other family
(aunts, uncles. cousins)?
3 Do any of your family live in another town or country? How do
you keep in louch with them? Do you ever visit them or do they
visit you? When?
!'OR YOUR PORTFOLIO
~ . Project: A celebration
1 Choose a celebration or event. Draw a diagram with
important words about it. Check with your teacher which
words can' t be translated into English.
Exa mple
Polish Easter: cokes - mozurki, plants - bazie
2 Make notes about these things. Use words from your
diagram.
the place and date I the reason for the celebration
the preparations
what happens I your feelings
3 Use your notes to write three paragraphs. Check them for
prepositions, spelling and punctuation.
4 Work in groups. Read the other descriptions. Which one is
the most interesting?
Exercise 7
• Ask students to look at the example
network.
• Students may find it helpful to build
another network on the board as a
class, e.g. for the ver b 'do' .
• Tell students they can write true
sentences about themselves or they
• Students then work in small groups,
making the networks for ' have' and
'play' .
can invent informat ion, if they wish .
Monitor and check students' sentences.
• In pairs or small groups, students
exchange and read each other's
sentences.
Answers
do: games, a favour, your
homework, sport, the
washing up
have: ga mes, an accident, an
illness, a good laugh, dinner,
something to eat
play: games, the piano,
chess, sport
Extra
Students work individually,
writing 6-8 sentences, using
some of the expressions in the
table. Check students' sentences.
Speaking
Exercise 8
• Read though the questions
with the class .
• Students work in groups of
3-4, asking and answering
the questions. Monitor but
do not interrupt students'
fluency.
• The groups feedback to the
cl ass.
Project
• Read through rhe stages of
the project so that students
understand what to do.
• Elicit rwo or three
examples of suitable
celebrat ions or events from
the class.
• Students work indi vidually,
drawing a diagram with
important words in a
network. Check the words
and advise students to use
their L1 for t he words rhat
cannot be trans lated into
English.
• Students make nOtes about
their celebration or event.
Remind them to organise
their notes so that they can
write their description in
paragraphs.
• Students use their notes to
write their description and
then check it. Monitor and
help students correct any
language errors.
• Students can add a
photo or picture to their
descripti on, if they wish.
• In groups of 4- 5, students
read the descripti ons and
di scuss which is the most
interesting one.
3
language Check
Exercises 1-2
Answers --+ student page
Exercise 3
Answers
11 have been
12 have been doing
13 have had
14 have been playing
15 haven't got
16 have been working
17 have painted
Exercise 4
Answers
18 Can you help me put it
up?
19 I don't get on with him
very well.
20 It's warm today so you
don't need to put it on.
21 Tomorrow, I am going to
meet up with them and
go to the cinema.
22 Could you turn it up,
please. I'm freezing!
Exercise 5
Answers --+ student page
Feedback (COl Track 29)
• Students li sten to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spell ing
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
ro see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at again.
• Give students t ime in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 32 of the
Workbook.
Study HeLp: Unknown
Words
• Read aloud the advice
and examples for
' depressed' and ' mobil e
home' . Elicit sentences to
explain 'detached house',
'wheelchair' and 'cl an'.
StudlJ Corner 3
Language Check
1 Write the names of the homes.


3 Terrace//wu.g 4 BUI111a/uw
-
2 Complete the sentences with the verbs in the
corred: form.
pass on I hold I a"end I belong I give I perlorm
5 My sister to a local youth dub.
4 Rewrite the sentences. Repl ace the underlined
words with pronouns. Be careful with word
order.
18 Can you help me put up .tb..e....1mt?
19 I don' t get on with my math) teacher Mr

20 It 's warm today, so you don't need to put on

21 Tomorrow, I am going to meet up with
f.rimd.> and go to the cinema.
22 Could you turn up the central beating, please?
I'm freezing!
Grammar 0/ 12
5 Complete each gap with one word.
6 They performed their new song on TV last night.
7 My dad -J!lYL- a spe«h at the wedding.
A: do something this weekend.
B: Great! What do you want to do?
A: 00 you going dancing lonight?
B: Sorry, I can't it toni ght.
S Two hundred people 1liktJ.i!kJf... my sister's
wedding lasl Saturday_
9 A meeting was in the school hall.
10 In traditional societies. older peopl e
thei r traditions to young people.
Vocabulary D / 10
3 Complete the e-mail with the verbs in brackets
in the Present Perfect Simple or Continuous.
Hi Brian,
I " ___ (be) very busy recentl y. At school. we
12 ___ (do) exams for a week now - so far. I
13 ___ (have) Maths, French and English. In my
free time, I 14 ___ (play) that computer game
you lent me. U's really difficult and I 15 __ _
(not get) past the basic level yet! Mum and Dad
16 ___ (work) very hard in the house recently
and they 17 ___ (paint) the kitchen and the
li ving room. The new rooms look great. How are
things with you?
Jack
Feedback
listen and check your answers to the language
Check. Write down your stores.
• look at the table below. Then do t he exercises
on page 32 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers: look again at:
Numbers 1-10 Get Ready - Key Words
A: What Saturday?
8 : Ri ght. Why 27 we go to that coffee bar
first? We have something to eat
before we go.
A: Yeah, good What time?
B: we meet there at six o'clock?
A: Okay. See you then.
Key Expressions 0/ 8
Study Help: Unknown Words
When you are speaking and you don'. know a
word, don't stop speakins.
Try to explain with words you know.
Examples
It you feel really sad and miserable.
(depressed)
It's Q house that you can move around.
(mobile home)
If you think a word in your language has a
latin origin or might be similar in English,
make a guess. Check if it is right
Example
Bet:thaven was a famous ... compositor? Is tho, right?
Across Cultures 2 - Word Builder
Numbers 11- 17 Unit 7 - Grammar
Work in pairs. Choose five difficult words from
Modules 1- 3. Take turns to describe the words to
your partner. Your partner guesses what they are.
Numbers 18--n Unit 8 - Sentence Builder
Numbers 23-30 Unit 9 - Key Expressions
• Read aloud rhe advice about words
wirh a Larin origin or words rhar
might be simi lar in English. Elicit the
correcr word for rhe sentence a bour
Beethoven (composer).
• Students work indi viduall y, looking
through Modules 1-3, choosing five
difficult words and noring down how
to describe the words.
• In pairs, students rake turns describing
t heir five words and guessing t heir
parmer's five words.
• Think of five words in your language which could
be similar in English. Check with your teacher.
• Srudenrs work individuall y or in
pairs, li sring fi ve words which could
be similar in Engli sh. Check srudents'
words.
• Srudents rell the class their five Ll
words and wrire the English words
on the board. Check spelling and
pronunciation.
Modu Ie 3 Test, TTP, Page 71
\ttnagerf g If,


Part·time jobs: % of teenagers with iobs:

Average wage: 6£ 27
A","II' pod_ """'Y io UK:
lL...Z..lL- .
.Moosl popular jobs: delivering 7 newspa.ners
and worting in a shop.
pod. """'Y io the UK
IloocIool: 2£ /200
.... podo m"""l io UK (Wolesl:
lL.fQL... .
Spending: sweets/crisps/chocolates
%;
mobile pM".: % .
o..e.: % leeoogers who do iobs
.cuM the hou .. : .
Get Ready
Background
Saving: % of teenagers who save:
overoge savings:
12£ 107 per year.
This lesson looks at money vocabulary
and how teenagers deal with money. The
information in the rapescript in Exercise
2 is taken from the Halifax pocket money
survey in 2006. This is an annual survey
so you mi ght be interested in getting
updated information at the Halifax
website: www. hbosplc.com
(l Exercise 1 (CD1 Track 30)
, Check that students understand the
difference between the pairs of words,
win and earn and borrow and lend.
Elici t sentences containing the words,
e.g. I've forgo tten my dictionary. Can I
borrow yours, please?
• Students check the meaning of the Key
Words in the Word Bank (Compounds
and Confusing Words) on page 12S.
• Students li sten and repeat the Key
Words after the recording, pa ying
particular attention to word stress in
compound words.
• Ask students to look at the photos,
identify the obj ects and say the prices.
Extra
• Students work individually, writing 5-6
sentences using some of the Key Words.
Check students' sentences.
• Each student then reads
aloud two of their
sentences to the class.
2 (CD1 Track 31)
• Give students time to
read through t he gapped
notes before you play the
recording so that they
know what information to
listen for.
• Play the recording, twice if
necessary, for students to
complete the information.
• Check answers by asking
indi viduals to write the
answers on the board.
Check that students write
and say percentages and
money correctly.
Answers - student page
Extra
Write statements on the board:
1 The survey was done for
12-18 year olds.
2 Pocket money was higher
last year than this year.
3 Girls get about 40p more
pocket money a week than
boys.
4 Girls earn less than boys in
their part-time jobs.
524% of teenagers have a
part-time job in a shop.
Play the recording again for
students to listen and decide
if the statements are 'tr ue' or
'false'.
Answers
IF 2T 3T 4F SF
Exercise 3
• After students have done the
pair activity, they can tell the
class their partner's answers
to questions 2 and 3.
• The class can find out
which three main things
most of them normally
spend their money on.
Exercise 4
• Di scuss the meani ng of the
statement with the class.
Extra activity on Websi te
3
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 9 and 10).
Background
The topic is a chari ty aucti on
organi sed on eBay. eSay is an
o nline shopping and a uction
website where you can buy
and sell things a ll over the
world. It was founded in
1995 in the USA and sells
millions of objects every day.
For information 011 online
shopping, visit the Challenges
Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Encourage scudents to tell
the class what they or their
fa mil y ha ve bought on the
Internet (\\'fere they pleased
with what they bought?
Was it cheaper than in
the shops? Did it arrive
quickly?)
Exercise 2 (COl Track 32)
• Check that students
understand how auctions
on eBay work.
• Pl ay the recording for
students to read and listen
and answer the question.
Answers
to help cl ear unexploded
land mines
3 (COl Track 33)
Students work indi viduall y or
in pairs, reading the text and
matching the photos with the
descripti ons.
36
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 4
• Students discuss the questions
In groups.
• The groups then report back
to the class.
Auction
Warm-up
t What do you or
your family buy
on the Internet?
2 Read the text below about a
charity auction on e8ay. What
is the money needed for?
I Buy I Sell I My ebay I Community I Help I
HnstOl'1'135 (Not )
eBay for Chanty
Wayne Rooney's football boot s
go on sale on Internet site eBay
t his week. It is pari of a charily
auction of celebrity shoes, called
Give Landmines The Boot. The
auction is organised by the Mines
AdviSOry Group Iwwwmagorg uk),
an organisation that helps clear
unexploded mines in areas that
have been affected by war.
A MAG represent ative said:
'Thousands of people in former
war zones have lost their legs
aher st epping on landmines and
unexploded bombs. It's brilliant t hat
so many well·known people are
helpi ng raise money to stop this.'
The aucti on will be held for el even
days and can be seen on eBay at
wwwebayco yk.
Grammar: The Passive
Exercise 5
3 Read about the shoes
you can buy at the
audion. Match the
photos (a-e) with the
descriptions (1-5).
BLACK. LEATHER THIGH-
HIGH BOOTS WORN BY
ALICE COOPER on some of
his tours. They have been
signed by Al ice himself and
will be sent wi th a special
certificate. h)
ITEM!
RED FOOTBALL BOOTS
DONATED BY ENGLAND
AND MANCHESTER
boots are unworn and have
been personalised with
Wayne's shirt number, 8. tI)
ITEM I
8
0
0
BROWN BIKER BOOTS
WITH A ZIP AND lWO
BUCKLES. They were
designed by Prada and
donated by Ringo Starr.
They have never been
worn and are in excellent
condition. a)
lIT
PINK DR MARTENS
DONATED BY SUGABABES.
They are signed by all three
members of the band,
Keisha, Heidi and Amelle. C
ITEM.
CLAUDIA SCHIFFER'S
BLACK VELVET ANKLE
BOOTS. They were bought
in Milan when she started
out as a model. e}
ITEM
4 Would you like to have something that once belonged to a
celebrity? What would you like to buy? What would you do
with it?
Grammar: The Passive
5 Complete the sentences (1-5) from the texts with the correct
forms of the passive. Then complete the rest of the table (6-8).
Example Tense Form
They ' ___ _ __ by Nike
, ___
is l ore + 3rd
specially for professional pl ayers. form of the verb
They 2 ______ in
Past Simpl e

---+
Milan. 3rd form of
the verb
They 3 ___ never 7
---
has I hoye +
______ and are in
been + 3rd form
excellent condition. of the verb
They will 4 ___ ___
modal verb can I will I must
with a special certificate. + infiniti ve + be + 3rd form
They can 5 ______
of the verb
on eBay.
Answers
• Students complete the table working
indi viduall y. Point out that the
sentences come from the texts in both
Exerci ses 2 and 3. Monitor and help as
necessary.
1 are made 2 were bought 3 have
(never) been worn 4 he sem 5 be seen
6 Present Simple 7 Present Perfect
Simple 8 was / were
Exerci se 6
• Read aloud the sentences . Students
then work indi viduall y, matching the
sentences with rhe reasons for using
them.
• Check answers by asking indi viduals
to read aloud each sentence, tense and
form.
Answers
lc 2a 3b
6 look at the sentences in the table. The passive
sentences sound better than the active ones.
Match the sentences (1-3) with the reasons for
using the passive (a-£).
Passive Active
The auction will be m will hold the auction
held for eleven days. for eleven days.
2 Brown biker boots
with a zip and two
buckles. They were

3 They are signed .by
all three members
of the band Keisha
Heidi and Amelle.
Brown biker boots
with a zip and
2 buckles. Prada
designed them.
All three members of
the band, Keisha, Heidi
and Amelle, signed
them.
We use the passive because;
al We don't start sentences with new information.
bl The subject is very long.
c) We don't know or ca re who does it.
Somelimes aU the reasons are true for one
sentence.
Practice
7 look at uses b) and c) in Exercise 6 and decide
which sentences below would sound better in
the passive. Rewrite them.
A retired bank manager who collects old cars
has bought the Rolls Royce.
2 A person can buy autographed photos of David
Beckham in an auction.
Someone caught Ihe bank robbers.
Peter gave me ten red roses.
5 A pop star whose name is still unknown
donated the money.
• Point out that sometimes more than
one reason may be true fo r using the
passive. Ask students to find more
passive verbs in the texts in Exercises 2
and 3 and say which reason(s) explain
why the passive is used.
Practice
Exercise 7
• Elicit the first a nswer from the class.
• Students complete the exercise working
individuall y. They can compare
answers In pairs.
Grammar
8 look at use a) in Exercise 6. Choose the better
way (a or b) to continue the sentences (1-2).
1 Picasso painted a lot of paintings.
a) One of them was bought for £58 million.
b) Someone bought one of them for £58 million.
2 Elton John put the whole contents of his
london house on sale.
a) Almost everything was bought by collectors and
fans.
bl Collectors and fans bought almost everything.
9 Find nine places where the passive is better in
the text and rewrite it.
They have removed
a Vincent Van Gogh
painting from an auction
after someone questioned
its authenticity.
Someone had found
the small oil painting
at a market in Paris in
1991 and sold it for less
than e 1 ,500. Experts
from the Van Gogh
museum in Amsterdam
said it was a fake. Othc(
experts have disagreed
with this opinion.
They put off {he sale
when the museum agreed
to re-examine the work.
After museum experts
examine the painting,
auctioneers will put it on
sale again. Auctioneers
hope that they will sell it
for at Icast e2 million.
to Put the verbs in brackets into active or passive.
Edgar Degas (auend) an auction where
someone (sell) one of his paintings for
$100,000. The artist 3we.s ashd (ask) what he felt.
' I feel as a horse must feel,' he replied, 'when the
beautiful cup -4 isjJven (give) to the jockey.'
2 John lennon (sign) hi s last album,
Double Fantasy, for his murderer, Mark Chapman,
just before he (shoot). Recently it
7wa.s bought (buy) for $1 .8 million.
Your Turn
11 Game Work in groups. In one minute, write as
many true sentences as you can about your life.
Use the verbs below and the passive.
Example
My bike wos stolen lost week. My computer hos been
repaired I will be invited to my cousin's wedding
asked
bought
written
stolen made
invited used
lost cleaned
injured found
stopped broken
sold repaired
...... 'IMIOUT! Page 112, Exercise 10
Answers
1 The Rolls Royce has been bought by
a retired bank manager who coll ects
old cars. (use b) 2 Autographed photos
of David Beckham can be bought in
an auction. (use c) 3 The bank robbers
were caught. (use c) 4 The sentence
sounds better as it is. 5 The money was
donated by a pop star whose name is
still unknown. (use b)
Exercise 8
• Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud the pai rs of sentences.
Answers
1a 2a
Exercise 9
• Advise students ro read
through the text quickly
before they sta rt rewriting it.
• Students do the exercise,
working individually or in
paIrs.
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences in their new
text. If students disagree
about any of the answers,
encourage them to refer
back to the three reasons
for using the passive in
Exercise 6.
Answers
A Vmcent Van Gogh painting
1 has been removed from an
auction after its authenticity
2 was questioned. The small
oil painting 3 had been found
at a flea market in Paris and
4 had been sold for less than
€1,500. It 5 was pronounced
a fake by experts from
the Van Gogh museum in
Amsterdam . . .. The sale 6 was
put off when ... it 7 will be
put on sale again. It 8 is
hoped that it 9 will be sold for
at least €2 million.
Exercise 10
Answers --+ student page
Your Turn
Exercise 11
• Read through the example
sentences and verbs with
the class.
• Students wor k in groups
of three to four, writing as
many sentences as they can
in one minute.
• Each group reads aloud
their sentences to the class.
Encourage the class to help
correct any errors in the
sentences.
-+ 'l'IMI OU'I'! Page 112,
Exercise 10
Photocopiable Activity 7,
TIP, Page 54
I
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4, 6 and 9).
Background
This lesson looks at how
money has developed. You
might like to point out the
following facts:
the Romans paid their
soldiers in sa lt, thus the
origin of the English word
'salary'
the coins from Lydia (a
Greek city on the coast of
Asia Minor ) were made of
an alloy of gold and silver
called electrum
For more facts, visit the
Challenges Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1 (CDl Track 34)
• Students listen and repeat
the Key Words after the
recording. Check students'
understanding of the words.
• Students work in pairs or
as a class, guessing what
the objects are made of.
Reading
Exercise 2 (COl Track 35)
38
• Play the recording for
students to read and li sten
and check their guesses.
• Encourage students to say
what the objects are as well
as what they are made of.
Answers
a) metal (ancient Chinese
spade) b) stone (from Yap in
the South Pacific) c) paper
(note from Frank's Deli)
d) paper (Noney bank note)
e) gold and silver (coin from
Lydia, Turkey)
Exercise 3
• Students work in pairs,
reading the text and
answering the questions.
funny money
Warm-up
1 Look at the Key Words and the photos.
Guess what the objects are made of.
Exampl e
I think 0) is mode of iron.
Key Words: Materials
bronze, cloth, copper, glass, gold, iron, leather,
metal, paper, plastic, silver, stone, tin, wood
Reading
2 Read the article.
is 15,000 BC and two cavemen are chatting. 'Hey,' says
one, 'I've got these apples. Do you fancy swapping a bag of
apples for that rabbit you've killed?"I'U take for
my rabbit,' the other replies. 'Three! You must be Joking. I II
give you two.'
People have always practised bartering but it's an
way of doing business. You don't al.ways have the ;lght thlOg to
exchange and most things are so bIg that you cant carry them
around. Because of that, in ancient times people used shells,
feathers, eggs and salt as simple money.
The ancient Chinese used small bits of metal in the shape of
knives or spades but the first real coins were produced in Lydia
(modern Turkey) in the 7th century BC. They were a mixture
of gold and silver. Early European coins were silv:r,
while some Pacific islanders preferred stone coms - the bIggest
were 3.5 metres high and weighed nine tons!
Pieces of paper were first used as money in China over a
thousand years ago but it was not until the 17th century that
bank notes appeared in Europe,
In 1989, a US bank refused to lend money to Frank
Tortorielli, a delicatessen owner, who wanted to move to a
new location. So Frank made his own personal money. He sold
paper notes for $8 and people could buy S10 worth of food in
his new shop at a later date. His idea was such a success that he
was able to move!
'Time Banks' are a new idea. A group of people make a list
saying what each person wants and can offer. Then, people
get in touch with each other. For example, Fred does an hour's
gardening for Sue and ten 'time dollats' go from her account .
to his. Joe then sells a pile of firewood to Fted who pays for It
with some of his time-dollar credit.
'Noney'is purely decorative money with zero value. A .
Russian student once gave his favourite teacher some attracbve
Noney notes on Teachers' Day and she loved them. Noney
doesn't always work though. One New Yorker tried to pay for
a cup of coffee and a slice of toast with it in a cafe. 'You can
keep that for yourself,' came the reply.
3 What types of money in
the text:
would look nice in the garden
but wouldn't fit in your
pocket?
2 looks nice but is worth
nothing?
3 does not exist physically?
4 increased in value after a few
months?
4 Read the text again. Answer
these questions.
Why does one of the cavemen
say 'you must be joking'?
2 Why did people begin using
shells or feathers as money?
3 What happens when you pay
someone ten 'time dollars'?
4 What is Noney useful for? What
is it not useful for?
5 Look at the Word Builder,
Find the words in red in the
text and match (1-7) with (a-g).
Word BuDder
a bag ofJ} al
paper
2 a piece of a}
bl firewood
3 a bit off,! cl coffee
4 a group ofa; dl people
5 a pile of b}
el toast
6 a cup of t}
II metal
7 a slice of e} gJ apples
Suggested answers Suggested answers
1 The Pacific islanders' stone coins
2 Noney money 3 'Time banks'
4 Frank Totorielli 's personal (deli ) money
Exercise 4
• Students do the exercise working
individually. They can compare
answers 111 paI rs.
1 Because he doesn't think the rabbit is
worth three bags of apples. 2 They were
an easier way of doing business than
bartering. 3 They do something for you
in exchange. 4 It is decorative but it is
has no va lues so you can't buy anythi ng
with it.
Exercise 5
Answers -+ student page
Extra activity on Website
6 Which of these words can you not use together?
Example 1 d) hot chocolate
, a bag 01
a) crisps b) sugar c) sweets @)hot chocolate
2 a piece of
a) chocolate b} chalk @nilk d) paper
l a bit of
a) bread @)coffee c) chocolate d) cake
4 a group of
iI) friends @)apples c) students d) animals
5 a pi le of
a) CDs b) cl othes @)orange j uice d) rubbish
6 a cup of
@wine b) tea c) hot milk d) coffee
7 a sl ice of
@)rice b) bread c) cake d) meat
...... Word Bank. page 127
7 Memory Game Work in groups and play the
game. Use these words:
bag, bar, bit. bottl e, box, can, carton, cup, glass,
packet, pi ece. pi le, slice, tube
Example
A: I went shopping and bought a bog of crisps .. ,
B: I went shopping and bought a bog 0/ crisps and
Q conon oj milk , ..
c: I went shopping and bought
...... Word Bank. page 127
Exercise 6
• Students do the exercise working
individuall y or in pai rs.
Answers ..... st udent page
Exercise 7
• Read through the list of wotds.
Elici t words to use wit h, box, e,g,
'chocolates', packet, e.g, ' bi scujts' and
tube, e.g. 'toothpaste' .
• Ask three students to read aloud the
example sentences and to complete
Speaker C's sentence.
Sllilis
8 look at the Sentence Builder. How do you say
these sentences in your languages?
a) such (+ adjecti ve) + noun + that
b) so + adjective + thot
Sentence Builder
His idea was such a (great) success thilt he
was able to move.
2 Most things are so big that you can't carry
them around.
9 Join each pair of sentences in two ways using
50 and such.
Example
1 It was such on t'QSy 80m thot everybody
got 100%1
The exam was so tosy that everybody got 1000At!
It was an easy exam, Everybody got 100%!
2 The party was noisy. The neighbours complained,
3 It was a good hotel. We deci ded to stay there
next year,
4 The film was sad. I cried!
5 It was a col d day. We didn't go out.
Speaking
10 Imagine you belong t o a 'Time Bank', Write a
list of your 'offers' and 'wants' ,
Example
off ers: toke dogs for walk, help with moths
homework
wants: copy 0/ the new Robbie WifJioms CD
11 Work in groups, Show the others your li sts,
Then negotiate. Did you agree to do business?
Example
A: // you lend me your bike, I'll toke your dog f or
a walk,
B: No thanks. But I'll lend you my bike if you buy
me a co/a,
---Fact Dr FictiDn? ---
Some Celtic coins, made in Britain between
150 Be and 50 AO, are in the shape of hedgehogs.
Check ro<K '1ISWer on PlOt lOS
...... 'IM.OU,.! Page 112, Exercise 11
• Students play the game in groups
of fi ve to six. If a student makes a
mi sta ke, t hey are 'our' of t he game.
The game stops when onl y one student
is left in it. The group then start the
next game. Moni tor and make a note
of any errors in the coll ocations. Check
these with the class afterwatds.
Exercise 8
• \X1hen checking answers, ask
individua ls to read aloud the sentences,
Exercise g
Answers
2 It was such a noisy
party that the neighbours
complained. The party was
so noisy that the neighbours
complained. 3 It was such a
good hotel that we decided
to stay there next year. The
hotel was so good that we
decided to stay there next
year, 4 It was such a sad film
that I cried. The film was so
sad that I cried. 5 It was such
a cold day that we didn' t go
out. Irffhe day was so cold
that we didn't go our.
Speaking
Exercise 10
• Encourage students to
thi nk of four or five 'offers'
and ' wants' .
Exercise 11
• Ask two students to
read aloud the example
exchange. Point out t he use
of t he condit ional structure
(I f you do X, [ ' /I do YJ.
• Students work in groups of
four to fi ve. Monitor but
do not interru pt st udents'
fl uency.
• Each group tell s t he class
what 'business' t hey agreed
and what 'wants' and
'offers' they were left with.
Fact ar Fictian
• After checking the answer,
ask students if they know
of any other coins that
have a strange shape or are
unusual, e.g. coins with a
hole in t he cemre.
• If any of the students
coll ect foreign coi ns, ask
t hem to bring some into
cl ass. They ca n tell the
cl ass about coins.
• If you have some UK coi ns
and notes, bring these into
cl ass to show to students,
For informat ion about Celts
and Cel tic coins, visit the
Challenges Website.
c6www.challenges-elt.com )
~ TIMI O"'T! Page 112,
Exercise 11
39
This Unit
Short of time: set Exercise 3
for homework. Shorten the
discussion in Exercise 1.
More time: do t he Extra
acti vit ies.
Background
In [his episode, Abi goes to
take some shampoo back to
a market sta ll and meets Ell ie
and Tanya. Ellie thinks it
might be another story. In fact,
Natural Products are the ones
polluting the river too - but
don' t tell the students!
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Encourage students to
speculate about why Abi is
pointing to hi s hai r.
Reading and
Listening
2 (COl Track 36)
40
Answers
They are at a marker. They
are talking about some
shampoo that Abi bo ught. It
made his head hurt and t hen
his hair starred to fall out.
Extra
Ask students to compare this
market and a typical market in
their country. Do students like
going to markets? What do
they buy there?
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Check answers by ask ing
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
Answers _ student page
Extra
Play the recording of the first
dialogue again fot students to
focus on the stress and intonation
patterns of the sentences in the
Key Expressions box.
Exercise 4
• Ask students what phrases
they use in their Ll to be
poli te and to sound less
aggressive.
Value for monelj
Warm-up
1 look at the photo. Where are Elli e, Tanya and
Abi? What do you thi nk t hey are tal king about?
Reading and Listening
2 Read and li sten to t he di al ogue. (heck your
guesses from Exerci se 1.
Abi goes to the market and meets Ellie and
Tanya there.
Abi : Excuse me?
Woman: Yes, can I help you?
Abi : Well , I bought this shampoo last week.
I'm afraid there's a problem with it.
Woman: Really, what's that?
Abi : Well, the first ti me I used it, my head
hurt a bit. Then, my hair start ed to fall
oul!
Woman: I' m terri bly sorry about that. Let me have
a look at it.
Abi: It 's made by Natural Cosmetics.
Woman: Have you got a receipt , please?
Abi : Yes, here you are.
Woman: Thanks a 101. Well , I reall y apologise
about thi s. Would you like a ref und or
would you like to choose another kind
of shampoo?
Abi : I'd like another shampoo, please. One
for dry hair.
Woman: What about this one? u 's sl ightly more
expensive but it's a reall y good one.
Abi: Okay, I'll have that one, please.
Woman: Right. here you are. And I'm sorry
about that other shampoo.
Abi: That's okay. And thanks very much.
Woman: Not at all.
Abi : Hi , you two! What are you doing here?
Ellie: We've j ust been having lunch over there.
Abi :
Tanya:
Abi:
Ellie:
Exercise 5
What about you, Abi?
Wel l, I've j ust taken back some shampoo.
11 was weird. 11 hurt my head and later
some of my hair started fal l ing ouH
Oh nol Poor you.
It 's not funny. Tanya!
No, it isn't funny. I bet other people have
had the same problem. We might have
another story here!
Speaking
3 look at t he Key Expressions. Use the dialogue
to complete the gaps (1-8).
Key Expressions:
Well, the fi rst time I
used it ..
Yes, here you are.
Everyday Listening
assistant
What's that?
Well , I
6 apeloai'il! about
this. Wo'Uld you
7 or
you lie to choose
of ... ?
Right, you are.
And I'm sorry again
about
• Read through the instructi ons with the
class. 1 (COl Track 37)



Eli cit an exa mple dia logue from the
cl ass, encouraging students ro use
pol ite expressions and cor rect stress
and intonatio n patterns.
Students work in pai rs, making
di alogues and ta king turns ro be the
shop assi stant and t he customer.
Some of t he pairs act out one of their
dia logues in front of the class.




Give students time to read through the
informat ion in the table.
PJay the recording of the first dia logue
fo r students to listen and complete rhe
informati on for Customer 1. Check
answers.
T hen pl ay the recording for dia logues
2 and 3 for students to listen and
complete the informati on.
Check answers for Customers 2 and 3.
Answers _ student book
?
d
-I
4 Read the Speaking Help.
Speaking Help: Being Polite
o In English, it is important to use
and 'thonI< you' a lot
• To make something sound less
oggressive, we use eHpressk:Jns like:
'I'm afraid .. :, ' 1m sorry but . . '
5 Work in pairs. Take turns
10 be a shop assistant and
a customer. Use the Key
Expressions to complain
about something you bought.
Remember to be polite!
Think about these things:
What did you buy?
• a beauty produd • clot hes
• a gadget • a computer game
2 What was wrong with it?
• it had bad side effects
• it didn't work
• it was damaged
• something was missing
• it was too tight or baggy
3 What do you want?
• a refund • a replacement
(;Exercise 2
Everyday Listening
1 listen to three shop dialogues and complete the table.
(ustomer 1 (ustomer 2 (ustomer 3
1 What did the a model car a computer a tpp
customer buy? jame
2 Why did the because there it doe$n't becau.se the
customer

work on hi$ tP/cJUr$ ran
complain? mlS.SU1j computer
3 What does the a replacement another her money
customer get in oithe $ame jame bad
the end? model
listen again. Match the adjectives with the people.
rude, tired and sleepy, aggressive, polite, cheerful, nervous
Dialogue 1: customer
Dialogue 2: customer
Dialogue 3: customer
nervous ,shop assistant tJd/ife
,
agjrw/ve ,shop assistant rude
cheerful ,shop assistant ft'redandslu/l;Y
:3 Pronunciation Pradise saying the words below. Underline
the consonant sounds (sp, th) that are difficult for you
\ll 4
5
twelf1h, receipt, gathering, environment. marathon,
crisps, weekl y wage, pounds, weird , product, baggy,
third, tests, sweets, hedgehog, birthday, exhibition,
maths, district, battlefield, origin, detached, another,
Wednesday, aUdion, challenge, spending, especially
Extra
• Play the recording for students to listen
and match the adjecti ves with the
people,
• Play each dialogue separately and ask
detailed comprehension questions, e.g.
Dialogue 1:
Who did the cuscomer buy the model car
for? (her son)
• Check answers by playing each
dialogue separately and eliciting which
adjectives describe the shop assistant
and customer in that dialogue. Ask
students if t hey can remember some of
the words and expressions the person
says that sound ' rude' , <tired and
sleepy' etc.
Answers --+ student page
Why? (for his birthday)
Has she got the receipt? (yes)
Is there another model car like this one in
the shop? (no)
What's the shop assisstant going to do? (to
order one)
Why does the customer want that
particular model? (because her son col lects
them and he especially wanted that one)
Exercise 3
• Write the first three or
fou r words on the board
for the class to pronounce
and identify any diffi cult
consonant sounds.
Underline these consonants
in the words on the board,
• Check that students can
say the remaining words
the list,
• Students work indi vidually,
qui etl y saying the words
and underlining the
consonant sounds that are
difficult, Monitor and help
as necessary.
4 (COl Track 38)
• Play the recording several
times for students to listen
and repeat the words,
chorally and indi vidually,
• Students may find it
helpful to isolate the
diffi cult sounds and repeat
them aft er you. Where
appropriate (e,g, 'th'
sounds), point out and
demonstrate the position of
the tongue and lips when
making the sound(s),
Exercise 5
• Students work indi viduall y
or in pairs, reading the
Key Words in the first four
modul es (as far as Lesson
12) and writing down the
words they find difficult
to pronounce. You may
wish to limit the number of
words, c.g. to 20.
• In groups, students
compa re their lists and say
the words. Monitor and
help with pronunciation.
• Select ten to twelve words
from the lists. Write them
on the board for the class
to practise saying them.
... TIMEOUT! Page 112,
Exercise 12
Photocopiable Activity 8,
TIP, Page 55
42
Your Challenge
Writing: A Letter of
CompLaint
Exercise 1
• Read aloud the questi ons.
Tell students not to try
and order the parrs of the
e-mail at thi s stage but just
to skim the parts quickl y to
answer the questions.
Answers -+ student page
Text Builder
Exercise 2
• After checking answers,
ask an individual to read
aloud the sentences in the
e- mail in the correct order.
Explain or encourage
students to guess the
meaning of any new words.
Answers -+ student page
Extra activity on Website
Exercise 3
• After checking the answers,
ask individuals to read
aloud the sentences
containing Since, because,
because of and as.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 4
• Read through the Writing
Help.
• Explain that we use Yours
sincerely in a forma l letter
when we begin Dear Sir!
Madam beca use we do
not know the name of the
person we are writing to.
If we know the person's
name, then we begin with
the name (e.g. Dear Mr
Smith) and end with Yours
faithfully followed by a
comma.
Your Challenge
Writing: A Letter of Complaint
1 Read the mixed-up parts of the e-mail (a-g)
quickly and answer these questions.
1 Who wrote the letter? Peter Mlll1er
2 What did he buy? MP3 player
3 Where did he buy it? an on/t'ne slrop
. ] I look forward to hearing from you. 5)
. ] Dear Sir/Madam, 1)
• ) Yours sincerely, 6)

I have bought many things in the past
from your online shop and the service
and quality has always been excellent.
However, I recently ordered an MP3
player and I am writing to inform you
of a problem. 2)
Since I am a regular customer, could
you please send me some new
headphones or suggest an alternative
solution7 4)
Peter Milner 7)
I have downloaded music from my
computer successfull y but I am unable
to listen to it because the headphones
are faulty. The problem might be
because of a bad connection as
sometimes the sound comes
through one side. 3)
Text Builder
2 Put the parts of the e-mail (a-g) in the
correct order.
3 look at the linking words in blue. Which of
these do they express?
al time bl addition cl reason dl contrast
since because (II because !Ii
, --
Exercise 5
Answers
(Hell o) / Dear
(to tell ) / inform
(can' t ) I am unable to
(don't work) / are fault y
(write back soon) / I look forward to
hearing from you
(goodbye) / Yours sincerel y
Exercise 6
• Read through Sreps 1-3 so students
understand what to do.
4 Read the Writing Help.
5 Find formal words or expressions in the e-mail
that mean:
• hell o • to tell • can't • don't work
• write back soon • goodbye
FOR YOUR PORTroUO '-________ -,
6 Write an e-mail to a company complaining
about something you bought recently.
::01 Think of a product you bought and
t;; imagine what was wrong with it.
Examples
a computer game (damaged) /0 pair of jeans
(too tight)
~ 2 Write your e-mail.
• give your reason for writing
• describe the problem
• say what action you want them to take
Remember
• be polite - always say 'please' and 'thank you'
• use formal words and expressions
ib3 Check your e-mail for contractions and
t;:; linking words.
7 Work in groups. Read each other's e-mails.
Whose complaint is the most serious? Whose
letter is most convincing?
• Advise students to use the three points
in Step 2 to organise their complaint
into three short paragraphs (reason for
writing, describe the problem, say what
action you want the company to rake).
• Remind students to use linking words
and not to use contractions. Help
students wi th vocabulary, if necessary.
Exercise 7
• St udents work in groups of fi ve to six.
After each group has chosen t he most
se ri ous e-mail and the most convincing
e- mail , they can read them aloud to the
class .
Ie
Read the text. Which holiday offers the best value for money?
City Tour
Ocean Paradise
During this one-week
tour, you explore Prague,
the picturesque capital of
t he Czech Republic, take
a cruise on the Danube
while visiting Budapest
and walk the narrow
Hire an island on the Seychelles and
stay in a luxury villa to enjoy the.
comforts of the rich and the amazmg
wildlife of the Indian 9
cean
.
AU services provided.
W_-' streets of the old town
of Tallinn. Enjoy S· hotets and top restaurants in the
fastest developing part of Europe.
Explore S
America
Exciting three-week holiday.
F\y from the United States to
(hile to watch the penguins and
admire the snow-capped peaks of .
the Andes. In Peru, go to Lake Titicaca and climb Machu Complete the sentences with the
Picchu to see the famous Inca ruins. Cruise the Galapagos where necessary.
Islands to see the giant tortoise. Flights, trave.l and 1 ....Ii:JL Nil e is the longest river in the
accom
modation in good quality tourist hotels mcluded.
world and __ Lake Baikal is the
Kayaking in Croatia deepest lake.
do ' 2 ....Ii:JL Ri o Grande separates _ _
A five-day active break on the A alic, Mexico from United States.
kayaking from one unspoiled island
to another. Visit historical vi llages 3 I spent my last holidays in ~
on Korcula island and tJy delicious Netherlands. 1 worked in a bar in _ _
local food at amazing prices on Krk. Amsterdam.
Accommodation in guesthouses. 4 __ Crete is the biggest Greek island
Flights and travel not included. in ...ilJL Mediterranean Sea.
=:::::::::===:....:-----------.,..j S ....Ii:JL Czech Republic and __
2 Compl ete the table with examples of geographical
names from the text and your own examples. Which
names take the and which do not?
examples from your examples
the text
(ontinent Suuth Amenia
country Chile
the + country the Unded States
city Prajue
river the Danube
lake Lake TitICaM
sea I ocea n the Int/ian OUiln
mountain top Machu Piahu
mountain range theA., ...
island Krk
group of islands the f;ala/,"'los
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1
• Srudenrs work individuall y, reading the
texts and deciding whi ch holiday is the
best value for money. Point out that
this may not be the cheapest holiday.
• Students then fotm groups of five to
six and exchange opinions, giving
reasons for t heir choice.
, The groups report back to t he class
and find our whi ch holiday was chosen
by the majority of students as the best
value for money.
Slovakia used to be one country with
the capital. __ Prague.
6 ....Ii:JL Yangtze, the longest ri ver of Asia,
starts in ...i.I:JL Oangla Mountains in
__ Ti bet.
7 .....IhL Amazon starts in ...ilJL Andes,
flows through __ Peru, __
Colombia and __ Brazil and enters
...i!JL Atl ant ic Ocean at the equator.
S ~ Thames, which flows through
__ Oxford and __ london, is
one of the longest rivers in ...i!JL
United Kingdom.
4 Write six sentences about your
country. Include information about:
interesting ci ti es
rivers and lakes
mountains and the sea
Extra
If you have a world map, display it for
students to find the countries and cities
mentioned in the texts. Encourage students
to talk about any of these places they have
visited or would like to visit.
Leave the map on display to refer to when
doing Exercises 2 and 3.
Exercise 2
• Students first complete the
table with names from the
text, writi ng one example
in each section of the ta bl e.
Check students' answers.
Students then work in pairs
or small groups, adding
an exa mple of their own
to each space in the table.
Monitor and correct any
errors.
• The groups tell the class
their extra examples for
each category. Tell students
not to worry about using
English pronunciation for
names of countries, rivers,
mountains, etc.
Answers ..... student book
Exercise 3
• Do the first two sentences
with the class.
• Students then work
individuall y, completing the
exercise.
Answers ..... student book
Exercise 4
• Read through t he
instr uctions with the
class. Eli cit one or two
suggestions for interesting
information to include in
the six sentences about
cities, ri vers, lakes etc. in
the students' count.ry.
• Give students ti me in class
or at home to find out
facts and informat ion, if
they wish.
• Advise students to refer
to the texts in Exercise
1 when writing their
sentences.
• Monitor and help students
correct any errors.
Language Check
Exercises 1-6
A11swers --+ student page
(iJ Feedback (CDl Track 39)
44
• Students listen to t he
recording to check t heir
answers. Check spell ing
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at aga in.
• Give students rime in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 42 of the
Workbook.
Study Help:
Communication
Problems
• Read aloud t he advice and
example sentences. Ask
students to repeat aft er
you 'Do yo u know what
I mean?', using polite
intonation. Ask students
what they say in their own
la nguage to check that
someone understands them.
• Before students work in
pairs, ask t he class to


read the dial ogue and say
whether any sentences are
rude or whether a li stener
might not understand some
of t he words in it. (Ns first
sentence is rude. A's second
and third sentences might
sound rude, depending on
the intonation.)
Students work in pairs,
saying the sentences in a
different way. Moni tor and
help as necessary.
Some of the students say
their sentences to the class .
They can sec how many
different sentences they
ha ve thought of.
Study Corner q
Language Check
1 Complete the text wit h money words.
I am money to buy a motorbike. I've
already got £359 in my .
I get £5 every week from
my mum and dad and I do a part-time job on
Saturday mornings to extra money.
My is only £15 for four hours work
but it helps a lot. I don't much money
on sweets or chocolates.
2 Compl ete the text with suitabl e words.
I sometimes buy a 7 of crisps and a
of cola on my way back from school.
Then, when I get home, I usually have a
of tea and a of my
granny's fruitcake.
Vocabul ary D / 10
3 Put the verbs in brackets in the correct form
of the passive. which sentence is fal se?
11 Years ago, shell s were used (use) as money by
a lot of Nort h American Indians.
12 Since 1999, the euro has been introduad
(introduce) in twelve European countries.
13 Every year, a lot of old coi ns arewu§ht4nd
.idd (buy and sell) on the Internet.
14 Next year, euro notes wi t h a picture of the
Queen on t hem witlhe made (make) in Bri tain.
1S If you belong to a local 'time bank', you must
remember t hat every transaction you make
i5 reCQrr/ed (record).
Feedback
list en and check your answers to the
l anguage Check. Write down your scores.
• look at the tabl e bel ow. Then do the
exercises on page 42 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers: l ook again at:
Key Words
Numbers 7-10 Unit 11 - Word Bui lder
Numbers 11- 20 Unit 10 - Grammar
Numbers 21-25 Understanding Grammar
Numbers 26-30 Unit 12 - Key Expressions
Suggested answers
1 Excuse me, I bought this watch
here last Saturday but I think there's
something wrong with it. It's not
worki ng properly_ 2 Excusc me, coul d
you tell me the price of t hat MP3
player over there, please? 3 I work in
a pizzeria . __ that's a place that makes
pizzas_ It's a parr-time job ___ I do it on
Saturdays _ II do it for 10 hours a week_
Module 4 Test, TTP, Page 72
4 Put the verbs i nto the active or the passive.
last week, a bank in central Bristol 16wa,:; robbed
(rob) and £1 million 17wa,:;stolen (steal). This
morning, the police (arrest) a man.
He 19 has been held (hold) for questioning by the
police. Tomorrow, he 20 witl he taken (take) to
Bristol Prison.
5 Complete the text with the when necessary.
The most expensive house in the world is in
21 ___ Britain. It has 103 bedrooms and
five swimming pools. It is near River
Thames.
The most expensive house in 23 _ _ _ North
America is in USA. It is on 25 the
Atlantic coast and has its own golf course-.---
Grammar 0 / 15
6 Compl ete the dialogue i n a shop.
B: Can I you?
A: Well , I'm 21 there's a problem with
this shirt. I bought it last week and it's got a
mark on it.
B: I' m terribly about that. Have you

A: Yes, here you are.
B: Thanks. Would you like a or would
you like to choose another one?
Key Expressions 0 / 5
Study Help: Communication Problems
To check that someone understands you, don't
say: 'Do you understand me?' It sounds rude. U!Ie
these expressions:
Example
Do you know what I mean? I think ... , don't you!
If someone doesn't understand what you say,
try saying it in a different way.
Example
A: I need to lend a pound for the bus.
B: Sorry?
A: I mean, I haven't got a pound for the bus.
[an you give me a pound?
B: Ah, you wont to borrow a pound.
• Work i n pairs. Say these sentences i n a different
I've got a complaint about this watch. It 's no good.
What 's the price of that MP3 pl ayer over there?
Worki ng in a pizzeria is my part-time job.

I.
verbs fo r speculation.
Large numbers: three billion
(3,000,000,000); one million
(1,000,000), three hundred
thousand (300,000), six. hundred
and fifty·three (653)
Fractions: a half {l/z}, a third (l/
l
),
a quarter (1/.), a fifth
a tenth (1/10), two thirds (l/))
Estimates: about a million,
nearly 70%, over a third,
between 30 and 40
Gel Ready
Background
How do you wash every day? Do you have
a) a big bath? b) a long shower? c) a quick shower?
2 What do you do when you brush your teeth?
a) leave the tap on all the time
b) leave the tap on some of the time c) use a glass of
3 How do you get a drink of cold water in the summer?
a) run the tap for a long lime b) run it for a few
c) keep a bottle of water in the fridge
This lesson foc uses on the growing water
crisis around the world.
• Students work indi viduall y, wri ting
three questions, using words (e.g.
two-thirds
J
five point three), not
numbers. Remind them to make a note
of the answers. Monitor and help as
necessa ry.
1 (CO2 Track 2)
• Play the recording for students CO li sten
and repeat the Key Words.
• As k one of the students to read aloud
the example question for the class co
answer (answer: elevenI11 ).
• In pairs, students ask and answer their
questions.
• Each student then asks one of their
questions for the rest of the cl ass to
answer.
2 (C02 Track 3)
• Give students rime to read
through the nOtes before
you play the recording.
• Pl ay the recording, twice
if necessary, for students
CO listen and compl ete the
stati stics. Tell them ro write
in numbers, not words.
• Check answers by asking
indi vid ual s to read aloud
the sentences and wri te the
statistics on the board.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Write prompts on the board:
1 What is the population of
the world?
2 Where is t of fresh water
found?
3 Where do our bodies get
water from?
4 How do famil ies in Africa
get water?
Play the recording again for
students to listen and answer
the questions.
Answers
1 about 9 billion 2 the polar
ice caps 3 food especially
fruir and drinks 4 The
women collect it and it can
take an hour a day.
Exercise 3
• Give students time to read
through the questi onnaire.
• Students work in pairs,
asking and answering the
questions and making a
note of their answers.
• Students read the
information on page 106
and see how much water
they waste.
• Encourage the cl ass ro
suggest other ways of
saving water.
Photocopiable Activity 9,
TTP, Page 56
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 6, 7 and 8) .
More time: do the Extra
acti vities.
Background
HMS Sussex, a 17th-century
English wreck, found recentl y
in Spai n's territori al waters
is estimated to contai n gold
worrh £200 mill ion. The
recovery of the wreck has
been postponed by rhe Spani sh
government, which cl a ims
that the ship's identity is not
absolutel y certa in.
Interestingly, most underwater
investigation is carried our
nor by governments but
by commerci al explorati on
companies, the best known of
which is Odyssey. This is due
( 0 the fa ct the state institutions
(museums, universities)
cannot afford to finance
cosrl y explorations involving
a lot of expensive specialised
equipment and expen s' fees.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students discuss rhe
questi ons as a cl ass.
• Encourage any st udents
who have been scuba
diving or snorkell ing to
tell the cl ass about their
experiences . Ask: Where
were you? What did you
see? Did you enjoy it ?
2 (CD2 Track 4)
46
• Check rhat srudents
understand that ' HMS'
stands for ' Her/His
Majesty's Shi p' .
• Play the recording for
students ro read and listen
to find out why ' HMS
Sussex' is an interesti ng find.
Answers
It could be one of t he most
valuable shipwrecks in
rhe world. It had been on
a secret mission and was
carrying rons of gold and
silver. It might also contain
objects of historica l value.
Underwater Treasure
Warm-up
1 Why do people go scuba di ving a nd
snorkl ing? Would you like to do it?
2 Read the text. Why is HMS Sussex an
interesting find?
On 27 December, 1693, HMS Slmex, a warship
of the Royal Navy, sailed out of Portsmouth.
Then one February morning in 1694, a storm
broke out. The Sussex sank 800 to the
ocean floor near Gibraltar. The ShlP may have
been unstable because there were a lot guns on
the upper deck. During the storm, the .wtnd must
have blown the Sussex over onto her Slde.
In 1994, a 17th-century document was found
which revealed that the Sussex had been on a
secret mission: the ship was carrying tons of gold
and silver t o finance the war with France. Today,
this gold and silver must be worth a fortune and
the Sussex could be one of the most valuable
shipwrecks in the world. Iron chests full of
coins worth £1 million in the 17th century, can t
be less than £ 200 million today.
The wreck was located in 200 I by Odyssey
Marine Exploration. While searching the area
where the Sussex had sunk, they found o?"ly
wreck with a cannon. They knew immediately It
couldn't be any other ship. However, the
f the wreck has been delayed. Great Bntaln
the ship while Spain says the wreck could
have been Spanish.
Archaeologists say that the coins may not
be the only valuable thing in .wreck. It
. ght contain lots of objects of .J:ustoncal value.
think these objects ,might have been well
preserved because the temperatures and oxygen
Jevels are very low at that depth.
-

-
.-
F
3 Would you like t o expl ore a shipwreck? Why?
Why not?
4 Compl ete t he sentences from
correct verb forms. Then complete t he rul e.
Speculations about the _t
It (ouldn' t ___ any other ship.
2 The coins may not ___ the only
valuable thing in the wreck.
3 It might ___ lots of objects of
historical val ue.
-4 This gold and silver must ___ worth a
fortune.
S The Sussex (ould ___ one of the
most valuable shipwrecks in the world.
6 Iron chests full of coins can' t __ _
worth less than £200 million today.
Speculations about the paS!
7 The ship may ___ unstable.
8 The wind must ___ the Sussex over
onto her side.
9 The wreck (ould ___ Spanish.
10 These objects might ___ well preserved.
When we speculate about the present, we use a
modal verb + ___ .
When we speculate about the past, we use a
modal verb + _ __ + 3rd form of t he verb .
5 Match the modals wit h the speaker's level
of certainty.
1 must a) I' m almost sure it's
not t rue.
2 may I might I could b) Maybe it 's true.
3 may not c) Maybe it's not true.
4 can't d) I' m sure it's true.
Extra activity on Website Grammar: Speculating
Exerci se 4
Exercise 3
• Students work in groups of four to
fi ve, discussing the questions.
• The grou ps then report back to t he
cl ass and see if most of them would
li ke to expl ore a shipwreck.
• Encourage students to talk about any
famous shipwrecks they have heard of.
• Check answers by asking indi vidual s to
read aloud t he sentences.
Answers
1 be 2 be 3 contai n 4 be 5 be 6 be
7 have been 8 have blown 9 have been
10 have been
spec ulate about the present - be
spec ulate a bout the past - have
6 Complete the dialogue with correct forms of
the verbs in brackets.
Grammar
8 Rewrite the sentences using the correct
modal verbs.
1 Perhaps they haven't found the wreck.
They .. the wreck.
2 I'm sure the coin is pure gold.
Jim: This wreck must 1 ~ (be) very old. It
may 2 ~ (sink in the 17th century. It
could Jhave h 11 (belong) to Col umbus!
Dan: Come on! It can't ~ (be) Columbus's.
His ship didn't sink.
Jim: Right, but the name is the Santo 00'0 so it
must 5 ~ (bel Spanish.
I'm not sure. Did you see the compass? They
• .iut¥£.JJ8i. (have) such things in the
17th century.
A diver might 7/u:ve tIwppM (drop) it here.
let's .. down apin. There could . ~
(lit) some interestina things on board.
must •
Complete the sentences with modal verbs:
must or can't.
Treasure hunters study old maps and
documents. They be expert historians.
Old ships that carried gold from America
must have been very heavy.
3 There's no light 1000 metres under the sea.
II ~ be very pleasant down there.
4 Warship wrecks ~ be very safe to
explore because they sank with ammunition.
The sinking of the Titanic ~ have been
a shock for its builders.
The ship is made of metal. It have
sunk more than 100 years ago.
Exercise 5
Answers
ld 2b 3c 4a
Practice
Exercise 6
• Advise students to read through
the dialogue quickly for general
understanding before they start
completing it.
• Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud the sentences.
Answers -+ student page
The coin ... pure gold.
3 It's possible that the map was drawn in the
15th century.
The map ... in the 15th century.
4 I'm certain that there isn't anything valuable
here.
There ... anything valuable here.
S Maybe the divers didn't drown during the
storm.
The divers . .. during the storm.
6 It's obvious that these coins aren't older than
50 years.
These coins .. older than 50 years.
Your Tum
9 Look at the photo. Use the cues and modal
verbs from this lesson to make guesses about
the man's present and past.
work hard all his life, catch a lot of
be happy. be healthy, have a house
sea, get up very early, have his own
be a fisherman all his life. start ii;i;;i;;;-';'; •
he was a boy, want to work in
= 0:-=---1
Extra
• Ask students what expressions the
speakers use ro agree and disagree with
each other (Come on!lRightlI'm not surel
[ don't think soIBut ... ).
• In pairs, students practise reading the
dialogue aloud and changing parts.
Monitor and correct any serious
pronunciation errors.
Exercise 7
Answers -+ student book
Exercise 8
• Check answers by asking
indi viduals to read aloud
the pairs of sentences for
each item.
Answers
1 may/might not have found
2 must be 3 may/might!
could have been drawn
4 can't be 5 may!might not
have drowned 6 can't be
Your Turn
Exercise 9
• Students wor k in pairs or
groups of three, reading the
cues and speculating about
the man's present and
past. Encourage students
to agree and disagree with
each other's opinions, e.g.
A: He must have his own
boat.
E: I don't think so. He
might have shared
Extra
a boat with other
fishermen. T think his
family must be quite
poor.
Ask students to look at the
people in the classroom and
make speculations about them.
Give one or two examples,
e.g. (Mike) is looking tired.
He must have gone to bed late
last night. Susan likes climbing
mountains. She can't be
frightened of heights.
Students work in groups
of three to five, making
speculations.
Each group then tells the
class two or three of their
speculations.
Fact Dr Fiction
• After checking the answer,
ask students if they know
about any old ships that
were sunk and have been
excavated and raised and
can be seen in museums
today, e.g. the Vasa in
Sweden (sunk in J 628),
the Mary Rose in England
(sunk in 1545).
~ 'IMIl OUT! Page 113,
Exercise 13
Photocopiable Activity 10,
TIP, Page 57 4)
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exerci ses for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4, 6 and 8).
More time: do the Extra
activity.
Background
This lesson looks at three
natural wonders. See these
websites:
Victoria Falls: e.g.wikipedia
http://ce.eng.usf.edu/ pharos/
wonderslN a rural/victoria fa lis.
html
The Everglades (US National
Park Service)
http://www.nps.gov/ever/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/
Patagonia
Warm-up
1 (CD2 Track 5)
• Play the recording for
students to listen and
repeat the Key Words.
• In pairs or groups of three,
students look at the phoros
and use some of the Key
Words to describe them.
Reading
Exercise 2 (CO2 Track 6)
• Read aloud the instructions
and check that students
understand what to do.
• Monitor and check
students' notes, helpi ng
as necessary. Students
can look up the meaning
of new words in their
dictionaries if they need to
include the words in their
notes.
Exercise 3
• In turn, each student tell s
their group about their
place and why it is a great
place to visit.
Exercise 4
• Students work indi viduall y,
reading the texts and
answering the questions.
natural Wonders
Warm-up
1 look at the Key Words. What can you see in
the photos on page 49?
Key Words:
forest , glacier. gorge (US = canyon). hill , island.
lake, marsh, mountain, river, swamp, waterfall
Reading
2 Work in groups of three. Each student reads
one of the descriptions of the places (1-3) on
page 49 and makes notes about these things.
• name • location • landscape and scenery
• activities • wildlife
3 Now tell your group about your place. Try to
convince them that it is a great place to visit.
4 Read the articles and answer the questions.
1 Why do bits of the Moreno Glacier fall into the
lake?
2 What is special about condors?
3 When do alligators move quickly?
" Why is the summer unpleasant in the
Everglades?
5 Why are the Victoria Falls called 'the smoke
that thunders?
6 How deep is the Zambesi gorge?
5 Complete the Word Builder with adjectives in
red from the text.
Word BuDder
1 rocky I I $How-caeped mountain
2 I freshwakY lake
3 beautiful I breq/dgkiH# sight
" pine I rain I I forest
5 --'E!liL.. / --..l11!:L.- ani rna Is
6 common I t .ulaHJereR

8 bad I cold I good /

10 amazing I small I
Answers
species
noise
weather
rain
variety
1 It is one of the few glaciers that is not
retreating. 2 They are the world's largest
birds of prey. 3 When there is something
to eat (a mea l)) near them. 4 Because it
is very hot, there is often heavy rain and
there are a lot of aggressive mosquitoes
(rhat bite). 5 The noise is deafening and
there is spray and mist everywhere.
6 100 metres
6 Write about your country.
The ___ is an endangered species but
___ are very common.
2 In the summer, we often/sometimes get
___ weather and often/sometimes there is
___ rain.
3 There are a lot of I a few ___ forests with
a ___ variet y of wildlife.
4 _ __ is an area with a beautiful landscape.
S There are a few/some/a lot of ___ lakes in
'1 look at the Sentence Builder.
Sentence Builder
Although they look slow, alligators can move at
lightning speed.
Despite looking slow, alligators can move at
lightning speed.
8 Rewrite the sentences beginning with the
word in brackets.
It 's cold and windy but it's still a great place to
visit . (Although)
2 II 's expensive but the flight over the waterfall is
worth it. (Despite)
3 There are quite a few lions in the area but their
numbers are going down. (Although)
" It 's a long way from Buenos Aires but it's easy
to get there by plane or coach. (Despite)
5 I had a bad cold while on holiday in Patagonia
but I went whitewater rafting. (Despite)
6 There were a lot of mosquitoes at the campsite
but I wasn't badly bitten. (Although)
Speaking
9 Think of one of your favourite places near you
or in your country. Write notes to describe it.
Example
a waterjall- mountain river - in thick forest
- great place for picnics and swimming in the
summer - but water v. cold!
10 Work in pairs. Describe your place to your
partner. He I She guesses where it is.
---Fact Dr Fictiol?- --
The highest waterfall in the world is the Salto d
Angel (Angel Falls) in Venezuela. At 979 metres
is nearly ten times higher than the Victoria Falls.
Exerci se 5
• Students work individuall y or in pairs,
compl eting t he table.
Answers - student page
Exercise 6
• Read through the gapped sentences
with the class. Elicit suggestions for
completing sentence 2 about the weather
in summer in the students' own country.
• Check answers by asking indi viduals
to read aloud their sentences and see if
the rest of the class agree.
In Patagonia, the dramatic Andes mountains stretch along the border between southern
Argentina and Chile. The high, snow· capped mountains form a magnificent background
to deee, lakes, thick forests and high waterfalls. Perhaps the most spectacular
place to visit is the Moreno Glacier and lake Argentino. The glacier is one of the few
in the world that is not retreating. If you are lucky, you will experience the breathtaking
sight of enormous blocks of ice tailing into the lake as the glacier moves forward.
Amongst Patagonian wildlife are pumas, rheas (American ostriches) and armadillos,
I ,l
plus of course condors, the world's largest birds of prey. The area is ideal for outdoor
activities like skiing, riding, trekking and whitewater rafting.
The Everglades National Park
in southern fiorida has a unique
landscape of marshes. dense
forests and mangrove swamps.
Nowhere in the whole park is higher than
two and a half metres above sea level. This
diverse ecosystem is home to a wide variety of
birds and animals, including endangered species
such as the rare Florida panther and the American
crocodile. Birdwatching and fishing are popular
and the best way to get around is by boat. The
Everglades is a great place for kayaking or
canoeing but watch out for the alligators!
Despite looking slow, these ugly creatures can
move at lightning speed when there is a meal
nearby. Avoid visiting in the summer because of
the hot weather, frequent heavy rain and swarms
of aggressive mosquitoes.
The African name for the waterfalls is
IoIosi-oa·Tunya, which means ' the smoke
:hallflunders', and you can see where the
ft comes from. When you get near the
li THE VICTORIA fAl
the noise of water is and
is spray and mist everywhere. Every
550,000 cubic metres of water drop
the gorge of the Zambesi river over
'00 metres below. The Victoria falls, on the
wder of Zambia and Zimbabwe, is now
the adventure capital of southern Africa.
IJu can take a flight over the falls or go
on the river below. Visitors can also
!Jl on kayak, canoe and walking safaris in
the two national parks near the falls. There
Me lois of animals to see, including
'eph.nts, buffaloes, giraffes and hippos.
• After checking answers, ask students:
What is the most breathtaking sight
you've seen in this COUNtry?
Exercise 7
Point out the position of the comma in
each sentence.
Exercise 8
• Students do the exerci se working
individually. Check students' sentences,
including rhe use of rhe comma.
I Ask individual s to read aloud rhe pair
of sentences in each item.
Answers
1 Although it's cold and windy, it's sti ll
a great place to visit. 2 Despite being
expensive, rhe fli ght over rhe waterfall
is worth it. 3 Although there are quite a
few lions in the area, their numbers are
going down. 4 Despite being a long way
from Buenos Aires, it's easy to get there
by plane or coach. 5 Despite having a
bad cold while on holiday in Patagon ia,
I went whitewater rafring. 6 Although
there were a lot of mosquitoes at the
campsite, ] wasn't badly bitten.
Speaking
Exercise 9


Read through the example
notes with the cl ass.
Students work indi vidual\y,
making notes about one
of their fa vourite pl aces.
Encourage them to use
vocabulary from this Unit,
where appropriate.
Exercise 10
• In pairs, students descr ibe
their place and guess
where their partner's place
is. Monitor but do not
imerrupt students' fluency.
Make a nOte of any
general language problems
to go over with the class
afterwards.
Fact or FictiOIl
• Check that students
remember how to say the
number (nine hundred and
seventy-nine).
Extra (Fact or Fiction)
Revise saying large numbers
and expressions from Get
Ready (page 45). In pairs,
students write three to five
'true' or 'false' statements
about the length of rivers, the
height of mountains etc. in
their country or the world.
Give them time to check their
information.
Students read aloud their
statements to the class who
say whether the information is
'true' or 'false'.
TIM_ OUT! Page 113,
Exercise 14
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 4).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
The dialogues are set in Bristol
Zoo Gardens which has a very
good and informati ve website:
www.bristolzoo.org.uk
The Everyday Listening is
about otters in the UK. A
good article about them is in
http;lInews.bbc.co.uklllhi/
ukl362403.stnt
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups or
as a class, talking about the
phoros and answering the
questions.
• Encourage students to
talk about zoos or wildlife
parks that they have
visited.
Reading and
Listening
~ Exercise 2 (CD2 Track 7)
• Play the recording for
students to listen and check
their guesses from Exercise ].
• Check that students
remember Ahi 's problem
with the shampoo and why
they need a sa mpl e of river
water.
Extra
• Play the recording for
students to listen and make
a note of new vocabulary.
• Explain or encourage
students to guess the
meaning of any new words,
e.g. dinner jacket, tanker!
tank, swallow.
• Ask students if there are
'adopt an animal' schemes
at zoos in their country.
If so, have any of them
'adopted' an animal?
,« Bristol Zoo
Warm-up
1 look at the photos. Where are Ellie and
Tanya? What are they doing? What do
you know about the birds?
Reading and Listening
CiJ 2 Read and listen to the dialogues.
Check your guesses from Exercise 1.
Tanya: Welcome to ' Weekend Special' at
Bristol Zoo. Elli e's going 10 tell us about
how the zoo helps animals.
Ellie: Right , I'm going to talk about the
penguins. First, where are they from?
We usually associate penguins with cold
places but adually, these guys come from
southern Africa. They' re SO cm tall, sorry,
70 cm tall, with typical ' dinner jacket'
colours.
Next, how do they live? They're world-
class swimmers and brilliant at catching
fish. They keep the same partner for
life and often return to the same nest
every year.
Now, let's look at threats to their
environment. The population of penguins
has gone down recently. The main reason
for this is oil. Oil tankers clean their
tanks at sea and penguins sometimes
swallow the oil. Another problem is oil
spills, when oil in the sea covers the poor
penguins.
So, what does the zoo do to help? Well ,
it studies penguin behaviour in the
wild and also helps a South African
organisation get oil off the penguins.
Finally, what can you do to help? Okay, you
can adopt a penguin at the zoo for BO.
You can also travel by car less - that way
there will be fewer tankers!
After the programme ...
Abi: Hey, that was great!
Ellie: Thanks. By the way, have you checked
out the makers of that shampoo?
Abi: Not ~ e t . I've been really busy with my
mUSIc.
Steve: And we need samples from the river.
Tanya: My mum's a chemist - she can test
them at the university.
Ellie: Okay, we've got a lot to do!
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Students work individuall y or in pairs,
finding the Key Expressions in Ell ie's
talk in Exercise 2 and deciding if the
words are used to gain time or to
organise the talk
Answers
1a 2b 3b 4b Sb 6b 7a 8a 9b lOa
Exercise 4
• Elicit some examples of endangered
animal s. Gi ve students time to check
information about their animal.
• Tell students to write notes, not
complete sentences . Suggest that they
find a picture of the animal to show
during rheir presentarion.
Exercise 5
• Students read Ellie's presentation to
find how she cor rects herself. (Answer
- sorry, 70 em tall).
• Read aloud the advice in the Spea king
Help.
• Advise st udents to practise saying their
talk before they give thei r presentari on
in class. They can practise it at home
and, if possible, record ir so they can
listen ro ir.
which of the underlined words in
the Key Expressions are used to
3) gain time b) organise the talk?
Example 1 oj 2 b)
R!&!:t1, I'm going to talk about.
Ei.r£1. where are they from?
how do they live?
Nlm, let's look at ..
The mai n reason for this is .
Another probl em is .
7 5Q, what.
8 ru, it studies.
£i.!1gJh', what can you do to hel p?
Q.kay, you can ..
Find out information and write
notes about an endangered a nimal
lor a presentation.
al general informat ion (habitat I size I
colour) b) how they li ve
tllhreats to thei r envi ronment
d) what is bei ng done 10 hel p them
Exercise 6
Skills
look at the Speaking Help. How does Ellie correct herself in
the presentation?
Speaking Help: Giving Presentations
• Use \IIU ........ _ S<¥no II*1gs that OIl! too
woiplkD2C1 Use lIoe \IDU'"" got.
• 00001 IiV ID speaIo boo
• Use WIlfIIsID gcin IDe ancIlD InIi paris or \IIU .. __ ,
• When you know you have made a mIstdI!. CDm!d: yDtI'5II!If.
If you're not sure, just CO"" ani
6 Use the ideas in the Speaking Help to give your
presentation to the cl ass. When you listen to other
presentations, give them a mark for :
al interest b) performance c) language.
7 Tell the class which presentation you li ked most and why.
Exa mple
I really liked Beata's talk. It was interesting because she talked
about European bisons. She gave a good performance and her
language was quite good.
Everyday Listening
1 What do you know about Eurasian otters? Try to
complete the information.
Name of animal: .. g.1.1!:-r
5"" . .... 1le"'dmJ'ng ....... .
.. .If.M,; ........... .
Habitat:. . .... ....... .
D;et .. . .. fi.>h. .. .............. .
Threats: ...... .. .p.l!//u#l!I'! ....... .. ..
Areas in Britain now: ...
listen to a talk and complete the notes in Exercise 1.
Pronunciation. listen to the sounds in Ihese words.
1 sea li:1 2 lei 3 near hal
4 bear leal 5 h.eard hI 6 gr.eat lell
4 Say these words.
reveal, search, treasure, cheap, clean, wear, cl ear, leave,
mea nt, disa ppear, pleasant, each, heavy, breathtaking,
mea l, earn, spread, early, creature, weather, learn, reason,
fea r, threat, tea, ideal , cream, appear, research, year, ready,
brea k, breakfast, leather, idea
listen and check your pronunciation.
........ TIM. CUTI Page 113, Exercise 15
• Students give their talks to the class
Everyday Listening
Exerci se 1
or in groups. If appropriate for your
class, students can award marks for
each talk. Encourage them to mark
sympatheticall y and be generous rather
than harsh in their marking.
Exercise 7
• Give students time to t hi nk about
and write their sentences if they wish
before telling the class about the
presentation they liked most.
• Students work in small groups and try
to compl ete the informat ion.
2 (CO2 Track 8)
• Play the recording, twice if necessary,
for student to li sten and complete the
nOtes.
Answers ..... student page
Extra
Play the recording, pausing
after each of the three parts
of the talk, i. e. Part 1 as far
as 'Lucky otters, is what I
say', Parr 2 as far as 'but
thi ngs have gOt berter' and
then rart 3 to the end. After
each Parr, ask more detailed
comprehension questions. For
example, after Part 1, ask:
1 What colour is their fur?
(brown with a lighter patch
on their fronts)
2 How long do they live in
zoos? (up to 20 years)
3 How long do they live in the
wild? (up to 4 years)
4 How long can they stay
underwater? (4 minutes)
5 How fast can they run? (12
mil esl19.2km an hour)
Exercise 3 (CO2 Track 9)
• After students have listened
to the words, play the
recording for them to listen
and repeat the words.
Exercise 4
• Students work in pairs or
small groups, saying the
words qui erly to themsel ves.
5 (CO2 Track 10)
• Pia y the recording for
students to listen and check
thei r pronunciation.
• Then play the recording for
them to listen and repeat
the words .
Extra
Write on the board:
They carefull y searched for
the great treasure in the sea
for a year.
Students repeat the sentence
after you, phrase by phrase,
e.g. They carefully search I for
the great treasure / in the sea /
for a year.
Then each student says the
whole sentence.
TlMI OUT! Page 113,
Exercise 15
Across Cultures J
Background
This lesson focuses on two
drinks which have brought
people together. Both tea and
coffee 3re hugely popular
around the world and many
cultures have own
particular way of preparing
and serving them.
For a brief history of tea, see:
http://www.stashtea.com/facts.
htm
Exercise 7 - for more
information, see www. bbc.
co. uk/healthy Ji vinglnutritionl
drinks
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work 111 pa lIS or
sma ll groups, looking at
the photos and guessing
what the things are and
where they are from.
Reading
(Il Exercise 2 (CO2 Track 11)
• Play the recording for
students to li sten and read
to check theif guesses f rom
Exercise l.
• When checking answers,
ask students which section
of the article supports theif
answers.
Answers
a Britain (mi lky tea)
b Japan (tea ceremony)
c Russia (samovar for hot
wa ter to make tea )
d Turkish coffee
e Italy (Cappuccino coffee)
Exercise 3
• Students work individually,
reading the article and
answering the questions.
They can compare answers
In pairs.
Warm-up
1 look at the things in the photos (a-e).
What countries are they from?
Reading
2 Read the article and check
your guesses from Exercise 1.
3 Read the article again. Answer
these questions.
1 Which countries:
a) produce a lot 01 tea?
b) drink a lot of tea?
2 How is tea in Russia different from
that in Britain?
3 Why did Ethiopian monks like coffee?
4 Where did the words 'coffee' and
'cappuccino' come from?
4 Work in pairs. Ask and answer
these questions.
Do you believe the legends about
tea and coffee? How do you think
tea and coffee were discovered?
2 Do you drink tea or coffee? Do you
like them?
3 How do people drink tea and coffee
in your country?
4 What are the most popular non-
alcoholic drinks in your country?
5 Which of the adverbs in the
Word Builder:
a} make an adjective stronger?
b) not as strong?
Word Builder'liD!..
extremely refreshing very strong
terribly popular really good
incredibly angry
rather long
slightly sweet
pretty keen
quite nice
absolutely
fanlastic*
..l'I!!
* With strong adjectives (fantastic, great,
amazing, brilliant) you can only use
'absolutel y' and ' really'.
Answers
1a China. Indi a. Kenya 1 b Japan,
Russia, Britain 2 In Russia, people drink
tea with lemon. In Britain, many people
drink tea with milk. 3 Because it kept
them awake during nightly prayers.
4 Coffee comes from the Arabic word
'quahwa' . Cappuccino comes from the
Capuchin friars because it is the same
colour as their robes.
According to legend. 5,000 years ago, the Chinese Emperor, Sheri
Nung, ordered everyone in China to boil water to avoid disease.
One day. he \V3S going to drink some water. when some leaves
from a tree fell into it. Shen Nung tried rhe brown liquid and
found it extremely refreshing. That was the start of te3.
Dy the 9th AD, tea had spread to Japan, whe-re it
became terribly popubr wi th Buddhist monks. III the 17th
century. 'tea mania' arrived in Europe and chen America. It even
provoked a war between America Jnd Britain.
In 1773, a group of Americans, incredibly 3ngry
about on their te3, threw boxes of tea into
Boston h3rbour!
Nowadays. tea is a (0111l 1l0n dri nk in lllallY
countries. China. India and Kenya arc the
largest tea producers and the Jap3nese still
take P3rt in the rather long 3nd complic3ted
teJ ceremony. In R ussia, people drink sl ightly
sweet tea with lemon and some people still
use traditional for the hot water
The British arc pretty keen tea drinkers, too.
Nowadays. <afternoon tea' wit h cakes and
sandwiehl."S is much less (ommon but many
Brits drink several mugs of milky tea every d1Y,
6 Work in pairs. Use the adverbs from the Word Builder
and the adjectives below to talk about the drinks in
the box.
great, nice, horrible, tasty, disgusting, fantastic, awful,
tasteless, sweet, bitter, refreshing
sweet tea; weak, milky tea; lemon tea ; mint tea;
iced lea; fruil juice; hot milk; strong, black coffee;
white coffee; iced coffee; hot chocolate; water;
fizzy drinks
Example
A: I think sweet tea is really horrible!
B: f don't agree. I think it's rather nice.
Extra
Play the recording for students to read
and listen and make a note of any new
vocabulary.
Explain or encourage students to guess the
meaning of new words, e.g. provoked (a
war), taxes.
Exercise 4
• Students work in pairs, discussing the
questions.
• The pairs report back to the class and
see how much general agreement there
is ln their answers.
COFFEE
lcgt'ud is that around 800 nc , a farmer in the
of Ethiopia noti ced his goats eari ng: some
n-d berries and thell running around happily.
Hr USfl-d them and immcdiatdy he fdt less ti red. Soon,
monks were using rhe berries in a drink to kl'l' P
mmudn.'S awake during ni ghtly prayers.
The'drink spread to Arabia and 'quahwa' was taken to Turkey
Europe. In rhe 17111 century, colTee was a real craze for
. At one time, there were three thousand coffee houses
hundred billion cups of coffee arc drunk ew ry day.
GrcCCt" people drink small cups of very sweet,
coffee. III Italy. there is coffee for every occasion.
is vcry strong, black coffee and it is really good afiL'f
I ""h '(: 'pp" ,,;;uo" is an with steamed milk and is quit e
Speaking
nice at any time
of the day. It is
named after the
Capuchin fri ars
because it has
the same colour
as their robes.
'Granita di caWe'
is an absolutel y
fantastic drink;
it is iced colfee
with cream, ideal
for hot summer
afternoons!
7 Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
How go d ,5 you- ii'luld diet?
8
How many gtuses of waler do you drink a
'1 bl <I
III Hili many ClIpS 01 ..... or In do po driok "''1 day!
W '1 b) <) thre,
8 ,,' Speak Oul 00 you agree
with the statement below? Why or
why not?
The government should ban fizzy
drinks because they are bad for you.
FOR YOUR PORTFOLIO
Project: A poste,
Write about one of these things from
your country.
• a beaut iful la ke, ri ver or waterfall
• an animal in danger of extinction
• popular non-alcholic drinks
1 Find out information. Use
the Internet, books and
encyclopedias. Ask other people.
2 Write notes for four paragraphs.
Place Animal Drinks
1 location f appearance I the most
size numbers popular
lett drinks
2 why it is habilat I descriptions
beautiful diet and of them
behaviour
3 activities threats to how they
you can the animal are made
do there and its
environment
4 wildlife what we when
..
How ...., filly drinb do you hawt ...., wttIt!
you can should do people
'1 b) <l
How , ... do po have 'diet' or 1igh" drinks!
'1 b) <) da,
A Whtn you m thinly at borne, what do you
" a) r "' I
bl tl awol' " .
Cbe<k your answers on page 106.
Exercise 5
Read through the expressions in the
table with the class . Draw students'
attemion to the information below the
table about adverbs to use with 'strong
adject ives' .
• Gi ve students time to look back at the
arti cl e and see how the expressions are
used.
• Students can compare answer s in pairs
before checking answers as a class.
Answers
a) extremely, terribly, incredi bl y, rather,
very, really, absolutely
bl slightly, pretty, quite
see there to protect it drink
them
3 Use your notes to write a
description. Find photos and
make a poster.
4 Di splay your poster in the
classroom.
Exercise 6
• Read through the adjectives and drinks
wit h the class. Check that students
understand any new words, e.g. bitter.
• Ask two srudems to read aloud the
example exchange.
• Students work in pairs, giving their
opinion of the drinks and agreeing or
disagreeing with each other.
• Each pai r tells the class their opinions
of twO or three of the drinks.
Speaking
Exercise 7
• Read through the questions
with the class.
• Students work 111 palfS,
asking and answering the
questions .
• Students check their
answers on page 106.
Exercise 8
• Ask one of the students to
read aloud the statement.
• Students work in groups
of foU[ to six, di scussing
the statement and giving
reasons why they agree or
disagree with it.
• The groups then feedback
to the class and see what
the majority opinion is.
Project

Read through the stages of
the project so that students
understand what to do.

Elicit one Of twO specific
examples of each thing
from the students' country.

In Stages 1 and 2, students
can work together in
pairs or small groups,
helping each other to find
informa ti on and photos
and to organise thei r notes
into four paragraphs. This
cooperati ve acti vity will
link with the Study Help
advice given in Study
Corner 5 in this Module.

Students use their notes
to write a draft of their
description. Monitor and
point out any language
errors for students to
correct. Encourage students
to help each other correct
any language errors.

Students make their posters
and display them in the
cl assroom.

Give the class time to read
the posters and say which
ones they think are most
interesting and informati ve.
Language Check
Exercise 1
Answers
1 four-fift hs
2 eight point seven six
3 three and three quarters
4 ten billi on
5 seven million, eight
hundred and thirty three
thousand, six hundred and
forty eight
Exercises 2-3
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 4
Answers
16 Tania might have gone to
the cinema yesterday.
17 Chris must be at Sue's
house.
18 Simon can't have come to
school today because his
bike isn't here.
19 Clare must have played
well yesterday beca use
she has got into the
school team.
20 Tom can't be very good
at football because he's
_ very lazy.
21 Sue must have enjoyed
the party because she
didn't leave until 2 a.m.
Exercise 5
Answers
22 Despite tasting nice,
coffee can be bad for you.
23 Although green rea is
healthy, I hate ir.
24 Despite being refreshi ng,
soft drinks have got 10[s
of sugar in them.
25 Al though I love drinking
espresso coffee after
dinner, I can' t sleep
afterwards.
Exercise 6
Answers ..... student page
G Feedback (CD2 Track 12)
54
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spell ing
where necessary.
Study Corner 5
1 Write the numbers in words.
1 4/ 5 2 8.76 3 3%
4 10,000,000,000 5 7,833,648
2 Complete the words in the description.
The English Lake District in the north·west of
England has no glaciers or 6S !1 f!.!¥ - f f! fl. fl. '- g
mountains but it is very beautiful. It has some
'r !l. f.Kl mountains but the
highest IS less than 1,000
metres. There are sixteen
8f [. '- §.. !J.!¥!l!.. £. [. lakes
and you can go canoeing
or sailing on some of them.
There is not a very 9W i.. g f-
variety of wildlife but you
can see red deer and foxes
and some red squirrels. The
red squirrel is now a very
lOr f! r. f.. species in England.
3 Choose the adverb to complete the sentence.
" I think that b) very c) rather
fantastic!
12 They drink coffee from a) terribly b) absolutely
@ rathersmall cups.
13 Tea is not my favourite drink although it is
a} extremely b) obsolutel>@1uite ni ce to have
someti mes.
14 I hate milky tea. It is a) rather b) ver>@)reallY
horrible!
1S He puts fi ve spoons of sugar in his tea - he
likes it a} rather@)incredibly c) quite sweet.
Vocabulary D / 15
Feedback
(jy. listen and check your answers to the
Language Check. Write down your scores.
• look at the table below. Then do the
exercises on page 52 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers:
Numbers 1-5
Numbers 6-10
Numbers 11-15
Numbers 16-21
Numbers 22-25
Numbers 26-30
look again at:
Get Ready - Key
Unit 14 - Word Buifder
Across Cul tures 3 -
Word Builder
Unit 13 - Grammar
Unit 14 - Sentence Builder
Unit 15 - Key Expressions
• Students look at the table to see which
sections in the Students' Book they
need to look at again.
• Give students time in cl ass or at home
to do the exercises on page 52 of the
Workbook.
Study HeLp: Writing Tasks
• Read aloud the advice in the Study
Help.
4 Rewrite the sentences so they mean the same.
Use can, must, can't, might and may.
16 I think Tania went to the cinema yesterday
but I'm not at all sure. Tania ... yesterday.
17 Chris isn't here so he's definitely at Sue's
house. Chris ... at Sue's house.
18 Simon's bike is not here so he hasn't come to
school today. Simon ... to school today because ...
19 I think Clare played well yesterday. She has got
into the school team. Clare ... because.
20 Tom is lazy so I don't think he's good at
football . Tom ... ot football because .
21 I think Sue enjoyed the party. She didn't leave
until 2 a.m. Sue ... the party because.
5 Rewrite the sentences so they mean the same.
22 Coffee tastes nice but it's bad for you. Despite ..
n Green tea is healthy but I hate it. Although.
24 Soft drinks are refreshing but they've got lots
of sugar in them. Despite ...
25 I love drinking espresso coffee after dinner but
I can't sleep afterwards. Although .. .
Grammar D! 10
G Complete these sentences from a talk about
Bri stol.
26 Today, I'm going to about Bristol.
27 about its history .
28 The maJn reason for this growth was the
importance of the port of Bristol.
29 Another reason for the growth of Bristol was
the development of industry.
30 Final(y , what thi ngs can you see there?
Key Expressions D I 5
When you are doing a writing task, get help
from your partner(s).
Discuss your ideas before you start .
Example
A: I'm going to write a letter complaining about
a broken MP3 pJayer. What do you think?
B: I think that's a good idea but can you exploin
what's wrong with it?
Show your paragraph notes to him I her and
ask for ideas and suggestions.
When you have finished, ask your partner to
it and che<k for mistakes.
• If students worked together in some
of the stages of their Project in
Across Cultures 3, encourage them
to discuss how they got more ideas
and suggestions for content and
organisation from other st udents. Tell
students they wi ll have an opportunity
to pracrise helping each other in
writing tasks in future Modules, too.
Module 5 Test, TTP, Page 73
y
look at 1Ioe .............. the Key Words. Whkb
of the 1IIInp ......... Ior oar planet?
Key Words: The Environment
ctimate change, deforestation, drought,
energy-savi ng light bul bs, floods, fossil fuels
{e.g. petrol, gas, (oal), global wa rming,
greenhouse gases (e.g. carbon dioxide),
hybri d cars (using el ectricity and petrol),
orga ni c vegetables, pollution, recycl ing,
renewable energy, solar energy, wind farms

and _. _ do Ihey _
_ qllloIIom?
Jht1i,;
# 5
\-11 ... -. IMfIy /,."..1rHIt KnIll -/HIt i"",.,-.
Impanant Is tile eminJnmenllor,...1
Is the bIa8osI_memal
• • the_or,...,. .... )?
...... II\I ...... I_I .. _ ... ' lives?
WIiIt dO_ do to help the planet?
Get Rendy
Backgro und
This introduces the topic of the
environment, which has also been parr
of the citizenship syll abus in the previous
levels (see Challenges 1 - lessons 22
and 23). Hybr id cars are cars wi th both
electric and petrol (or diesel) engines. They
use the electric engine in rowns and at
lower speeds. They use less fuel and emit
fewer emissions rhan norma l cars. See Fact
or Fiction - Unit 17.
Exercise 1 (CD2 Track 13)
• Play the recording for students to
listcn and repeat the Key Words. Pa y
particular attention to word stress in
compound words. Check t hat students
understand any new vocabular y.
• Students identify t he things in the
photos - a) wind fa rm b) solar car c)
encrgy-saving light bulb. In groups
or as a class, students discuss which
t hi ngs are good for our planet, givi ng
reasons.
2 (CD2 Track 14)
• Give students ti me to read
through the quest ions
before you play the
recording.
• Play t he recording, twice if
necessary, for students to
listen and make notes of
Tom and Kei th's answers.
• Pla y Tom's speech and
check the answers for him.
Then play Keith·s speech
and check the answers for
him.
Answers
2 Tom - climate change
because of greenhouse gases
Keith - air pollution (i n
London)
3 Tom - the planet wi ll
get hotter so there wi ll be
more droughts, storms and
hurri canes. The ice caps at
the poles are melting and the
sea level is going up. Some
countries might disappear.
Keith - he doesn't think
there will be big problems
in hi s lifetime. Maybe there
will be in hi s grandchildren's
li ves. He'd like the British
climate to change and have
hot, sunny summers.
4 Tom - save energy at
home, walk to school,
recycle paper and batteries,
join a green organisation
Keith - he does nothing to
help the planet (He has a
good time, shopping and
partyi ng. He's going to get a
car as soon as he can).
Extra activity on website
Exercise 3
• After the pair activity, find
out what most students
thin k is the biggeSt
environmental problem.
Exercise 4
• Remind students to make a
note of their answers.
Exercise 5
• Students tel l the class how
'green' their partner is.
• Ask students if they agree
with the description of
themselves according to
their quest ionnaire score.
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 7, 8 and 10).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
This lesson introduces will +
be + ing (Future Continuous)
and its two uses: L prolonged
activities that will fill a period
in the furure or will be going
on around a point in the
furure, 2. polite introductions
to requests and offers.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups or
as a class, looking at the
photos and discussing the
questions. Encourage them
to speculate about what the
family have done in their
back garden and why.
Going Green
Warm-up
1 .at the photos. Do you think the boy
lives In a town or in the country? Why?
2 the text. list the things the Barnes
famIly plan to change in their life.
(fJ Hle hear a lot about how 14Je
sflOuld c/lCllIge Ollr lives to help
save OIlY plal/et. We talked to
Jim Bames, 15,irolll Oxford,
Ill/,ose family has decided to go
greeH.
'An average UK family
produces more than 1 ton of
rubbish a year. So we want
to recycle everything. We're
going to grow our own
vegetables and keep hens.
Soon, we'll be eating our
own eggs for breakfast! And
I'll be able to take the eggs
to school to compare them
with supermarket eggs.
To save electr icity, we're
going to watch less TV
and use low energy light
bulbs. We're going to put
solar panels on our roof for
the heating and hot water.
This time next week, I'll be
having a free solar shower!
We're going to walk and
cycle to cut air pollution,
too. So, at 7.30 on Monday
morning, my dad will be
cycling to work and I'll
be going to school on my
skateboard - how cool is
that?!'
-------
3 of plans are the most difficult to achieve?
whIch actIOns help protect the environment most? Why?
2 (CO2 Track 15)
Read between Jim and his mother later that year.
What IS JIm taking to school?
56

Students read the text and
list the things the famil y
plan to change.
Answers
1 recycle everything
2 grow vegetables
3 keep hens
4 use less electric equipment
at home
5 have solar panes installed
on the roof
6 walk and cycle
7 go to school on his
skateboard
Exercise 3

Jim: Mum, will you be feeding the hens?
Mum: Yes, why?
Jim: I promised to show our organic
Mum:
eggs in class tomorrow. Could you
check if they have laid any new ones?
Sure. By the way, I'll be picking
some tomatoes. Do you want me to
get you some as well?
Jim: That's a great idea! I'l l show
the ctass our home·grown
vegetables.
Students work in groups
or as a class, discussing
the questions and giving
reasons for their opinions.
4 (CO2 Track 16)
-E-x-t-r-a----------- • Play the recording for students to read
Ask students: Do you dol and listen and answer the questions.
Would you like to do any of Answers
these things? Which things Organic eggs laid and home-grown
will be easy/difficult for the vegetables / tomatoes
family to continue doing for
a long time? What do you
think their neighbours think
of the changes the Barnes are
making? Would you like to
live with the Barnes fami ly?
(Why?lWhy not? )
Extra activity on website
Grammar: Future Continuous
Exercise 5

Students work indi vidually, completing
the sentences and deciding which
meaning (a or b) they express. They
can compare answers in pai rs before
checking answers as a class.
Answers --+ student page
Exercise 6
Answers
1a 2b
Complete the sentences (1-3) from t he text
in Exercise 2 with correct verb froms. Which
meaning (a or b). do the sentences express?
Soon, we 11 he14f1ng our own eggs for breakfast. b)
2 This time next week, I 11 he haVing a free solar
shower! a)
3 At 7.30 on Monday morni ng. my dad J£i!f..Jz£
~ to work and 111 be flO/na to school on
my skateboard. b) J J
a) a si ngle event in the future
b) a longer activity during or around a certain
time in the future
6 Match the sentences (1-2) from the dialogue
in Exercise 4 with their functions (a-b).
1 will you be feeding the hens?
2 I'll be picking some tomatoes.
a) polite introduction to a request
b) polite introduction to an offer
Practice
7 Complete the sentences with the verbs (in
brackets) in the Future Continuous.
1 On Sunday, we ___ (clean) our local park
all day.
I ___ (you I watch) the Chelsea-Arsenal
game tonight?
3 At 9 o'clock on Monday, we ___ (write) a
chemistry test.
4 Why can't I call at 8 p.m.? ___ (you I
have) your piano lesson?
5 I can't go out tonight. I ___ (help) my
mum to clean the flat.
6 At this time next week, my dad
___ (fly) to New Zealand.
Practice
Exercise 7
• Check answers by asking students to
read aloud the sentences, using shorr verb
forms (e.g. we'll) where appropriate.
Answers
I '11 be cleaning 2 Will you be watching
3 '11 be writing 4 Will you be having
5 '11 be helping 6 'II/wi ll be flying
Grammar
8 A group of teenagers have organised a 'green
day' at t heir school. Write what they will be
doing tomorrow at noon.
1 Mike I coilect rubbish in the local park
2 Jenny I give a talk about vegetarianism
3 Susan I show a film on rain forests
4 Helen I plant trees in the school yard
5 Jake I coilect plastic bottles at the school
6 Sid I put energy·saving light bul bs in the
classrooms
9 Use the cues (in brackets) to write pol ite
introductions to t he offers and requests.
__ ? Could you send this letter for me? (go
to the post office)
2 __ I can walk your Rex, too. (walk my dog)
3 __ ? Can you give me a lift ? (drive to town)
4 _ _ Would you like me to get you anything?
(go shopping)
5 _ _ ? I'd like to send a few e-mai ls. (use the
computer)
6 _ _ Shall I mention the problems with the
canteen? (see the head teacher thi s afternoon)
Your Turn
10 Imagine what you and your family will be
doing on Saturday. Use the time expressions
in the box to make sentences.
Example
At 7 a.m. all my family will be sleeping.
at 7 a.m. in the morning at 11 a.m.
at 2 p.m. at 6 p.m. i n t he evening
11 Work in pairs. Student A looks at page 105,
Student B looks at page 107. Use the cues
to make polite i ntroducti ons to t he requests
and offers. Reply to t hem.
Example
A: Will you be using your bike today? I'd like
to borrow it for two hours.
B: You con toke it now but
bring it bock be/ore
six o'clock.
Exercise 8
• Tell st udents to use fu ll verb forms in
these written sentences.
Answers
1 Mike will be collect ing rubbish in the
local park. 2 Jenny will be givi ng a ta lk
about vegetarianism. 3 Susan wi ll be
showing a fi lm on rain forests. 4 Helen
will be planting trees in the school yard.
5 Jake will be collecting plastic bottles
at school. 6 Sid will be putting energy-
saving light bulbs in the classrooms.
Exercise 9
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences, usi ng polite
intonation.
Answers
1 Wi ll you be going to the
post office?
2 I' ll be walking my dog.
3 Will you be driving to
town?
4 I'll be going shopping.
5 Wi ll you be using the
computer ?
6 I' ll be seeing the head
teacher this afternoon.
Extra
After checking answers, ask
pairs of student to read aloud
the offers and requests and to
respond to each one politely
e.g. Yes, of course. I I'm sorry,
but I can't because .... I Yes,
please. / Thank you for the
offer, but ... .
Your Turn
Exercise 10
• Students work individually,
writing t heir sentences.
Monitor and point out
any language errors for
students to correct.
• Tn pairs or small groups,
students read aloud their
sentences.
Exercise 11
• Ask twO students to
read aloud the example
dia logue. Elicit three or
four suggestions from the
class of other responses to
make in this situation.
• Student work in pairs,
making dialogues with the
prompts on page "105 for
Student A and page 107
for Student B. Monitor but
do not interrupt students'
fluency. Make a note
of any general language
problems to go over with
the class afterwards.
• Some of the pairs say their
dialogues for the cl ass to
hear.
.... TIME OUT! Page 114,
Exercise 16
Photocopiable Activity 11,
TTP, Page 58
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4, 7 and 9) .
Background
Ethical shopping is increasi ng
rapidly in Britail\. Now, over
5% of the total food bill in
the UK is made up of organic
products. Fair trade products
are also on the increase as
people rea li se that many major
brands arc manufactured in
third-world swear shops with
exploitati on and child labour
common.
See the foll owing wcbsites
about fair trade and organic
products:
w\Vw.fa irtrade.org.uk
www.chocaid.com
\Vww.theorganicpharmacy.com
www.thebodyshop
international. com
For information 011 triclosan,
visit t he Challenges Website.
c:6WWW.Chali enges.elt.com )
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Read aloud the statements
and check that students
understand any new
vocabulary, e.g. toxic,
chargers.
• Students work in small
groups, discussing the
statements and deciding
which is not true.
• The groups report back to
the class and see if they
all agree about the fal se
statements.
2 (CO2 Track 17)
58
• Play the recording for
students to read and li sten
and check their guesses
from Exercise 1.
Answers
3 and 4 are untrue
Extra activity on website
Fair Trade
Warm-up
1 look at the sentences (1--4). Which of them do you think is
not true?
1 Many shampoos, soaps and deodorants contain potentially
toxic chemicals.
2 When you buy a bar of chocolate, an African child probably
helped to make it .
3 People who make most of the world's footballs are well -paid.
4 Mobile chargers are energy·efficient.
Exercise 3 Exercise 4
Reading
2 Read the brochure and check
your guesses from Exercise 1.
• Read a loud the Reading Help.
• Point out the sentence ' The facts may
or may not be t rue.' Ask students
when ' facts ' may nOt be ' true', e.g.
when facts/stat istics are selected and
the complete facts are not given.
• Students work individually or in pairs,
reading t he text and maki ng a note of
four opi ni ons and four facts.
• Encourage students to say how 'fact'
and 'opinion' are expressed in their
OWI1 language. Is it always easy to
separate the two?
• In turn, individuals read aloud one fact
and one opinion to the class and see
how many different facts and opinions
they have found in the text.
look at the Readmg Help
• presented os foct: often has
19R5, doles or plaCeS, The 'focts' rroy or
..... not be trueI
• Opmns often hove 0Ili- od)edM!s (e,g,
blmgl. OIlinoon verbs (e.g. 1hInh, -l. Of
.-Imi!1lt. ""'II)'
t. • •
1 Which of the products in the brochure would
you like to get as a present?
2 Which of them would you buy with your own
money?
1 Would you pay a little bit extra for a green or
fair·trade product?
G look at the Word Builder. Complete the
examples from the text with get or take.
Wold Builder
1 -Jd.- a good deal
2 a look at something
3
4
S -Jd.- a decent wage
6
I !I---ract Dr
H,ol/'ywood celebrities Brad Pitt, Cameron
Dial and Leonardo di Caprio drive 'green'
hybrid cars like the Toyota Prius.
CMtt 'fOUl _, on jIoIge ID5.
Suggested answers
Facts: 1) 4 packs of 100g for £7 ,95
2) 70% of cacao, used [Q make
chocolate, is grown in West Africa
3) It takes an hour in the sun to get ten
minutes on your mobil e 4) £6.50
Opi nions: 1) producers get a ' good' deal
2) Farmers are paid ' well' 3) 'fantastic'
gadget 4) scienti sts ' beli eve' they might
cause cancer
Exercise 5
• Srudenrs work in pairs, di scussing rhe
questi ons. Encourage them [Q give
reasons for their answer [Q questi on L
Skills
7
It 1gets / takes me half an hour to 2m/take home
after school. I usuall y walk but if it's raining, I
1getl take the bus. First, I usually listen to some
music and charge my MP3 player. Then, I
4get l take a look at my e- mail and 5$lftote
ready to do my homework on my laptop .
Sometimes, I imItate headaches when I am
on the computer too long so I 7getl take a break
every hour. On Wednesday evenings, I work for
a couple of hours at my uncle's camera shop. I
don't 8gr1}tate much money but I 9mi toke good
discounts and I l0gQ1 /took a fantastic present from
my uncle last Christmas. It's a camera and video
recorder that l' getsi lotes great pictures!
,...------1
It 's the ideal present for young players
interested in becoming the stars of the future.
Are you worried about using chemical
products?
You can help the environment by buying
products with an eco·label.
All the honey, nuts and oi l are produced
without using pesticides.
Exercise 6
Answers --+ stlldent page
Exercise 7
• Give students time to look at the
Coll ocati on section in the Word Bank,
page "127,
• Students work indi viduall y, completing
the text and noting the sentence in
whi ch both get and take a re possibl e.
• Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud the sentences.
Answers --+ student page
Exercise 8
• Ask individual s to read
aloud the sentences .
• Students find and read
aloud more examples from
the text.
Answers
No pesticides or chemicals
are used in making products
with the organic logo.
... farmers ... are paid well
for producing cacao ...
You ca n forget about buying
.. . or using ...
you can waste electricity by
uSing ...
Are you worri ed about using
personal care products ...
Exercise 9
• Gi ve students time to read
through the cues. Elicit two
or three example sentences
from the class.
• Students work individually,
writing t heir sentences.
Speaking
Exercise 10
• Gi ve students time to read
through the information
about t heir product and
check the meaning of any
new vocabulary.
• Students work in pairs,
taking turns to ask and
answer questions about
their product. Monitor and
make a note of any general
language problems.
• As a class, students discuss
the two products, saying
which they think they
would like to have.
Fact or FictiOIl?
• After checking the answer,
encourage students to
say if they know of any
other celebriti es who
are concerned about the
environment and are
'green' .
'IM. OU'! Page 114,
Exercise 17
Photocopiable Activity 12,
TTP, Page 59
59
This Unit
Shoft of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercise 4 and 5).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
In this episode, further
evidence is found of pollution
in the local river.
See the Channel 4 website for
predictions about Britain's
weather in 2080. There are
also links to other sites.
http://www.channel4.
com/science/microsites/U/
ukweather2080/fom. html
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups or as
a class, looking at the phmo,
guessing what happened and
who the woman is.
Reading and
Listening
~ Exercise 2 (CO2 Track 18)
• Play the recording for
students to listen and check
their guesses from Exercise 1.
Extra
Play the recording for students
to listen and focus on the
speakers' stress and intonation
patterns.
Students work in pairs,
reading aloud the interview
and changing parts. Monitor
and correct any serious
pronunciation errors.
Exercise 3
Answer
was
Exercise 4
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the example
sentence. Elicit one or two
more sentences from the class.
• Students work individually,
writing sentences a bout the
story episode. They can
compare answers In palfs
before checking answers as
a class.
"" local !tero
3 look at the Sentence Builder. What word could
you use instead of got?
Warm-up
1 look at the photo. What do you think
happened?
Reading and Listening
~ 2 Read and listen to the dialogue. Check your
answer from Exercise 1.
Ellie and Steve do their first live interview.
Ellie: Right, can I ask you some questions,
please?
Boy: Sure, no problem.
Ellie: To start with, can you tell us
something about yourself?
Boy: Well , my name's Jeremy Mitchell
and I like fishing.
Ellie: A couple more questions. How old
are you and what school are you at?
Boy: I'm seventeen and I'm at St
Brendan's.
Ellie: Thanks. You were at the ri ver
yesterday, weren't you?
Boy: That 's right. I didn't catch anything
though. As usual!
Ellie: Why's that?
Boy: What do you mean exactly?
Ellie: I mean, why aren't there any fish
now?
Boy: Well, there's been a lot of dead
fish there recently.
Ellie: Interesting .. . Anyway, so what
happened yesterday?
Boy: Well , I was fishing when this lady
came past with her dog. It jumped
into the water and couldn't get out.
Ellie: So what did you do?
Boy: Well , t leant over and got hold of
him. He didn't li ke it but I got him
out. Then he started to look weird.
Ellie: Can you explain that?
Boy: I mean, he obviously wasn't
well. We took him to the vet.
He was so scared that he nearly
bit her. Anyway, he got checked
out and he's okay now. Apparently,
there was something in the water.
Ellie: Thanks, Jeremy. That's very
interesting.
Answers
The fish got poisoned. The vet nearly
got bitten by the dog. The dog got
rescued. The dog got taken to the vet.
The dog got treated by the vet. The
woman/dog got helped by the boy.
Speaking
Exercise 5
• Look at the first two or three
expressions with the class and check
that students can identify the function
of each expression.
Sentence Builder
4 Write sentences with get about the story
episode. Use the words below.
Example Jeremy got interviewed by Ellie.
interview, poison, bite, rescue, treat by vet,
take to the vet , help by the boy
• Students complete the exercise,
working individually or in pairs.
Answers
5c 7a 8a 9b 11a 12b
Exercise 6
• Read through the instructions with the
class.
• Students work in pairs, making
notes for their interview. Hel p with
vocabulary, if necessary. Encourage the
pairs to rehearse their interview quietly,
using the Key Expressions where
appropnate.
I,
Speaking
5 Which of the ynderlined Key Expressions are used to:
a) ask for clari fication? b) clarify something? c} check information?
Key Expressions: Interviews
Interviewer
1 can I ask you some questions, please?
3 To start with, can you tell us
something about yourself?
4 A couple more questions.
Interviewee
2 Sure, no problem.
5 You were at the river yesterday. 6 That 's right .
weren't you?
Skills
Everyday Listening
1 look at these predictions
for European weather in
2080. which do you think
are most likely to happen?
1 1llThere will be wet weather
in the winter in northern
Europe, especially Scotland.
2 0 There will be extremel y
heavy snowfalls in the Al ps.
l O The minimum temperature
in Moscow will be -30 degrees.
4 1llThere will be very little
Answers _ student page
Extra
Ask students to look at
predictions 2 and 3 in Exercise
1. Play the recording again for
students to correct these two
predictions according to the
information on the recording.
7 Why's that? 8 What do yOI! mean
91..ID.ein, why aren't there any fish now? m.ct.l..¥?
rain in the southern and
central Spanish desert.
3 (CO2 Track 20)
Slll in the spring, storms will
cause flooding in Holland, the
Czech Republic and Poland.
6 Work in pairs. Prepare an interview with an imaginary local
hero who rescued a person or an animal. Write notes about
these things:
6 0 There will be a heat wave
throughout Europe in August.
71llTemperatures in southern
Spain will reach 50 degrees.
Questions: personal information I what happened I
what the person did I what happened in the end
8 !2]Hurricanes will hit Western
Europe.
local hero: Personal information: na me I age I interests
What happened: where you were I what happened I what you did
listen to the European
weather forecast for 2080
and check your guesses
from Exercise 1.
7 Work in groups. Act out your interviews using the Key
Expressions when possible.
8 Tell the cl ass about the other pair's interview.
Moniko Interviewed Adorn. Adorn rescued 0 goldfish from his
/ritnd's toilet!
Exercise 7
The pairs for m groups of four and act
out their interviews. Monitor but do
not interrupt students' fl uency. Make a
note of any general language problems
to go over with the class afterwards.
Exercise 8
h tTa
The class can vote for the most unusual or
funniest story.
The pair of students who thought of rhe
story act out the interview for the class.
Cil3 Listen Closely listen to
the words and mark the
word stress.
1 t5cord (noun) I to record (verb)
1 i ord I to rt@-d
2 e ric I elec@);ity
3 e on I persorl@tv
4 Q 0 I pho@graphy
5 I poss i@iJt.
6 cument I
7 pular I
8 imiji ne I ima! ' r@on
9 I i nce I scie ti ic .
nomy I eeo mlCS
anise I
ogy I
Everyday Listening
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups or as a class,
reading the predictions and saying
which they rhink are most likely
to happen. Encourage them to give
reasons for their choice.
2 (CO2 Track 19)
• Play the recording, twice if necessary,
for student to listen and check their
guesses from Exercise 1.
• Ask students to repeat the
example pair of words
after you.
• Give students time to rea d
through the words and say
them quietly to themselves.
Encourage them to try and
identify where the main
stress comes in the words.
• Play the recording for
students to li sten and mark
the word stress.
• Check answers by asking
students to say the words
with correct word stress.
• Then play the recording for
them to li sten and repeat
the words, chorall y and
indi viduall y.
Answers _ student page
Extra
Write on the board:
Was it a scientific
docwnentary abour
electricity?
No, it was about ecology and
economiCS.
Students repeat the question
and answer after you.
Then pairs of students ask and
answer the question .
...... TIMECUT! Page 115,
Exercise 18
61
or
62
Your Challenge
Background
See information on
Buy Nothing Da y - an
international da y when people
don't go shopping
hrrp:l/www.adbusrers,org!
metas/eco/bndl .
Writing: A 'For /
Against' Essay
Exercise 1
• In groups or as a class,
students di scuss the
answers to the first two
questions.
• Students then work
indi viduall y, readi ng the
article and answer ing the
third question.
• Each student then tell s the
class whether they agree
with the article, giving their
reasons.
Text Builder
Exercise 2
• Students work indi vidually,
marching the pa ragraphs
with the copi es. They can
compare answers in pa irs
before checking answers as
a class.
Answers
1d 2b 3a 4c
Extra activity on website
Exercise 3
• After checking answers, ask
individuals to read aloud
the sentences containing
the linking words.
Answers
b) so that, in order to, to
c) To sum up
d) For exa mple
e) However
Exercise 4
Answers
1 in case 2 in order to I to
3 so that
Exercise 5
• Read through Steps 1-4 so
students understand what
to do.



Your Challenge
Writing: A ' For/Against' Essay
1 Read the essay. Answer these questions.
What days and times can you go shopping in
your count ry?
2 Is shopping one of your hobbies? Why or why not?
3 Do you agree with the article? Why or why not?
Text Builder
2 Match the paragraphs (1-4) with the topics (a-d).
FOR YOUR
a) reasons agai nst shoppi ng for fun
b) reasons for shoppi ng
c) personal opi nion
d) shopping in Bri tai n
3 look at the Jinking words in red in the text.
Match them with the uses below (a--e).
Example
aJ in case
a) show something might happen in the future
b) show t he purpose for doing something (x3)
c) make a conclusion
d) give an exa mpl e
e) contrast two ideas
4 Complete t he sentences with the words in red
from the text.
Take your umbrella ___ it rains.
2 Take your umbrella ___ keep dry.
3 Take your umbrella ___ you don't get wet.
Gi ve students a few minutes to work
in small groups, thinking of advantages
and disadvantages for one of the
topics. The groups then tell t he class
their ideas. This should ensure that
every student has some ideas for the
ropi c they choose. Remind students
of the advice in Study Help Module
5 page 54 about shari ng ideas and
consulting other students.
Students work indi viduall y, writi ng a
list of advantages and di sadvantages
for their topic.
Students write paragraph notes for
their four paragraphs.
5 Write an essay about the advantages and
disadvantages of one of these things.
• cars • living in a big ci ty • nuclear power
:01 Choose a topic. Write a li st of
t;:; advantages and di sadvantages.
:02 Write notes for four paragraphs:
t;:; introduction I for I against I concl usion.
0. 3 Use your notes to writ e the essay. Check
t;; it for mi stakes.
0... Work in groups. Read each other's
~ 4 essays. Tell the class what you think
...... about t hem.
Example
Magda's essay was about cars. It was a good
essay but I didn't agree with her. I think (Ors
are great!
• Students write a draft of their essay.
Encourage them to work with a
partner, checking their essays for
mi stakes and helping each other
correct any mistakes. St udents ca n
refer to you if they are not sure about
an y of the corrections.
• Students then wri te a fa ir copy of their
essay.
• In groups of 4-6, students read
each ot her's essays and discuss thei r
opinions of the content.
• Students tell the class what they think
about t heir group's essays.
r
" Understanding Grammar: Modals referring to the past
Read the t ext. What were Dian Fossey's most
important achievements?
for almost

Dian Fossey
"led among
ITlOOntain
,,"lias in
Mrica. For
li\efirst few
had
to live alone
J\ a tent at
high altitude.
M.hough she had no previous experience, s.he had to set up a
camp and learn to live in an unfnendly enVIronment.
She need not have stayed in Africa, she could have
gone back home. But thanks to her perseverance we
know much more about gorillas' behaviour and hfe.
LDlitating their behaviour Dian was able to get fne.ndly WIth
them. She was abl e to sit among them play WIth them.
She described her observations in many artIcles and her only
book 'Gorillas in the Mist'.
After one of her favourite gorillas was brutally Dian
declared war on the poachers, who were gradually kllhng the
orilla population. Her campaign to stop them became .world-
famous after The National Geographic publi.shed an artIcle about
her life among the gorillas. Many people thmk she should have
been more careful.
3 Choose the correct comment (a or b)
for each sit uat ion.
1 You touched a snake and got bitten.
a) I shouldn't have t ouched it.
b) I could've touched it.
2 You queued all ni ght and bought a t icket
for t he concert of your favourite band.
a) I was abl e to buy a t icket.
b) I needn't have bought the t icket.
3 You had a test so you studied all night.
a) I had to study.
b) I should've studied.
4 Compl ete the sentences with the correct
verbs.
The tree was very old so we had to I
needn't have cut it down.
2 We shouldn't have I could have gone
camping, it rained all weekend.
3 The dog was oul al l day, you should have
I needn't have walked him.
4 I' m so happy, I had to I was able to see
whales when I was on hol iday.
S Why did you buy thi s dress? You could
have I needn't have saved thi s money for
rol ler skates.
5 Rewrite the sentences. Use the verbs
f rom Exercise 2.
In 1980 after writing her book. she returned to Africa to
continue with the gorillas. On December 26, 1985, she
WitS murdered. After her death. a new.census sh?wed that, at .
last, the gorilla population started to nSf'. The DIan .Fossey Gonlla Did you manage t o go skiing in winter?
Fund International has continued her work and are now
d
. I ' I 19 nlsallons ... to go skiing i n winter?
protected by governments an mterna lona 0 a .
The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund International 2 It was a mistake to go to t hat party.
I ... to that party.
Complet e the sentences f rom the t ext with the
correct forms of verbs. Match them with their
meanings (a-e).
She had to _ __ alone in a tent.
She need not have/ needn' t have ___ in Af rica.
She could have/could' ve ___ back home.
Dian was able to ___ fr iendly wit h them.
S She should have/should' ve ___ more careful.
a) She did it although il wasn't necessary.
b) She didn't do it al though it was possible.
c) She managed to do it although it wasn't easy.
d) She had no choice, she was forced to do it.
e) She didn't do it and it was a mi stake.
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1
• Students work individually, reading t he
(ext and answering the question.
, Students tell the class what they
thi nk Dian Fossey's most important
achievements were.
Suggested answers
I Because of her work, we now know
much more about gorill as' behaviour and
social life. 2 She starred a campaign to
stop poachers kill ing gor illas a nd now
gori llas are protected by governments
and international organisations.
3 Was it necessary for you to leave so early?
... leave so ear ly?
4 We took the taxi completely unnecessarily
- the plane was delayed.
We ... the taxi - t he plane was delayed.
5 I hod an opportunity to buy an FC
Barcelona T-shirt but I didn't.
... an Fe Barcelona T-shirt.
G Finish the sentences t o write about
things that happened t o you in the last
f ew days.
I had to .
2 I shouldn't have .
3 I shoul d have .
Exercise 2
4 I was able to .
5 I needn't have.
6 I coul d have.
• Students work individuall y, complet ing
the sentences and matching them with
their meanings .
• Students can compate answers in pairs
before checking answers as a class.
• When checki ng answers, draw
students' attention to the position of
' not' in negative sentences (e.g. need
110t have stayed).
• Point out the sentence
pattern in sentences with
had to/was able to (had to
live t was able to get ) and
the sentence pattern with
the other modals in this
lesson (need to have gone
/ could have galle / should
have gone ).
Answers
1 live d) 2 stayed a)
3 gone b) 4 get c)
5 been e)
Exercise 3
Answers
1 a ) 2 a ) 3 a )
Exercise 4
• Check answers by asking
individuals ro read aloud
t he sentences.
Answers --+ student page
Exercise 5
• Elicit the answer to item
1 from t he class. Check
that students can form the
question correctly.
• Students work individua ll y
or in pai rs, rewrit ing the
sentences by using verbs
from Exercise 2.
Answers
1 Were you able
2 shouldn't ha ve gone
3 Did you have to
4 needn't have taken
5 could have bought
Exercise 6
• El icit one or two exampl es
for the first two sentences
from the class.
• Students then work
individual ly, writing
sentences about things that
happened ro them in the
last few days. Tel l them
they ca n write about true
things or t hey ca n invent
t hi ngs. Monitor and check
students' sentences.
• In pairs Or smail groups,
students read aloud their
sentences.
6
'
,
Language Check
Exercises 1-5
Answers -+ student page
Feedback (CO2 Track 21)
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spelling
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 62 of the
Workbook.
Study Help: Noticing
Language
• Read aloud the advice
and questions about the
dialogue in Unit 18. Give
students time to work in
pairs, reading the dialogue
in Unit 18 and completing
the answers.
Answers
Unit 18 Dialogue
words for gaining time:
right, well, so
words for reacting to people:
sure, thanks, that's right
useful expressions:
No problem. (that's okay)
As usual! (it always
happens)
words that go together
ask questions
dead fi sh
look strange
take a dog to the vet
structures:
question tag - weren't you
there's been - present perfect
I was fishing when ... - past
continuous
look strange - look +
adjective
got checked out - passive
form with 'get'
• Students then work
individually, looking at
the reading text in Unit
17. Monitor and hel p as
necessary.
Module 6 Test,
TIP Page 74
Study Corner 6
t (omplete the text wi th environmental words.
1C 12. £..!::! d i.. £. a. i..!I.!.. is a gas produced by
traffic, industry and domestic heating and is one
of the 2g r.!..!..!::! h. f!. !i.i!. g !! that are
heating up the planet. We don't know how much
3g L f!.. i2.!! 1. w !! LJP!..!::!# there will be this
century but some scientists think the temperature
will rise by five degrees. The main solution to this
problem will be the use of 4r !..!:! !. P!! IzL!.
e .!::!!. L§.f like wind and solar energy instead of
Sf f!.. J. J.!. L f fJ.1. L.i like oil, gas and coal.
2 (omplete the sentences with the correct form
of get or take.
Wi ll you a look at my essay while I
7----#fl-- ready? It wi ll only you a few
minutes.
1 9----4J!i-. a new camera for my birthday and 1
loads of photos on holiday.
Vocabul ary 0 / 10
3 (omplete the gaps with will ('/I) or will ('/I) be
and the correct form of the verb in brackets.
A: What 11 wi/l,you be tIolj.W (you do) at ten o'clock?
B: 1 12 11 Ize w()ykiJ1J (work).
A: Okay, (phone) you later.
c: 1 don't think (go) to university.
0: So what 15 wIt/loU (you do)?
c: I think I 16 wi/I Jet (get) a job in my dad's
company.
A: 17 wJl,vou ge (you see) Kathy tomorrow?
B: Yes, I think so.
A: 18 wil(you J ive (you give) her this letter, please?
E: Do you think you 19 wil//ike (like) the same
music when you're older?
F: Yes, I don't think my tastes 2owJ/ chaJ1§-e (change).
Feedback
listen and check your answers to the
language Check. Write down your scores.
• look at the table below. Then do the
exercises on page 62 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers:
Numbers 1- 5
Numbers 6-10
Numbers 11-20
Numbers 21-25
look again ___ _
Get Ready - Key Words
Unit 17 - Word Builder
Unit 16 - Grammar
Understanding Grammar
Numbers 26-30 Unit 18 - Key Expressions
Answers
Unit 17 - text
useful expressions:
get ready for ...
it only costs
excellent value
a real bargain
words that go together:
get + a good deal etc. (i n Word Builder)
decentlliving wage
to charge a mobile/MP3 etc.
waste electricity
natural ingredients
personal care products
4 Choose the correct verb in each sentence.
21 When we went camping, we .h.tzd...lD. 1 were able
to have (old showers.
22 I could 1 should have taken a street map with
me because I got lost.
23 I shouldn't I needn't have taken a street map
with me because it was easy to find.
24 I forgot my keys but 1 hod to 1 was able to get
in through a window.
25 We could J shouldn't have won the game but
we didn' t play very well.
Grammar 0 / 15
5 Complete the dialogue.
A: To 26s t f! r. t with, can you tell us something

B: What do you mean 28e l!!! f t. L)!. ?
A: Well, 129 m f.!!.!::! , how old are you? What
hobbies have you got?
B: Sure, no 30p r. £. i2. 1.!..JP . I'm sixteen and I'm
from Bristol. My hobby is fishing.
Communication 0 I 5
After reading a text and answering questions on
it. go through it again and look for examples of
useful language.
In dialogues, find words and expressions for:
- gaining time (e.g. RiRht ... )
- reacting to other people (e.g. Sure ... )
In dialogues and reading texts, find more
useful expressions {e.g. How cool is thotm
Find words that go together:
- verb and noun (e.g. ask + questions)
- adjective and noun (e.g. natural ingredients)
- multi· part verbs (e. g. come past)
Find examples of structures you have studied
(e.g .... , ...... 't yo"n.
Now look at the reading text in Unit 17. Find
useful expressions, words that go together and
structures you have studied.
allergic reactions
ideal present
multi-part verbs - put electricity bills
up I put something on your skin I make
sure that
structures
' that' structures - after verb (guarantees
that ... ) after verb (s ure that ... )
participles - cacao used to make
chocolate
passives - when it is disconnected
give + compl ement - gives you beautiful,
fresh smooth skin
600/0 of what you put on your skin
Get Ready
1 Look at the Key Words. What kinds of
clothes do you like?
Kev Words: Clothes
Style: (asual, (001 , designer, formal , trendy,
old·fashioned, scruffy, smart, styl ish, tasteless
Type: baggy, flared, narrow, tight, torn trousers /
jeans; long-sleeved, short-sleeved, sleeveless
5hirt / blouse! T-shirt! top; polo-neck, V-neck,
round neck jumper; flat , high-heeled, pointed
shoes ! boots; ankle-length, knee-length,
mini skirt! dress
Materials: corduroy trousers / jacket;
rotton T-shirt / trousers; denim jeans / jacket;
leather jacket / shoes; linen trousers / jacket;
silk tit / shirt ! blouse; woolly hat / jumper
Patterns: checked, plain, polka-dot ,
wiped shirt! blouse
2 Use the Key Words to describe the clothes in
pholos (a--e). Give your opinions.
Get Ready
Background
~ 3 listen to the street survey and complete the
questionnaire for the boy.
W Who
(1) How
{Il WhClt
or whot
would you
Ityte of
influence'
delCribe
jeonl do
the woy
your Ifyle?
you like?
you dr..,?
0
0
boggy
El
rop
0
""""'.
tight
0
0
!amoo.
flo,",
-"
0
0
...., k)rn denim
1V
4 Work in pairs. Ask each other the questions
from Exercise 3. 00 you have anything in
common with your partner?
5 , \ Speak Out Discuss these statements.
There is a lot of pressure on young people to
buy designer clothes.
2 People worry too much about their appearance.
Teen fas hions change quickly and this
might be an opportunity to ask the class
what's 'in' and what's 'Out '. Teachers may
wish ro extend the Key Words box, e.g.
different materials (corron, denim, nylon,
silk), different patterns (plain, spotted) or
different top styles (v- neck, round-neck,
low-neck, off-the-shoulder).
• Check that students understand any
new vocabulary_ Encourage them to
use their knowledge of word-building
to guess the mea ning of words like
sleeveless, ankle-length.
• Students tell the class what sort of
clothes they like. Ensure that each
student says at least one sentence.
Exercise 2
• Students work in small groups, describing
the clothes and giving their opinions.
Exerci se 1 (C02 Track 22)
• Play the recording for students to
listen and repeat the Key Words. Pay
particular attention to word stress in
compound words.
• Each student tell s the class a bout the
cl othes in one of the photos and gives
their opi nion.
(iil Exercise 3 (C02 Track 23)
• Give students time to read
th rough the questionnaire
before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording, twice
if necessa ry, for students
to li sten and complete the
questionnaire.
Answers
I b 2b 3a 4c Sb
Extra
Write on the board:
1 alternative clothes?
2 formal clothes?
3 slogans on his T-shirts?
Play the recording for students
to listen for information about
the three things.
Answers
1 alternative clothes are
hi ppi e, heavy metal or
goth(ic)
2 He doesn't li ke formal
clot hes, e.g_ ties and
jackets. He has to wear
t hem every day at school.
3 His pa rents somet imes
don' t like the slogans on
his T-shirts.
Exercise 4
• Students work in paiTs,
taking turns to ask and
answer the questions.
• Each pa i r tell s the class
if they have anythi ng in
common in the clothes they
like or don't li ke.
Exercise 5
• Encourage students to
think of specific examples
to suppOrt their opinions
about the statements, e.g.
where does the pressure
come from to buy designer
clothes'
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 7, 8 and 9).
More time: do the Extra
activity.
Background
The fashion of the 1920s
differed dramatically from
previous years. The change
in fashion accompanied other
social changes resulting from
t he traumatic experience
of WWI, where almost a
generati on of young men
perished. Young people felt
they needed to break away
from conservative social norms
and enj oy life. This att itude
was visible in much freer,
often wild, lifestyle.
The word 'flapper' originally
refers to a very young bird,
unable to fly yet and not ready
to leave the nest.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in pairs or
small groups, looking at
the photos and discussing
which fashion they prefer.
• Open up the discussion
to the class. Encourage
students to give reasons for
their opinions.
Exercise 2 (CO2 Track 24)
• Students work indi vidually,
reading the text and
making notes of the main
changes in women '5 fashion
between 1900 and the
1920s.
• When checking answers,
encourage students to guess
the meaning of corsets.
Answers
In 1900, women wore tight
corsets (to have small er
waists) and huge, decorated
hats.
By the 1920s, women
wore simple, loose dresses,
trousers and shorts.
Rooring Twenties
Warm- up
1 look at the photos (a-b).
Which fashion do you prefer?
Why?
2 Read the text. What were the
main changes in women's
fashion between 1900 and
the 1920s?
Exercise 3
World War I, women u50d 10 wear dresses like the
piclure above. Then, in Ih. 1920s, cam. Ihe 'flapper' look, which
was similar 10 many modem fashion designs. We a,ked SIep/JanJe Reno
and Barbaro Heller 10 lel/ us about tha,e days.
Stephanie Reno (96): 'When I was a child, women used to wear those
tight corsets to give themselves a smaller waist. And then, one day,
my older sister just threw away all her corSets. She was fallowing the
fashion of the day and she started wearing simple. loose dresses. She
would even wear shorts! She would put on make-up, go co parries,
smoke and drink. My mother thought she had gone completely wild!'
Barbara Heller (95): 'Clothes used to be terrible in the old days - thai
is. before the (weories. My mother didn't use to wear trousers at all.
My granny would always put on this horrible huge hat, decorated
flowers and feathers. She never went out without it. And then, all of
sudden, everything changed. I remember my sisters were very sporty
girls - they went swimming and cycling and they would wear trousen
all the rime. They needed comfortable clothes.'
The person who had the greatest influence on the style of the t920s
was Coco Chane!. the most famous fashion designer of the 20th
century. She cut her hair short and wore trousers, so they became
trendy in women's fashion. Dack in the 1920s, she introduced the
cardigan, the little black dress, Chane! No.5 perfume and many
items that are still popular today.
3 Why do you think women's fashion changed so
Grammar: used to and would
• Students work in groups or as a cl ass,
di scussing the question. Encourage
them to think of the effects of world
events such as World War 1 (see
Background notes) .
We use would and used to to ta lk about
past habits. Used to can be used to talk
about both states and habits, whereas
would can only be used to ta lk about past
actions. However, some verbs, although
techni cally classified as activilY verbs, e.g.
live are not used with would,
Ex tra
Remind st udents of Study Help Module 6
page 64 'Noticing Language' . Ask them to
read through the text and make a note of
words that go with ' fashion', e.g. female
fas hion, modern fashion designs, following
the fashion .
The negative form wouldn't often has
a slightl y different meani ng, expressing
refusa l (She wouldn't wear a skirt. She
wouldn't lend anybody her bike.)
;t
Grammar: used to and would
Complete the sentences with used to, didn't to,
would and wouldn't.
would

trousers alilhe time.
2
without it.
Would they put on
make-up?
used to
4 Clothes be
terrible in the old days.
5 My mum didn' t
wear trousers.
6 Did women use to have
long hair?
5 Find more examples of used to and would in
the lext. Did the people do these things only once
or regularly?
6 look althese sentences and complete the rule.
My sisler used to I would pul on make-up in public.
She used to I wtmItl have short hair.
We use used to / would only for actions. We use
used to / would for both states and actions.
Complete the sentences with used to, didn't use to
or would. In which sentences is uw to the only
correct option?
Women's clothes in the past ___ be
uncomfortable.
2 My mum ___ put on high heels whenever she
went oul.
1 My granny ___ wear glasses, but now she wears
them all the time.
4 When I was at the seaside, I ___ go swimming
every morning.
S My family was poor and we ___ have expensive
clothes when I was young.
, 1 ___ be slimmer when I was a kid .
8 Use lhe cues and used to or didn't use to to make
sentences about the lifestyle of these people.
Example
Footbollers in the 19505 didn't use to eorn much money.
footballers in the 19505 - earn much money, run more
sIowty, score a lot of goals, fou l other players alai,
wtar long, wide shorts, be world-famous stars, train less
factory workers in the 19th century - get up early,
earn very much, work 14 hours a day, live long, be
poor, live in very poor conditions
Exercise 4
, Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud the sentences in t he table.
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 5
, Studenrs read the text again to find
and read aloud more examples of used
to and would.
• Check that students understand that
the people did these things regularly.
9 look at the photos. Describe the clothes
people used to wear in the 1960s. Use
the cues and used 10 or would.
Example
They used to wear /larnJ jeans. They
would put on ....
lIared trousers, long hai r, beard,
flowery shirt, short dress, big collar,
large hat, ethnic jewellery, long skirt,
platform shoes, big glasses
Your Turn
10 Make sentences about the time when
you were seven years old. Use the
cues and used to and would. Add your
own ideas.
Example
I usN to ploy with my friends every day.
We would meet up at the school sports
ground. Kids didn't use to have 0 lot of
homework in those days.
have a lot of homework,
play computer games,
wear fashionable clothes,
have long hair, go to bed early,
read comics, watch kids programmes,
like school, read a lot of books,
be tall , have a lot of toys,
play with friends
Exercise 6
• Students work in pairs, readi ng the
sentences and worki ng out t he rule.
• After checking the answer, ask students
to look at the beginning of paragraph
3 of the text . Read aloud the sentence
'Clothes used to be terrible in the old
days.' Check that students understand
that t his describes a state and so only
' used to' is correct here.
Answers
We use would onl y for actions. We use
used to for states and actions.
Practice
Exercise 7
• Students do the exercise
working individually. They
can compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences.
Answers
1 used to 2 used to/would
3 didn't use to/woul dn't
4 used to/woul d
5 didn't use to
6 used to ('used to' is the
only correct option in
sentences 1, 5 and 6)
Exercise 8
• Read through the cues with
the class. Give students
t ime to t hink of sentences.
• As a class or in groups,
students take turns to make
sentences about the lifestyle
of footballers in the 1950s
and of 19th-century factory
workers. If students disagree
about any of the facts, ask
them to give reasons for
their answer, e.g. whether
footballers in the 19505
scored a lot of goal£.
Exercise 9
• Monitor and check
students' sentences.
• In pairs or small groups,
students read aloud their
sentences to each other.
Your Turn
Exercise 10
• Give students time to
read through the example
sentences and the cues
and to think of their own
sentences. Encourage them
to add their own ideas.
• In small groups, students
tell each other a bout the
time when they were seven.
Encourage students to help
each other correct any
language errors.
.... TIMEOUT! Page 11 6,
Exercise 19
Photocopiable Activity 13,
TTP, Page 60
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4, 5 and 8).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
The text tells the true story
of Waris Dicie. She was born
into a traditional desert
nomad family in East Africa
and suffered a painful fema le
ci rcumcision when she was
only fi ve. Thi s sensitive area
has been left out of the text
and it is up to teachers to
discuss the issue or not. After
over ten years as a supermodel
marketing products for
Revlon, Waris became a
United Nations Ambassador
and devotes her time to
women's rights, particularl y
campaigning for the abolition
of female genital mutilation.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Ask students to look at rhe
photos and describe the
appearance of the person
and her facial expression
in each photo. Encourage
them to speculate about
what sort of person she is.
• Students work individually
or in pairs, guessi ng the
answers to the questions.
Reading
2 (CO2 Track 25)
• Students read the text and
check their guesses from
Exercise 1.
Answers _ student page
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the sentences
in the Reading Help. Point
out that it is important
to check that the missing
sentence goes with the
sentence before and the
sentence following it.
Exercise 4
• Read through the sentences
(a-f) with the class. Check
that students understand
any new words, e.g. illegal
immigrant.
. .
'Waris's story is one of remarkable cOHrage:
Elron John
Waris Dirie was born in Somalia. Her name means 'desert
flower'. Her mother was quite well-off but her father was
from a poor family. After they married, her parents were on
the move aU the time with their goats and camels. life was
hard but Wads had a happy childhood. 1----4........
When she was twelve, her father arranged for her to marry
an old man in exchange for five camels. It was
such a horrible idea that she decided to run away to the
capital. Mogadishu. There, she moved from one relative to
another. Finally, a kind aunt got her a job as a maid in the
Somalian Embassy in london. When the ambassador returned
to Somalia, she lost her job. Suddenly, she was in real trouble.
Waris was on her own and out of work in a foreign country.
She lived by herself, had no money and her English was so
bad that it was difficult for her to find work. Eventually, she
got a job as a cleaner in McDonalds.
One day, everything changed. By chance, a fashion
photographer came in for a burger and saw Waris cleaning
the floor. She looked like a perfect model so he immediately
offered her work. 3---.i:/L She became a top fashion model,
advertising Revlon beauty products, and her face was on the
covers of hundreds of magazines around the world. She was
even in a James Bond film, The Uving Daylights, in 1987.
Waris had such a warm and attractive face that her
modelling career was a huge success. 4--/L- She wrote
her autobiography, Desert Flower, about her exciting and
exceptional life. 'It's very sad: she says. 'I had to make the
choice to leave my country: What was it like in Africa? 'Afrita
was different: she says. 'I was young. I had nothing to worry
about. I had my family, I had my animals, I had my simple
life:
s---.itL. She works for the United Nations and campaigns
for women's rights all over the world. There is never a dull
moment. 'I'm trying to sit down for a moment and there's
no time for that: she laughs. 'In Somalia, we don't care what
time it is!'
"
.
"
• Students work indi viduall y, reading the
text and deciding where the sentences
fit in.
Suggested answers
1 Because her father had arranged for
her to marry an old man of 60.
• Check answers by asking individual s
to read aloud the section of text
containing the missi ng sentence and the
sentences before and after it.
Answers _ student page
Exercise 5
• Students work indi vi duall y, reading the
text and answering the questi ons.
• In small groups, students di scuss their
answers before checking the answers as
a class.
2 When she ran away from home and
when she lost her job at the Somalian
Embassy in London.
3 She had to choose to leave her
country.
4 In her childhood in Somalia, she had
nothing to worry about and her life
was simple. Now she has a very busy
life working for the United Nations.
3 look at the Reading Help.
ReDding Help: _ liaps
. _1I1e port oIl11e Iatt wIIh II1e gop and
t:" II1e IIIpIc ag. AlmII£ rrJIlI'IIogo. IlDI/}.
II1e ___ and alll!r1l1e gap.
._ a ......... \II1II_ goes In II1e gop.
Look lor ,"""a as III piopIe ag. 5iJe, /hem,
the IIDI), things ag./t, IhI5) ... _ ag. _
IJ!!OIS /o/er, _ f1JOI).
, When you finish, check the eHtm sentence
doesn·t fit in any of the gapsl
4 Use the Reading Help to complete the gaps
(1-5) in the text wi th the sentences (a-f).
There is one extra sentence you don't need.
a) The man was sixty.
b) Warts now li ves in New York.
c) She used to race camels with her brothers
and sisters.
d) Within months, she had started a new career.
e) She was an illegal immigrant at first.
I) However, in 1997 she decided to give up her
life as a model.
5 Read the text again and answer these
questions.
1 Why did Waris run away?
1 What were the most difficult times of her life?
1 What is she still sad about?
4 How was her childhood in Somali a different
from her life now?
S look at the Word Builder. Complete the
phrases from the text with preposi tions.
Word Builder
1 _ , _" _ the move
2 __ '"_ exchange ---for.--
_ ,_,,_ trouble
4
5 ---4-- work
6 --'l--- herself
7 --'l--- chance
8 wdhin months
9
10 ---foL- a moment
Extra
Ask students what they know about two
of rhe topics in the text - Somalia and the
United Nations. Encourage students to use
English as much as possible.
Exercise 6
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 7
• Elicit two or th ree suggest ions for
completing the first sentence.
Skills
7 Complete the sentences about your life.
, I like being on my own when I am ...
2 Once, I was in trouble at school because I ...
3 Once, by chance I found a .
4 I first went to school by myself when I was.
8 Preposition Quiz Complete the sentences
with these prepositions.
I above, for, on, in, at, over I
the holidays, I spend a lot of time
the Internet because I'm too busy when I'm
.......i1I....- school.
2 I was my way to a football game. I was
--..in..-. a hurry but there was a traffic jam and
we had to wai t --foL- ages.
3 The town of Puna is ....m:::a::... 3,800 metres ..aa.zu:
sea level the border of Peru and Bolivia.
4 the past, there were a lot of wolves
living the wild.
........ Word Bank, page 123
9 look at the Sentence Builder. Match the
questions and answers about Waris Oirie.
Sentence Builder
What is she like? (;)
2 What does she look like? a)
3 What does she like? b)
a) She has a wa rm and att ractive face.
b) Working for women's ri ghts.
c) She is a courageous woman.
Speaking
to Work in pairs. Choose a famous celebrity. Ask
and answer questions about him I her using
the Sentence Builder. Guess the celebrity.
Example
A: What's he or she like?
B: She's intelligent and hard-working. She's
---Fact Dr Fiction? ---
Top models have to be at least 1.8 metres tall .
C/I""k you, 8n:;wl!' lin pJg& 106
........ TIMI. OUT! Page 116, Exercise 20
• Students work individually, writi ng
their sentences. Check the sentences
and help with vocabul ary, if necessa ry.
• In pairs or sma ll groups, students read
aloud thei r sentences to each other.
Extra
Ask students to look at the Word Builder in
Exercise 6 and find the six expressions that
are not used in Exercise 7.
Students work in pairs, writing six
sentences containing these expressions.
Each student reads aloud two of their
sentences to the class.
Exercise 8
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 9
Answers ..... student page
Speaking
Exercise 10
• It may be hel pful to
demonstrate the act ivity
by thinking of a celebrity
yourself and answer ing the
class's questions so they
can guess the person.
• Give students t ime to plan
what to say about their
chosen person before they
work in pairs.
Fact or Fiction?
• After checki ng the answer,
ask students if they think
there is a minimum height
for other professions, e.g.
police officers, fire fighters,
ballet dancers? (In the UK,
there are no height li mits
for police officers and fire
fighters, For ballet dancers
in Europe, t he minimum
height is 1. 78m for male
dancers and 1.63m for
fema le dancers.)
-+- TIM. OUT! Page 116,
Exercise 20
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4 and 6).
More time: do the Extra
acti viti es.
Background
The characters attend a
fashion show. It is common
for students of fa shion to
display t heif designs at the end
of the course.
Warm-up
Exercise 1 (CD2 Track 26)
• Pl ay the recording for
students to listen and
repeat the Key Words.
• Students work in pairs or
small groups, giving theif
opinions about the people
in the photo.
• Ask the class to suggest the
names of fa mous people
they think arc ' glamorous',
' handsome' , ' elegant' or
' unattractive' .
Extra
Find out if any of the students
have attended or taken part
in a fashion show. Encourage
them to tell t he class about
t heif experiences.
Reading and
Listening
2 (CO2 Track 27)
70
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and answer the questions.
• Ask students what they
think Ellie's ' type' is.
Answers
Tanya thi nks he is cute. Ellie
says he isn't her type. Abi
likes the clothes of the first
model, especiall y the long
jacket .
Extra
Ask students what has
happened about tests on the
sample of ri ver water and
what they think the group
should do now.
People: attractive, beautiful,
cute, elegant, good-looking,
gorgeous, not very good-looki ng,
stylish, unattractive
Women: glamorous, pretty
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the three sentences .
• Draw students' attention to t he
sentence structure used with each
expressIOn.
Exercise 4
Answers
He looks like a model. It looks like an
old one. Hi s T-shirt looks like an organic
cotton one. The strap looks like leather.
Exercise 5
• Do the items in the fi rst two sentences
with the cl ass.
• Students work individuall y Ot in pairs,
completi ng the exercise.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 6
• Tell students they can write about the
clothes of the model and of t he peoplr
in the audience.
• Students work indi vi dually, writing six
sentences usi ng the cues in the exercise.
Monitor and point out any language
errors for students to correct.
Dlue hair - he lool..:s a model His leather Jacket
look, (001 It looks an old one from the 30<;
HI\ tight jeam look fantastic His T-shirt looks
an organic cotton one. Paui"s watch looks Swiss
the strap 100"5 I(',.{her
5 look at the Kev Which of
them are posit i\e ,. ..... ', neut ral ;'- and
negative .'x?
Expressions: Describing people
He's a slim guy with short. brown hai r. ( - )
His trousers go with the jacket . (+)
... but they' re a different shade of grey and
they look a bit short. (x)
Underneath the jacket, he's wea ring a black
T-shi rt with white designs on it. (-)
She's wea ring an orange jacket and a
matching top. (+)
Round her neck she's got a white scarf. (- )
II doesn't rea lly suit her because she's
very pale. (x)
In {Urn, s[Udenrs read aloud t wo of
their sentences to the class.
Exerci se 7
• Students look at the ph oro of the
boy on page 65. Ask twO students to
read aloud the example dia logue from
Exercise 7.
Listen .. four dialogues. For each question,
choose tile coned answer (a, b or c).
1 What is the boy's new hairstyle like?
.!l spiky, blue hair It) long, straight black hair
spiky, __ hair
2 What birthday pment does the girl buy for
her_
a) a rirIB (8)a pair of earrings q a shoulder bag
3 Whot type aI jeans did the boy buy?
short, cut..., _
baggy jeanswilh pockm q tom, denim jeans
• What wilt lllept ..... bad< to the shop?
@ a minHldrt ".!uP <I a short dress
Listen ..... answer these questions.
Diat_ 1: Why did the boy chonge his hoir?
Diologue 2: What do,... koow about the
lirl's friend?
Diotogue 3: Why doe the boy like t he jeans?
Diotogue 4: Why is'She .. iog to take it back
to the '!!JoII1
List en Closely"" III six polite
questions '""" .... 2. _ Id the
intonation be ....... your IiInguage?
Listen again and the
Everyday Listening
Exercise 1 (C02 Track 28)
• Give st udents time to read through the
quest ions and answers before you play
the recording.
Answers - student page
• Elicit expressions for gi ving opinions,
agreeing and di sagreeing. 2
• Students work in pairs, looking at and
talking aboll t other photos of people in
the book.
In rum, each pair tell s t he class which
phoro to look at as they say one of
their dialogues,
• Pl ay t he recording, pausing it after
each di alogue for students to answer
the question.
Answers
1 All his friends have got
hair li ke that.
2 She doesn' t wear make-
up. I She doesn't li ke
shoulder bags. She loves
long ea rri ngs.
3 because they aren't roo
tight I they have a lot of
pockets
4 Beca use there is a mark
on t he skirt .
Exercise 3 (CO2 Track 29)
• Check that students can
recognise when a speaker's
intonat ion is going up or
down. The shop assistant's
poli te quest ions have a
rising intonat ion.
• Students di scuss whether
the intonation woul d be
similar in their language.
4
• Pl ay the recording for
students to listen and
repeat the questions,
chora ll y and indi vidually.
Exercise 5 (CO2 Track 30)
• Pl ay the recording for
st udents to listen and
deci de if the girl s is certain
or hesi tat ing.
Answers
Ib 2a 3b 4a Sa 6b
• Students listen again
to identify whether the
intonati on is rising or
falling. The intonation
is falling in the girl 's
certain replies. When she
hesitates, she uses a rise-fall
intonati on.
• Students discuss whether
the intonation would be
simi la r in their language.
6
• Play t he recording for
students to li sten and
repeat the replies, chorally
and individuall y.
...... TIMI OUT! Page 11 6,
Exercise 21
Photocopiable Activity 14,
TTP, Page 61
Across Cultures q
Background
This unit looks at different
forms of body decorat ion in
different cultures, both past
and present. \VIe have avoided
more unpleasant techniques
such as 'sca rifica tion' (cutting
the body to leave patterns of
sca rs) or altering the shape of
body parts (e.g. foot binding
in imperial China and neck
binding in parts of Africa).
Warm-up
1 (CO2 Track 31)
• Play the recording for
students to li sten and
repeat the Key Words.
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the exampl e
sentence. Elicit two or
three more sentences from
the class.
• Students work in pai rs or
small groups, taking turns
to say what they have done
and what they woul d or
wouldn' t like ro do.
Reading
Exercise 2 (CO2 Track 32)
72
• Play rhe recording for
students ro listen and read.
Tell students nor to worry
about undersranding every
word but to read for gist
comprehension and decide
which section is most
interesting.
• Students tell the class
which section they thought
was mOSt interesting and
give their reasons.
Exercise 3
• Students work individually,
reading the text and
answering the questions.
They ca n compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a cl ass.
Warm-up
1 look at the photos and key Words. Which things
have you done? What would you like or not like
to do?
Which types of body art:
bring you good luck
keep you cool and clean
show status
Example
cure illness
I've dyed my hair but I wouldn't like to shove my head.
KeyWords
dye: your hair
paint: your hands, fingernai ls, toenails
pierce: your ears, nose
put on I wear: lipstick, make-up, perfume, a wig
shave: your head, armpits, legs, face
tatt oo: your arm, back, leg, neck
Reading
2 Read the text on pages 72-73. Which section
do you think is the most interesting? Why?
__ All kinds of body art are common in history.
i i
Let's take a look.
• Henna is a natural dye with a reddish·orange
colour. It was first used by women in Mesopotamia
over -1.000 years ago to paint their hands.
• In India, women still paint their hands and feet
with henna for their wedding day. They
believe in its power to make their
marriage successful.
• In Morocco, some
women rely on henna
patterns to protect
them from evil and
bring good luck.
Answers
bring you good luck: henna
keep you cool and clean: head shaving
show staws: the length of your hair
cure illness: tattooing
improve hunting ski ll s: nose piercing
Exercise 4
• Read a loud the sentences in the box.
• Students work individuall y or in
pairs, reading the text and find ing and
reading a loud similar sentences.
• Otti the Ice Man, a frozen human, was found in Austria
is 5,300 years old. His frozen body had fifty·seven
From the position of the tattoos, we think he had
done for health reasons because he suffered from
in his ankles, knees and lower back.
• Only female mummies in ancient Egypt were
tattoed. This tradition may have had something to do
with childbirth.
• Plato' and Herodotus refer to tattooing in Ancient
Greece. Tattoos were used as marks for slaves
and criminals.
• In the 18th century, many French sailors returned
voyages in the South Pacific with elaborate tattoos.
This became a tradition in the British Navy in the
19th century.
• Over 500 years ago, tongue piercing was performed in
Aztec ceremonies in Mexico.
• The native people of Alaska traditionally had their
noses pierced at birth to please the spirits of animals
and to help them when hunting. The decoration
of an eagle's feather, a sea lion's whisker or a small
Exercise 5
• Ask one of the students to read aloud
the exa mple sentence.
• Students complete the exercise worki ng
individually. They can compare
answers in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
4 Look at the Sentence Builder. Find simi lar sentences
in the text.
Sentence Builder "'--
Someone dyes the men's. hair with henna.
Men have
1 their hair I dyed with
henna.
Someone shaved the ancient Egyptians' heads.
Ancient Egyptians had their heads shaved.
5 Use the cues to write sentences li ke the ones in the
Sent ence Builder.
Example
1 I haven't had my ears pierced.
I can't wear those earrings. 1/ not / ears / pierce
I went to a beauty salon. 1/ nails J pai nt
Your ha ir's very long. When / you J going to J it / cut?
• I didn't like the colour of my jacket. 1/ it J dye black
5 Have yo u seen Barry? He / back J tattoo wit h
a dragon
ThaI's not her nat ural colour. She / hair / dye
Look at the Word Builder. Find t he verbs in blue in
the text and complete t hem with t hese prepositions.
to, with, as, in, of, from, on
Word BUilder
believe
--''' --
suffer
--t--
rely
--""--
have something
prolect
---frw-
to do
with
deal -1illL
refer
_ _ to __
depend
_ _ 0_ "_ return ~
belong ~
use -1illL
consist
-4--
Ancient Egyptians had their heads shaved to help
them deal with the heat and to keep clean. They
wore wigs for different occasions and shaved young
boys' heads. leaving one piece of hair down the side
of the head as a sign of childhood.
For the andent Greeks, the length of your hair
depended on your status in the community. Long
hair was a symbol of money and power; having a
shaved head meant you were a slave and belonged
to a master.
Answers
2 I had my nails painted.
3 When are you going to have it em?
4 I had my jacket dyed black.
S He has had his back tattooed with a
dragon.
6 She has had her hai r dyed.
Exercise 6
Answers -+ student page
7 Preposition Quiz Work in pairs.
Make sente nces using words in t he box.
Example
f come from London.
apologise. come, complain, about, for,
fall in love, know, learn, listen, from, to,
pay, talk, think, wait, worry with
........ Word Ba nk, pages 122- 123
Speaking
8 '\ .\ Speak Oul Work in pairs.
Di scuss this stateme nt:
All piercings and tattoos look horrible and
are unhygienic.
FOR YOUR PORT-OLI O
~ Project: A description
Write a description of a famous person.
1 Find a good full -lengt h photo of a
fa mous person in a magazine and
cut it out.
2 Find infor mation a nd make notes
about these things:
personal infor mation (date and place
of birth; family background ; ca reer
highli ghts)
physical descript ion (height , face.
hair)
what they are wearing in the photo
3 Writ e your descript ion. Use
expressions from the module.
Then check it for prepositions,
spelli ng and punctuation.
4 Stick your photo with your
description.
5 Make a class displ ay or pass your
descriptions around the class. Who
do you think is the best-dressed
celebrity?
Exerci se 7
• Check t hat st udents have matched
each verb with the correct preposition
before they make sentences . Students
can check thei r answers in the Word
Bank (page 122-123). If appropriate
for your class, explai n that some
of the verbs can go with more than
one preposition, e.g. ' I apologised to
my neighbour about the noise / for
brea king her window'.
• Students work in pairs,
writing sentences usi ng
words in the box. Check
students' sentences.
• The pairs then form groups
of four or six and read
each other's sentences.
Speaking
Exercise 8
• St udents work in pairs,
discussing the statement
and giving reasons for t heir
Op1l110n.
• Open up the discussion to
the class and see how much
general agreement there is.
Project
• Read through t he stages of
the project so t hat students
understand what to do.
Give students time to find
information and a picture
of their chosen famous
person 111 a magazlI1e or on
the Internet.
• Advise students to organise
their nOtes and write
their description in three
paragraphs, foll owing the
t hree topics in Stage 2.
Remind them to use the
structures look like . .. and
like ... where a ppropriate.
• Encourage students to
hel p each other check
their pa ragraphs for
prepositions, spelli ng,
punctuation and the use
of expressions from t his
module.
• After st udents have read all
the descript ions and looked
at the photos, they can
vote for t he best-dressed
celebrity.
Language Check
Exercises 1-5
Answers -+ student page
(CD2 Track 33)
74
• Students listen to t he
recording to check their
answers. Check spelli ng
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
ro look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home [0 do the
exercises on page 72 of the
Workbook.
Study Help:
Dictionary Skills (1)
• Depending on how familiar
your students are with
phonetic symbols, they
will need more or less
information and examples
of this area of study.

Check that the dictionaries
your students are
using provide phonetic
transcription.

Give students time to look
at the phonetic symbols
on the inside back cover.
Suggest whi ch symbols are
most useful for them to
learn.

Students work individuall y,
working out the three
fashion words (1 baggy
shorts 2 flared jeans
3 shoulder length hair ).
• Each student then writes
three words using phonet ic
symbol s. Students ca n
check their transcripti on by
referring to their dicti onary.

Students then work in
pairs, testing thei r partner.
Extra
in turn, each student wr ites
one of t heir words in phonetic
transcription on rhe board for
the rest of the class CO say the
word.
Module 7 Test, TTP, Page 75
Study Corner 7
Language Quiz
1 Complete the adjectives in these
sentences.
1 Her f 1!! r.- f. ' jeans go over her shoes.
2 It 's difficult to walk in these h i.. j. h. .
h '- '- L '- d" shoes.
3 I like wearing P !l.1.J!. · n '-fl.
jumpers.
4 He ohen wears aw l!.. J!.1. L;t. hat.
5 I wear s b.J!. r. t · s 1.'-'-!:l.d"shirts in
the summer.
6 Mydad wears st.r.i..ft I i shirts when
he goes to work.
7 I think those trousers are a bit
olio f
8 That shirt is really t (! i. t l. L l. i...i -
the colours are absolutely horrible!
9 At the party, the women were weari ng
long, a !!:! 1.,- . 1l.!1§. t b. evening
dresses.
10 I always wear C!l J..!i.li L clothes, like
jeans a nd T·shirts.
2 Complete the answer to a clothes
survey with prepositions.
Well , I rely my friends for
fashion ideas but I always go shopping for
clothes my own. Sometimes,
I look at shop wi ndows 13--fo.r-- ages
before going into the shop. Other times,
I go straight in and look around. It depends
14--ilL.......... how I feel. I don', ohen go to
shops that belong big chains;
I prefer small. independent shops.
Vocabulary 0 / 15
Feedback
• listen and check your a nswe rs 10 the
language Check. Write down your scores.
• look at the table below. Then do the
exercises on page 72 of the Workbook.
Wrong a nswers:
Numbers 1- 10
Numbers 11-15
Numbers 16-21
Numbers 22- 25
Numbers 26-30
look again al :
Get Ready - Key Words
Unit 20 and Across Cultures
- Word Bui lders
Unit 19 - Grammar
Unit 20 and Unit 21 -
Sentence Builders
Unit 21 - Key Expressions
3 Read about T·shirts and complele the text with uled
to, didn't use to, would or wouldn't. Use would or
wouldn't when possible.
In World War I, American soldiers wear
wooll en clothes and they oft en be very hot
in the summer. European soldiers have cooler,
colton undershirts. The Americans noticed this and soon
wore them, calling them T·shirts be<ause of their shape.
wear white T·shirts because I thought they
looked li ke underclothes: recalls George (SO). ' But then
sta rs like Marlon Branda and James Dean started weari ng
them and all the youngsters copy them.'
Ma rgot (55) ' Me and my boyfriend buy white
T·shirts and dye them a mixture of bright colours. It was
the fashion then!'
4 Compl ete the dialogue with look and like.
A: What does your new girlfriend 1l---'m!L ?
8 : Well, she 23 looks great. She looks 24
Scarlett Johansson.
A: Wow! And what is she ?
B: She's really nice. She's fun to be wi th.
Grammar D 110
5 Complete each gap in Ihe fashion show commentary
with a suitable word.
A: Those trousers don't 26-;--#L- with that top. They
a re a different 27 of red.
B: Are you sure?
A: Yes, and they don' t really you.
R: Well, here are some t rousers with a 29matdril1§ top.
U's exactly the same colour.
A: Yes, but the trousers 30---'m!L a bit small.
Key Expressions D! j
Study Help: Dictionary Skills (1)
Oictionaries use phonetic symbols to show the
pronunciation of words.
Use a dictionary and write new words with
phonetic symbols.
Try to learn some of the phonetic symbols.
• What a re these fashion words?
1 Ibregl J :>:ts! 2 /nc:;xl d3i:nzl
3 IJauld:;) leI]9 heal
• Work in pairs. Write three words using the
phonetic symbols to test your pa rtner.
........ Phonetic (hart at the back of the book
1 .... at the Key words. Add as many sporb as
,... can to the lists in _ minutes.
Example
........ 1 achlnoment: hiIh jump. ski jumping
Personal achievement: discus, javel in, long
jump, weightlifting
Racing: horse racing, marathon, rowing
Individual: boxing, fencing, wrestling
Team games: basketball, cricket, ice hockey,
rugby, water polo
Adventure: paragliding, scuba diving,
5ky diving, surfi ng
------
_ sports ....., lOU played? WIIich would
,... nile to play?
.... at the photos. WIlen did people first play
the -'<1 LIsten to • sports proplImme and
pool the sports in chronolotkll order.
Get Readl,l
Background
Ancient boxing had fewer rules than the
modern sport. Boxers fought without
rounds until one man was knocked out, or
admitted he had been beaten. Unlike the
modern sporr, there was no rule against
hitting an opponent when he was down.
There were no weight classes within the
men's and boys' divisions; opponents for
a match were chosen randomly. Instead
of gloves, ancient boxers wrapped leather
thongs (called himantes) around theit hands
and wrists which left their fingers free.
4 LIsten apln. In which of the sports:
1 ...... the _Ie in danpt1 WhY1
2 could the pIaye .. hh their -' on
the floor?
J could the playe .. not use their hands?
4 did the telms __ the rules before the
pmes1
5 could the players die H they IasI1
, could the players hit their __ and IlOl
he sent oft7
5, Out lYofk In pairs. Do "'" think
vIolent.nd da_ sporb .........
rupy and _ radna _Id he ""-"edl
Give ......... Use ...... of_wards.
accident, ch.U ...... dan..,. _. freedom.
health. injury. pain. rIsIc, ru .... safely
Example
I think boxing is D _bit S{JDfI. 1It>u .. risk btoltr
injury DIIII MIl dmth.
For information on rlachtli , visit the
Challenges Website.
)
1 (CD3 Track 2)
• Play the recording for students to
li sten and repeat the Key Words. Pay
particular attention to word stress.
• Students work in pairs or small groups,
adding as many sportS as they can to
the li sts in two minutes .
Exercise 2
• In groups or as a class, students say
which sports they have played and
which they would like to play.
3 ((D3 Track 3)
• Check that students can
identi fy the sports in the
photos (basketball , rugby,
surfing, boxing) .
• Encourage them to guess
when peopl e first pl ayed
each of these sporrs.
• Pl ay the recording once for
students to listen and make
a note of the answers.
Answers
1 boxing - 5,000 years ago
2 basketball - fifth century
3 surfing - 1777
4 rugby - 1823
Exercise 4
• Give students time to read
through the questi ons
before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording, twice if
necessary, for students to
answer the questions.
Answers
1 surfing. Because the
surfers tried to go as near
to the rocks as possible
and t hen jump off the
board into the water at
the last minute
2 boxing
3 basketball
4 rugby
5 basketball
6 rugby
Extra
Di vide the class into four
groups. Ask each group to
listen carefull y to one of the
secti ons and make a nOte of
extra infotmation about the
history of the sport. Play the
recording.
Each group then tell s the class
their extra information.
Exercise 5
• Read aloud the words in
the box. Check students'
understanding.
• Elicit three or four
sentences from the class.
• The pairs discuss violent
and dangerous sports.
• Each pair tells the cl ass
their opini on about one of
the sports.
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 5, 8 and 9) .
Background
Emil Zatopek (1922-2000) is
the most famous. Czech runner
ever.
Diego Maradona (born 1960)
is considered one of the best
and the most controversial
foorba llers ever.
Elena lsinbayeva (born in
1982) is world champion III
women's pole vaulting
For more information on
these sports people, visit the
Challenges Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Ask students if they can
identi fy the people in the
photos.
• Students say if they know
who are the present-day
champions in these sports.
2 (CD3 Track 4)
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and answer the questions.
Answers
1 Emil Zatopek - Czech,
Diego Maradona
- Argentinian, Yelena
Isinbayeva - Russian
2 Emil Zatopek is the only
funner in Ol ympic history
to win three gold medals
for the 10,000m, 5,000m
and the marathon. Diego
Maradona scored his
most famous goal with his
hand in J 986 in the world
cup quarter-final against
England. Yelena Isinbayeva
in 2005 became the first
woman to jump Sm.
Exercise 3
• Give srudents time to
think of one or two 'magic
moments' in sports. Tell
them to say when and where
it was and who was involved
in the magic moment.
• Students tell t he class.
...
Emil Zatopek is the only runner in Olympic history to wi n
t hree gold medals - for the 10,000 m, 5,000 m and the
marathon. He achieved this at the Helsinki Olympics in
Zatopek's running style was not very attractive. His head
would often roll , his face showing pain and effort, and
many people thought he was not even going to finish the
race. He panted heavi ly while running. which earned him
the nickname of 'the Czech Express'. When asked about his
worrying facial expressions, Zatopek replied that running
was not gymnastics or ice-skating.
One of t he best footballers of all-time. Di ego Maradona.
ironically scored his most famous goal with his hand. In
1986, in t he World Cup quarter-final against England,
Maradona punched the ball into the English net with his
fist. The referee did not spot the trick and allowed the
goal. Argentina won 2- 1 and went on to win t he World
Cup. After the match, Maradona told reporters that he had
scored the goal 'a little with the head of Maradona and a
little with the hand of God' .
Maradona recent ly admitted that he had scored with his
hand but said he didn't regret it.
During the 2006 World Cup, Maradona predicted that
Argentina would win the Cup again. Unfortunately, they
were beaten by Germany in the quarter-finals.
'" ",'"n, Isinbayeva, a 23-year-old Russian pole vaulter, has
already broken the world record over 15 times. Young and
attractive, she has made women's pole vaulting one of the
most popular athletics events. In 2005, she became the first
woman ever to jump 5 metres. Ye[ena said it had been her
dream and announced that she was planning to break the
world record 36 times, to beat her compatriot Siergei
who broke it 35 times.
Grammar: Reported statements
4 Make a list of the verbs in
the text that are used to report
people's words or thoughts.
Example think
5 Complete the table on the
right with sentences from
the text.
6 What changes do you notice
(e.g. I -+ he, ;s going ..... wos going)?
Grammar: Reported
statements
Exercise 4
Actual words
'He is not going to finish
the race.'
'Running is not gymnastics.'
' [ scored with my hand.'
'I don't regret it:
'Argentina will win the
World Cup:
' It has been my dream.'
'J am planning to break the
world record:
Exercise 5
Reported words
Many people thought he was
not going to f i nish the race.
Ztifutek Y'flied that YUi111t'nj W{(5
nut Jpnna.s&.s
Mayadona atlmitter/ t!tat!te kad
scgm/ wHir his hand
but said he didn't yt:jYCt it
Maradona I'm/ided that AY!Jf!I1finA
wou(J Win the cup a:Jf.Un
rdCl1<i stWI it had bun hey dyeam
announced that site wa.s plal'mmj
W break the world record
• Students work indi viduall y or in pairs,
listing the verbs that are used to report
people's words or thoughts.
• Check answers by asking individuals
to read aloud the actual and reported
words. Write [he tense changes on the
board.
Answers .... student page
• When checking answers, ask st udents
to read aloud the sentences conta ining
the verbs.
Answers
reply tell admit say predict announce
Practice
Exercise 6
• After checking answers, ask students ro
say the actual words for each reported
statements, e.g. 1 I'll win. 2 I won.
7 Match the reported statements (1-4) with when they
were said (a or b).
He said he would win. b)
2 He said he had won. a)
She said she was
playing tennis. b)
4 She said she was going to
play tennis. a)
a) afler a game
b) before a game
a) before the game
b) during the game
8 What were these people's actual words?
1 The captain said they had trained very hard.
'We ... '
2 The coach admitted Ihat the players weren't very fit.
'The players ... '
J Many commentators predicted that Brazil would win the
2006 World Cup. 'Brazil ... '
4 The goalkeeper told the journali sts that he was going
to retire. 'I. '
S The leam spokesman said that the players didn't want to
talk to the media. 'The players ... '
, Everybody thought Ihe team were celebrating at their
hotel. 'The team ... '
Exerci se 7
Answers _ student page
Exerci se 8
• Elicit the answers to the first twO items
from the class.
• Students complete the exercise,
wor king individually,
• Check answers by asking individuals to
read aloud both sentences in each item.
Answers
1 have trai ned very hard. 2 a r e n ~ t very fit.
3 will win the 2006 World Cup. 4 I' m
going to reti re. 5 don't want to talk to
the media. 6 are celebrating at their hotel.
Grammar
9 Report what a famous long distance
runner said about his career.
Example
1 He said that he wa'i working with
a dietician.
1 'I'm working with a dietician.'
2 'I've won ten international
competitions.'
3 'I'm not going to run a marathon.'
4 'The next Olympic Games will be my
last.'
5 "don't eat sweets.'
6 ' I was a very unfit child.'
10 Report these quotes from the
famous football er, Ronaldo.
1 'I have been poor and money doesn't
have any importance for me. I won't
let all the money and glory go to my
head.'
2 " decided to join Barcelona because
it's a sunny place.'
3 'I've never timed myself over 100 m,
but I have done a test over shorter
distances, 20 m or 30 m, with and
without the ball. What's strange is
that I'm faster with the ball than
without it.'
• 'We lost because we didn't win.'
5 ' It does not matter who scores.
We will celebrate all the same.'
Your Turn
11 Report things that people said
about recent sports events.
Example
During the World Cup my father
said that Ronaldinho wasn't playing
very well.
(--Fael Dr FietioD?--
Thierry Henry once said: 'I eat football,
I sleep football, I breathe footba!1.
I'm not mad, I'm just passionate.'
___ "IM. OUT! Page 117, Exercise 22
Exercise 9
• Ask one of the students to read aloud
the example sentences.
• Tell students to begin each answer
with He said that ... and to change
pronouns.
Answers
2 He said that he had won ten
international competitions. 3 He said
that he wasn't going to run a marathon.
4 He said that the next Ol ympic Games
would be hi s last. S He said t hat he
didn't eat sweets. 6 He said that he had
been a very unfit chi ld.
Exercise 10
• Elicit the sentences for the
first item from the class.
• Students work individua lly
or in pai rs, completing
the exercise. Tell students
to begin each reported
sentence with He said
that ...
Answers
1 He sa id that he had been
poor and money didn't
have any importance for
him. He wouldn' t let all the
money and glory go to hi s
head.
2 He said that he had
deci ded to join Barcelona
because it was a sUlmy
place.
3 He said that he had never
timed himself over 100m,
but he had done a test over
shorter distances, 20m or
30m, with and without the
ball. What was strange was
that he was faster with the
ball than without it.
4 He said that they had lost
because they hadn't won.
S He sa id t hat it didn't
matter who scored. They
would celebrate all the
same.
Your Turn
Exercise 11
• Give students time to t hi nk
of things people said about
recent sports events. They
can invent what people
said if t hey wish.
• Students tell the class
t heir sentences. Encourage
students to hel p each other
correct any errors.
Fact Dr FictiDII
• After checking t he answer,
ask students to report the
quote (He said that he ate
football, slept football,
breathed football. He said
that he wasn't mad, he was
just passionate.
• Encourage students [0
share any information they
have on Thi erry Henry's
li fe .
.... TIME OUT! Page 117,
Exercise 22
Photocopiable Activity 15,
TTP, Page 62
This Unit
Shorr of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3, 6 and 9).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
The ancient Olympic
Games had rhe foll owing
events: boxing, wrestl ing,
chariot racing, horse racing,
pankration (fea ts of strength),
discus, javel in, jumping and
running. Athletic contests were
onc way rhe anci ent Greeks
honoured t heir gods.
For more infor mati on on the
games visit the Challenges
Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Ask students if they like
watching the Olympics
on TV and what their
fa vourite events are.
• Students work in groups
or as a class, discussing the
questi ons.
Reading
2 (CD3 Track 5)
78
• Students read the first two
paragra phs of the text to
check their answers for
Exercise 1.
Answers
1 in Olympia
2 crowns of olive leaves
3 every four years
4 chariot and horse racing,
boxing, running, di scus
and javelin throwing
Exercise 3
• Read aloud the advice in
the Readi ng Help. Check
that students understand
what the abbreviati ons
mea n, e.g. 'v. gd' ;; 'very
good' .
• Bui ld up notes for the
second paragraph on the
board with the cl ass.
OIrmpic Games were held in Otympia
to honour .... god Zeus. As well as
important religious centre, Otympia
was get to by ship. This was important
because athletes and spectators came from as
fior away .. Spain.,.. EJI'pt.
star of Sydney 2000 - for SWImming one of the
slowest races in history. He had only learned
to swim five months before and nearty
because he thought he was gotng to drown!
eThe modem Olympics h ... sometimes been
COilDO'olelsiai In me 1936 Olympics In Berlin,
Only Gnek-spealcing men could take pan and .... Nazi leader Adolf Hid ... congratulated all
che pmes were always in the same place. the winners apart from blade. arhletes such as
Inooead of medals, they presented J...., Owens. And although ....... was a terrorist
ClOWnS of olive leaves to me winners. However, attack on the Israeli team at the 1972
_ne thit1pare still the same today. Jjke the Munich pmos, they decided to
Olympics take place .... pmos.
-j and uhletes get a lot of money
fiorn chariOl: and ho,,", • Apart fiorn poIiacs, .... biaest

do most of the original COilbOdl"5) ofrecent ames'has
running. as well as discus been 'doping', as some athletes
tTy to chat. In 1988, the
Canadian, Ben Johnson, won
the 100 m In record time but OIympocs have produced colourful
c:haracters as wen as great champions, like the
ScMer: gymnast Larissa L.a.tynina, wi nner of a
Ncord etghteen medals. Polydamus ofThessaly
once killed. lion with his bare hands to
entenatn the aowd! More recently, British ski
Jumper ' eddie the Eagle' became a celebrity in
1918. eddie was owrweight, wore glasses and
dropped Ilice a stone. However, although he
came last in every event, he did not
the competition. Eric Moussambani ('Eric t he
Eel' ) Equatorial Gui nea, was t he unlikely
• Students work indi viduall y, reading
and maki ng notes about paragraphs 3,
4 and 5. Monitor and help if necessary.
Extra
Explain or encourage srudents to guess the
meaning of any new voca bulary.
Play the recording for students to read and
listen, focusing on pronunciati on of new
words.
his country when
he tested positive for
He didn' t
it but he was only one
of many athletes taking
drugs. Since then, he
has
drugs but ' doping' is
still a big issue.
Exercise 4
• Ask two srudents to read aloud the
example question and answer.
• Give srudents ti me to read through
their notes and t hink of four or five
questions to ask a bout the text.
• In pairs, students take turns asking and
answering questions about the text.
Extra
Students change partners and ask and
answer their questi ons with their new
partner.
Work in pairs. (lose your books.
Use your notes to ask and answer
questions about the text.
Example
A: Why were the ancient games held in Olympia?
B: Because it was on important religious centre
and port.
5 look at the Word Builder. Guess the meaning
of the verbs in II )w in the text.
drop out of something (e.g. a
competition, a course of study)
give up
go ahead with something (e.g. an event ,
your plans)
let somebody down (e.g. your friends,
your team)
get away with something (e.g. a crime)
speak out against something (e.g. the
arms trade, drugs)
Rewrite the sentences (1-5). Replace the verbs
in italics with verbs from the Word Builder in
the correct tense.
He gave his opinions against racism in sport.
Z She was in last position but she didn't stop.
3 He failed his exams and left university after the
first year.
They distributed free sun hats to runners in the
local marathon.
I really tried in the race because t didn't want
to diSlJppoint my schooL
Verb Ga me Work in groups. Make sentences
(minimum five words) with the verbs below.
The first group with eight correct sentences is
the winner!
• put on I put up I put off ! put down
• turn on I turn up I turn off I turn down
--.. Word Bank, page 122
Exercise 5
Skills
8 look at the Sentence Builder. Find more
examples in the text of linkers followed by
nouns or -ing forms.
Sentence Builder
Olympia was an important religious centre and
was easy to get to by ship.
As well as being an important religious centre,
Olympia was easy to get to by ship.
We still have mosl of the original events but not
chariot and horse racing.
We still have many of the original events, apart
from chariot and horse racing.
They didn't give oul medals. They presented
crowns of olive leaves.
Instead of giving out medals, they presented
crowns of olive leaves to the winners.
9 Use linkers from the Sentence Builder to write
sentences about these things.
• sports • school subjects • music
• learns • colours • writers • vegetables
• computer games • hobbies
Examples
As well as playing volleyball, I also play tenni5.
I like playing most sports, aport from rugby.
We played basketball instead of football in our
games les50n.
Speaking
to Work in pairs. Ask and answer the questions.
What are the most popular Olympic events in
your country?
2 Who are Olympic celebrities in your country?
3 Do you do any sports that are in the Olympics?
How good are you?
4 Would you like to take part in the Olympics?
Why or why not?
---Fact Dr FictiDD?--
The word 'athlete' is an ancient Greek
word. It means 'champion'.
• Check answers by asking individual s to
read aloud the sentences.
• Students work as a class, findi ng the
verbs in yellow in the text and guessing
their meaning. Ask students what
Answers
1 spoke out against
2 give up they would say in their Ll for these
expressIOns.
• Students look at the Word Builder
(Multi-parr Vetbs page 122) and
check their guesses by reading the
explanations and example sentences.
Exercise 6
Students do the exercise working
indi viduall y. They can compare
answers in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
3 dropped out of
4 gave out
5 let down
Exercise 7
• Elicit an exa mple sentence for 'put on'
from the class. Remind students that
the sentences must have at least five
words in them.
• Check the sentences as
each group finishes. Point
out any language errors in
the sentences for the group
to correct.
Extra
Each group read aloud their
sentences. The rest of the
class li sten and see how many
sentences ate over five words
long.
Exercise 8
• Ask individuals to read
aloud the sentences in the
box.
• Students find more
examples in the text and
read them aloud.
Exercise 9
• Ask individuals to read
aloud the example
sentences .
• Elicit three or fou r more
sentences about some of
the topics.
• Students work individuall y,
writing eight to ten
sentences about some of
the topics and using the
thtee linking expressions.
Check students' sentences.
Speaking
Exercise 10
• Students ask and answer
the questions in pairs.
• The pairs then form groups
of four or six and tel1 each
other their answers.
Fact or FictiOI!
Extra
After checking the answer,
write these statements on t he
board:
1 Top Olympic athletes are
paid too much nowadays.
2 Most rap athletes take drugs.
3 Men and women should
compete against each other at
the Olympics.
Students discuss the statements
as a class or in groups, giving
reasons for their opinions.
-+ "MI OUT! Page 117,
Exercise 23
79
This Unit
Short of time: set Exercise 3
for homework and shorten the
discussion in Exercise 1.
More ti me: do the Extra
activities.
Background
Steve and Ellie go to the police
to tell them they've found
toxic chemicals in the river
water. A slightly threa tening
e-mail arrives at Radiochill.
e rg's website. Tanya and Abi
present a sports round-up
progra mme for their onl ine
radio stati on.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students pool wha t t hey
can remember about
the story and the people
without looking back at
t he previous episodes.
• They can t hen look back at
previous episodes to check
if they ha ve [emem bered
correctly and if they
have omitted anything
important.
Reading and
Listening
2 (CD3 Track 6)
80
• Give students time to read
th rough the questions
before you play the
recording.
Answers
1 the shampoo
2 He tells them to bring all
the results and sampl es
to the police stat ion, to
go to an environmental
group like Greenpeace,
to be careful and not to
mention the company's
name publicly until the
pol ice have fi nished their
investigati on.
3 pollut ion of the river
4 students' own suggestions
"" The Police Station
Warm-up
1 What can you remember about the story 50 far?
Reading and Listening
2 Read and listen to the dialogues. Answer the questions.
1 What does Steve show the police officer?
Extra
2 What advi ce does the police offi cer give?
3 What is Tanya's programme about?
4 Who do you think the note is from?
Elfie and Steve go to the police stotion.
Policeman: can I help you?
Ellie: Yes, we're from radiochill .org, a radio station for young
peopl e. We'd like to report something.
Policeman: What exactly?
Ellie: Well , there were dead fi sh in the river so we took a
sample of the water. There are toxi c chemical s in it.
tracked these chemi cals to a local cosmetics factory!
Steve: Yes, they're in this shampoo, for example.
Policeman: Are you sure?
Ellie: The analysis was done at the university.
Policeman: Ri ght. First , you should bring me all your
result s and samples.
Ellie: Right , we'll do that.
Policeman: And if I were you, I'd go to an environmental
group like Greenpeace. ,'m sure they' ll help.
Steve: That's a good idea.
Poli ceman: And you'd better be careful.
Ellie: Of course. We will be.
Policeman: I mean, you shouldn't mention
the company's name publicly - not
unti l we've fini shed our investigation.
Ellie: No, we won't, I promise.
S!ev.: Thank, lor your help,
Policeman: Not at all .
Bock at the studio ...
Tanya: ... so now we know the ri ver is
being polluted. Okay, that's all
from me on radiochill.org.
Abi: Hey, look at this note. It says, 'We
heard your report about the river.
It is fal se. Keep your noses out of
other people's business. ' There's
no name or address.
Tanya: Wow! What should we do?
Abl: Let 's phone Elli e and Steve. Maybe
we need to check out that factory!
Speaking
Exercise 3
Speaking
3 look at the Key Expressions.
Match the advice (1-4) with
the replies (a-d).
Key Expressions: Giving Advice
1 You should bring me aU your
results, dJ
2 If I were you, I'd go to an
environmental group. c)
3 You'd better be careful. b)
4 You shouldn't mention the
company's name. a)
a) No, we won't. I promise.
b) Of course. We will be.
c) That 's a good idea.
dl Right, we'll do that.
Play the recording of the first dialogue
between the policeman, Ellie and Steve for
students to focus on the speakers' stress
and intonation patterns.
Students work in groups of three,
reading aloud rhe dialogue and changing
parts. Monitor and correct any serious
pronunciation errors.
• Check answers by asking pairs of
student to read aloud each sentence
giving advice and the reply to it.
o Check that students understand what
the short verb forms stand for, e.g. I'd
go (I would go), You'd better (You had
better),
Answers -+ student page
4 Work in pairs. choose a problem. Give your
partner some advice.
Everyday listening
Skills
Example
Q!J t listen to radiochill.org's sports report.
A: Oh no! I haven't done my moths homework
and I've got moths next ltsS{)n.
B: If I weft! you, I'd do it now.
A: I con't. I haven't got time.
B: Well then, you 5hould tell the teacher,
You haven't done your maths homework and
maths is your next lesson.
It was your boyfriend's/girlfriend's birthday
yesterday but you forgot.
Your parents bought you a new mobile phone
but you've lost it already_
Your friend invites you to stay at hi s/her house
lor the weekend but he/she has got a dog and
you're altergic to dogs.
Exercise 4
• Ask two students to read aloud the
example dialogue.
• Give students time [Q read through the
situations and think of advice to give.
• Students work in pairs, taking turns to
describe a problem and to give advice
to their partner. Monitor but do not
interr upt students' fluency. Make a
nOte of any language problems to go
over with the class afterwards.
Are these sentences true (T), false (F) or
is there no i nformation (NI)?
1 [lj They have a sports report every week.
2 ItJ Bristol City football team lost.
3 ILJ Arsenal are top of the Premier league.
" It was raining during the athletics
competition.
S [[] A Russian won the women's 100 metres
fi nal.
6 [lJ Britain finished fourth in the long jump.
7 The athletics competition finishes at four
o'clock.
8 !tJ The Bristol ice hockey team are top of the
league.
Listen Closely The meaning of a sentence
can change if you put t he stress on a
different word. l isten to these examples.
It 's half-past five on Saturday:: not .Q..I.!..ltl.e.-
past
2 It's half-past flyt on Saturday = not half-past
l2lI!
3 It's half-past five on not
Usten to sentences from the sports report
and mark t he main stress. Then choose the
correct mea ning (a, b or C).
1 Today was a good day for Bristol City.
.!l. not yesterday b) not a bad day
@lot Bristol Rovers
2 Manchester Uni ted stay in second place after
their draw against liverpool last night.
@)not first place b) not win c) not last week
3 She just beat the Canadian Sindy Turner by
two hundredths of a se<:ond.
..& not the American bJ not three hundredths
(9)lot tenths of a Sfiond
.. The Romanian, Alexandru Telegdy, threw an
amazing seventy-three metres.
a) not Bulgarian seventy-two
eJ not centimetres
S An important match for Bristol Warriors
tonight against top-of-the-table Coventry.
.!l not Bristol Juniors b) not tomorrow
(9)'lot bottom-of-the-table
....... TIM. OUTI Page 11 7, Exercise 24
Extra
Each pair says one of their dialogues for
the class to hear. The rest of the class say
whether rhey think the advice is good.
Everyday Listening
1 (CD3 Track 7)
• Give students time to read through
the sentences before you play the
recording.
• Tell students not ro worry
a bout understanding every
word at this stage but
to focus on listening for
the information in the
statements.
Answers -+ student page
Extra activity 011 website
Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 8)
• Play the recording first
for students to listen and
then for them ro listen and
repeat the sentences with
t he correct stress.
• Ask individual students in
t urn to choose one of the
sentences to read aloud and
another student to respond,
e.g. Student A: It's half-past
five on Saturdav. Student
B: not Fridav.
3 (CD3 Track 9)
• Pl ay the recording, twice if
necessary, for srudenrs to
listen and Illark t he main
stress and then choose the
correct meanmg.
• Check answers by playing
the recording aga in,
pausing after each item
for students to identify t he
main stress and give the
correct meanmg.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Ask srudenrs to look at rhe
answers that were not correct
for each sentence. Ask them
which word would be stressed
if these answers were correct.
For example, in sentence 1,
Today would be srressed for
answer a) (not yesterday) and
good would be stressed for
answer b) (not a bad day) .
... TIM. OUTI Page 11 7,
Exercise 24
Photocopiable Activity 16,
TIP, Page 63
81
Your Challenge
Background
This report is about the sports
faci liti es in a Briti sh town of
about 10,000. It is based on
factua l information about the
town of Ludlow.
Writing: A Sports
Survey and Report
Exercise 1
• Students read the survey
quickly to find sports
facil ities they use.
• Students tell the cl ass
which sPOrtS fac il it ies they
use. Ask them if they use
any sports faciliti es that 3re
not mentioned in the text.
Text Builder
Exercise 2
• Students work individually,
completing the survey
with the linking words.
They can compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
• Explain or encourage
students to guess the
meaning of any new
vocabulary in the survey.
Answers - student page
Extra
Ask students to read the survey
and find expressions for how
many people said the same
thing, e.g. Nearly everybody
said .. . , (Two) people
mentioned ... , Over half the
people said .. . .
Elicit more expressions, e.g.
100% / about one-third /
under half the people.
Exercise 3
• Read through Steps 1--4 so
students understand what
to do.
Your Challenge
Writing: A Sports
Survey and Report
t Read the sports survey.
Which sports facilities
do you use?
Text Builder
2 Complete the survey with
these linking words.
although, as well as, instead of,
however, too, apart from, fi nall y,
for example
• Read a lo ud the questions in Step 1.
Elicit suggestions for three or four
more questions. Tell students to
write three to fi ve questions. Weaker
students may find it helpful to work in
pa irs fo r Steps 1 and 2.
• Depending on your teaching situation,
srudents walk around or sit in groups
to ask and answer questions.
• Students work individua ll y, writing
a draft of their report and including
reported speech and linking words
where appropriate.
3 Do a survey and write a report about
sports facilities in your area.
~ 1 Write some questions.
What sports facilities in your area do
you use?
What do you think about them?
How could they be improved?
What other sports facilities does your
town need?
tb2 Ask other students your questions and
~ write down their answers. Don't write
their names.
tb3 Write a short report of the results of
t;:. your survey in rough. Try to include
some reported statements and the
linking words from Exercise 2.
tb4 Read the Writing Help. Check your
t;; report and rewrite it neatly.
Writing IIIIIp: CIIedIIng
· _Ihe _ again. HeM! \IOU
CDiiplebid the task? Haw CDUIcI VDU
...... \lOW IIHt more _ .... IIIIg1
• HeM!youl&dlhe ___ enS
11"*'11-
• HeM! you -....-nIl enS
punctuoHon?
4 Read each other's reports. Do any
results surprise you?
• Read through the Writing Help with
the cl ass. Encourage students to work
with a partner, checking their reports
and correct any mistakes. They ca n
refer to you if they are not sure about
any of the correcti ons.
• Students rewrite their report neatly.
Exercise 4
• [n groups of four to six, st udents read
each other's reports and say if any of
the results surprise them.
r
Understanding Grammar: TaLking about quantity
1 Read the text. Why do you think beach volleyball is becoming
more and more popular?
Beach volleyball ... rted in California and became popuiar at a
pl'ofessionallevel in the 199Ck In 1996, it became an Olympic event.
Beach volleyl>all i. played on sand. Ea<h team conoim of two player<.
Both of them have to play all the time and neither of them can be
changed All player< play the game l>arefoot. All male play'" wear loose
shoru and mogt female players wear bikinis. In international '
both playerS! from the team must wear the same colours, None the
playen is allowed to weal' jewellery that can harm other players.
International beach ~ I l e y b a l l is dominated by Brazil, the United States
and Auitralia, All of these countries have won Olympic gold medals and
produced a lot of international ....... lntereatingly, female beach volleyball
players are generally more famous and earn more than their male
counterparts. This may result from the
faat that most of the fans are men.
There hu been a lot of controversy
over the costumes worn by female
play'" during the game. Some criti"
say that the bikinis are worn to attract
more viewer" and sponsors and they
!naI<e the .port Ie" reopectable than
other OlympiC evenU.
2 Complete the table with examples from the text.
A
.llImost/some/both
+ plural noun
B
all/mostisome/both + of +
pronoun/the ".
all players
most female plaJer$
some tnciC$
both player$
Complete the rule.
all of these countries
most ufthefan$
some of you
both
neither
none
of them
of them
of the plaJCY5
In (olumn@s, the words 01/, most and some refer to people or
things in general.
In column A@the words all, most and some refer to specific
people or things.
3 Put all, none, most, some and Q fot on the Kale.
-2!E!!L. ~ --1!.IP.L ~
all
r
100%
4 Use the ted to complete the rules with both, neither and none.
neither and ~ have negative meaning.
2 ~ and ",etcher are used to talk about two people
or things.
5
2
3
4
S
6
S
2
3
4
S
6
7
8
Answers
Complete the gaps with of
where necessary.
AII ___ professional
sports people have to train
every day.
I left some ~ the
money on the table,
We spent most ~ the
time chatting.
Most ___ big cities are
very noisy,
None ~ the teachers
was a native speaker,
r asked both ~ them
for help.
Complete the sentences with
the words from the table in
Exercise 2,
MO$t teenagers go to
Khool.
We're not a very good team;
~ of us plays really
well.
Jane and I failed the test
because neither of us
studied very much.
I watched ~ of the film
but I didn't see the ending.
~ animals can live
without waler for a long time.
~ of my parents does
sport; of them prefer
to read in their free ti me.
Think of the people in
your class. Make sentences
belinninl with All of us ... ,
None of us ... , Most of us .. , ,
Work in pairs. In two minutes,
write as many sentences as
you can startinl with Both of
us ." and Neither of us ... ,
Example
Both of us have blond hoir.
Neither of us has been to
London.
Understanding Grammar
It is a social ga me and can be played
Exercise 1
• Encourage students to say why they
think beach volleyball is becoming
more popular.
• Students work individually, reading the
text and checking the answer.
on many beaches throughout the world.
Professional women players wear bikinis
and this attracts more sponsors and
male viewers.
Exercise 2
• Look at the table with the class. Point
out that some phrases, but not ali ,
can be used with and without 'of' and
so examples can be written in both
columns of the table.
• Students work individuall y
or in pairs, reading the text
and completing the table.
• Draw the outline of
the table on the board.
Check answers by asking
individuals to complete the
table on the board
Answers _ student page
Exercise 3
• Draw the line on the board
for individuals to wr ite the
words in the correct places
on the line.
Answers _ student page
Exercise 4
Answers _ student page
Exercise 5
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read the
sentences aloud.
Answers _ student page
Exercise 6
• If students disagree about
any of the answers, ask
them to give reasons
for their choice, e.g. the
answer to item one could
be 'all teenagers' or 'most
teenagers (if students
include 17-19 year aids
who may have left school ).
Answers _ student page
Exercise 7
• El icit one or two example
sentences then give students
time to think of sentences.
• Students tell the class their
sentences. Ensure tbat each
student says at least two
sentences.
Exercise 8
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the example
sentences.
• After the pairs have written
their sentences, they can
form groups of four or
six and read each other's
sentences.
s
Language Check
Exercises 1-2
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 3
Answers
11 Rafael said he liked
simple things such as
fishing and being with his
family.
12 He said his victory over
Federer had been very
important.
13 Rafael said that when
he had been young he
had preferred foot ball to
tennis.
14 He said he had had to
choose between tennis
and football.
15 He said he had got better
at tennis but he hadn't
changed.
16 He said tbat bis first big
tournament win had been
very important for him.
17 He said that people in his
local town treated him
like everybody else.
18 He said that every tennis
player dreamt of winning
Wimbledon.
19 He said his family made
him happy and his uncle
was his coach.
20 He said that his uncle
had given him a Real
Madrid shirt when he
had been a player.
Exercises 4-5
Answers -+ student page
Feedback (CD3 Track 10)
84
• Students listen to the
recording to check theif
answers. Check spelling
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 82 of the
Workbook.
Study Corner 8
Language Check
1 Look at the pictures and write the names of

1 wci&bM/"t1j 3--Jardill-
-./""1° ft?! ' -UidL JD,t-
2 Complete the multi-part verbs in the text.
It was the hardest cross-{ountry race of my life.
The weather was terrible but the school decided
to 'go the race. The first two
miles were okay but then we had to cross a river
and go up a hill. I nearly --¥-- because
I felt terrible. Then, near the end, I got a pain in
my leg and was going to 8drop
the race. But just then, I saw the finishing line in
the distance and I didn't want to my team
. In the end, I finished the race and
came third. I was the happiest person ever when
they the medals afterwards!
Vocabulary 0/ 10
3 Report the sentences taken from an interview
with top tennis player, Rafael Nadal. Start
each sentence with said ... ,
11 'I like simple things such as fishing and being
with my family. '
12 'My victory over Federer was very important.'
U 'When I was young. I preferred football to
tennis:
14 'I had 10 (hoo'" beh.,..,n tennis and fOOlball :
Feedback
C3. Listen and check your answers to the
Language Chm. Write down your scores.
• look at the table below. Then do the
exertises on page 8l of the Workbook.
wrong answers: look again at:
Numbers 1-5 Get Re.dy - Key Words
Numbers 6-10 Unit 23 - Word Builder
Numbers 11-20 Unit 22 - Grammar
Numbers 21- 25 Understanding Grammar
Numbers 26-30 Unit 24 - Key Expressions
Study Help: English Outside
School


Read through the questions and
suggestions with the class.
Students say what they have tried and
if they enjoyed it and found ir helpful,
e.g. which magazines they read, which
songs they got the words of.
15 "have got better at tennis
but I haven't changed:
16 'My first big tournament
win was very important
for me:
17 'People in my Io<al town
treat me like everybody
else.'
18 ' Every tennis player
dreams of winning Wimbledon.'
19 'My family make me happy and my uncle is
my coach.'
20 'My uncle gave me a Real Madrid shirt when
he was a player.'
4 Complete the sentences with all, both, most,
and nonl!.
my twin sisters love music but
21. neither of them plays an instrument.
The exam was really hard; of us failed
and of us got over 50%1
I like l.s-E11L- sports but my favourite is
basketball.
Grammar 0/ 15
5 Complete each pie<e of advice.
A: I' ve got a terrible headache.
B: You take an aspirin.
A: It 's going to rain.
B: You'd take your umbrella.
A: I can't do this homework.
B: If you, phone
someone in your class.
A: I've got a bad cold.
B: You go out tonight
Key Expressions 0/ 5
Study Help: English Outside
Which of these things have you tried? Which are
you going to try?
Watch an English OVD with the subtitles in English.
Read a Penguin Reader for your level.
Read mag<llzines in English.
Go to the 88Cs Wf!i>site (www.bbc.co.uk).lt·sa
good plact to practise your reading. You can
listen to BBC radio programmes online.
Listen to songs in English and get the words
the Internet.
Talk to fQreign tourists in English in .... ,"-,.
when you are on holiday.
• Students discuss which of the
suggest ions they are going to rry. They
can report back in a later lesson and
discuss how they got on.
Module 8 Test, TIP, Page 76
detective stories and films; make
mysteries and a
alibi , blood, criminal.
fingerprints. investigation.
murder, witness
General: clue, crime scene,
kidnapping, motive. theft
People: detective, kidnapper.
murderer, suspect, thief,
victim
Evidence: DNA, footprints.
hair, murder weapon, ransom
note
Get Ready
Background
American TV cri me and detective series
have been incredibly popul ar si nce the
1950s. They have been broadcast all over
the world and often repeated many years
after the series has finished. Some famous
series are: The Fugitive, Hawaii 5-0,
Colombo, Ko;ok, Charlie's AI/gels (wi rh
recent movie spin-offs), Murder. She Wrote
(the longest-running detecti ve ser ies), The
X-Files, Homicide, Monk and CST (Crime
Scene Investigation) .
Exercise 1
• In groups or as a class, students discuss
thei r favourite detecti ve srories, giving
reasons for their choice.
~ Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 11)
• Play the recording for students ro
li sten and repeat the Key Words. Pay
particular attention ro word stress .
• Check that students understand any
new vocabul ary.
• Students wor k in pairs, adding the
words in the box to categories a-c of
the Key Words.
Answers
a alibi investigation
murder
b criminal witness
c blood fingerprints
~ Exercise 3 (CD3 Track 12)
• Read aloud the statements
(1-8).
• Ask students to look at rhe
phoros of the detectives
and guess which one
matches some of the
statements.
• Play the recording, twi ce
if necessa ry, for students
ro listen and match the
derectives (a-d) with the
statements (1-8) .
Answers --t student page
Extra
Divide the class into four
groups. Ask each group to
listen carefull y to one of the
descri ptions and make a note
of extra information about the
detective. Play the recording.
Each group tells the cl ass their
extra information.
Check that students understand
any new vocabulary.
Exercise 4
• Students wor k in small
groups, di scussing the
qual ities a detective needs
and giving reasons.
• The gro ups feedback to the
class and see how much
genera l agreement there is.
Exercise 5



Ask one of the students
ro read aloud the exa mple
sentence.
In pairs, students di scuss
which qualities each job
requires, giving reasons.
In turn, each pair tell s the
class the qualities required
for one of the jobs and
why.
85
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 7 and 8) and shorren
the discussion in Exercises 1
and 3.
Background
The topic of the lesson is
the discovery of Homo
floresiensi s. a new human
species on an Indonesian
island Flores in 2004. There is
more about this discovery at
these addresses:
hrrp:llnews.nationalgeographic.
com/news/2004/101l027 _
041027 _homo_floresiensis_
2.html
hrrp://www.new5cienrisr.com/
article. ns? id=d n 65 8 8
hrrp:l/www.abc. ner.au/science/
ncws/stories/s1480331.htm
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Swdenrs look at the
pictures and describe the
creatures. Encourage them
ro guess when and where
they lived.
(ig Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 13)
86
• Pi a y the recording for
students to read and li sten
and find the difference
between the ' hobbit' and
us. They ca n check their
answers from Exercise 1
about when and where the
three creatures lived.
Answers
They were small (the size of
a three-year-old child) and
had a smaller brain, longer
arms, a sharply sloping
fore head and no chin.
Exercise 3
• Revi se voca bul ary from
Get Ready, Exercises 4
and 5 (page 85) by aski ng
students what skill s and
qual it ies an archaeologist
needs. Ask studenrs to say
whi ch of these qualities
they have.
History Detectives
• Students say whether they would
like to be an archaeologist and give
reasons.
Grammar: Reported questions
Exercise 4
• Read aloud the report of the interview
and the first entry in t he table.
• Studenrs work indi vi dually, compl eting
the rable.
• Check answers by aski ng individuals
to read aloud each pair of original and
reported questions. Draw students'
attention to the change in verb tense in
each pair of senrences.
Answers
I wanted to know how old the skeleton
was. 1 wanted to know why they had
ca lled it 'the hobbit' . I (also) asked if
Homo f10resiensis was very differenr for
Homo sapiens. I asked what funhet
research would be done.
Exercise 5
• Students work indi viduall y or in pairs,
reading and answering the questions.
Answers -+ student page
Grammar: Reported questions
4 Read this report of the interview.
Complete the table with reported
questions.
Original question
'What have
archaeologists
found on
Flores Island?'
'How old is the
skeleton?'
'Why did they
coif this creature
the "hobbit"?'
'IS Homo
floresiensis very
different from
Homo sapiens?'
'What further
research will
be done?'
Reported question
I asked him what
archaeologists
had found on Flores
Island.
5 look at the direct and reported
questions above and answer the
questions:
When we report a question:
1 we use the word order of a
statement @I No
2 we change the tense in the question
if the reporting verb is in t h ~ s t
tense ~ I No
3 we use the question word from
the question ~ I No
4 we add if when there is no
question word (j§1 No
Practice
Exercise 6
Grammar
Practice
6 Match the direct questions (1-6) with reported
questions (a-e). Two of t he di rect questi ons are
matched wi th one reported question.
1 'What do you do?' e)
2 'What have you done?' a)
3 'What are you doing?' t}
4 'What did you do?' e)
5 'What will you do?' h)
6 'What can you do?' tI)
aJ He asked what I had done.
b) He asked what I would do.
c) He asked what I was doing.
d) He asked what I could do.
e) He asked what I did.
7 A st udent reports an interview for a job at an
archaeological si te. Wri te the ori ginal questi ons.
They asked me jf I had ever worked at an
archeological site.
2 They wanted to know if I was planning to study
archeology.
3 They asked why I had chosen t hat job.
4 They wanted to know if I (ould speak English.
5 They asked if I would be happy to sleep in a tent.
6 They asked if I suffered from any diseases.
8 Report these questions a journalist asked an
archaeologist.
1 'Have you ever worked in Africa?' He asked me
2 'Where are you currently working?'
3 'Do you have any sponsors?'
4 'Are you going to write a book?'
5 ' Did you take part in the investigation into the
"hobbit"?'
6 'Where will the bones of the hobbit be kept after the
investigation?'
7 'What is t he origin of the "hobbit"?'
8 'Where are most of the prehistoric remains found?'
Your Turn
9 Think about some questions your famil y and friends
asked you yesterday and report t hem to the class.
Example
My sister asked me if I was tired.
...... 'IM.CUT! Page 118, Exercise 25
Exercise 7
• Check answers by asking pairs of
students to read aloud the matched
di rect and reported questions. Point
• Remind students to punctuate the
direct questions correctly (with quote
marks and question marks) and change
other words such as pronouns where
necessary.
out that past simple and present perfecr
verbs in direct question are changed to
past perfect in reported questions.
Answers -+ student page
• When checking answers, point out that
'that ' in item 3 changes to ' t his' in the
direct quest ion.
Answers
1 ' Have YOLI ever worked at
an archaeological site?'
2 'Are you planning to
study archaeology?'
3 'Why have you chosen/did
you choose this job?'
4 'Can YOli speak English?'
5 'Will you be ha ppy to
sleep in a tent?
6 'Do YOll suffer from any
diseases ?'
Exercise 8
Answers
1 if I had ever worked in
Africa.
2 He asked me where I am
currently working.
3 He asked me if [ had any
sponsors.
4 He asked me if ] was
going to write a book.
S He asked me if [ had
taken pa rt in t he
investigation into the
'hobbit'.
6 He asked me where the
bones of the 'hobbit'
would be kept a fter the
invescigation.
7 He asked me what was
the origin of the 'hobbit' .
8 He asked me where most
of the prehi storic rema ins
were found.
Your Turn
Exercise 9
• Elicit two or three
exa mples of direct
questions (e.g. Have YOli
got any homework? Are
you going to the cinema
at rhe weekend? ) and the
reponed questions (My
mum asked me if I had
got any homework. My
friend asked me if I was
going to the cinema at the
weekend. )
• Give scudenrs time to think
of four or five questions
and how to repon them.
..... 'IMEOUT! Page 118,
Exercise 25
Photocopiable Activity 17,
TIP, Page 64
8
This Unit
Shorr of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 3 and 7),
More time: do the Extra
activity.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students discuss the
questions in small groups,
giving reasons for their
answers.
Reading
~ Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 14)
88
• Play rhe recording for
students ro read and li sten
and check their guesses
from Exerci se l.
Answers
1 Stapleton
2 Holmes
3 Sir Charles Baskerville
Exercise 3
• Students work individuall y
or in pairs, reading the
text and choosing the
correct words. Advise them
ro read through the text
qu ickly first for general
understanding.
• Check answers by asking
individuals ro read aloud
the sentences.
Answers ..... student page
Exercise 4
• Read aloud the instructions
and check that students
understanding the meaning
of 'idiomatic expressions' .
Students may find it helpfu l
if you refer to two or three
idioms from their Ll.
• Students do the exerci se
working in pairs.
• \Vhen checking answers,
point out that the
expression (t he black sheep
of the famil y' has negative
connotations and is used
when someone is different
from the rest of the family
because that person is
considered to be a failure
Sherlock Holmes
Warm-up
1 look at the drawings (a-f).
Who do you think was:
1 the murderer?
2 the detective?
3 the murder victim?
Reading
2 Read the story and check
your guesses
for Exercise 1.
LaSt week, the body of another Baskerville, Sir Charles, was found outside Baskerville
Hall. There were no marks on his body but next to it were footprints of a huge dog, This
reminded Holmes that in the 17th century, the evil Sir Hugo Baskerville had been killed
by an enormous hound.
Sir Charles's young nephew, Sir Henry Baskerville, returned from America, On his first
day, he mysteriously lost a boot at his hotel and soon afterwards, received a threatening
note, Holmes and Watson went to see him.
Having talked to Sir Henry, Holmes sent Warson to scay with him at Baskerville Hall.
Watson was a light sleeper and heard strange noises that night, The next morning, he
went for a walk on the moors and met Mr Stapleton, a neighbour. Stapleton told Watson
how dangerous the moors were because of the hound and the bogs, where people could
easi ly drown. While they were talking, Stapleton's wife arrived. She whispered to Watson:
'Go back to London immediately!'
One night, Watson saw the Baskerville's butler signalling to someone on the moors.
He found out that he was helping a prisoner who had escaped from a nearby prison. The
next day, Watson saw another stranger on the moors and followed him. But the stranger
turned Ollt to be Holmes! Suddenly, they heard terrible screams. The)' ran towards the
noise and found the dead body of the prisoner - wearing Sir Henry's clothes. That night,
having looked at the Baskerville portraits, Holmes realised that Stapleton was the spitting
image of old Sir Hugo.
The following day. Sir Henry went for lunch with Stapleton. Holmes and Watson
decided to follow him. It was very foggy, and on his return, Sir Henry was attacked
by a huge dog. Holmes took out his gun and shot it. luckily, Sir Henry was safe and
sound. They went back to Stapleton'S house and found Mrs Stapleton tied up. She told
them about her husband's plan to kill the BaskerviUes. Stapleton was really Sir Charles's
nephew, although Sir Charles had never met him. Stapleton was the black sheep of the
family who had gone away to South America. But he had returned because he wanted to
get the family's money. Mrs Srapleron showed them where her husband had hidden the
hound on the moors. They followed Stapleton'S footprints but they disappeared in the
bog. Having got lost in the fog, Stapleton must have drowned in the bog! The mystery of
the Hound of the BaskervilleI' was over.
or an emba rrassment, e.g. someone who
gets into trouble with the police, someone
who drops out of school or college and
doesn't try to get a job, someone who
goes abroad and doesn't keep in touch
with their family.
Exercise 5
• Do rhe first twO sentences with rhe
class.
• Students complete the exercise working
indi viduall y. They can compare
answers in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
Answers
a light sleeper/easily woken up
safe and sound/unhurt
the spitting image/exactly like someone
the black sheep of the fami ly/someone
who is different from the rest of his/her
family
over/finished
AnSLvers
1 literal
2 idiomatic
3 literal
4 idiomatic
5 idiomatic
6 literal
3 Read Holmes's explanation. (hoose
the correct options in italics.
'Elementary, my dear Watson! Stapleton came
back from 1SoUlh Americo I the USA to live near
Baskerville Hall. He knew about the story 01 2Sir
Henry I and he trained an enormous dog
which he kept lon the moors I in his house. Sir
Charles also knew the legend and was frightened.
Stapleton arranged to meet him one night but sent
his dog instead. Sir Charles died 40f 0 heart attack
I from a bite when he saw the horrible dog.
When Sir Henry arrived, Stapleton went to london.
He followed Sir Henry and stole one of his
sl!22tI I hots to get his 'name I smell for the dog.
When you and Sir Henry got to Baskerville Hall.
Stapleton's wife tried to warn you because she
thought you were 7Sir I Sir Henry. later, the
dog killed the escaped prisoner because he was
wearing aSir Charles's I Sir Henry's clothes which
had his smell! That evening, I realised Stapleton
was a Baskerville when I saw 9Sir Hugo's I Sir
portrait.
The next day, Stapleton sent his dog to attack
Sir Henry but I shot the dog. When he saw this,
Stapleton tried to escape but he drowned in the
bog. Finally, we found Mrs Stapleton tied up
because she was 10Jor I gggjm1 her husband's
plans to get the Baskerville's money.
4 look at the Word Builder. Find the idiomatic
expressions in the text and match them with
these meani ngs.
• someone who is different from the rest of his I
her family ,. exactly like someone
• finished ,. unhurt • easily woken up
Word Builder
to be a light sleeper; to be safe and sound;
to be the spitting image of someone;
the black sheep of the family; to be over
---Fact Dr FictiDI? ---
Arthur Canan Doyle got tired of Sherlock Holmes and
'killed' hi m in a story. People complained so much
that Cooao Doyle had to bring him back to life.
Chld:........,,- fIlSWIt' 00 P<19t 106.
Extra
Read through the section on 'idiomatic
language' in the Word Bank with the class.
Point out that a good dictionary will
include idiomatic expressions. Students may
like to look up expressions such as 'black
sheep' (listed under 'black'), 'spitting image'
(listed. under 'spitting') in their dictionaries.
Give students examples of other similar
expressions, e.g. 'I've gOt a heavy cold.
/ He's a heavy smoker/drinker/sleeper'.
'This laptop is tons better than myoid
one.'
Sir Henry Bukel'YiUe
5 Are the underlined words literal or idiomatic?
1 That bag is very
2 There was some very rain last night.
3 We walked for ten miles yesterday.
4 This laptop is better than myoid one.
S The exam was a nightmare - it was really hard!
6 I had a bad nightmare last night.
....... Word Bank, page 128
G look at the Sentence Builder. Find more
examples in the story.
Sentence Builder
Holmes talked to Si r Henry. Then he sent Watson
to stay with him at Baskerville HaiL
Having talked to Sir Henry, Holmes sent Watson
to stay with him at Baskerville Hall.
7 Rewrite the sentences using the structure in
the Sentence Builder.
1 Stapleton rented a house near Baskerville Hall.
He got to know Sir Charles.
2 He heard about the legend of the hound.
Afterwards, he bought and trai ned a huge dog.
3 Stapleton took Sir Henry's boot. After that, he
used it to get the hound to attack him.
4 The hound followed Sir Henry's smell. It then
killed the prisoner wearing his dothes.
Speaking
8 Work in pairs. Read about two situations and
ask your partner 'yes I no' questions to try
and explain them.
Example
Did somebody come in through the window?
.. Student A, page lOS ... Student B, page 107
.... 'IMIOUT! Page 118. Exercise 26
Exercise 6
• Read aloud the sentences.
• Students wor k in pairs, finding and
reading aloud more examples from
the story (1 That night, having looked
at the Baskerville portraits, Holmes
realised that Stapleton was the spitting
image of old Sir Hugo. 2 Having got
lost in the fog, Stapleton must have
drowned in the bog.) Point out the use
of the comma in the sentences.
Exercise 7
Answers
1 Having rented a house
near Baskerville Hall ,
Stapleton got to know Si r
Charles.
2 Having heard about the
legend of the hound, he
bought and trained a huge
dog.
3 Having taken Si r Henry's
boot, Stapleton used it to
get the hound to attack
him.
4 Having followed Sir
Henry's smell, the hound
then killed the prisoner
wea ring his clothes.
Speaking
Exercise 8
• Give students time to read
through their situations
and expl anations and check
that they understand them.
• Students wor k in pairs,
taking turns to read aloud
a si tuation and ask and
answer 'yes/no' questions
to guess the expl anation. [f
students cannot guess the
explanation after asking
10 ' yes/no' questions,
their partner gives the
explanation.
Fact Dr FictiOI!
• After checking answers,
ask students to think of
other fictional characters
whose 'death' would be
very unpopul ar, e.g. Agatha
Christie's Belgian detecti ve
Hercule Poi rot, James
Bond.
TIMI OUT! Page 11 8,
Exercise 26
Photocopiable Activity 18,
TTP, Page 65
8
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 4 and 5).
More time: do the Extra
act iviti es.
Background
Ellie and Steve go to the
cosmetics factory to interview
Mrs Foster, the owner, and to
get evidence that the factory is
polluting the local river. Mrs
Foster is not very cooperative,
denies all knowledge of
toxic chemicals and asks
the reporters to leave. They
decide to hide and wait for
an opportunity to look for
evidence inside the warehouse.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in groups,
guessing where Steve and
Ellie are and who the
woman is and describing
what is happening in the
photos.
Reading
2 (CD3 Track 15)
90
• Read through the questions
with the class before YOli
play the recording.
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and answer the questions.
Students can also check
their guesses from
Exercise 1.
• When checking answers,
encourage students to guess
the meani ng of 'take legal
action' .
Answers
1 Because she has something
to hide.
2 Because they ask about
dangerous chemicals in
her products and say that
she has killed fi sh in the
nver.
3 She will take legal action
if Ellie and Steve say
anything on the radio.
Exercise 3
• Explain that indirect questions usually
sound more polite, especiall y in formal
situations.
• Draw students' attention to the use
of Could you tell lis/me if .... when
making yes/no direct questions into
indi rect questions and' Do you know
(what ... )? when making Wh- questions
into indirect questions. Point out that
<Do you know' in items 2 and 3 does
not change and it is not affected by the
verb tense.
Direct questions
1 Are there any
dangerous
chemicals ... ?
Exercise 4
Answers
Indirect questions
Could you tell us if there
are any dangerous
chemicals ... ?
Do you know what it is?
1 Do you know where they li ve?
2 Do you know what time it is?
3 Could you tell me if there is a post
office near here?
4 Do you know what she does'
5 Do you know who that man is?
6 Could you tell me if he phoned last
night?
Could we talk to
you, please?
Could you turn that
recorder off?
Do you think you could
turn it off, please?
Do you mind if we lake
a look around?
Is it okay if we ask
some questions?
Speaking
Exercise 5
Answers
Of course.
Sure, no problem.
I' m sorry, you can't.
Go ahead.
Okay.
a ask for permission: 1 4 5
b ask someone ro do something: 2 3 6
rude: 6
Extra
Play the recording of the dialogue from
Exercise 2 for students to focus on the
stress and intonation patterns in the
requests and responses.
Pairs of students read aloud the Key
Expressions.
1 look at the listeni ng Help.
listening Help: Taking Rotes
• Us! the IDpIcs you toont to moho notes
ooout
• As you 1Islen, WIIb! wortIs nett!
to each topic.
• Don't write rull sentences. Use obbreviotions.
listen to detectives describing two crimes.
Use the listening Help to make notes about
these things for each crime (when possible).
• crime • vidim • suspect • motive
• evidence • alibi
3 Work in pairs. Compare your notes with your
partner's. Who gOlthe most details?
1
2
3
4
5
Listen Closely listen to the questions and
complete the gaps. Then li sten and repeat
the questions.
How ""
__ know?
_-"D .. o ___ ---f ,y<;.u '----_ have any suspeds?
__ --"",h, "-__ ----' h"."'v<'---_ ,n
alibi?
Where _---' i'- , __
When -:----""'''-0 __
'ib(; now?
thy want the
Students then work in groups of three,
reading aloud the complete dialogue from
Exercise 2 and changing parts.
Exercise 6
• Elicit one or two more dialogues using
some of the cues before students work
III paLrs.
Extra
Each pair of students say one or two of
their dialogues for the class to hear.
Exercise 7
• Elicit two or three
dialogues from the class
before students work in
pairs.
• Check that srudents do not
make incorrect sentences
when using ' Do you mind
... '. For exa mple, 'Do you
mind taking my book back
to the library?' is correct
but 'Do you mind if you
take my book back to the
library?' is nOt .
Everyday listening
Exercise 1
• Read aloud the advice
about taking notes.
Remind students of the
advice in Unit 23 on raking
notes from a written text .
@Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 16)
• Students wr ite two li sts of
the six topics (one list for
each crime), leavi ng space
to write t heir notcs .
• Pla y the recordi ng, twice if
necessary, for students to
listen and make notes.
Exercise 3
• In pairs, students compare
their nOtes to see if they
agree about the facts and
who got t he most details.
• Play the recording, pausi ng
it appropr iately, for
students to check their
notes.
4 (CD3 Track 17)
Answers -+ student page
...... TIMI OUT! Page 118,
Exercise 27
91
Across Cultures 5
Warm-up
Exerci se 1
• You may wish to introduce
[he topic of unsolved
mysteries such as how the
ancient Egyptians bui lt the
pyramids, the existence
and locati on of Atl ant is,
the Loch Ness monster,
UFO (Unidentified Fl ying
Obj ects) sighrings, etc,
before tu rning to the phoro
and drawing of Rapa Nui
(Easter Isl and).
• Students work in small
groups, looking at the
pictures and guessing what
the statues represented
and why they were there.
Each group discusses
which reason (a, b or c)
they think was the most
likely reason for the
destruction of the island's
old civilisati on.
• The groups exchange
ideas as a cl ass. Hel p
with vocabulary where
necessary.
Reading
2 (CD3 Track 18)
92


If you have a large map
of the world, displ ay it
fo r students to see where
Easter Island is.
Play the recording for
students to listen and read
and check their answer to
Exercise 1.
Answer
c
Exercise 3



Read through the phrases
1-8 and the exampl e
answer with the class.
Check that students
understand any new
vocabulary, e.g. cannibals.
work individually,
readi ng the text and
findi ng the sentences .
They can compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a cl ass.
Check answers by asking
individuals to read al oud
the sentences. Check
Warm-up
1 look at the photo and drawing. Guess what
destroyed the island's old ci vilisation (a, b or cj.
a) A volcano erupted and kill ed everyone.
bj Europeans invaded the island and kil led most
of the people.
c) The islanders cut down the forests and had no food.
Reading
2 Read the text and check your answer to Exercise 1.
that students understand any new
vocabulary in these sentences.
Answers
2 Some peopl e thought that UFOs
must have put them there or that the
island was once part of the lost city of
Atlantis.
3 Between 1300 and 1600 years ago, a
group of Pol ynesians came to Rapa
Nui in canoes.
4 Thi s was an ancient Polynesian
tradi tion.
S (These giant statues couldn't be
moved) bur rhe Rapa Nui peopl e
transported others around the island
on rollers made from palm trees.
Answers
6 Food suppli es were low (and the
isla nders began [0 fi ght each other ).
7 (In t he 18
th
century, Europea n) slave
traders took away young and healthy
islanders.
8 Perhaps in the 21st century we a re
doing t he same as the islanders did,
destroying the place that gives us life.
3 Find the sentences in the text that tell
you these things,
Example
1 The island is a littfe triangle of 100
square kilometres.
the shape and size of the island
1 some theories about the origins of
the statues
1 how the Polynesians got to the island
4 why they made statues
5 how they moved the statues
, why some islanders became cannibals
7 what happened to the younger generation
of islanders
lour modern world may be similar to
the island
4 Find the words in from the text
for each group (1-3) in the Word Builder.
Exercise 4
5 Replace the ynderlined words to make the
description more interesting. Do not repeat words,
The number of tourists waS quite iIIW1 this year. We
stayed in a small village near a lake. The
mountain behind the town was Wl:.b.ig and we didn't
Iry to climb it. The hotel was nKe but our room was
Very small. We spent a few days visiting the museums
and ~ monuments, We were lucky because the
weather was ~ . Our last day was the day of the
Cup Final. The local team was in it , so they showed the
match in the square on a TV screen. Their QJ..d
captain scored the winning goal , and there was a
.bii party after the malch with ¥eC.¥..bJg amounts of rut
nkt food and drink.
~ Word Bank, page 124
Speaking
6 , , . Speak Out Work in groups. Do you agree or
disagree with these statements? Give your reasons.
1 We are destroying our planet very fast.
2 The same might happen to us as the Easter
Islanders.
3 Tourists spoillhe places they visit.
FOR YOUR PORTFOUO
~ Project: An article
You are a 'history detective', Write an article about
an unsolved mystery,
1 Choose a historical mystery. Here are some ideas.
• the losl world of Atlantis
• Nazca lines in Peru
• Stonehenge in England
2 Make notes about the mystery. Use the Internet
or an encyclopedia.
3 Write your article in three paragraphs:
a) the mystery
b) possi ble expl anati ons
c) your personal opinion
4 Work in groups, Read each other's articles,
Which is the most interesting mystery?
Exercise 5
• Students wor k individuall y or in pa irs,
readi ng the text and completing the
rable.
• Before doing the exercise, el icit two
or three adj ecti ves to replace 'nice'
in a text . If you wi sh, students can
read the ' Word Famili es' section in the
Word Ba nk (page 124) before doing
the exercise.
Check pronunciat ion of rhe words
when checking answers.
Answers
1 vast huge maSSive giant
2 ancient ageing
3 li ttl e low tin y
• Remind studencs not to repeat words.
Ad vise them to read quickl y through
the text before t hey start replaci ng the
words so that they can select the most
appropriate word for each noun, e. g,
'deli cious' goes with ' food' but not
with ' weather' .
• Students compl ete
the exercise working
individua ll y or in pairs.
Monitor a nd help as
necessa ry.
Suggested a11SLUerS
quite low vasr (la ke)
enormous (mountain)
lovely (horel) tin y (room)
ancient (monuments)
glorious (weather)
giant (TV screen)
ageing (captain)
huge (parr y)
massive (amounts)
delicious (food )
Speaking
Exercise 6
• Students work in groups
of four to five, di scussing
the statement and giving
reasons for their opinions.
• Open up the di scussion to
the cl ass and see how much
general agreement there is.
Project
• Read through the stages of
the project so that students
understa nd what to do.
• Elicit suggestions of
other mysteri es, including
mysteri es from the
students' own region and
country.
• If you wish, students can
work in pairs, resea rching
the sa me topi c and pooling
their informati on, They
should rhen plan and
write their article working
indi viduall y.
• Encourage students to
work in pa irs, helping
each ot her check their
paragraphs for grammar,
spell ing, and punctuati on.
Remind students to use
different adj ecti ves to
make their articl e more
interesting.
• St udents then work in
groups, reading each
ot her's a rti cles and
di scussing which mystery is
most interesting.
93
Language Check
Exercises 1-2
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 3
Answers
J 1 She asked him how long
he had been there.
12 He asked the teacher if
he could go home early.
13 I asked him what he
was going to do at t he
weekend.
14 The teacher asked Mike
where his homework was.
15 I asked her when she had
got back.
16 They asked Mr Williams
who would win the next
World Cup.
17 They asked us if we had
ever been hiking in the
mountains.
Exercise 4
Answers
18 Do you know the way to
the station, please?
19 Do you know what time
it is?
20 Do you know if Paul
invited Kerry to his
party?
Exercise 5
Answers -+ student page
Feedback ((D3 Track 19)
94
• Students listen to the
recording to check their
answers. Check spelling
where necessary.
• Students look at the tabl e
to see whi ch sections in the
Students' Book they need
to look at again.
• Give students time in
class or at home to do the
exercises on page 92 of the
Workbook.
Study Corner 9
Language Check
1 Complete each gap with one word.
The detective looked at the cri me scene. The
, an old man, was on the floor. The
murder 2w----'ilfW!- ' a knife, was next to him.
He hoped there were 3f iH§«'lZn'nts on the knife.
There was a lot of money in the man's jacket so
money wasn' t the . A witness saw a
neighbour entering the house earlier so he was
the main 5s U$fKd
2 Complete the idi omatic expressions.
6 You' re the spitt ing of your brother;
you are so al i ke!
7 I never sleep deeply; I'm a sleeper.
8 We were worried about the climbers but they
returned safe and .
9 He never keeps in touch; he's the black
of the family.
10 Thi s is boring. I'll be glad when it's .
Vocabulary D / 10
3 Rewrit e the questi ons.
11 ' How long have you been here?' she asked
him. She asked ..
12 ' Could I go home earl y?' he asked the teacher.
He asked the teacher ...
13 'What are you going to do at the weekend?' I
asked him. I asked him .
14 'Where is your homework, Mike?' asked the
teacher. The teacher asked.
15 ' When did you get back?' I asked her. I asked.
16 ' Who will win t he next World (up?' they asked
Mr Williams. They asked .
17 'Have you ever been hiking in the mountains?'
they asked us. They asked us ...
Feedback
Li sten and check your answers to t he
Language Check. Write down your scores.
• Look at t he table below. Then do the
exercises on page 92 of t he Workbook.
Wrong answers:
Numbers 1- 5
Numbers 6- 10
Numbers 11- 17
Numbers 18-20
Numbers 21-30
look again at:
Get Ready - Key Words
Unit 26 - Word Builder
Unit 25 - Grammar
Unit 27 - Sentence Builder
Unit 27 - Key Expressions
Study HeLp: Revision for
Exams
• Read aloud the advice in the Study
Help.
• Tell students about the exams. Check
that they understand the different parts
of the exams and what the exams test.
• Remind students that they can test
each other on vocabulary, especia lly
if t hey have written new words and
expressions in their vocabulary books.
4 Rewrite the questions.
18 ' Can you tell me the way to the bus station,
please?' 'Do yau know .
19 What time is it?' 'Do you know .
20 'Did Paul i nvite Kerry to his party?'
'Do you know.
Grammar D /10
5 Complete t he dialogue with these words.
afraid, ahead, could, course, mind,
okay, right, sorry, think, will
Kath: Mum, is it 21---4--- if I go to a concert
with Anna on Saturday night?
Mum: but don' t be late.
you take your mobile phone?
Kath: Sure. Do you if I ask a favour?
Mum: No, go 2S-----'lhmL .
Kath: There aren't any late buses after the
concert. Do you Dad could pick
us up in the car?
Mum: Of Oh, wait a minute. No, he
can't. I'm he's working late on
Saturday.
Kath: What about you, Mum?
Mum: What time does il fini sh?
Kath: About one o' clock.
Mum: One o'clock! I'm 29...J£1I)!- , you can'l stay
out that late.
Kath: Oh please! Just once.
Mum: No, and that 's final ! Now, you
get on with your homework, please?
Key Expressions D /10
Study Help: Revision for Exams
Ask your teacher about the different parts 01
the exam, e.g. grammar.
Read the texts in Challenges again. look
through the Key Words, Word Builders and
Word Bank. Check words you are not sure of.
look through your wri"en work in your
Portfolio. list your most common mistakes.
Practise the Key Expressions.
look at the Grammar Summary in the
Workbook. Do the extra grammar exercises in
t he summary and the CD·ROM.
• When students have looked through
their written work and listed their
most common mistakes, ask them ro
show you their lists so that you can
suggest suitable Units to look at again
and practi ce acti viti es.
Extra
Students often find it helpful to answer
some ' mock' or 'practice' exam questions
during their revision period, especially if
rhe exam is a timed exam.
Module 9 Test, TTP, Page 77
Get Rendy
Background
You may prefer to bring in some music of
their own choice fo r Exercise 5.
1 (CD3 Track 20)
• Play the recording for students to
listen and repeat the Key Words. Pay
part icul ar attenti on to word stress.
• Students work indi viduall y, making a
nOte of which words they would use to
describe each painting.
• In small grou ps, srudenrs compare rhe
adjectives they have chosen, giving
their reasons.
Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 21)
• Pl ay the recording for students to
li sten, then di scuss the adjectives as a
class.
Exercise 3
• Give students rime to read through
the sentences before you play the
recording.
• Pl ay the recording, twice if necessary,
for students to complete the sentences
with speakers a-c.
Answers -+ student page
Extra
Divide the class into three
groups. Ask each group to
listen carefully to one of the
speakers and make a note of
extra information about hislher
opinion of the painting.
After listening, each group
tells the class their extra
information.
Exercise 4
• In turn, each student tell s
the class which painting
they like most, giving theif
reasons. Encourage them to
use the Key Words where
appropriate.
Extra
In groups or as a class,
students talk about their
personal favourite painting,
(not one of the paintings in
this Unit), saying why they
like this painting and giving
some information about the
artist. They can bring a picture
of the painting to class to
show the other students.
Exercise 5 (CD3 Track 22)
• Give students ti me to read
through rhe quest ions
before you play the
recording.
• Play rhe recording twice
for students to li sten and
answer rhe questions.
Tell them ro answer rhe
questions in note-form.
Exercise 6
• Tell t he class what you
have imagined about each
scene.


Students work in groups,
exchanging ideas. Point out
that there are no ' right'
answers - people interpret
music in very different
ways. Students who are
used to listening to a fairly
wide range of music and
ha ve a lot of imagination
may find thi s an easier task
than others.
The groups feedback to the
class and see how many
different scenes they have
imagined for each piece of
music.
95
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 8, 9 and 10).
More time: do the Extra
activities.
Background
The topic of the lesson
is a popular hypothesis
that genius coincides with
mental problems, most often
schi zophreni a and manic
depression.
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Students work in small
groups, discussing the
questions. Encourage them
to talk about contempora ry
artists as well as past
painters, musi cians and
writers.
~ Exercise 2 (CD3 Track 23)
96
• Play the recording once for
students to read and li sten
for general understanding.
• Students work individuall y,
reading the text and listing
the famous geniuses and
their problems.
Answers
Vincent van Gogh -
committed suicide
John Forbes Nash -
schizophrenia
Paul Gauguin - depression
Lord Byron - violent and
eccentr ic personality and
lifestyle
Beethoven - quarrell ed with
everybody, had strange
personal habits, went deaf
Rembrandt - an eye illness
Extra
Play t he recording again fo r
students to read and listen
and make a note of any new
vocabulary.
Exercise 3
• S t ~ d e n t s discuss the
questions in small groups.
Encourage them to
interpret ' arti stic' in a
wide sense, e.g. craftwork,
choosing colour schemes,
furn ishing their room.
mad Genius?
Warm- up
1 Look at t he painting and t he photo.
Do you t hink artists are different
from other people? In what ways?
2 Read t he text. Make a list
of the famous geniuses in
the text and their problems.
Grammar: Past Conditional
Exercise 4
• Students work individuall y, referring
back to the text and completing the
sentences.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 5
• Students work in pai rs, studying the
sentences and answering the quest ions.
• If you think it will be helpful to your
st udents, ask them how they would say
these sentences in their Ll.
Answers
3 Do you have any artistic
skills? When are you more
creative - when you are
happy or unhappy?
the past! situations we imagine
Exerci se 6
Answers -+ student page
Practice
Exercise 7
• Students work individua ll y or in pairs,
reading and choosi ng the correct
ending for each sentence.
Anstvers -+ student page
Grammar: Past Conditional
4 Complete the sentences from the text with
hod I hadn't or hove.
If he ~ stayed in France, he wouldn't
~ painted his most famous works of
art.
2 He wouldn't ~ composed such
masterpieces as the Ninth Symphony if he
.....h.JJ.ifo.L lost his hearing.
3 Would he ~ been a worse painter if he
~ had normal vision?
5 Do the sentences above talk about t he future,
present or past? 0 0 they talk a bout sit uations
that happened or situati ons we imagine?
6 Complete the rul e.
In the Past Condit ional we use if + ,
would + ~ + 3rd form of the verb.
Practice
7 Choose the correct ending (a or b) for each
sentence.
II Copernicus hadn't discovered that the Sun
was the centre of our sol ar system, .
® modern astronomy wouldn't have started.
b) modern astronomy would have started.
2 Arthur Conan Doyle wouldn't have become
famous, ...
® if he hadn't created Sherlock Hol mes.
b) if he had created Sherlock Hol mes.
8 Compl ete the sentences with correct forms of
the verbs.
If Mozart ___ (not be) so talented, he
___ (not become) famous in his times.
2 If Michelangelo ___ (listen) to his fa t her,
he ___ (work) as a merchant.
3 Einstein ___ (not leave) Europe if Hitler
___ (not come) into power.
4 Van Gogh ___ (paint) uni nteresting
pictures if he ___ (be) mentally healthy.
5 If Louis Armstrong ___ (not be) born in
New Orleans, he ___ (not have) a chance
to listen to great bl ues musicians.
6 Dostoyevsky ___ (not write) Crime and
Punishment so fast if he ___ (not need)
money to pay his gambling debts.
Extra
Ask students to make similar sentences
about themselves. Write cues on the board,
e.g.
1 If I hadn't been born in (country), I
wouldn't have (spoken .. ... )
2 If my friend hadn't helped me, I wouldn't
have .....
3 If my parents hadn't given me my
pocket money, I wouldn't have
Exerci se 8
Grammar
9 Rewrite the sentences as conditionals.
Example
1 If Kurt Cobain hadn't suffered from
depression, he wouldn't have committed
suicide.
Kurt Cobain suffered from depression - he
committed suici de
2 Newton observed apples fall ing off a tree
- written theory of gravi ty
3 Ernest Hemingway had a very interesting life
- he had something to write about
.. Chopin left his home in Poland - he composed
so many sad romantic pieces
5 Leonardo da Vi nci wasn't an ordinary man - he
created great works
6 Napoleon was a military genius - he won so
many battles
to Complete the sentences.
Example
If impressionist pointers hadn't been so poor, they
wouldn't have pointed so many pictures.
1 If impressionist painters hadn't been so poor,
2 If Chopin had lived longer, ___ .
3 If ancient scholars had known that the Earth is
round, ___ .
.. If black people hadn't brought their music from
Africa to America, ___ .
5 If Copernicus hadn't discovered that the Earth
goes round the Sun, ___ .
Your Turn
11 Think of things that happened or didn't
happen this month. Imagine they happened
differentl y and write sentences.
Example
If I hadn't bought a new bike J could have bought
some CDs.
If the storm hod been heavier, many places would
have been in danger.
---ract Dr rictiDII? ---
The artist Vincent van Gogh cut off
his right ear.
Answers
1 hadn' t been / wouldn' t have become
2 had listened / would ha ve worked
3 wouldn't have left I hadn' t come
4 would have painted / had been
5 hadn't been / wouldn't have had
6 wouldn't have wr itten I hadn' t needed
Exercise 9
• Read aloud rhe exa mpl e item to the
class.
• Check answers by asking indi viduals to
read aloud the sentences.
• Elicit t he second answer from the
students.
• Studen ts work individuall y, rewriting
the sentences.
Answers
2 If Newton hadn' t observed
apples fa ll ing off a tree,
he wouldn' t have written
t he theory of gravity.
3 If Ernest Hemingway
hadn' t had a very
interesting life, he
wouldn' t have had
anything to write about .
4 If Chopi n hadn' t left
hi s home in Poland, he
wouldn' t have composed a
lot of sad romanti c pieces.
5 If Leonardo da Vi nci had
been a n ordinary man,
he wouldn' t have created
great wotks.
6 If apoleon hadn' t been
a milita ry genius, he
wouldn' t have won so
many batrl es.
Exercise 10
• Ask one of the students
to read aloud the exampl e
sentence.
• Elicit two or three
suggest ions for the second
sentence.
• Students work individuall y,
complet ing the sentences.
Check students' sentences.
• In groups of three or four,
students read aloud their
sentences to each other.
Your Turn
Exercise 11
• Read aloud t he example
sentences.
• Elicit two or three more
sentences.
• Students work individually,
writing th ree to fi ve
sentences.
• In groups or as a cl ass,
st udents read aloud their
sentences.
Fact Dr FictiDn?
• After checking the answer,
encourage students to share
what they know of Vi ncent
van Gogh's life and art.
... TIMI OUT! Page 120,
Exercise 28
Photocopiable Activity 19,
TTP, Page 66
This Unit
Short of time: set some of the
exercises for homework (e.g.
Exercises 6, 7 and 10).
Background
For more informati on, visit rhe
Challenges Website.
)
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• As a class, students discuss
science fiction books they
have read and fil ms they
have seen (in their Ll or in
English). Encourage them
to give their opinions of
some of them.
Reading
c; Exercise 2 (C03 Track 24)
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
for genera l comprehension.
• Students then work
individually, reading the
text and finding the names
of the characters.
Answers
human - Arthur Dent
dresses badly - Zaphod
Beeblebrox
wr iti ng a book - Ford
Prefect
destroyed Earth - Vogons
helps design planets
- 51art ibartfast
is very unhappy - Marvin
the Paranoid Android
Exercise 3
Answers
a Vogan
b Ford Prefect
c Za phod Beeblebrox
d Arthu r Dent
e Marvin the Android
f Trillian
Exercise 4
• Read aloud the example
question for students
to answer (Marvin the
Paranoid Android),
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
Warm-up
1 look at the photos on page 99. What are
some typical features of science fiction books
and fi lms?
Example
They often have aliens.
Reading
2 Read the text about a science fiction book
(page 99) and find out who:
is human • dresses badly • is writing a book
destroyed Earth • helps design planets
• is very unhappy
:3 Identify the characters in the photos (a-f).
4 Read the text again and write three questions
about it.
Example
Who is a brilliant scientist?
5 Work in pairs and test your partner. Ask and
answer your questions.
S look at the Word Builder. Find words in red in
the text with similar endings.
Examples
fegendm / planetga aefllifm / explanation
Word Builder
Adjectives
legendary, colourful, galactic, typical,
insignificant, dangerous, terrible, insensitive,
different, bored, selfish
Nouns
creation, writer, tourist, appearance,
ca pacity, existence
7 Match words from Exercise 6 with these
dictionary definitions.
8 Game Make nouns or adjectives from these
words. Which word ending is the odd·one-out
in each group?
argue, entertain, inform, govern (nouns)
2 danger, fame, nerve, thought (adjecti ves)
3 create, educate, excite, imagine (nouns)
4 expense, imagine, impress, power (adjectives)
5 design, type, teach, write (nouns)
........... Word Bank, page 124
9 look at the Sentence Builder.
Sentence Builder
Here are some colourfu l characters. He runs
into them.
He finds himself in a strange universe. Ford
gives him explanations about it.
Here are some of the colourful characters who
he runs into.
Ford gives him explanations about the strange
uni verse which he finds himself in. -.II
10 Now join these pairs of sentences in a
similar way.
She is a brilliant scientist. Arthur once tried to
chat her up.
2 The Earth was a giant computer. The Vogons
blew it up.
3 They were rescued by a spaceship. Zaphod was
in it.
4 He got a message from Marvin. He needs to
repl y 10 it.
5 Ford told him about Trillian. He knew all
about her.
6 I saw a programme aboul UFOs. I believe in them.
Speaking
11 Work in pairs. Invent your own science fiction
world. Think about these things.
• a planet • an alien • a robot • a spaceship
• a special machine
1 Having the usual features or qualities of something.
type.!
2 Caring only about yourself. selfish
3 Very famous and admired. ICjel1dary
4 The amount that something can contain. capacity
5 Something new and different that someone
has made. creait"on
• Students work indi viduall y, writing
three questions about the text. Remind
them to make a note of the answers.
Monitor and check students' quest ions.
Exercise 5
• Students close their books and work 111
pairs, taking turns to ask and answer
t heir questions.
Exercise 6
• Students work individua ll y or in pairs,
finding t he words in red in the text
and addi ng them to the cor rect group.
• Check answers by asking individua ls
to write the words in groups on the
board.
12 Now form new pairs. Tell each other about
your world.
Example
Our planet has got green sky and red sea. It gaes
around two orange suns.
-.TIM 0
Answers
Adjecti ves
-ary: planetary
-ful: powerful awful
-ic: scientific
-ieal : philosophical
-al: normal personal fina l
-ant: important
Page 120, Exercise 19
-ous: various enormous ridiculous
-bIe: horrible irresponsible
-tive: creative massive
-ent: intell igent
-ed: depressed
-ish : greenish
Galaxy is the creation
of writer Dougan Adams. It is about Arthur Dent;. an Engbhmlln, who escapes
from Earth iust before ume aliena, the Vogons. blow ~ up. He has mIIny dangerous
~ , but; he isn't a typical hero and is always in his .....mg gown!
......... ume at the colourful characters who he runs into •••
FORD PREFECT AA alien who is writing a guidebook for galactic tourists. Ford planned
to visit Earth (en Insignificant little bIue-green planet) for 8 week but stayed fifteen years.
He didn't want to appear different and chose his name because he thought it was nermal ,
but actuaIty it's the name of a car! 'v\Ihen the \bgons arrive, he leaves WIth his new friend,
ArtI'KJr. Arthur IS confused but throughout the story Ford gM!s him explanations abc:Iut the
strsnge un....erse which he finds himself in - for example, the importance of not reading the
Vogons' terrible poetry - it's absoIutety AWFUU
ZAPHOD BEEBLEBROX A legendacy
alien who has two heads and three arms, He's
j:f'Oud of his appearance but he was voted the
'I'Jorst.Oresse Being seven times. He is selfish.
lI'responsible and insenSitive. but very intelligent.
He rescues Arthur and Ford in his spaceship.
the Heart of Gold.
TRILLIAN An important character because
she is Earth's only other S UNMlf'. She is a
briliant sCientist who Arthur once
to chat up at a party
E""".
Horrible greenish
MARVIN THE
PARANOID ANDROID
A robot who is bored and depressed
because he never uses his brain to
its full capacity. He knows that he wil
never USB more than a tiny part of
his enormous intelligence. He solves
all the scientific and philosophical
problems of the Universe - but
he can't solve his persooal
prot;ems.
creatures with no creabVe ability
at all . They are employed by the Galactic
""""""'" '" destroy things.
SLARTIBARTFAST An alien designer of planet.ary coastlines.
[He's Vf1r'/ proud of the NoI'Yiegian ijcrds), He tells the story of some
Answers
Nouns
-ation: calculation
-er: character hitchhi ker designer
programmer
· ist: scienti st -ancc: importance
-ity: abil ity -ence: intelligence
Exercise 7
Answers _ student page
Exercise 8
• Demonstrate the game by eliciting the
first group of nouns and wr iting rhe
words on the board for students to
fi nd the odd-oll e-out.
• Students complete the game, working
in pairs.
• When checking answers, a lso check
spell ing and pronunciation, especia ll y
word stress in pairs of word such
as educate/education, imagine/
imaginatioll.
• Look at the ' Word Bui lding' section
ill the Word Bank (page 124) with the
cl ass.
Answers
1 argument entertainment government,
information (odd-one-out)
2 dangerous famous nervous
thoughtful (odd-olle-out )
3 creati on education excitement
(odd-one-out) imagi nation
Answers
4 expensIve imaginati ve
impressive powerful
(odd-one-out)
5 designer typi St (odd-one-
out ) teacher writer
Exercise 9
• Read aloud the sentences.
Point out the use of the
relati ve pronoun (who,
which) and the preposition
a t the end of the sentence.
Remind students of the
multi -parr verbs ' run into
(somebody), and ' find
(yourself) in (a pl ace)' .
Exercise 10
• Tell students to use the
relati ve pronouns who or
which in their sentences.
El icit the first sentence
from the class.
Answers
1 She is a brilli ant scienti st
who Arthur once tri ed to
chat lip.
2 The Ea rth was a giant
computer whi ch the
Vogons bl ew lip.
3 They were rescued by a
spaceship which Zaphod
was 111 .
4 He got a message from
Marvin which he needs to
repl y co.
S Ford cold him about
Trilhan who he knew all
about.
6 We saw a programme
about UFOs which I
believe in.
Speaking
Exercise 11
• Elici t some ideas from
t he class before students
work in pa irs. Encourage
students to use vocabulary
they a lready kll ow.
Exercise 12
• In their new pairs, students
tell each other a bout their
sci ence fi ct ion world.
Encourage them to ask
thei r partner questions.
... TIM. OUT! Page 120,
Exercise 29
I
II
This Unit
Short of time: set Exercise 3
for homework and shorten the
discussion in Exercise 1.
More time: do the Extra
acti vities.
Background
Ellie and Steve tell the others
what happened at the factory
and the news story is resolved.
The characters celebrate their
first 'scoop' in the evening.
Information about Brunei's '55
(steam ship) Great Britain' can
be found at
www.ssgreatbritain.org
Warm-up
Exercise 1
• Check that students
remember what happened
in the last episode.
• In groups or as a class,
students look at the photos
and guess what happened
after the last epi sode.
Encourage them to suggest
as much detail as they can,
e.g. what happened when
Ellie and Steve were at
the factor y at lunchtime?
Who contacted the police ?
Where did the police arrest
the woman?
Reading
QExercise 2 (CD3 Track 25)
100
• Play the recording for
students to read and listen
and check their guesses
from Exercise 1.
• Encourage students to
guess the meaning of
any new voca bulary, e.g.
'heavies' , 'illegal'.
Extra
Play the recording for students
to focus on pronunciation,
stress and intonation patterns.
Students work in groups of
four, reading the dialogue
aloud and changing parts.
Monitor and correct any
serious pronunciation errors.
Success!
Speaking
Warm-up
1 look at the photos and guess what happened after the
last episode.
3 Why do we use these Key
Expressions?
aj to change the topic
b} to go back to a topic
cj to interrupt
Reading and Listening
~ 2 Read and listen to the dialogues. What really happened?
Key Expressions:
Abi and Tanya are in the studio.
Abi: I bought this album yesterday. It 's really.
Tanya: Sorry to interrupt. Have you heard
from Ellie and Steve?
Abi: No, I haven't. By the way, we' ve got to get
the news ready soon.
Tanya: Oh, here they are. What happened?
Ellie: Well, we spoke to Mrs Foster. She was
obviously lying so we hid outside. Then, at
lunchtime, we looked around the factory.
Tanya: Wow!
Steve: Yeah, and we found some triclosan!
Ellie: As I was saying, we were in t he factory.
We were taking photos when suddenly
we heard somebody shouting! We ran
to our bikes.
Steve: Yeah, and Mrs Foster and two heavies
were there!
Tanya: Oh, no!
Steve: We started riding away as fast as we could.
Ellie: But they followed us in a car!
Steve: luckily, we got away and phoned
the police.
Ellie: They arrested her and the two
heavies. They were trying to
move the chemicals.
Tanya: Amazing!
Ellie: let's start work. We' ll be first
with the news!
Loter, the group celebrate at the
S5 Great Britai n.
Abi : Can I say something? let 's
drink to radiochill.org and
our first big story!
Tanya: Thanks to Ellie and Steve!
Steve: Changing the subject, look at
that guy smoking inside.
It's illegal in cafes now.
Ellie: Hey - that's a good idea for
a programme.
Tanya: Come on, Ellie. l et's talk about
that later. let's have some fun!
Speaking
Exercise 3
• Students work individually or in
pairs, referring back to how the Key
Expressions are used in the dialogue
and deciding why we use them.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 4
1 SOrry to interrupt. t}
2 By the way, we've got to get
the news ready soon. a)
3 As I was saying, we were ... b)
4 Changing the subject, look.
5 let's talk about that later. a)
• Read through the cues in the diagram
wit h the class.
• Build up an example conversation
wi th the class. Ask t wo students to
read aloud the example question and
answer. Then, elicit suggestions to
conti nue the conversation, following
the diagram.
4 Work in pairs. Use t he Key
Expressions and the diagram
to have a conversation.
Example
A: Did you see that film lost
night?
B: Yeah, amazing. wasn't it?
By the way. did you see tlte
Anenol game?
!A: Start talking about last night's TV. I
B: Reply. Change the topic to sport
or clothes.
Everyday Listening
1 look at the Listening Help.
listening tII!Ip: AI 511 ring ou.stIDns
·
Skills
• ...
........ lhem.
· Thinkal_ ................ RIr ___
asks abOut ___ ,Ihe ___ ,, __ or

Listen to two conversations. Are the sentences true (T)
or false (F)?
Dialogue 1 (Sue and Ben)
1 [[j Steve and his girlfriend went out with each other for a
long time.
21B Ben doesn't like sport.
3 !£I Ben and Sue both liked Steve's girlfriend.
41L] Ben doesn't want to go to the birthday party.
Dialogue 2 (Katy and Tom)
S[[j Tom's dad is getting a new computer.
6[B Katy has passed her driving test.
7[£j Katy had a serious crash.
8[I] Tom was once injured in a car crash.
(fl3 Listen Closely Some sounds disappear or change in
natural speech. Listen to the sentences.
1 They've been together lor ages.
2 He looked terrible.
3 He's such a good guy.
4 I better start getting ready.
It's her eighty·sixth birthday!
I've got to do two more 0/ my rnaths problems.
• Students work in pairs, making
conversations and taking turns to begin
the conversation. Monitor but do not
interrupt students' fluency. Make a
• Elicit synonyms and examples
for another topic, e.g. the topic
of ' hobbies' (near-synonyms are
'past imes, leisure act iviti es, interests'
and exampl es are 'cycli ng, singing,
photography' ),
note of any general problems to go
over afterwards.
Extra
Each pair of students says one or two of
their dialogues aloud.
Everyday listening
Exercise 1
• Read aloud the advice about answering
questions.
2 (CD3 Track 26)
• Give students time to read thro ugh
the questions before you play the
recording.
• Play the recording, twice if necessary,
for students to li sten and mark the
sentences true (T) or fa lse (F).
Answers -> student page
Extra
Divide the class into two
groups. Ask each group to
listen carefully to one of the
conversations and make a note
of extra information. Play the
recording.
Each group then tells the class
t heir extra information.
3 (CD3 Track 27)
• Pl ay the recording two or
t hree ti mes, pausing it after
each sentence for students
to listen carefully.
• Check that students
identify which sound
di sappea rs or changes
in each sentence. Some
students may find thi s
easier than others. If
necessary, say the phrases
slowl y yourself so that
students can foc us on
which sound disappears or
changes. (It is not necessary
to use technical terms such
as 'el ision' or ' intrusive
Irl', )
• Students may find it helpful
if you give some examples
from their Ll where
sounds disappear or are
changed in natural speech.
Answers
1 for ages (intrusive frl)
2 looked terrible (e li sion of
Id/ )
3 good guy (el ision of Idl)
4 starr getting (el ision of It/)
5 sixth birthday (elision of
'th')
6 more of (i ntrusive frl)
4
• Play the recording several
times for students to listen
and repeat the sentences
chorally and individua ll y.
-+- TlMI OUYl Page 121,
Exercise 30
Photocopiable Activity 20,
TIP, Page 67
101
Your Challenge
Writing: A Story
Exercise 1
• Ask students to look at
and talk about t he picture
- where do you think this
is? What time of year ?
How would you describe
the two young people? Do
the two young people live
in this place? How long do
you think they have known
each other?
• Read through the
expressions together then
students work in groups or
as a class.
Exercise 2
• Students read the story and
check their answers from
Exerci se 1.
Answers
after midni ght
thi ck moustache
hot weather fall in love
Text Builder
Exercise 3
• Students work individuall y,
completing the text wit h
the linking words. They
can compare answers
in pairs before checking
answers as a class.
• Check answers by asking
individuals to read aloud
the sentences containing
the linking words.
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 4
• Students work indivi duall y,
matching the paragraphs
with the notes.
• After checking answers, ask
students to read the text
and make a note of any
new vocabul ary. Explain or
encourage st udents to guess
the r:neani ng of any new
words.
Answers
A when and where it
happened
B how it all began
C t he main action
.... -- D what happened in t he end
102
Writing: A Story
1 l ook at t he picture. which three of these expressions do
you think are not in the story?
after midnight, sandy beach, t hick moustache,
hot weat her, punk music, open·air cafe,
fall in love, firework display
2 Read the story and check your answers from Exerci se 1.
e It happened 1 our summer holiday in Spain. We
rented a house in a village on the coast. The house was near
a sandy beach, like those you see in travel brochures but the
water was freezing!
., One day, we wcre going back home 2 ~ we had
spent all day on the beach. A driver was having problems with
his car. 3 Whel1 wc saw that the car was completely SnIck
in the sand, my friend Paul and 1 offered to give it a push.
4 ~ twO Spanish girls came and helped us. Having got
the car out, one of the girls thanked us in English and smiled
at me. 'I'm Isabel,' she said. 'That's my dad. Maybe we'll see
you at the fiesta?'
G The following Friday was our last day. We went to the
fiesta after dinner. The streets werc crowded. In the square,
a local group was playing Spanish punk music. s ~ ,
I saw Isabel and her friend, Blanca! Paul and I \va1ked
nervously across to them. Isabel looked lovely with her tanned
skin, brown eyes and long, dark hair.
(!) We had a lemonade in an open-air cafe and Isabel and
I talked and talkcd for ages. 6Mcal1wht!e , poor Paul and
Blanca were getting bored, so we danced for a while and then
watched the firework display. 7 we were watching the
fireworks, we held hands. But Paul and I had to go home, so
we all swapped mobile numbers. 8 Afterwards I phoned her to
say goodbye. We kept in touch for a while but then we stopped.
I still think about Isabel sometimes and smile, even now.
Text Builder
3 Complete the text wit h t hese linking
words.
after, afterwards, during,
meanwhile, suddenly, then,
when, while
4 Match t he paragraphs (a-d) with the
notes below.
what happened in the end
when and where it happened
the main action
how it all began
FOR YOUR PORTfOUO\. '-_____ -,
5 Write a story beginning: I was on
holiday in ... when it happened.
S:l 1 l oOk at the Writing Help.
t;
Writing Help: Planning
• W_ pkming 0 stnry. think
0/ 0 iDpk: you Itnow about.
_ topk:s wIII _
waDJIory and language.
• When you .... moIin!l
roes. lr1J to use IIIe WIIRIs
you Itnow. DrIly _ ~
new WIIRIs _ t Is WIll
----
• When you .... udt1!I. ovoid
gommar structures you are
nat sute about.
S:l 2 De<ide what kind of story you
t;:; want to wri te.
• a cri me • an accident
• getting lost • a romance
S:l 3 Write notes using the headings
t;; in Exercise 4.
S:l 4 Use your notes to write your
t;:; story. che<k t he story fo r
spelling, grammar, vocabulary
and linking words.
6 Work in groups. Read each other's
stories.
Exercise 5
• Encourage students to work with
• Read th rough Steps 1-4 so students
understand what to do.
• Draw students' attenti on to the advi ce
on 'Planning' in Step 1. Emphasise that
students should try to use vocabul ary
and grammar tbat they a lready know.
• Eli cit three or four suggesti ons for
di fferent stor y lines. Students wit h less
imagination can use one of these story
lines if they wish.
• Students work individually, planning
and writing t heir story. They can
illustrare their story, if they wish.
a partner, checking and correcting
rhei r stories. They can refer to you
if rhey are nor sure about any of the
correct ions.
Exercise 6
• In groups of four to six, srudents read
each other's stories.
• Students can make a display of their
stories.
Understanding Grammar: wish
1 Read the short note about Stanislaw le m.
Have you read any of his books?
Stanistaw Lam (1921-2006) was
a world famous science f iction
writer. His most popular books are
The StarDiaries, Safaris and The
Cyben"ad. He wrote in Polish but
his books have been translated in
over 40 languages. He wrote about
t he consequences of technological
progress and the impossibitity of
communication between humans
and aliens. His aliens often take
very unusual shapes. like the ocean
of plasma in Solaris. He had a sharp
sense of humour and also wrote
satirical and philosophical articles.
Read what Internet users say about l em's books.
What do they like and not li ke about them?
'At high school, the literature teacher asked us if we
wanted to read Sofaris by lem or Brave New Worfd
by Huxley. I wish we' d voted for SoIaris. I've read
some of lem's stories now and they're great - they
make you think, unlike most science fiction books:
'I don't like the English translation of Safaris. I w ish
I knew Polish - then I would be able to read it in the
'I think So/aris, the film, was quite good. I only wish
they hadn't changed the ending. lem himself
didn't like it because it made the film into a typical
Hollywood love story:
'The funny thing about l em is that he often
sympathised wit h machines - robots or computers -
perhaps he thought that people didn't treat them well.
I wish he could explain why.'
Understanding Grammar
Background
The topi c of the lesson is Stanislaw Lern,
the world-famous Polish science fict ion
wr iter, whose books are often regarded as
more 'ambiti ous' and thought- provoking
than ~ o s t popular literature.
Exercise 1
• Students say what they know about
Stanislaw Lern before they read the
text. Ask them if t hey have read any of
his books.
• Students read the text. Ask t hem if
they learnt anything new about Lem.
3 Paraphrase the sentence from the text
with the same meaning.
I wish we'd voted for S% ris. = I'm sorry
t hat.
2 I wish I knew Polish. = I'd like to .
3 I only wish t hey hadn't changed the
endi ng. = I' m not happy that .
4 I wish he could explai n why. = I'm sorry
that ...
4 Which sentences (1-4) above talk about
the past and which about the present?
Complete the table wi th correct names
of tenses.
regret about the past regret about the present
wish + wish +
5 (hoose all the Correct paraphrases (a-<)
for sentences 1 and 2.
1 I wish I was a writer.
@ I'm sorry I'm not a writer.
b) I woul dn't li ke to be a writer.
@ It's a pity I'm not a writer.
2 I wish I had studied phil osophy.
a) It 's a pi ty I studied philosophy.
b) I'm sorry I st udied philosophy.
@ I'm unhappy because t di dn' t study
philosophy.
6 Pa raphrase the sentences. Start with
I wish ...
I'd li ke to be taller. I wish ___ .
2 It's a pity my parents di dn' t buy me more
books when I was a child. I wish ___ .
3 It's a shame I can't sing well. I wish
.. I regret I wasn't born in a warmer country.
I wish ___ .
5 It was silly to quarrel with the teacher.
I wish ___ .
6 What a pity l em isn't ali ve. I wish ___ .
7 What things do you regret about the past
and the present? Write sentences starting
wit h I wish ....
Example
J wish Poland had won the World Cup.
Exercise 2
• Students work individuall y, reading the
texts and noting what the writers like
and don' t like.
• When checking answers, ask students
who have read the books or seen
the film whether they agree wi t h t he
opll1lOns.
Answers
Li ke: hi s stories make you t hink I he
often sympathised with machines as if
he thought that people didn't treat them
well
Don' t like: the Engl ish translati on of
' Solari s' I the endi ng in the film of
'Sola ri s'
Exercise 3
• Elicit the first answer from
the class.
• Students complete
the exercise working
individuall y. They can
compare answers m palfS
before checking answers as
a class.
Answers
1 we didn' t vote for Solaris
2 know Polish
3 t hey changed the ending
4 he can't explain why
Exercise 4
• Ask students which
sentences in Exercise 3 talk
about the past and whi ch
talk about the present.
• Students complete the table
with the correct names of
tenses .
Answers
past - sentences 1 and 3
(Past Perfect )
present - sentences 2 and 4
(Present Simple)
Exercise 5
• Point out that there may
be more than one correct
paraphrase for each
sentence.
Answers --+ student page
Exercise 6
Answers
1 I was tall er
2 my parenrs had bought
me more books when I
was a child
3 1 could sing well
4 I had been born in a
warmer country
5 I hadn't quarrell ed with
the teacher
6 Lern was ali ve
Exercise 7
• Students work individually,
wr iti ng five to six
sentences. Check their
sentences.
• Tn pai rs or small groups,
students read aloud t heir
sentences.
Language Check
Exercise 1
Answers -+ student page
Exercise 2
Answers
11 If Sue had passed her
exams, she would have
gone to university.
12 If I hadn't missed a goal
in the last minute we
wouldn't have lost the
game.
13 If my sister hadn't gone
to the parry, she wouldn't
have mer her boyfriend.
14 If his brother hadn't
played the guitar, Tommy
wouldn't have become a
famous guitarist.
15 If I hadn't been ner vous, I
would have played better.
16 If he had done more
exercise, he wouldn't
have had problems in the
marathon.
17 If she had known about
the concert before, there
would have been tickets
for sale.
ISH Tania hadn't gone on
holiday to Greece, she
wouldn't have mer Sofia.
19 If it had snowed, we
could have gone skiing.
20 If he hadn't gone so fast
on his motorbike, he
wouldn't have broken hi s
leg.
Exercise 3
Suggested answers
21 wasn'r raining.
22 had studied harder.
23 knew the answer.
24 had got here earlier.
25 had seen it.
Exercise 4
Answers -+ student page
(CD3 Track 28)
104
• Students listen to the
recordi ng to check their
answers. Check spelling
where necessary.
• Students look at the table
to see which sections in rhe
Students' Book they need
to look at again.
Study Corner 10
Language Check
1 Complete the text with the words in brackets in
the correct form.
The fantasy world of Narnia is the
(create) of the (write) C.S. lewis. Four
children (Peter, Susan, Edmund and lucy) enter
this l tt;Wfmj?!.L5 (mystery) world through a magic
wardrobe. They meet (colour) charaders
but Edmund has an StlYJ-ument (argue) with Peter
and he falls into the hands of a 6tlaHjffous (danger)
and (power) witch. She is the
(rule) of Narnia but is worried about the return
of Asian, the lion. They made a film of the book
in 2005. The special effects are very 9i41?rcssive
(impress) and the film is very good 10t!ntedainment
(entertain),
Vocabulary 0/ 10
2 Rewrite the sentences so that they have the
same meaning.
11 Sue didn't pass her exams so she didn't go to
university. (If Sue ... to univmity. )
12 I missed a goal and we lost 1-0) (// I ... til< 8Om<.)
13 My sister went to the party and she met her
boyfriend there. (If my sistt r ... Mf boyfritnd.)
14 Tommy's brother played the guitar, so Tommy
started to play. too,. and became a famous
guitarist (If his brother ... n famous guitarist.)
1S I was very nervous and didn't play well. (If I ...
b<Uu. )
16 He didn't do any exercise and had problems
in the marathon. (If he ... problems in
mnrothon. )
17 She didn't know about the concert until
yesterday and there were no tickets left.
(// sh< .•. lie"'lS for sal<.)
18 Tania went on holiday to Greece and met Sofia.
(1/ ronio ... SO/i •. )
Feedback
listen and check your answers to the
language Check. Write down your scores.
• Look at the table below. Then do the
exercises on page 102 of the Workbook.
Wrong answers:
Numbers 1-10
look agai ...
Get Ready and Unit 29-
Key WOrds and Word Builder
Numbers 11-20 Unit 28 - Grammar
Numbers 21-25 Understanding Grammar
Numbers 26- 30 ' Unit 30 - Key Expressions
• Give students time in class or at home
to do the exercises on page 102 of the
Workbook.
Study HeLp: Using
Dictionaries (2)
• Read through the advice with the class.
• Students look up the idiom 'lose
(your temper )' in their dictionary. Ask
them to give an equi valent idi om or
paraphrase in their L1.
19 There was no snow SO we couldn't go skiing.
(// it . .. skiing. )
20 He broke his leg because he went too fast on
his motorbike. (I} he ... his leg.}
3 Complete the sentences.
21 Oh no, the weather's bad. I wish it ...
22 I didn't study much for that exam. I wish I ...
23 I don't know the answer. I wish I ...
24 It's a pity you missed the start of the match.
I wish you ...
25 The film sounded great. I wish I .. .
Grammar 0/15
4 Complete the dialogue,
A: to interrupt you, Pat. Have you
seen my mobile?
B: Er. yeah, it's over there. the way,
5ue phoned earlier. She wants to know what
we're doing on Saturday.
A: I think we're meeting Sandra, aren't we?
28-'..dL talk about that later.
I was saying, where's my mobile?
B: There. on the table.
A: Oh, yeah.
B: the subject, can you read this
letter? Tell me what you think.
Key Expressions D! 5
Study Help: Dictionary Skills (2)
R .... the _. below.
A good dictionary can help you work out the
meanings of idiomatic expressions,
First, identify the key word in the phrase. e.g. Ht
los! hi! 1m"., _ Iiold him thai I had broktn
tM window. Then look up the key word in your
dictionary, • .
Finalty, look for an equivalent idiom in your own
language or try to paraphrase the English one.
• Find idiomatic expressions with these
meanings in sentences 1-3.
do badly I not realise something / not know where
you are
1 We lost our way when we were in the forest.
2 The computer game was such good fun I lost
track of the time.
3 Our basketball team lost out because their
players were much tall er than us.
• Students work individually, reading
sentences 1-3 and matching the
idiom a tic expressions with the
meamngs.
Answers
1 ' lost OUf way' I not know where you
are
2 'lost track of' / not realise something
3 'lost out' I do badly
Module 10Test, TTP, Page 78
SwdenL A and B answer keys
Student A
Unit 4, Exercise 10, page 17
Ask and answer questions aboullhe pictures. Use
the cues In the order In which they ate liven. Use
the Put Perf(!(t In the answers,
Example
A: Why did he decide to rob the bonk7
B: 8«ouse he hod 10JI 011 hiJ mOrley ,omblirl,.
A
Why did he decide to rob the bank?
How did they manage 10 catch Ihe robber?
Why didn't he wear a mask?
Were the police certain Ihey had Ihe right man!
Old they find the money?
he - see a cow in the road
no, bul he - nol sleep wt'll the night before
win a few amateur dr ivinl competitions
he - drop his girlfriend al the bus stop
Ihe owner of the cow - call the police
Unit 16, Exercise 11, page 57
Rtquests
, (use bike) ... I'd like to borrow it for lwo hours.
2 (ao on the Internet) ... can you see if there are
any Interesting films on?
3 (read this malazine) ... Can I have a look at it?
Offers
4 (not use the computer) ., . You can play some
gamt'S.
5 (order pizza) .. . Would you like some, too?
6 (see Ihe denlist) ". Would you like me to make
an appointment for you?
Unit 17, Exercise 10, page 59
Read aboutlhe product below. Then answer your
partner's questions.
I

Tni. trendy cotton
T·.hln i. mada from
pura organic carton. Tha
cotton i. grown In India
and we guatent .. thel
the Im, lll lrmer. glt
a good price for thair
carton. All cotton i,
grown organically and
no chamic.1 p.lticid ..
are UNdo Tha factorill
wha,. the T-.him
are mlde .11 pay tha
minimum w.g. and have
good working condition • .
T·. hlrt•• re av.ilabla In tha following coloutl:
Red, Cream, Bilek end Mlluin .izlI: XS (8),
S 1101, M 1121. L 1141. XL 1111. XXL 1181.
Tha organic T·,hirt illtVlilh Ind v,1V
comtOrtlble. II only COlli £19.00.
Now uk your pilttner these qut'Stions.
What is the product?
2 Why is it good for Ihe environmenl?
3 What different ways 01 charging Ihe radio
are there?
4 How much does it cost?
S What kind of people need it?
Unit 26, Exercise 8, page 89
Read these situations and explanations. Then
answer partner's questions.
Siluation: A man Is in bed. He makt'S a phone
call , says nOlhlng, and then goes 10 sleep.
Explanation: The man is in a hotel and can't
sleep because someone in the ne.t room is
snoring. The man phones the ne.1 room, wakes
up the snorer and then goes to sleep.
Situation: There are some slones, a carrot.
a hat and a pipe on the ground in Ihe middlt'
of a garden.
Explanation: The obj(!(IS are the remains of a
snowman which has melted.
Questionnaire scores and answers
Module 1. (Oet Rudy, bercise 2. Pale 4.
1 postal 2 telegraph llelephone
4 5 e·mail 6 mobile
7 Instant
Unl! 5. 1. 'a,e 18.
Guy Fawkes: 3, 5. Cleopatra: 1. 6. Colombus: 2, 4.
Unll 5. 3. Pa,e 1a.
Look at the hudllnes about the newl Iloriet; in Gel
Rudy, Exercise 2, ja,e 15. Gueu what they mu n.
1 Aussi e Sam United
2 Cuba Crisis Declared
1 Proud Parents Pose
4 Masked Gunman CAughl
5 Thousands Fl ee Homes
Now match headllnel (1-5) wi th the u planallonl
(-I·
a) The government have declared a state 01 emergency
in Ihe south of Ihe island.
b) Julie and Jeff invited Journalists to their home to
take phot os 01 them and thei r son, Ben.
e) One ot the men who robbed the Natwest Bank in
Manchester has arrested.
d) Dave Smith played brill iantly and saved two
penliities agai nst Liverpool.
e) large numben of people in Cuba lIave lIad to leave
their houses.
Module 5. Get Rudy. berel se 3. Pale 45.
Results:
Answers mainly 'a': you and your lami ly a lot 01
water
Aluwen mainly 'b': you need to use leu waler
Answen mainly 'c': you are looking after your planet!
Reasons:
1 Having a quick shower can save over 400 litres of
water a wetk compared to having ill bath.
2 & 3 Leaving the tap on wastes 9 litres a minule.
AnolS (ult urel 3. Exercise 7. 53
Results:
Answers mainly 'a': you are very heal thy
Answen mainly 'b': you should drink more heallhy
drinks
Answen mainly 'c': you to completely change your
drinking habits
Reasons:
, To be l'Ieallhy you should drink 1.5111rH of water
a day.
2 Coffee and tea are healthy in small quantities but
the caffei ne in them is damaging In quantitlH.
Sofl are dan,erous In large quant itiH because
they cause weight problems.
4 Diet drinks have art ificial sWfftenen which could be
dangerous.
5 Milk is a good drink b«ause it giyes you calcium
which you need lor teeth and bones. Many
leenaBen mOl'e calci um. fresh lrult is lull 01
vitamins. Manutaclured only conlain
oI lruit juice and quite a 101 01 sugar. Fizzy soh
drinks have a lot 01 sugar that is bad lor your teeth
and your
Module 6. Gel Ready. bercise 4. Pase 55.
Quesllonnalre Scores:
1 Tum the lights off when you leave a room. +2 points
(Why? Leaving lights on wastes a lot of electricity.)
2 Walk or cycle to scllool every day. +5 points
(Why? Many short car journeys are unnecHsary and create
more pollution and greenhouse gases than long Journeys.)
3 leave Ihe TV or hi·fi on standby. - 2 polnh
(Wily? Leaving machines on standby increases our
use by
4 Use a reusable bag when you go shopping. +3 points
(Why? Over 500 billion pl astic bags are used and tllrown
away every rear.)
5 Use bol h sides of a piece 01 paper. +2 points
(Why?4£m of all the trees cut down are used to make
paper.)
6 Drop liUer wl'len you're out with your friends. -8 points
(Why? Liller tooh 1I0rri bl e, costs a 101 01 money 10 clean
up and is bad for wildlife.)
7 Coltro and recycle cans and plastic bottles. +5 points
(Why? Recycllnll saves energy and resourcH (e.g.
aluminium In cans). It also rechKH the amount 01 rubbish
we produce which has 10 be put somewhere.)
Results:
6 or under You are a disaster for the planeU
OYer 6 That's quite good but you can do morel
OYer 10 8rilliant! a good green!
Fact or Flctlan?---
Uni t 2, paae 9. fact
UnitS, page 19, faet the figure is rising dailyt)
Unit 8. page 29, filet (1.round a lihh of 8ritish young
people feel unsafe at night. Birls more than
".,..1
Uni t 11, paBe 39, fletion {The Celts used coins
as rings and wheels but not as
hedgehogs! Some coins, though, were made in
the shape ot animals. tn In the 5tll
century 8(. (oins in the shape of dolphins were
used.)
Uni t 13. page 47, filet
Unit 14, page 48, fiKI
Unit 17, page 59, txt (See this website:
www byb"dcirs fOro )
Uni l 20, paBe 69, fkUOfI (There are no hei ght limits.
Most models are between t.73 m and 1.8 m but
many are smaller or taller.)
Unit 22, page 77, fact
Unit 23, page 79. fictiOfl (It means who
competes for a prize'.)
Uni t 26, page 89, filet (Holmes was killed in
rht Mwn/ure oj Final Probltm but
reappeared in Adwnturt oj Empty HouJt
alter public pressure for popular detective to
be broullhl back 10 life.)
Uni t 28, page 97, fktIOfI (Vi ncent van Gogh cui off
his teft ear.)
106
Student B
Unit 4, Exercise 10, page 17
Ask and answer questions about the pictures.
Use the cues in the order in which they are given.
Use the Past Perfect in the answers.
Example
A: Why did he decide to rob the bonk?
B: Because he hod lost al/ his money gambling.
B
lose all his money gambling
security camera - film the robber's face
leave the mask at home
the robber - leave his fingerprints in the bank
the robber - hide the money in his house
Why did the man crash into the tree?
Did he drive too fast?
Was he a good driver?
Were there any passangers in the car?
How did the police learn about the accident?
Unit 16, Exercise 11, page 57
Requests
1 (buy tickets for a concert) ... (ould you get one
for me?
2 (sit here) ... (ould I take this seat?
3 (go to the school shop) ... Will you buy me an
orange juice?
Offers
<4 (not eat this chocolate bar) •.. Why don't you
have it?
5 (make tea) ... Shall I get you a cup, too?
6 (go out) ... Would you like something from
the shops?
Unit 17, Exercise 10, page 59
Ask your partner questions about a product.
1 What is the product?
2 Why is it good for people in the developing world?
3 How is it good for the environment?
4 How much does it cost?
5 What colours are there? Have you got my size?
Now read about this product. Answer your
partner's questions about it.
ROVER WIND-UP RADIO
Unit 26, Exercise 8, page 89
Read these situations and explanations. Then
answer your partner's questions.
Situation: Oliver and Sam are lying dead on the
floor in a pool of water. The window is open.
Explanation: Oliver and Sam are goldfish. The
window blew open and knocked the goldfish bowl
onto the floor. The bowl broke and the fish died.
Situation: A woman buys a new pair of shoes,
goes to work and dies.
Explanation: The woman is a knife-thrower's
assistant in a circus. Her new shoes have high
heels. She wears them during the performance
and is taller than usual, so a knife kills her.
I.,\ IM
1£2, 'Uf 1,1 ii i
"" I I.
[J
...,.. Ju.a one thme -the nal11ft of lite ."Im ...
•• in the wnHI9 placwl C.n you eonect them?
D
o "lIr"" show they're allO'" by putting out their tongues,
f) put their tail between their legs when they are frightened.
g Cj"affu rub no.8. a. a .ign of affection.
5J
9' Icartgat'Il(l' .how affection by holding each othe(, trunks.
fIJ9s prell their necks together when they are attracted to each other.
UJ ,,, .. alas hit the ground with their back legl when there i, danger.
IHSTAHT MESSAGES
Helen, Miriam and l ydia were <hatting online, but
went wrong with the program and it put
the meSS<lges in the wrong order. Put them in the
(orrect order.
a) Mir.iam:Yes. it took me agH. And you?
b) you sure you jutt don't want to mi .. the
phyt;kf tftt1
O d'
D ·'
O n
0
9
'
O hl
"
HI Miriam. Have you done the math.
homework?
M.i.tiam;. l'm not going to school. I've got a cold.
I can't do number 3 ®_
So are you gonna miss the party on
Satu(day?
M.ir.ia.rn;. 1 don't think I've done It right, either. look,
Helen'. online.
M.ir.ia.rn;. Well, J think I'll be better for that!
Mi.r.iam..; No, honm, I've got a sore throat and
temperature.
I
m Stories in Reverse
Here is a fun ny news story from Germany. Put the sentences in
A the correct order to find out why the woman called t he poli ce.
An old woman called me police .. ,
[d a Before that, the parrot had
started to caU'Mama, Mama!'
b Before that, the woman had
thought her new neighbours
child was alone in the house,
t:l c Before that, the woman had
heard someone calling for their mother.
t:J d Before mat, the woman's new neighbours had
put their pet parrot in its cage and had gone out,
B Here's a Story from Brazil. Put the sentences in
the correct order to find out what happened.
Some boys found S60,000 ' ..
L:J a Before mat, some robbers had
hidden che money in a suiu:ase
in the garden of an old house,
i:J b Before that, the robbers had
robbed a bank,
[J c Before chat, they had climbed over the fence
into the garden and had seen a suitcase full of money,
II d Before mat, the boys had football,
., e More that, they had lost me ban in me garden of an old house.
Cit Headlines from History
Match these headlines from histor y with the years,
1347 1492 1789 1893 1912 1958 1969
... . RUSSIA LAUNCHES I
SPUTNIK SATELLITE
REVOLUfION IN FRANCE' \
• KING FLEES VERSAI.g::j
6
Mixed-Up
News
Find two different news stories.
Match each spntence (a-h) with
the headlines (A or 8) and then
put them in the correct order .
O lBATHROOM PLAYI
e
RADIO ROBBERY
CD a) A Brazilian OJ was robbed
while he was doing his daily
radio $how.
rn b} The play. called
Thorough Seorch, Is staged
in a bathroom at the
Renaissance Theatre.
OJ c) The police said:'The
robbers didn't realise what
was going on and we were
able to surprise them and
arrest them.'
rn d) A new play Is a surprise
hit in the Brazilian city of
Sao Paulo.
OJ e) Only 30 people can fit
Inside the bathroom and
they have to stand up during
the 30-minute performance.
OJ f) Tlago Amorin da Silva
was talking 'live' on Verde e
Rosa radio station at 2 a.m"
when two men broke into
the studio and demanded
money.
0] g) A spokesperson for the
producers sald: ' We are a
huge success. We have to
perform extra shows every
week!'
IT] h) The thieves didn't realise
that they were on the radiO
and over a hundred listeners
called the police.

- Women Get Vote\
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CO
7 The Island
Read the first part of a summary
of the Lord of 'he Fll t.f b y William
Goldin,. the Nobel Prize winner.
Match the names of the boys (1-4)
with the descriptions (a-el) . Which
character do you like and dislike
most 1 Give reasons.
I Piggl
2
3 Jlck
4 Sim
I' Ihl Illdlr I1III group
III cholrbll IIIIIIDI kll
cl In onlllighl bOl 11'- gllllll
dllhlilldir of III kunlln
8 The Beast
I)urlng World Wir II, two flngllsh KhoolboY5 roN'1
on a M.uUfullroplcal Deach. Ralph 15 falr·halred and
good·\ooklng_ Piggy 15 chubby with glaues. They were
on a plant whrn It was shot down anel (',atht<! In the
Jungle. Piggy K'CI a conch 5h('11 and Ralph uses It to
call th ... olher boys Ihar were on Ihe plant'. Gradually,
they all come to I he beach. A group of choirboys, Jrd
by an older boy callw Jack, arc Ihe lUI to arrive. The
boys decide 10 choose a leader. All the Choirboy! vOle
fOT Jllck but the rcst choose Ralph. Aslcader, Ralph
a.'ks Jad. to be In charlie or II group of huntcu. Then.
Ralph. Jack and a choirboy called Simon explore the
Island. They climb through Ihlck junglc 10 the top
of the highest mountain. They ate on pn lind
there arc no olher people,
When Ihey return to the tJoC lt ch, Ralph call! another
mtttlnll. There are no adulu on the hland and they
will have to survive on theIr own. The IInle boys
are afraid and one of t hem Sly, he IIIW II 'hell$1'
during the night . Ralph decides to buil d . o n t he
mountain $0 that ranlnM ship, can lee It . They wlleel
9 Chaos
Read the last part of
the summary. Why
Read the second part of the summary,
I.bt the three most negative things
t hat happen.
[.utrt Ihal evening, Ralph II mtetlng. li e
complaln$ that nobody Is doing hIs job. They are not
,,"lIdlng shelters, collectIng water or "ceplng the fire
going. Howeve" the l)()y. arc more wnrrled about beaMS
and mOOfteU. Ralph Qnd Piggy try to explaIn that liltre
prll no 1lI0nMers VII the Islond. SImon slIY$that thl! !,waft
rnBy be the bOYllhemselveJ bul tile boys JU!lllllugh ot
hIm. Jack and hIS hunters offer to kill the monster and
run off dancing and clulllIlnK.
did the boys get out of
control? What do you
think would ha ppen If
you and your c1as.'Imate.'l
were In the same
lIituatlon all Ute bOy.'l1
That nlghl, while the boYlare sleepIng, there Is.n air
hattl/.' "land. A pMr.chullstlRl1dS un Ihe
Island .nd hlJ parachute gets elught In the ttl 'C'. The two
looking pftt't tht' lire hIm and think he the
monsler. They b.ck 10 Ihe be.ch Ind 11'11 everybody.
Ralph, Jack ollilihe hunh'r\ go lookIng for Ihl! monlter.
While they .re j.ck MII,nlsci I""ther hunl
butlhe pig esc.pel. Afterwards, the boYI pl.y a game
of 'hunting' ()111' of the ynung boyJ and nearly kill him.
When It gets d.rk, Ralph wlntl to ,0 back to the be.ch
bUI j.ck per,uade, Ihcm to ket"p lOin • . Thry ICC' the
parlchutlSt 1n Ihe dirk .nd think he Is the man Iter.
The next mornlna, they have. mCfll ns.)lck sa)"l
Ralph 1$ a coward bUI the boya do not wlnt to change the
leader JO Jack Soes off to. place by the sea called Castle
RO('k and 51nru hi) own ' Ir llJc' of 'hunter,' . The hunt ers
calch • pili and then auack ItJIlph', s roup to get burning
nicks from the fire. More of the boys loin the hunters
be-cause Ihey alt hunllry and Jack Is golnM to hove a big
feast to eat the piS. l.a ter, Simon goes Inlo the jungle and
sec;s the 1)1,, '. heod covered In 11I1!$. It scerns to comc 10
life and talk to him. SImon falnU.
When Simon up,
11l' sees Ihe dead parachulln
In 6 tree. Ht takes the
parachut e with hi m to prove
to the ot hers Ihat IhNe Is no
monst er. Meanwhil e, Rll ph
and Pi ggy go 10JICk'l feul .
Aflt r the fUlt, j ack Invit es
III t he boys to Join h Is tri be
and of tht m I('(epl .
They are danci ng I nd
chantlna when they S«'
a fig ure coming towards
Ihem. II Is Si mon with Ihe
parachute bulthey thl ok
he Is the monster. They
all ack and "Ill him wit h
Ihelr hands.
Rolph and Piggy go back
to Iht old camp. They
ru li se they have just "iIled
someone. Bac" at Castle
Rock, Jack lies up and beau
a Imy just to show his power.

dead wood and start a lire with I'I88y'5 glanes but thl'
fire gets out of control and there Is II forest fire. Piggy
rcall.w thai a lillie boy IJi and everyone Is
shocked.
The hoy' have 101$ of frult to eat on the lJilnnd hut
some of Ihem wanl meal. Jack and his hunters tly to
catch a pIg but It e'\Copes. fie got', back to the beach
where Ralph and Simon are building hun for the lillie
boys. Ralph Is angry with jack because he thinks that
Jae" and his hunters are tlylnllto avoid real work.
Further down Ihe beaCh, lOme small boys are
playing when one of Ihe romes along. He
destroys their sandcastles and Ihrows al them.
Then all of the hunters paint their faces and go off
looking for another pig. Laler, Ralph lind Piggy see a
shIp In the dIstance but Ihe fire Is outl The hunters
come back wllh n Pili and Ihey blC c)(clted. Ralph Is
angry because they ]el l he fi re go Oul bUllhey Ignore
hi m. When Illggy Jack hitS him and bn'o"s
0111:' of the leme) of hi s The hunlers make a
fire. roasl the piS and dnncl.' wildly round the fire.
Ralph angrily goes off on hit own.
li e says thai Ralph and f'lggy
are now a danger to Ihe tribe.
That nlghl, Ihe hunters attack
the camp and steal l'lggy's
glaSSt'5.
The followlnll mornlnK,
Ralph calls a meetlnll bul there
are only a few boys left In hlii
IIroup. They dl'(;lde 10 ta lk to
Jac" and get "lillY'S alasK'S
back. Ilowever, when Iht!)' xn
10 Can le Mock, a fight between
Jack and Ralph Statts. l' lggy
tn .' Inp II . He says thai U
b bett er W have nnd to

agree 111011 10 flght and kill.
Suddenly, one of Ihe hunters
pushes a big roc" down the
hilitownr<b Piggy. U kills
him and smasht., the conch
! helJ. Ralph runs off Into Ihe
Junxle.
In the morning, the
hunterJ come afler Ralph
and (IUd his hiding place.
They cannot gel him out so
Ihey sel flrc to the lungle.
Malph !igh'" hi s way OUI
and runs Ihe beach.
lI e h running desperately
when he plm05t crash!;') In\o
a British naval offlcer on the
beach. Ills shi p had SC('n the
fire and rome 10 Investlgatc.
When he.K't'S the buys with
their painted and ClIrryl ng
he thInks they have
been havIng fun and games.
However, when Ihey tell him
whal has happcnt'<!, he Is angry
that a group of English boys
have behaved like 'savageJ·. In
the end, all the buys art' taken
to the shIp and start the Inng
Journ ry home.
-
10 Guess the Price
0iIeH how much the object. below
were told for III; auction.
$22,000 $140.000 560,000 $17.4 million
1 A hat and e tans from one of Cbar11e ChaPin', fillTJl
2 A bIact. cotktail dress worn br MM'oe in one of her fi lms.
3 Mang.y!ell« 10 i1 jounlali,l wrilten by John lemon.
• Four Alreranllagllromthe Ameriean W. 01
capwrt!d br IIf\ offiur in tile Britith army in 11I:KJ,
m Time Bank Quiz
Read about a local time bank and complete the accounts below.
Tom Kempton is a dentist who decided to set up a time bonk in
his street in London. One hour's W()(K gives everybody in the time
bonk one lime credit One 1ime credit means thot you con gel
on hour's work from someone else in the l ime bonk. The Ellindole
Avenue Time Bonk has now been going l or three months ond there
die seven people III it: Tom; two teenogers called Joanna Dovles
and Chlls Woterslone; a gUilO! teocheJ coiled Corol Corson;
on electricion called Neil Simons and his wife Sharon; ond on
elderly lady coiled Mrs Waits
In the first week, MIs Wai ts wanted someone to point her
living room. Joanna and Chris pointed it for her during
the school holidays_ They each spent three days doing
it and WOI'ked four hours a day, When they finished,
Chris spent half 01 his credils on guilar lessons with his
neighbour Carol Corson. Chris spent eight more credils
10 poy Neil Simons to repair his sound system. Neil
was organising a birthday porty lor his daughter and
his neighbour Mrs Wai ts mode cokes and biscuits for
it. It took MIs Waits twelve hOUfS 10 do this. In the some
week. COIOI Carson, hod a problem wilh a tooth and
went to Tom Her treatment took Tom nine hours
Tom then went away on holiday in SpCIIf"I for a week
and Mrs Waits looked oher his house and fed his
cot This took her ten hours because she did Tom's
ironing, 100. Neil's wile, Sharon, is now a houseWife
but worked before as a hairdresser. She cut and styled
Joanne Davies's hair twice a month in this Ihre9'"month
period and took on hour eoch lime. She also spent two
hours piercing Joanna's eors. Sharon needed someone to
babysit and Carol Corson came round and looked oher
her daughter lor Ihree hours.
Time C its Toto + Of" -
Mr,WoitJ .12 +10 -2A -2
loom", Davie,
Chrll Wo!et",1one
Tom ,,-...
((!fo! Corton
N.il 5imorr.
Shoron Simon.
1 11) bank accounl
b) auCiion l ) cheque book
d) credit card
e) savings account
2 a) dollar b) Frtnch franc c) turo
d) yen c) pound
3 a) to make money b) 10 earn money
() to win money d) 10 lose money
e) to raise money
4 a) eSay b) auCiion () boots d) on sale
\.) market
5 it) a piece of paper b) a cup of coffee
c) a slice of cake d) a bag of crisps
t') a glas5 of orange juice
6 a) bronze bl clolh () iron d) lin e) sliver
7 a) shampoo b) a refund
,: money back
d) a receipt e) a replacemenl
811) II doesn'l work.
b) It's damaged.
c) A part is missing.
d) It's expensive.
UO!ll!Wt lIS r
'lm'US E 'CXXYOOS l
' ."Ild nlll'l!)
c) It's 100 light.
J) HWff
II
In the 17th century, the pirate Tom Morgan
hid some treasure near the town of Blackport.
Read the statements. Mark on the map where you
think the hidden treasure Is.
Dr Hlwklngl - profellor of archaeologV
We know thai Tom Morga n arri ved In England In
1689 with Splnll h trea. ure. Hil I hip, Thfl Jolly
Roger, wal old and il might have l unk near Blackport,
11 could have been near the I. tand but dIver. have
looked for wreck. Ihere and found nothing al all.
We think Morgen could have leken the troasure to
Ihe Ihore and hidden It lomewhere. He came from
Blackport and knew lOIS of good place. to hide it.
Bemedette Morgan - one of Morgan'. famll v
I hoard lot. of stori e. about Tom Morgan from mv
gr.ndfllther. When Tom came b.ck to England, he
probablv steyed In one of the cottage. on the beach
near the church of St l aurence. He could have
hi dden the trealureln the Sla cave but peopla have
looked there and found nOlhi ng. One Iheory Is thaI
he burled it on Ihe beach. Another, i. that he threw
II InlO the pool wh ich II not far from Ihe beech.
Apperently, he elwave wenl fil hlng Ihare whan he
willa boV.
Micliv Green - treasure hun""C' _______ _
I've got an old map belongi ng to Tom Morgan,The
map'l nOI verv clear but I don't Ihl nk t he traasura
can ba on the beach. It woul d be too easy to find,
woutdn't ll? Whalaboul lomewhare on Black Hill?
ThaI's posalbl a but II's a long wav to take heavy
treelure. I think II mUlt be lomewhere neer the
wood or Blackport Farm. And It mUll have been
an ealV place to hldo traa.ure. Tom Morgan was
nOI walland died a few diV' Ift er coming back to
England of I tropicil dl lella.Tom had 10 hide Iha
Ireaaur. quickly, 100. l ois of peopl e were looking
for hlml


Order the places
be low from the
bl Ue.t t o the
smallest .
o ContInenti (1Iu):
"..,..
Atoo
Asia
., Oc;ean.
the Paclf1c
theArctk
thl AtJant!,
., AI",n (t. nl eh):
the "'a"lus (China)
the Nil,
th,AmUOf"l
o Mountain.
Aconc.rocua (S. Amlrla)
EYIA" (Atla)
• Lak .. (Iiu):
Lake Ttoou
Ca$pbn Sea
Lake VI,t<)rfa
KlIlmanluo (Ainu)
o t. landl
G ... nl.lnd (N. AmerleJ)
Grllt Brluln (Europe)
Madar-mar (Afrlu)
Meerkats
t he d .. "lptlol1. Go Ut66
.midi thru thlng6 In It art fal 't.
Murkals are one of t he most
popular ani mals al 8ristol Zoo.
They live in Africa and eat
Insects, rOOls and fruit. The
meerkats at Ihe zoo also love
eating dog biscuits and Me
very lond of coffee ice cream!
Mttrkah live in semi· desert
a!'US which are cold al night.
They like sunbathi ng in the
mornings to warm up. Thcy spend
thei, nlghls underground. They
art very sociable animals and live in
SroulK of 10-20. Each meerkat has a job in
the communily. There are hun ters. senlries (Ihey
walch for enemies) , police officers and babysitlers
(they look af ler olher meerkals' babics). Meerkals
communicale by making a solt murmur and Ihelr
I.npalr is as sophi!olicall!d as Ihal of whales
and dolphins. When meerkals bark, il means
that therl! is dangcr and all t he meerkats run
bac:k underground,
-- '1IIIr6JIf peur;l!l' NtIOt a osn IOU OIl rlqlllV'j
·IUfII.I"IIj 101 )dim. Iltwl llll "410 Aue UIIjIIUOW • I;
'IJOMAIIlU. '1tIO! i3qlO 0Ifl lllq t JO:llJjO 100 9Je
'wran t:II HWXlIHI,1IOp lflii rllI"OIlQ !lop q !t rlflIHV'l
0
---
16 Sort the Rubbish!
fl. , Ib, , llbl ,lace (1-11) lor In. rubbll,b (1- 20).
D
. '
wdboMd «rell padtulru bous 0 11 dothu (in good (ondition)
0 2 pintle puu,in, D I2 old mobile phon"
D 3 broken uleviJions/£Ornpultn: iJ 13 flowm/planu
4 newspapers/magarines D 14 fruit
0 5 planie bottlu (washed) iJ 15 liDs/cans (wuhtdl
D 6 bOltl.r/j.,. (."h.dl
!:J 16 wasle paprr
0 7 tea bags 017 Yfgrtablu
0 8 enYflopu/leum
[J 18 mut/fish
0 9 broken fridgu
[] 19 re-usable furniture
0 10 books (in good condilion) EJ 20 polystyrene packaging
H4Abi.tS
R .. d about thr •• f.mlll.,' shopping habits.
How green are they7 Classify them:
a) ultr.gr •• n b) not v.ry gl •• n c) very bad for the planet!
Give thr •• r."on, for .ach of your an,wert .
.. Every S.lIurday, Tina and
Cohn Royle 90 by ur to the
wpermarktl two milts away
from their home. They don'lllt!
vegetables very much but In lhe
sumlflef, they buy
kxal frUit from a farm shop near
them. Their f.woorne food is PlZLl,
hamburgers and chiPS and they
usually buy frozeo food. They boy
a lot of Iml, 100, especially baked
beans Cohn loves chocolate and
he always buys a few pacha of
chocolate biscurts They would like
to buy a new TV because the one
they've ootls very old
.. Tim arid Kathy Myers walk
to the local shops twice a week
WIth Ihelr re-usable shopping
bags. They buy organic fruit and
vegetables in the market - both of
them are vegetarians. They also
grow vegetables inlheir small
garden which Ihey fertilise wi th
their own compost. They have
ten hens which give them eggs,
and a goat which gives them
milk. Sometimes, they buy
low-energy Irght bulbs for their
house, They haven't got a
computer or telev'SIOn at home
They lislenlO Ihtir wind-up radial
* Rodney and Margaret
Caldwell go shopping twice a
week at a big hyper-market about
twenty miles from thei r house.
They' ve got a big foulcwheel-drive
car SO It's a comfortable journey.
They go on foreign holidays four
Of frve trines a year, e5pe<ially to
South Africa, the Far East and
Australia, and they like bUYing
delicaaes from around the
world. They always buy the best
vegetables oWallable; apples from
Chile, kIWIs from New Zealand and
raspberrres from Kenya Rodney
and Margaret Irke buying gadgets.
They hoWe four plasma TVs,
three computers, two enormous
waShing machines, a dishwasher
and two big fridges. They love
clothes and drrve two hundred
miles to lOndon every month to
go to the besl shops.
II gorden compost
..
III
charity shop
II recycling ceolfe
{melal/batterles)
Big Yellow Taxi
ftdd about the song,
' 61g YeHoow TaxI' ....., ....rltten by the canadian slnger-song ....rlter, Jonl It has
been performed by lots of other artists such as Counting Croows, Janet Jackson and
Sob Dylan. She ....rote It ....hen she ....as staving at a !lotel in Hawaii.
• LI.le" to the lOng.
They paved paradise
And put up a parking lot
Wi t h a pink 1 ___ , a boutique
And a swinging hot SpOt.
,horus
Don't it always seem to go
That you don't know what you've 2 __ _
Till it's gone?
They paved paradise
And 3 ___ a parking lot.
They took all the 4 __ _
Put 'em in a tree museum
And they charged the people
A S ___ and a hair just to see 'em.
Hey rarmer, farmer
Put away that ODT now.
Give me spots on my 6 __ _
But leave me the 7 ___ and the bees
Pleasel
Late last night
I heard the screen door slam
And a big 8 ___ taxi
Took away myoid man
41 • Listen asal". Complete the gap.,
to pav.· to cover with concrete or rarmolC
parking lor (US) car park
swinging hOl spOt: fashionable place
DDT: a to"ic insecticide that kill' bird, and bees
screen door: an e.od:ra outside door for protection
agai"st insects or bad weather
old man: boyfriend, husband
ash ion Quiz
Read the sentences and guess who the fashions were popular with.
2 Young people in
3 Fashionable Romans wore a lot of jewellery.
.. The average Roman citizen wore a whi te toga.
5 Long pOint ed shoes were popular in I 5th
6 At the end of the 16th century. people wore very big collars called 'ruffs', I--+---I---l
10 People started to have shorter hair after World War I (1914-19 18).
21 Spot the
Find ten Difference
What is 'in' this
year in your area?
Complete the
report. Read it to
the class.
differences in
appearance
between t he
twin girls.
............
Example Mary's jeans
are not torn but
Margaret's are.
So'p I
i(oUse-(S:
SLo,"'+S:
J .......J .. eJs/c;.OQ.S:
SL-,¢S:
llats:
41Dq 01 'U9W 6 'UElWOMII
'U9UJ £ '411X1 9 '41oq S 'oow t"
'\IiUJOM £ 't!9W Z :l!1IQ OOIl/SaJ
............
G;yIS
r .. ous... ..s;
Sk. ... ts/.cl..-o!.SS"",,;
T OOS/61""jSe.s:
Ja.cke/S/c:..<Xlfs;


Margaret Mary
I) S PO RTS
.J Read the sports commentaries.
(up diwler lor England. We
i Find three factual miitakes in each.
are losing AGAIN in the quartet' final)
10 the fifty.5e(ond minute
and EnsJand are losing 2-0. C.1n Kore
before halt-time? Roont'l' lakes the ball ... But
he lostS il to Sorin. Soti n pams to cambiasso.
cambiaWl ps past two men lind sends a long
pass 10 ")'ilIa on Ihe righl. Ayala centres the ball
and 10 Mn)i in (he penalty area. JO(
Cole challenges him and MtsSi goes down in
the area. I'm afraid that's II penalty for
Argentina! Thai's the third card
lor Cole, 100. so now England
only have twelve men!

23
Sports Crossword
Can you do the crossword?
Acro••
1 & 13. A football/9ftfSf .how. this whe" he lind. I player oH
3. In Ihi. event you throw a pninled stick,
S. The type of medal B winner gell .
7. Someone who is good at sports.
9. Tlli. perl on p,rfarm. in a gym.
12. In this event you thrCIW a heavy disc.
t& 8 down). Event in which YOIl jump over 8 horizontal bar.
11. A group of players.
t8. A drug problem in spon.
19. The king of the gods in ancient Greece.
Down
2. You get ona if yOIl eome 111. 2nd or Jrd.
4. The first modern Olympics were held here ;111896.
6. Olympic city in 2008.
10. This rsce i. over 42 km Illngl
11. Stylu In thi lspon are Ireutyle, brent. lroke and butterily.
15 & 16. A span plaved on ice.
It 's the last quarler
of this lantastfc World
(hampionship basketball game
bctwei!n (roatia and Spain. Croalia are
winning 1-0 bill it's a very game. Pau
Ihe ball and shoots from 4 metres
out bUllle misses. It 's a pity, Spain really needed
Ihal point Kawn lakes the ball and
illo Vujde. Vujde mO¥CS up Ihe court.
He passes 10 Ukic. ukic passes 10 Vujde.
N.warro holds Vueji('s arm and pulls
_ Ihe ball off him and paues it 10
Garbajosa. Now Spain got
possession again!
24 Anagram News Wha'a«,h .. nag<am. ;n,h .. po,,,n.w.?
..... .. ·
;""'- •. "".;;.,,' ' .• ! .. ,'
"'''''';' - fl " .. A
;'01:""'( r:. .l,:.f. u •
\?f.JIf:" y ('>' . {-"1. ;
.. '. .- ',', ""A, .J;. --, . -.
• " Lr' ....
...... "'" .• ",' " t",,,
; 1 r)/":'jIf..., .:J· , ..... r

,. ,. "W \ ',"
"(,,. ,. •• •. . .. 1 ·,.
_ ,)to. l ..,
.e-;'" . ;..: •. ' ft' (-
'i' 'oJ • " . ,"" ,.... I
r: '. , oJ, -
. c';Vo'"
. . i "!"' J t·
Here is the sportS news. Yesterday,
Arsellal WOIl lheir first game in the
European Champions 1 aeuegl
____ three-nil againsr
Glasgow Rangers. Manchester
United were lucky to get a ni l- all
2 wrad ___ agai nsr Benfica
of Portugal, In the athletics
3 etoimpontic ___ at \Vemb!ey,
Asafa Powel l of Jamaica WOll the
100 metres 4 if. nl ___ in 9.8
sreonds. The winner of the men's
S . ju du ___ was Virginijus
Alekna of Lithuania With a 6 whrto
___ of just over 70 metru .
Everything is ready for the wndon
7 rahnmoat ___ next week.
Tomorrow we will be talking with
some of the top women 8 tteasille
____ Roba Tola of Ethiopia,
Rciko Tosa Of}ilpan and Jelena
I'rokopcu pa of laMa.
2 8
Match the people with the descriptions.
8) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
II
Artist. scientist
and engineer
b) Leonardo da Vinci
cl William Shakespeare
d) Pablo Picasso
81 Isaac Newton
f) Charles Darwin
g) Michelangelo
hI Albert Einstein
His most famous painting
is the Mona Lisa. He
made nOles and drawings
for 8 tank, helicopter
and submarine.
II
III
Physicist
His theories of
'relat ivity' and famous
equation 'e mcZ' completely
changed modern physics.
He was given the Nobel
Prize for physics
in 1921.
, D
Pamter, sculptor,
architect and poet
D
Painter and sculptor Mathematician and scientist
His most famous works are the
statue of David i n Florence 8 nd
his painting on the ceiling of
the Sistine Chapel in Rome, He developed a new
style called 'cubism',
His most famous painting, Guernics,
shows the horrors of war.
fJ
He formulated the rules of
advanced mathematics and
showed that light consists
of different colours. He also
proposed the laws of gravity
and motion, which form the
besis of modern physics,
III
laturalist
He went on a sea
voyege to South
America and the
Pacific In 1831 and
used the experience
Composer
I!I
He was a musical genius and
spent his childhood touring
Europe. He spent most of
his life in Vienna, His operas
include Don Giovanni and
Dramatist and poet to formulate his
t heory of evolution in
his book The Origin
of Species in 1859, The Magic Flute.
He wrote end acted in his own
plays, which include Romeo &
Juliet, Macbeth and Hamlet.
More and more people, when they come
home from work or enter a virtual
wor1d via online computer games. Games
such II Second Ufe. The SimI Online and
Ewrquestare extremety popular, Playa,.
Cln create a new perlOnality, meet different
people and do things they could n .... er do in
real life. Let'a look at one of these games.
RunoScape
The action takes place In the imaginary wortd
of Gielinor, which contains yarioul: kingdoms,
tropiClllslanda and deIertI. Players can loot
at maps of the place any time they MnL
They can traY8I in different wayI! on foot, In a
variety of vehicles. or by maglc 'teleportatlon'.
E8Ch plrt of RuneScepe hll different tvPII of
monlters and playars have to complete taka.
When you join RutHJSc.pe. VOU first create
your own character or 'avatar' and choose a
task. Players interact with each other through
chatting, buying and setling things, and going
on mlulonslogether. These millions may
invotve fighting weird monsters or getting
out of tricky situations, Sometimes you can
change into IOmelhlng else, like a bird or e
rabbit. to get into or out of difficult places.
RuneSc.ptlla a multlplayer online rot ...
playing game, With nearly nine million active
players and 800,000 paying members, it Is
one of tho top online garnet in the world.
IJ!M.IIQ8 L
5 'UOVo\IIN t
'WIll'll E 'UROn t'OSSUd I 'l1I'I'I'loI$IlIU89
30 Lucy in the Diamonds
R.ead and listen to the song.
• fil'ld the underlined things in the pidure,
Picture yourself in a on a
Wi t h tangerine trees and marmalade ikill
Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly
A girl with kaleidoscope eyes
Cellophane flowers of yellow and green
Towering over your head
look for the gi rl with the sun in her eyes
And she's gone
lucy in t he sky with d iamonds
Follow her down to a bridge by a fountain
Where rocking horse people eat marshmallow pies
Everyone smiles as you dri ft past the Aowers
That grow so incredibly high
Newspaper appear on the shore
Waiting to take you away
Climb in the back wit h your head in the clouds
And you're gone
lucy in the sky with diamonds
Picture yourself on a train in a st ation
With plasticine porters with looking glass ties
Suddenly someone is there at the turnstile
• Match th_ words from the song with
the defil'lltlons,
1 tangerine a) a child's toy horse with
curved pieces of wood
on the base
2 marmalade b) a small fruit like an
orange
3 cellophane c) a 50ft material children
use to make models
4 rocking horse d) a kind of jam made
from oranges
5 marshmallow e) thi n transparent plastic
paper
6 shore f) a person who carries
your bags at a station
7 plasticine g) a soft, sugary sweet
8 porter h) a mirror
9 looking glass ;) land at t he edge of
some water
Time Out! Answer Key '
7 Ie 2a 3d 4b
8 The boys are not doing their jobs (e.g. building shelters,
coll ecting water and keeping the fires going), The boys hunt
one of rhe young boys and nearly kill him. The hunters
attack Ra lph's group ro st.eal burning sticks from the fire.
9 The boys arc afraid and hungry. There are no adults
to help them with the problems of survivi ng on a lonely
island.
11
Time Credits Total (+ or - )
Mrs Waits +12 +10 -24 -2
Joanna Da vies +12 -6 -2 +4
Chris Waterstone +12 -6 - 8 - 2
Tom Kempton +9 -10 -1
Carol Ca rson +6 +3 -9 0
Neil Simons +8 - 12 -4
Sharon Simons +6 +2 -3 +5
12 1 b 2c 3d 4c Sa 6b 7a 8d
13 Tom Morgan hid the treasure in Black Pool.
14 1 Asia, Africa, Europe 2 the Paci fic, rhe Ada mic, the
Arctic 3 the Amazon, rhe Nil e, the Yangtze (some scientists
t hink that the Nil e is longer than the Amazon) 4 Everest,
Aconcagua, Kilimanjaro 4 Caspian Sea, Lake Victoria,
Lake Titicaca 5 Greenland, Madagascar, Great Britain
16 1g 2f 3h 4g Sf 6d 7a 8g 9h lOb llb
12h 13a 14a 15e 16c 17a 18c (or a) 19h 20c
17 Ib (shop by car, eat a lot of fast food, buy lots of
tinned food) 2a (re-use shopping bags, grow their own
vegetables, use low-energy light bulbs, don't have a TV,
use a wind-up radio) 3c (s hop by car a long way from
home, have a big fou r-wheel-drive car, go on lots of fore ign
holidays, buy food fr om around the world, have lots of
energy-wasting appliances)
18 1 hotel 2 got 3 put up 4 trees 5 doll ar 6 apples
7 birds 8 yellow
21 1 Mary's jeans are nOt rorn but Margaret's are.
2 Marga ret's belt is wider than Mary'S. 3 Margaret's wa tch
has a white face. Mary's watch has a red face. 4 Marga ret
is wearing red and white striped socks. Mary is wearing
blue and whi te striped socks. 5 Margaret's T-shirt is green.
Mary's T-shirt is black. 6 Margaret's T-shirt has a black
triangle on it. Ma ry's T-shirt has a blue t riangle on it.
7 Margaret has a tatroo on her neck but Mary doesn't.
8 Mary has her nose pierced bur Margaret doesn't.
9 Mary is wearing two earri ngs but Margaret is only
wearing one earring. 10 Mary is wear ing a wooll y hat and
Jv1argarer is wearing a baseball cap.
22 Football: 1 It can't be before half-time because it's the
fifty-second minute of the game (each half of a football
ga me is forty-five minutes). 2 Cole can't be getting a thi rd
yellow card (you must leave the ga me if you get two yellow
cards). 3 Engl and can' t have twelve men left (there are
onl y eleven men on a side at the beginning of a game) .
Basketba ll: 1 In the last qllarrer of a basketball ga me, the
score would be much higher than 1-0. 2 If a player shoots
the ball from 4 met res Ollt, he gets more than 1 point if he
makes a basket. 3 The ga me would have been stopped by
the referee when Navarro held Vucj ic's arm because this is
a foul.
23 Across: 1 red 3 javelin 5 gold 7 athlete 9 gymnast
12 di scus 13 card 14 high 17 team 18 doping 19 Zeus
Down: 2 medal 4 Athens 6 Beijing 8 jump 10 marathon
11 swimming 15 ice 16 hockey
24 1 League 2 draw 3 competition 4 final 5 discus
6 t hrow 7 marathon 8 athl etes
25 Questions 1 and 2 a re answered. The crime is murder.
It happened about 3 o'clock in the morning.
26 1 There wasn't a mot ive. 2 Nobody could be certai n
about the murderer's language. 3 The murderer got in t he
apartment by climbing t he electric cables on the olltside
wa ll and jumping onto the window ledge. 4 The murderer
isn' t human. It's an ora ng- utan.
27 2
30 1 b 2d 3e 4a 5g 6i 7c 8f 9h
WORD BANK
• Multi-part Verbs
be named after to be given the same name as
someone (often someone in your family): I was named after
my father,
blow something up to destroy a building, etc using a bomb:
Guy Fawkes tried to blow up the Parliament building.
break out of somewhere to leave a prison, etc by force: Three
men broke out of prison yesterday.
bring something in to introduce a new law, etc The
government brought in a new lawaI/owing shops to be open
on Sunday.
care about someone / something to have feelings for a
person, animal, etc: She really cores about animals.
carry something out to put a new idea, etc into practice: The
government carried out thei, plans to build a new hospitol.
check something out to get information about something:
I checked out that new MP3 pfoyer on the Internet.
chill out to relax: After the exam, my friends and I chilled out
in a coffee bar.
come along arrive We hod a party and Martin come along.
come back to return: We come back home late.
come past (someone / something) to pass by: The bus comes
post our house every hour.
cut something down to use a saw, etc to bring down a tree: We
cut down the tree outside our house because it was dangerous.
die out to disappear completely: Two types of tiger have died
out in Indonesia.
drop out of something to leave a course, etc before finishing:
She dropped out of the course because it was too difficult.
end up to finish: We ended up going to bed late.
fall in love with someone to begin to love someone
romantically: J think I'm falling in love with you!
fall off something to fall by accident: My brother fell off his
motorbike last week.
faU out to come out, e.g. hair or a tooth: My hair is falling
out. f must be going bold.
get away with something to escape without punishment: f got
away with not doing my homework because the teacher was
away last Tuesday.
get back to return: What time do you get bock from school?
get by to manage: We don', have much money but we get by.
get (something) down to move (something) to a lower place:
(on you get that book down for me? What are you doing up
there? Get down!
get down to to begin doing somethi ng seriously: I find it
difficult to get down to my homework after school.
get hold of someone / something to catch and hold a person,
thing, etc tightly: f got hold of him and pulled him away from
the fire.
get in to enter a place: They got in a taxi. Hurry up and gd in!
get into something to become interested in something:
Recently, I've really got into taking photos and I've got
thousands on my computer.
get off to leave a bus, train, plane, etc: Let's gd 01/ here. They
got off the bus at the station. _ get out of
get on to wa lk on to a bus, train, plane: I got on the wrong
bus!
get on with someone to be friendly with someone: We get on
with our neighbours.
get out (of something) to leave or escape a car, house, etc:
There was a problem and we couldn't get out of the lift.
Quickly, Jet's get out of here.
get something out to remove something: J got a book out of
my bog.
get to to arrive at: We got to the airport early.
get up to move out of your bed or a chair: I get up late at
weekends. He got up and left the room.
give something away 1 give something as a present:
f gave away myoid toys to my cousin. 2 to tell a secret:
,'m angry with her she gove away the name of my
new boyfriend.
give something out to distribute: The teacher gave out
photocopies at the start of the class.
give something up to stop doing something: My dod gave up
smoking cigarettes fost year.
give up to stop an activity: The crossword was too difficult
and in the end I gave up. Why don't you just give up - you'"
never win!
go ahead to continue I do something: Student: Can I do the
project on my computer? Teacher: Go ahead but don't copy
from websites.
go ahead with something to start something as planned
despite problems: We went ahead with the party even though
some people couldn'e come.
go away to leave a place or person: They went away at the
weekend.
go down to get smaller: The price oj petrol is not going to
go down this year. It'll probably go up.
go on to happen: I heard a noise upstairs and wanted to know
what was going on.
go out with someone to have a romantic relationship with a
person: Fred's going out with my sister.
hand something in to give something to someone in authority:
We hod to hand in our papers to the police.
hang around to stay in one place doing nothing: We hung
around for ages waiting for the bus.
keep in touch with someone to continue to talk to, write
letters or e-mail someone you don't see often: I keep in
touch with my uncle in Australia.
let someone down to disappoint a person: J didn't feel like
going to lunch with my granny but f didn't wont to let her
down.
log on to connect to the Internet: f always log on first thing in
the morning to check my e-mail.
look after someone / something to care for a person, animal,
etc: She looked after my goldfish when I was on holiday.
look around to look at different things in a place to find out
about it: Why don't you go and look around while we park
the cor?
Look for someone / something to try to find a person, animal,
object, etc: (an you help me look for my passport?
look through to search a place: I looked through my cupboards
but J couldn't find that jacket.
look something up to find information in a book: I looked up
that word in the didionary.
meet up with someone to meet a person by arrangement:
We met up at 12.00 outside the shop.
put something down to put something you are holding onto
the floor or table: Put you bogs down on the table.
put something off to cancel or cha nge the date to a later one:
They put off the match because of the fog.
put something on 1 to get dressed: I put on my gloves because
it was cold. 2 to organise something: We put on a disco lost
Saturday at school.
put something out 1 to put something outside: Have you put
the cot out? 2 to extinguish: We used an old blanket to put
out the fire.
put something up to build I assemble something: It took us
hours to put up our tent.
run away to leave somewhere running: The children rang the
doorbell and then fan away.
run into someone to meet a person by chance: I Ton into Steve
in the street yesterday.
send someone off to force a person to leave a place: The
referee sent him off lor fighting.
set something up to organise a project: Ellie set up on online
radio station.
show up to arrive (often unexpectedly): Guess who showed up
at the party?
speak out (against / about something) to say something
publicly: We should speak out about the state of the
swimming pool. It's terrible!
start something up to begin a project: We started up a
magazine at school.
116
take something away to move something from a place: The
waiter took away our glosses.
take something back to ret urn an object: I forget to toke that
library book back.
take care of someone / something to look after a person,
ani mal. thi ng. etc: My sister took core of my dog when I was
away.
take something down to move something from a high place:
We took down the party dewrations.
take something off to move clothes off your body: He took off
his coot.
take off to leave the ground and go into the air: The plane
took off on hour ago.
take something out to move something out from where it was
He took out a gun from his pocket.
take part in something to do an activity with other people:
I toke port in the school sports day every year.
take place to happen: The party took place in a very big house.
take something up to start doing an act ivity: He's token up
goif·
tie someone / something up to fasten someone or something
with rope or string: The thieves tied up the bonk manager.
turn something down 1 to make a machine produce less
volume: Turn that radio down! 2 to say no when someone
offers something: They offered her the job but she turned it
down.
tUrn something off to ma ke a machi ne stop working: f turned
the TV off and went to bed.
tum something on to make a machine start working: I turned
my radio on and listened to the news.
turn out to happen in a part icular way: The cake turned out
well.
turn lights out to make a li ght stop working: Turn the lights
out before you come to bed.
turn up to arrive (often unexpectedly): Yesterday, my uncle and
his wife turned up at our house.
tum something up to make a machine produce more heat .
sound. etc: It was cold so we turned up the central heating.
wake up to stop sleeping: f woke up early today.
wipe something out 10 eliminate: The animals were wiped out
by disease.
work out to do exercise: I spent an hour working out in the gym.
• Prepositions
with adjectives
interested in I'm interested in ancient civilisotions.
afraid of I'm afraid of snakes.
fri ghtened I afraid I scared of My mum is a/raid of spiders.
keen on I'm keen on chess; J really like it.
allergic to I'm al/ergic to strawberries and get red bumps all
over my body ill eat them.
with verbs
argue about We never argue about money.
complain about We complained about the noise alter the
neighbours hod a party.
know about I didn't know about the porty. Why didn't you
tell me?
learn about We're learning about the Vikings in history.
talk about We talked about films and music lor hours.
think about What are you thinking about? You're not listening
to me!
worry about Don't worry about the exam; it'l/ be okay.
name after My parents named me after my grondfother.
use as They used sticks and stones as weapons.
arri ve at We arrived at the theatre at seven.
take ' have a look at Let's toke a look at these photos.
apologise for I apologised lor breaking my friend's bike.
campaign for They campaign for children's rights.
pay for My dad paid for my new laptop.
wai t for I waited l or the bus lor ten minutes and when it arrived
it was lull!
WORD BANK
come from I come Irom Wales but I live in London.
protect from This vaccine protem you Irom tetanus.
return from I returned from London on Monday night.
suffer from Do you suffer Irom allergies?
believe in Do you believe in ghosts?
consist of Water consists 01 hydrogen and oxygen molecules.
agree on We have similar ideas; we agree on most things.
rely I depend on You can always depend on Fronk; he's very
reliable.
belong to That book belongs to him.
listen to flove listening to music when I'm doing my homework.
refer to The President didn't refer to the war in his speech.
agree with I agree with you.
argue with 1 often argue with my brother.
compete with We competed with three other schools on our
sports day.
deal with My boss always gets her secretary to deal with
problems at the office.
do with Her job is something to do with computers.
in phrases
above sea level London is only a few metres above sea leve/.
around the world Teams from around the world ploy in the
lootball world cup.
get a job as a He got a job as a waiter.
at home I work He's not at home; he's probably at work.
at school 1 spend six hours a day at school.
at sea The fishermen were at sea lor two weeks.
at the same ti me Don't try and do your homework and watch
TV at the some time.
by chance It was pure luck. By chance, I met my friend Paul in
a street in London.
by my' your ' him ' herself I managed to repair my bike by
myself - nobody helped me.
for ages I haven't seen Simon f or ages.
good for Recycling is good for the environment.
for a moment Could you just wait here for a moment?
in a hurry I must go - I'm in a hurry.
in exchange for He gave me some CDs in exchange for my
computer games.
in her I his twenties I thirti es ' forties That man must be in
his seventies.
in hospital I was in hospital for five days when I hod my
appendix out.
in reply to I'm writing in reply to your letter of 5th April.
in the holidays I spend ° lot of time at the pool in the
holidays.
in t he north ' south I east , west Newcastle is in the north
of England.
in t he past In the post, people used to wear hats a lot in
Europe.
in t he 16th ' 19th ' 21st century Charles Dickens lived in the
19th century.
in the wild There are only about a hundred Imperial eagles in
the wi/d.
in trouble I'm in trouble at home for arriving late lost Soturday.
a long way off The lire is a long way off - about five kilometres
away.
off the coast /t 's an island off the coast of Mexico.
on holiday We visited my aunt when we were on holiday in
Florida.
on horseback They crossed the mountains on horseback and it
took them ten days.
on my own I have lived on my own for three years.
on my way to I was on my way to the shopping centre when I
met Paulo Jones Irom school.
on the beach We played voJleybaJl on the beach.
on the border There were long traffic jams on the border
because of problems between the two countries.
on the coast We stayed in a lovely vifloge on the south coast
of France.
WORD BANK
on the Internet My brother spends hours on the Internet.
on the moors I island There are no trees on the moors.
on the move NomQds ore people who are always on the move
from place to place.
on the radio I listen to the news on the radio.
out of control He was so angry thot he was out of control.
out of work My uncle is out of work at the moment beCQuse the
factory closed down.
all over the world Thot shop has got branches 01/ over the
world.
over (8,800) metres Mt Everest is over 8,800 metres high.
face to face ,'m not going to phone; f want to speak to him foce
to foce.
thanks to You were fote. I missed the bus, thanks to you!
up to The statues weighed up to 160 tons.
with a conscience (without feeling guilty) You can shop with a
conscience.
within months He started to learn the piano and within months
he could play quite well.
• Word Families
Talk
argue to disagree wi th someone, often loudly: They argue a lot
about politics.
chat to talk in a friendly and informal way: We chatted about
the weather.
discuss to talk or give opinions about something: I can always
discuss my problems with my best friend.
gossip to talk about other people's private lives: They were
gossiping about their neighbours .
• Word Building
Noun Adjective Verb
action I activity active acl
attraction attractive attract
beauty beautiful -
colour colourf ul colour
confusion confusing ! confused confuse
creation creative create
danger dangerous -
death dead die
difference different differ
disobedience disobedient disobey
enormity enormous -
entertainment entertaining entertain
expense expensive -
fame famous
-
humour humorous -
imagination imaginative imagine
impression impressive impress
incompetence incompetent
-
logic logical -
luxury luxurious -
mystery mysterious mystify
nervousness nervous -
peace peaceful -
physique (build) physical
-
power powerful -
practice practical practise
protection protective protect
ridicule ridiculous ri dicule
seriousness serious -
surprise surprising ! surprised surprise
suspicion I suspect suspicious suspect
thought thoughtful think
use useful ! useless use
usual I unusual
Small
little small (object, person, place): He loved painting when he
was a little boy.
low small (amount, level , price, weight): The price of petrol is
very low in the USA.
tiny extremely small (animal, object , person, place): Have you
seen thot new mobile phone? It's tiny!
Nice
delicious good, tasty (food or drink): That pizza is absolutely
delicious!
glorious extremely good (weather): It was a glorious summer's
day.
lovely very nice (event, food , person, place, weather): Thanks
for dinner. The food was lovely.
Very big
enormous They've got an enormous house.
giant The group played on a giant stage.
huge They've got a huge dog .
massive There was a massive crowd at the demonstration.
vast Vast areas of the country are desert.
Old
ageing (getting) old: The UK has got an ageing population.
ancient very old (place or thing): We visited the ancient town
of Pompeii. We saw some ancient monuments.
Adverb
actively
attractively
beautifully
colourf ully
confusingly
creatively
dangerously
-
differently
disobediently
enormously
entertainingly
expensively
famously
humourously
imagi natively
impressively
incompetently
logically
luxuri ously
mysteriously
nervously
peacefully
physically
powerfully
practicall y
protectively
ridiculously
seriously
surprisingly
suspiciously
thoughtfully
usefully
118
Suffixes (nouns)
believer creation librarian
designer examination veget arian
painter explanation
rul er imagination
teacher information
writer preparation
presentation
actor relaxation
doct or
governor
argument archaeologist
ability
depart ment art ist
activity
enjoyment biologist
humanity
entertainment chemist
reliability
excitement scient ist
government
• Confusing Words
argue to disagree with someone, often loudly: They argue a lot
about politics.
discuss to talk about something: They discussed what to do at
the weekend.
borrow to take something temporarily from another person:
I borrowed two pounds from my sister.
lend to give something temporarily to another person: I lent a
CO to my friend.
earn to get money by doing a job: I earn 35€ by working two
evenings a week in a pizzeria.
win to get money or a prize in a competition: I'd like to win
lots of money on the lottery.
salary the pay you get from your (professional) job: He's on 0
salary of £30,000 a year.
wage the weekly pay you get from your (unskilled) job: My
wage is £140 per week.
• Compounds
one-word nouns
background things (e.g. in a picture) that are not main ones
you see or hear
chequebook a book of printed cheques
childbirth the act of giving birth to a child
dishwasher a machine to dean dishes
downtown city centre (US)
ecosystem the animals and plants in an area
fingerprint a mark left by the top of your finger
firewood wood used to make a fire
firework something you light so that it explodes and produces
bright lights in the sky.
footprint a mark lett by your foot
landmine a bomb in the ground
masterpiece a work of great art
network a system of things connected to each other
newspaper sheets of paper with news and adverts
shipwreck a disaster when a ship sinks
spokesperson (spokesman or spokeswoman) a person who
gives information in publ ic
sweatshirt a thick cotton shirt without buttons
warship a ship used for war
waterfall water that flows over high rocks into a river or
the sea
weightlifting the sport of lifting heavy weights
wheelchair a chair on wheels for people who can't walk
wildlife animals and plants that live in natural conditions
WORD BANK
• Opposites
beautiful ugly careful careless uncomfortable
dangerous safe pain ful painless uncommon
enormous tiny thoughtful thoughtless unfair
hard·working lazy useful usel ess unfit
high low unhappy
long short impatient unhealthy
loud quiet impolite uninhabited
overweight slim impossible unkind
rich poor unknown
shy outgoing unlikely
sill y sensible inconsiderate unlucky
simple complicated incorrect unnecessary
strange normal incredible unpleasant
strong weak inexperienced untidy
tall short invisible unusual
well-known unknown
two-word nouns
adventure sport exciting, often dangerous sports
air pollution pollution from cars, houses and factories
apartment building a block of flats (US)
bank account a record of money that you keep in the bank
bank note a piece of paper money
baseball cap a hat used in American baseball that is now
popular with young people around the world
bike lane a part of a street or road for bicycles
brand name a name of a well-known company making
products like clothes, shoes and el ectrical goods
bus shelter a covered place to wait for a bus
carbon dioxide the gas produced when carbon is burned in air
chat show a TV or radio show where someone speaks to
famous people
child labour people under sixteen who have to work
city centre the central area of a city
climate change major changes in climate
community centre a hall or club where local people can meet
compost bin a place where you put organic waste to make
fertiliser for your garden
corner shop a small local shop in a city
credit card a system of paying with a card that gives you credit
that you pay back later
crime scene the place where a crime has happened.
debit card (or cash card) card that gives you cash from a
machine. You can also pay for things with it directly from
your bank account
detached house a house that is separate from others
developing country a country in the early stages of industrial
development
dinner jacket formal evening clothes for men
fair trade a system where producers in developing countries
get a fair price for their products
first aid simple treatment for someone who is injured
fitness centre a sports centre where you can do exerci se
fossil fuel oil, coal or gas fuels
game show a TV programme where people play games to
win prizes
global warming increase in world temperatures
greenhouse gas a gas that goes into the world's atmosphere
and hel ps to keep heat in, causing a rise in temperature
guerrilla tactics fighting against a much larger enemy using
surpri se attacks
heart attack a sudden illness when the heart stops beating,
often resulting in death
high jump an event in athletics where athletes have to jump
as high as possible
horse racing races between horses with riders
WORD BANK
hybrid car a car with two engines: electric and petrol or diesel
ice hockey hockey played on ke
inner city residential areas near the centre. often quite poor
instant messaging a computer program which allows you to
communicate with friends
long jump an event in athleties where athletes have to jump as
far as possible
make- up cosmetics for your face to make you look more
attractive. e.g. lipstick
mobite home a house on wheels that you can move
(US = trailer)
mobile phone a phone you can carry with you and use
anywhere
motor racing racing between cars or motorbikes, e.g. Formula 1
mountain biking Tiding a bicycle off roads or streets-
especiall y in hilly or mountainous areas
national park an area protected by the national government
nuclear power energy produced by splitting atoms
oit spiU an accident caused when oil gets into the sea, usuall y
after a shipwreck
oil tanker a ship that transports oil
online connected to the Internet
online shop a shop on the Internet
organic waste waste vegetables, plants, paper
personal care products products you use to keep yourself
clean and improve your appearance, e.g. soap, deodorant,
shampoo, make-up
pocket money money young people get regularly from parents,
grandparents, etc
pole vault an event in athletics where an athlete has to jump a
particular height using a pole
postal service a company that collects and delivers letters and
parcels
problem page a page in a magazine where an 'expert' replies
to letters from readers about their problems
ransom note a note demanding money that criminals send
after a kidnapping
renewable energy energy produced from renewable sourCe5,
e.g. the sun, waves or wind
scuba diving diving underwater using oxygen tanks
sea level the altitude of the sea
semi-detached house a house joined to one other house
ski jumping the sport of jumping from a height with skis
sky diving the sport of jumping from an aeroplane
slave trade the buying and selling of people to use as workers
smoke signals signals made of smoke
social event an occasion when you get together with friends
social life relationships with other people, e.g. friends and
acquaintances
solar energy energy from the Sun
solar panel a sheet of silicon which absorbs heat from the Sun
sports centre a place where you can play sport or do exercise
style guru an expert in fashion who other people foll ow
take off the moment when an aeroplane leaves the ground
terraced house a house joined to other houses in a line
toxic chemicals poisonous chemicals
village shop a small shop in a village that sells a variety of things
voLuntary work work you do for no money
wall charger a machine that recharges batteries from the mains
electricity
water pollution harmful chemicals and waste in rivers, lakes
and the sea
water polo a sport played by two teams in a swimming pool
with a ball and two goals
weather forecast prediction of the weather conditions in an
area
wind farm a group of wind turbines
working conditions what it is like to work at a place - the
heating, salary, breaks, etc
wortd record the best ' fastest ' highest. etc in the world
youth club a place where young people can meet , dance, etc
verbs
download I download free music from the Internet.
upload You (an upload your fomily photos onto your blog.
adjectives
after-school happening after the end of the school day
air-conditioned (room ' house ' car) kept cool by a machine
ankle-length (a dress' skirt) going down to your ankle
breathtaking very impressive
brightly-coloured with bright colours
cross-country through fields and woods
dark-skinned with a dark skin (e.g. indigenous people from
South America)
easy-going relaxed and calm - not angry
energy-efficient using energy in an economical way
energy-saving describing something that saves energy
English-speaki ng with the ability to speak English
everyday happening regularly, common
fair-trade giving a fair deal to producers in developing
countries
five-star (hotel ' restaurant) very good or luxury
freshwater water without salt - not seawater
fully-grown that has reached full size
good-looking (men and women) attractive
hard-working someone who works hard
high-heeLed (shoes) very high
long·haired with long hair
long-sLeeved with sleeves down to your wrist
middle-aged aged between about forty and sixty
never-ending that seems to take very long time
normal-sized of a size you expect
old-fashioned something that is old and not fashionable now
open-air (an open-air concert) not inside
outdoor happening or used outside
part-time (job) some of the time
ready-made that are ready to use, e.g. clothes that you can put
on and wear
shark-infested (parts of the coast) with many sharks
short-sleeved with sleeves above your elbows
shoulder-length with hair going down to your shoulders
snow-capped (mountains) with snow on the top
solar-powered describing a machine that uses solar energy
stuck-up unfriendly; thinking you are superior
top-quality the best
two·part (a TV programme) having two parts
water-efficient (washing machines ' dishwashers) not using
much water
well-known famous
well-off with quite a lot of money
well-organised efficient ' well-planned
well-paid receiving a lot of money for a job
world· famous well -known around the world
ages
two-year-old being the age of two
fifteen-year-old being the age of fiheen
thirty-nine-year-old being the age of thirty-nine
times
ten-minute (a break) that lasts for ten minutes
two-hour (a journey) that lasts for two hours
five-day (a holiday) that lasts for five days
WORD BANK
• Collocations
Verb Noun Noun
attend a meeti ng, a wedding, a funeral, a party clothes
be in danger, in pain, worth a fortune
bools, dress, skirt, socks
belong to a family, a team, a club, a group
baggy eans, lumper, shorts, Irousers
borrow I lend money, a car, a bike
cneCkeo acKet, scan, shirt
cause I look for trouble
change course (as ship), direction
corduroy ackel, Irousers, skirt
cotton I-sn,n , shrr' , blouse, lrousers
declare war (on)
do someone a favour, your homework,
the washing-up, research
drop litter
denim jackel, jeans
Oesigner label , clolhes
flared jeans, Irousers
lIal shoes
dye your hair
bools, shoes
earn money
fail an exam, a test
gel a birthday present, a decent wage,
a discount , a good deal, a job
a bus, a plane, a train
a (old, a headache
angry, nervous, upset, lost , ready
dressed, changed, lost , married
home
I dress, jeans, shorts, skirt
,inen jac .. t , suit
I shi n , lOp, T-shirt
mini sKIrt
narrow leans, Irousers
plain sh,n , blouse
poinled bools, shoes
j umper, shrr' , sweater, lOp
colder, hotter, warmer, hungry, tired
round neck jumper, lop
into trouble
stuck
jumper, Shirt, lOP,
give a performance, a speech, a present, silk blouse, shi rl, lie
an opinion top, T-shi rt
have an accident, an illness, an injury. slriped shi rt, socks, T-shirt, jumper
a headache, a cold I flu, a problem,
a good laugh, something to eat,
I'ghl

a look at something
IOn 'eans
hold an event, e.g. a wedding, a meeting,
V-neck 'umper
a competition
keep a secret, in touch
woollY 1at , ,umper, scan , sweater, lOp
leave a message, your name and address
places
lose your job, your temper
make money, a mistake, dinner, a noise, a fire,
a cake, a suggesti on , a compl aint,
your bed
pass on traditions, a message
perform a dance, a song
pierce your ear, eyebrow, lip, nose, tongue,
play games, the piano, chess, sport, the guitar
raise money (for chari ty)
receive a phone call , a letter, a message,
an e-rnail, a text
amazing, small, wide variety
bad, cold, good, hot weather
beauti ful, breathtaking sight, view
common, endangered species
deafening, loud noise
deep, freshwater lake
dense, pine, rain, thick forest
exotic, ra re animals
heavy, light rain
high, rocky, snow-capped mountain
recycle batteries, glass, paper
save electricity, energy, money, time
send an e-ma il , a letter, a message,
a text message
Quantity I Noun
Container
shave your legs, head
solve a mystery, a problem
spend money, ti me
take a bus, a plane, a train
a holiday, a rest, a break
a look at something
I ,
an exam, a test I ,
photos
pleasure in something,
pride in something
a long time, twenty minutes, an hour
drugs, a sample
a message
a photo
tattoo your arm, back, neck
waste electricity, energy, money, time
win a competition, a medal , a prize, a race,
the lottery
write a letter, a blog, an e-mai1
120
WORD BANK
• Idiomatic Language
be a tight sleeper to be easily woken up: I'm 0 light sleeper;
the smallest noise !takes me up.
be a nightmare be a complete disaster: The exam WQS 0
nightmare.
be over to be fin ished: The porty was over be/ore midnight.
black sheep of the famHy someone who is different from the
rest of his family in an unfavourable way: He never visited his
mother; he was the black sheep 0/ the family.
heavy music loud and powerful rock music: I quite like heavy
music_
I rregu la r verbs
Present Simple Past Simple Past Participle
be was I were been
become became become
begin began begun
break broke broken
bring brought brought
build built built
burn burnt, burned burnt , burned
buy bought bought
catch caught caught
choose chose chosen
(orne came come
cost cost cost
cut cut cut
dig dug dug
do did done
draw drew drawn
dream dreamt, dreamed dreamt, dreamed
drink drank drunk
drive drove driven
eat ate eaten
fall fell fallen
feed fed fed
fight fought fought
find found found
fly flew flown
forget forgot forgotten
get got got
give gave given
go went gone
grow grew grown
have had had
hear heard heard
hide hid hid
hit hit hit
hold held held
hurt hurt hurt
keep kept kept
know knew known
lead led led
learn learnt, learned learnt, learned
leave left left
lend lent lent
heavy rain a lot of rain: There was heavy rain last night.
miles (better, bigger, safer, etc) much (better, bigger, safer,
etc): This choir is miles more comfortable.
safe and sound completely safe or unhurt : The parents were
injured in the crQsh but the baby WQS sole and JOund.
spitting image (of someone) exactly like (someone): She's the
spitting image 0/ her mother.
Irregular verbs
Present Simple Past Simple Past Participle
let let let
lie lay lain
light lit lit
lose lost lost
make made made
mean meant meant
meet met met
pay paid paid
put put put
read (/ri:dl) read (/redl) read Vredl)
ride rode ridden
ring rang rung
run ran run
say said said
see saw seen
sell sold sold
send sent sent
set set set
show showed shown
shut shut shut
sing sang su ng
sink sank sunk
sit sat sat
sleep slept slept
smell smelt , smelled smelt , smelled
speak spoke spoken
spend spent spent
spill spilt, spilled spilt, spilled
stand stood stood
steal stole stolen
swim swam swum
take took taken
teach taught taught
tear tore torn
tell told told
think thought thought
throw threw thrown
understand understood understood
wake woke woken
wear wore worn
win won won
write wrote written
STUDENTS' BOOK
TAPESCRIPT
Module 1 Communication
Page 4, Exercise 3
Ellie: Hi, I'm Ellie. I'm from Bristol. Tanya and I
wanted to Start an online radio sl'ation, :md we asked
Steve and Abi to help us, so here we all arc. I'm going
to be a reporter. I'm going to look for news, interview
people, that sort of thing and Steve's going to work
with me. He's in my class at school. I'd like to do some
rejX)rtS OIl the environmem. I'm against all this pollution
everywhere and all these cars. Bristol's got: terrible traffic,
you know. I'm a vegetarian tOO - I never eat meat. rm
sixteen and I've just done my GCSE exams. Over to you,
Steve.
Steve: Er, my name's Steve. I'm sixteen and [ was born
here, in Brisrol. I like football and I'm a Ikisrol Rovers
fa n. r often watch them when they play at home. Er, I've
got two morc years at schooL My best subject is art, I
suppose. I like taking photos and I gOl: a good digital
camera for my last binhday. I'd like to be a designer or a
photographer or something like that when I leave schooL
Maybe I'll go to art college - I'm nor really sure. Ellie
asked me to help her on radiochill.org. I'm gonna help
her with reporti ng and I'll take pharos for the website. I
think it' ll be reall y cool. Your rum now, Tanya.
Tanya: Hello, my name's Tanya. I'm from Kiev in
Ukraine but we moved here ten years ago, when I was
six. My mwn and dad are OOth scientists and work
at BriS(ol Univcrsiry in the Phannacy Department. I'm
sixteen. I want to go [0 universiry, but I don't know
what I want to do ret. I'll probably do sciences like my
parents. Maybe medicine. I'd quite like (Q be a doctor.
Maybe. My real intereSt is sport and I JUSt love foot ball.
I follow Dynamo Kiev from Ukraine and my favourite
English team is Chelsea. I know Ellie and Steve from
school and I'm going to be the sports reporter for
radiochill.org. It'll be good fun, [ thi nk. And now, Abi.
Abi: Right. My name's Abi. My parents are from
Nigeria, originall y, but I was born in London. We
m o ~ to Bristol three years ago for my dad's work.
like it here. I'm really into music and I know all the new
bands in the Bristol area. I've got millions of CDs and I
sometimes work as a DJ at parties and that SOrt of thing.
Tanya lives in our street and she asked me to help \vith
this online radio station, so I said yeah, great. I' m going
to be the DJ and play all the music I like! It should be
really cooL I'm also going to go to a fashion show \vith
Tanya. That'll be an experience! I thi nk it's important
to look good. you know what I mean? When I'm a bit
older, I'd like to have my own dub and get local bands
to play there.
Page II, Exercise 1
1
A: I haven't seen your brother Tim lately. What's
he up to these days?
B: Tim? Didn't you know? He's on holiday. He's
got this friend in France. They're on a boat in the
Medit erranean for three weeks.
A: A boat? It's not fair. Some people have all the
luck, don't they?
2
A: My favourite ones are about football. There's
a great Manchester United blog. What about you,
Roxy?
B: No, I don't like SpOrtS blogs! And I don't [ike
those personal diaries, they're sooo boring. There's
a good ci nema blog I look at sometimes. I get ideas
for what films to see.
,
A: Hi there, Kelly. How's it ~ ? Did you do
your maths yet ?
B: Yeah, no problem. I finished chemistry, toO, but
I've gOt problems with geography. It 's a night ma re!
A: Do you ~ me to hdn? Why don't you come
over to my place?
4
A: Morning, Tom. You're late iUmin. What was the
problem this t ime?
B: Sorry, Miss Williams. I couldn' t hclJl it. My
122 mum's car didn't start. I had to get the bus.
5
A: What instruments can you play?
B: I can' t play am', actuall y. I had piano lessons at
school, but I wasn't really interested. What about
you, Susan?
A: Oh, I play the flute. I had a really good reacher.
6
A: Who are you sending that to, Cath?
B: My cousin. It's his birthday today, so I'm
sendi ng him an e-mail. He lives in the States bur he
came over here last summer. He's a ~ nice guy.
Module 2 News
Page 15, Exercise 2
A: And now over to Joa nna Wright with the four
o'clock news.
B: Thanks, Jerry. Hurricane Carl os is going ro hit the
south coast of Cuba at aoout ten o'clock tonight. Experts
think that C,rlos might be one of the worst hurricanes
in the last ten years - possibly as bad as Hurricane
Katrina in 2005. The Cuban gm'crnmem has already
moved touriStS from hol iday resortS on the south cooS(.
In Manchester this morning, three men tried to rob
the Narwest bank near Piccadill y Station. The men, all
amled and wearing masks, entered the bank just after
it opened at nine o'clock. The men escaped in a red
Ford Mondeo. Anyone who saw the robbery is asked
to contact Manchester police on 0 16 1,876,543. Julie
Williams, the Manchester-born actress from Westenders,
went into hospital this morning. She is expecting a baby
boy. Her husband, footballer Jeff Bowles. said they
were OOth nervous but looking forward 10 havi ng a
son. Finall y, fOOtball. Manchester United have signed a
new goalkeeper. Da\'e Smith is t\venry-one and is from
Australia. He begins training with thc club tomorrow.
That's all from me, now over to Sruart with the weather.
C: Thanks Jo. Well, we've had a grey, rainy day here in
Manchester, and the rain is going to continue through the
night, I'm afraid. Tomorrow will be a lot better though
and it'll be sunny and bright in the morning. In the
afternoon, it will .
Page 21, Exercise 1
1
A: Hi ya, Gary.
B: Hi ya, Mark.
A: How was the match?
B: All righ t.
A: Did you win?
B: We drew, 2-2.
A: That's not bad. Are you okay?
B: Yeah ... well, no, not really.
A: What 's t he matter?
B: I played really badly. I even mi ssed a penalry!
A: Really? I'm sorry about that.
B: It's okay.
2
A: Hi, Madge.
B: Hi, Pat.
A: Ha ve you met the new neighbours?
B: The couple in number twelve? Yes, I have.
A: What do you think?
B: Well, she seems nice, vcry sociable. but her
husba nd is a bit .. . odd.
A: Mm, [ know what you mean, he never says a
word.
B: What does he do?
A: Something to do with computers, I think.
B: Have you seen thei r dog?
A: I have. Bi g, ugly thing.
B: Looks dangerous to me.
A: I thi nk so, roo.
,
A: Hi, Scan. How was the exa m?
B: It was a nightmare.
A: I'm sure it wasn't that bad.
B: Oh yes it was!
A: Why? What happened?
B: For a start, when I arrived I couldn't find the
room, so I was fifteen minutes laIC. Lucki ly they let
me in. Then, you won', believe it, when I sat down,
I realised I'd forgotten my pen.
A: Oh no!
B: Yeah, so I had to put my hand up to ask to
borrow a pen. I felt really sru pid.
A: And what about the acrual exam?
B: It was hard. I mean. it was really difficult.
A: Do you t hink you've passed?
B: No way.
4
A: Hi, Cheryl.
B: Hi , Teri. How did it go ,hen?
A: How did 'what' go?
B: You know, your date with Colin.
A: Oh, fine.
B: Where did YOll go?
A: We went to see a film.
B: And then?
A: Then what?
B: You know what I mean.
A: Nothing. I got the bus home.
B: Are you gonna see him again?
A: Yeah, I'm meeting him in town on Friday.
B: Great!
Module 3 Communities
Page 25, Exercise 3
A: Hi, Robbie. I'm doing a school survey about
people's local communit ies. Can you answer some
questions for me?
B: Sure.
A: Right, the first one. What sort of area do you and
)'our fami ly live in? Could you describe it for me?
B: Well, I live in Herne Hi ll. It 's in the suburbs of
south London.
A: Is it a fr iendly area?
B: T here arc some nice people in our road but I
don't t hink you coul d call it 'friendly'. You know,
everyone's a bi t .. distant. My fami ly comes from a
small town origi nall y and the people there are nicer.
I think so anyway.
A: What kind of house do you live in?
B: O ur street, like a lot of streets round there, has
gOt terraced houses with little gardens at the back.
We've gOt four bedrooms - my mum and dad's, my
sister Sue's, my brother Dan's and mine.
A: Ri ght. Next quest ion. Is there a lot to do in
your area?
B: Well, it's quite a good area. I like it. There's a
corner shop in our st reet and a park just down the
road. My school's quite near, too. so I can walk to
it but I have to get a bus to (he nearest sports centre
or youth dub.
A: I-l ow many of your rclations live ncar you?
B: Nor many, really. My dad's pa rents died
when I was young, and my mum's parentS - my
grandparents - live in a small town ncar Exeter in
Devon. That's quite a long way from London but
we alwa ys go to see granny and grandad in the
holidays. My uncle Tony and aunt Cat hy live there,
tOO, with their children Kate and Fred. I get on
rcally well with them.
A: SO, what about relations in London?
B: I haven't gOt any relations in London - ah yes,
there's Auntie Jan. She lives in London but we don't
sec her very much.
A: What about fri ends? Where do you know your
friends from?
B: Well, my best friend, Sam, lives in my street.
We're both really into skateboarding. And I' ve got
school fri ends who live quit e near me, like Abe and
Paul. Oh, and I've got other Friends who I play
footba ll with on Samrdays, like Chris and Bill. The
rest of the dose friends I've got are in Devon, like
Martin and Tom. I was at primary school with them
ycars ago.
A: Last question, Robbie. Which adults from your
area do you get 011 well with?
B: Adults? Er, our neighbour. Mrs Robinson. She's
really nice. And at school I like l" lr Jenkins, my
history reacher. And of course there's Sean. He's m)'
football coach. He's great!
Page 31, Exercise 1
Abi : And now on 'radiochill.org' ir's rime for
'What's On' in Bristol.
Tanya: Yes, it's Friday and it's the weekend at last!
And if you' re into clothcs, like me, there's a great
fashion exhibition at the City An Gallery. It starts
on the second of Deccmber and goes on till the
eighteenth of January. I wem last v.;eek and t here are
some really cool clothes from the 1800s up to the
year 2000. The gallery'S open from nine-thi rty in the
morning till five-thirty in the afternoon, except for
Mondays. And iI's free!
Abi: Can't be bad. Is there an y stuff from the
sixties?
Tanya: Oh, yeah. The drcsses and hairstyles are
amazing.
Abi: I like all those bellbottom trousers - you
know the ones that arc really wide at the bottom.
And those weird, freaky shirts and strange ties.
Tanya: Me, too.
Abi: Anyway, let'S finish with music. If you want
to sec a band, you're in luck this weekend, Tanya.
At the Apollo club they've gOt Foo Fi ghters on
Friday, Franz Ferdinand on Saturday and the Pink
Fairies on Sunday.
Tanya: Sounds great.
Abi: Who's your favourite band?
Tanya: Out of those three?
Abi: Yeah.
Tanya: Er, Franz I think.
Abi : Right. Well, all the gigs start at nine o'clock
and finish aboU! half-past eleven. Tickets arc twelve
pounds.
Tanya: You're li stening to 'radiochill.org' . It's just
coming up to twelve o'clock.
Abi: So that's what's on in Bristol this weekend.
And that 's all from me, Abi Abacha.
Tanya: And me, Tanya. From Radiochill.org, have a
grear weekend everyone!
Module 4 Cash
Page 35, Exercise 2
A: Hello, and wekome to Your Mouey. Today,
we're going to talk about teenagers and money.
How much pocket money do teenagers get? How
many teenagers have part-time jobs? What do rhey
spend their money on? We have financial expert,
Andrew \V:ltIS, with us to answer some of rhese
questions. Firsl, Andrew, what about pocket money?
B: Well, there are surveys about pocker money
every year. Pocket money has gone up a lot in the
laSt few years bm thi s year it's a little lower than
last year. The average pocket money for twelve to
sixteen-year-aids in Britain is nine pounds se vemy-
six pence per week.
A: Nine pounds seventy-six, that's still a lot of
moncy- Arc there any differences between boys and
girls or different parts of the country?
B: Yes, it changes from year to year, bm this rear
girls get on average forty pence more than boys.
And the top area for pocket money is London.
London teenagers get nearly twelve pounds a week.
A: And the lowest?
B: The teenagers who get rhe lowest amount of
pocket money are those in Wales - they get JUSt over
half the amoum of Londoners.
A: Mm, about six pounds. Thar's a big difference.
Do reenagers have to do anything to ger t heir pocket
money? When I was younger, we had to do jobs
around the house.
B: About fifty per cent of reenagers say they have
to do chores al home, like tidying their bedroom
or doing the washing-up. So, yes, a lor of them do
something to earn their money.
A: Wh:lt abom parr-time jobs?
B: Wel l, Hearly a third of Iwelve to sixteen-yea r-
olds do parr-time jobs to pay for their lifestyle. The
average wage is abour twcnty-seven pounds and girls
do r.Hher bener here than boys. The most popular
job is delivering newspapers - twenty-four per cent
of teenagers have a paper round. Working in a shop
is quite popular, tOO, and seventeen per cent of
young people do rhat.
A: And so what do British teenagers actuall y spend
their money on?
B: The most popular items are, wait for it, crisps,
swee£s and chocolates! Yes, sixty-eight per cent of
tccnagers spend their own money on sweets and
snacks. Fifty-nine per cenr spend most money on
going out, you know, to the cinema, clubs and so
on, and forty per cenl spend their money on using
rheir mobile phones.
A: Andrew, do teenagers ever save any money? I
never did!
B: Yes, they do. In fact they're bener than a lot of
adults in this. Forry-nine per cent of teenagers save
money, and the average savings are a hundred and
seven pounds a year.
A: Mm, thar's quite a lot.
B: Yes, it 's nOt bad.
A: Well, that's all we have time for today. Thanks a
lot Andrew for coming in.
B: Not at all.
Page 41, Exercise 1
A: Can I help you?
B: Yes, I bought this model car for my son's
birthday and when he opened it. there were some
pieces missing.
A: Let's have a look. Right. Have you got the
receipt?
B: 0, sorry, I ean't find it. Oh, here it is.
A: Thanks. Would you like a refund or would you
prefer to choose another model?
B: Well, have you gOt the same model car?
A: I'm afraid that was t he ollly one we had. I could
order onc for you.
B: Yes, could you? Than ks very much. He collects
them, you see, and he especially wanted that one.
A: Okay, fine, ca n I JUSt take your name and phone

B: Yes, ir's .
2
A: Can I help you?
B: Er, I bought t his game on Saturday but it
doesn't work on my complllcr.
A: Let's see. Look, it says what you need on the
cover.
B: I didn't look when I bought it. Can I change it
for another game?
A: Well , not rea ll y, because you've opened the box
and put it in your computer. We can't sell it again.
B: What, but. I've gOt the receipt.
A: Okay, wait a minute. I' ll have a word with the
manager. You're in luck. He said you can changc it
for another ga me.
B: Oh, good.
A: Make sure you check what it says on the box
this time!
B: All right.
3
A: Excuse me?
B: Yes, can I help you?
A: I hope so. I boughr this tOp last week but when
I washed it the colours rail. Here, can you see? It's
gone all pink.
B: Oh, yes. That's nOt very good, is it? Ha\'c you
got the receipt?
A: Yes, here it is!
B: Great. Well, I can give you a refund or I can
change it for another one.
A: I think I'd prefer my money back, please.
B: Sure, no problem.
Module 5 Water
Page 45, Exercise 2
Hello :lnd welcome to Enrthwatd,. Today we're going to
talk about water. With the world's population going up
to about /lille billioll people, this is definitely going to be
one of the biggest problems in thc 21st century. In fact, in
many coumries of the world it's already a huge problem.
Water co\"ers most of our planet and nearly 98% of
water is in the sea. Fresh water makes up less rhan 3% of
the water on our planet, and two-thirds of that is in the
polar ice Clps. And the polar ice caps are disappearing
with global warming!
Everybody needs water because it makes up between
50 and 70% of our bodies. Let me just say that again,
we are all aoout 60% water! We get water from food,
especially fruit, and from drinks. An adult human should
drink two-and-a-half lirrcs of water a day. It Cln be in
the fonn of tea or coffee, but it's heakhier to drink water
on its own.
In developed countries, we are lucky. We just tum on
a tap and get cheap, clean water. In fact, we use ten
times, yes TEN times, as much water as people in the
developing world. Most of the people in rhe world
aren't SO lucky. They don't have clean water and unclean
water kills four thousand children a day through various
diseases. Yes, that's right · four thousand children die
every day because of dirty water. That's a hundred and
sixty-six children an hour or nearly th ree children every
min ute! In Africa, it's usually women who collcer water,
and this takes time. Many women spend over an hour a
day collecting water for their families.
What about the future? Well, the world's population is
increasing rapidly bur the world's water supply isn't. In
with climate change, many areas will get less water
than now. O\'er 40% of the people on the planet face
watcr shortages in the furure. So what can we do aoout
all this? \'(Ie interviewed Doctor Alice Hughes from
London University ...
Page 51, Exercise 2
Right, I'm going to talk about Eurasian otters which were
one of the most common animals in British rivcrs eighty
years ago.
First, something about what they look like. WeU,
Eurasian Otters have gOt" brown fur with a lighter patch
on t heir fronts. They've got long bodies with short legs.
Right, an adult male c.1n be up to one-point-twenty
metres long and can weigh up [ 0 forry ... sorry, [ mean
fourteen kilos. Next, something about how they live.
Otters live around rivers and lakes. They can live up to
twenty years in zoos but in the wild they're lucky if they
can get to four! Otters are brilliant swimmers. They can
dive twenty metres and stay undenvater for four minutes
without any problems. Otters are not bad on land either
and can run at twelve miles an hour. They mainly eat
fish bur they also ear frogs and sometimes birds. They
spend nearly half of their lives sleeping! Lucky otters, is
what I say.
Anyway, otters show how clean the water of a river is.
\"Vhen rou see an otter in a riVet; )"DU know that the
water is not very polluted. In the 1950s., you could see
them in ri\'Crs all ovcr the country but then there was a
complete disaster. Their numbers went down drastically
and they nearly disappeared. The main reason for their
decline was pollution from factories and farms going into
the ri\·ers. By the 1980s., there were only a few ottcrs in
parts of Scotlnnd, Wales and South-West England. It's a
bit of a sad story, but things have got bettcr.
So, what h.1ppened? Well, something had to be done.
The British govcrnment began controlling pollution
from factories and famlS. [t has taken a long rime but
gradually British rivers have become cleaner. Otters have
spread from the west and north and you can see rhem
again in all pans of Britain. Actually, the population of
otters is going up, although many are killed on the roads
because rhere is more traffic nowadays. Finally, what can
you do to help otters? Well, ),OU can join an organisation
that helps to protect nature and the environmenr. You
can also help to keep the local river clean and not throw
rubbish into it. Right, that's aoout it. lllanks a lot for
listening.
Module 6 Save the Planet
Page 55, Exercise 2
Tom: I think the environment's really importam
because we're destroying aUf plnncr. I mean, we're
polluting rivers, cutting down forests, killing animals.
And thc biggest problem is that, because \\ie produce
greenhouse gases, we' re even changi ng the Earth's
climate. Did you know, the ten warmest years in history
have been since '1990? [n the future, it's going to get
much worse, and that'll affect me and my generation.
[n this century, the plnnet will get honer by up to five
degrees. That will cause more droughts, more storms,
and more hurricanes. In 2006, there were so many
hurricanes that they ran out of names for them! The
ice caps at the poles are starring ro melt roo, so the sea
level's going ro go up by a few metres. Some countries
might even disappear! Imagine that. What can we
do about it? Well, everyone can do something. For
example, you can sa\'e energy at home, walk to school,
or recycle paper and batteries. You can join a green
organisation like Gretmpeace and prOtest. Some people
say it's no fun being green, and it's all serious. Bm
I'm in a group called Trees for LondOIl and we ha ve
Street parties to raise money. You can have fun and help
the planet at the s.1me time!
Keith: Personall y, I'm bored of ... 'the environment'.
We get it at school and from our parents. We get it
on lV, too. People say the world's going to end but
everylxxly still dr;,·es their cars and flies to Spai n on
holiday. I suppose there are some problems. The biggest
problem here in Brimingham is air pollution, but it's
the same as smoking nventy cigarettes a day, isn't it?
Anyway, I don't think we'll have big problems in my
lifetime. Maybe in my grandchildren's lives. There's no
reason to worry now. People say the climare is changing
and there's global wamling but the climate's changed
before. I mean, Ihere was an ice age nventy thousand
years ago! Anyway, I'd actually like the British climate
to change. Hey, we'll gel hot, sunny summers every
year! What do I do for the environment? \X'el l, I lm·e
having a good time, shopping and p..1ITying, so I've got
no time for cleaning ri,·ers and all thar 'save the planet'
smff. As soon as I can, I'm going to get a car and I'm
NOT going to feel guilty about it. There's no point
getting upset about the [umre. Enjoy yourself when you
can, that's what I say.
Page 61, Exercise 2
Hello, good evening. Here is the weather forecast for next
year, 2080, in Europe. In the \vinrer, there will be very
wet weather in northern Europe, especially in Scotland
and Ireland. There will be some snow in northern
Norway and Sweden but it won't last for more than a
few days. There'll be no snow in the Alps or the rest of
Europe this year - I'm sorry but you skiers will have to
go to the Himalayas again. Temperarures in l\oloscow will
reach a minimum of -5 degrees centigrade. That'll be the
coldest place on the continent this wimer! In southern
Europe, especially Spain and Portugal, the record ten-ycar
drought will continue. The southern and central Spanish
desert will have very little rain again this rear. EconomistS
say that the effect on the Spanish economy is going to be
disasrrous.
In the spring, there will be bad storms in northern
Europe. Most of Holland will be Aooded as will London
and south-east England. There will also be Aooding in
Poland, the Czech Republic and other p..1rts of Central
and Eastern Europe. In rhe summer, there will be a
heat wave in mOSt of Europe. It \vililast for O\'er three
months in June, July and August. Southern Spain , viII
be the honest place with record temperarures in Seville
and Q)Tdoba of over 50 degrees centigrade. Yes, you
heard that correaly, 50 degrees centigrade - thar's the
highest ever recorded! Northern Europe witl also be hot.
Temperamres in Paris, London and Berlin will reach 40
degrees and millions of tourists will go to popular holiday
resorts on the southern coast of England and the Baltic
coast in Poland, Latvia, Estonia and Lithuania. In the
aurumn, the weather will get cooler bur there will be bad
electric storms in the eastern Mediterranean, especiall y
southern Italy, Greece and Turkey. Five hurricanes \vi.ll
hit \'('estern Europe this aummn. The worst one will
probably hit the Canary Islands, Portugal, northern
Spain, wesrern France and then south-west Britain. There
\viH be a lot of damage and thousands of demhs. More
heavy rain is also possible in Scotland and Ireland with
the possibility of strOng winds.
That is the weather forecast for 2080.
Module 7, Fashion
Page 65, Exercise 3
A: Excuse me? Can I ask you a few questions,
please? We're doing a survey about young people's
fashion. It'll only take five minutes.
B: Yeah, all right.
A: Thanks. Firsl question. Who or what
,, __ ... the way you dress? Is if magazines, friends, pop
. Stars, or maybe the TV?
124 B: I don't know, rea ily. I suppose me and my
riends wear the same sort of clothes.
A: So. you get ideas from your friends.
B: Yeah, friends.
A: How would you describe your style? I mean,
what kind of clothes do you wear? Are they smarr,
casual, alternative or trendy?
B: What do you mean by alternative?
A: Well, I mean clothes that are a bit hippy, heavy
metal or goth. Do you know what I mean?
B: Yeah. Well, I usually wear casual clothes. I
don't like formal clothes and I hate wearing ties and
jackets. \Y./e have to wear them every day at school,
you know.
A: Right. And what style of jeans do you like?
B: This style, like these.
A: The style you're wearing now.
B: Yeah, quile baggy with loads of pockets.
A: What about hats? Do you ever wear anything
on your head - for example, if it's cold?
B: I don't wear hats.
A: What about the hood on your hoodie you're
wearing?
B: Oh yeah, I su ppose that's a sort of hat.
A: One last question. Do you ever argue with your
parems about clothes?
B: Er, sometimes, yea h. It's usually when I go out
with my friends. And sometimes they don't like the
slogans on my T-shirts.
A: Okay, that 's all. Thanks a lot.
Page 71, Exercise 1
1
A: Hi Mum.
B: Hi, Darren ... Oh, my .
A: What's the matter?
B: What's the matter? Look at your hair! What
have you
A: It's all right, mum. All my friends have got hair
like thi s.
B: But it's ... it's like a punk's hair · sticking up
... and the colour! It 's awful!
A: Calm down, Mum. Orange is cool.
2
A: Can I help you?
B: Yes. I'm looking for a birthday present for a
friend.
A: How about a T·shirt?
B: I don't know.
A: Or some make·up?
B: No. She doesn't wear make· up.
A: Maybe a ring?
B: Mm. Maybe.
A: A nice shoulder bag?
B: No, she doesn't like them.
A: Earrings?
B: Yeah, that's a good idea. These look ni ce and
she loves long earri ngs. What are they made of?
A: Silver. And they're really good value at eleven
ninety-ni ne.
B: I'm nor sure. Okay, I'll take these.
3
A: Hi Paul.
B: Hi Tony.
A: New jeans?
B: Yeah. I gOt 'em yesterday for my birthday.
A: They're great. I like jeans that aren' t too tight.
B: Yeah. All these pockets are great.
A: What do put in 'em?
B: This one's for my mobile, this is for my keys,
here I' ve got my wallet and here my MP3 player. It's
great, isn't it?
4
A: Hiya Lucy, what did you get?
B: Well, there were loads of offers, so I got a few
things. This tOp.
A: Ooh, that's nice ...
B: ... and this skirt. It's not toO short, is it?
A: No, let 's have a look .
B: And this dress. I thought it would be okay for
dancing.
A: Nlm, I like the colour. Wait a minute. There's a
mark on this skirt.
B: Oh, I didn't see that. I'll have ro take it back.
A: How much was the
Page 71, Exercise 3
1: Ca n I help you?
2: How about a T-shirt?
3: Or some make·up?
4: Marbe a ring?
5: A nice shoulder bag?
6: Earrings?
Page 71, Exercise 5
1: I don't know.
2: No.
3: Mm. Maybe.
4: No, she doesn't like them.
5: Yeah, that's a good idea.
6: I' m nor sure.
Module 8, Sport
Page 75, Exercise 3
Sport. You may work OUt in the gym, go fishing on
Sundays, or just enjoy watching football on rhe TV.
It's part of our daily lives. But why do we do it? And
where did our modem sports come from? In ronighr's
programme, we'll be looking at the origins of some of
our most popular spons.
Boxing. Some people 10\'1' it, some people think it's tOO
violent, but it's been around for a long, long time. In
fact, it's probably one of the oldest sports in the world.
There was boxing in ancient Greece five thousand rears
ago but the rules were quire different from today's. They
didn't categorise fighters by weight, so a big man could
fight a small man. Also, the boxers didn't wear gloves.
Oh, and a boxer could hit his opponent when he was
down on the floor! NO! very fair, was it?
One of the mOSt popular sports in the world
today, but did you know the AzteCS played a game like
basket ball as long ago as the fifth century? There were
nvo teams like in today's games and they had to get a
rubber ball through a stone hoop, a bit like a mooem
basket. One difference benvecn the ancient Aztec game
and modern basketball is that you could tOuch the baH
with any pan of your lxxIy except for your hands. Oh,
and one other thing; if you lost the game, they cut off
your head! Ugh!
Ah, surfmg. Golden beaches in California, South Africa
or Australia. But surfing was first seen by the British
explorer Captain Cook in 1777 off the islands of Tahiti
in the South Pacific ocean. The nati,·es in Pol ynesia
didn't ha\·e modern surfboards, of course, they just used
a piece of wood. And Ihe original version of the sport
was much more dangerous - surfers tried to go as ncar
to the rocks as possible and then lump off the board
into the water at the last moment!
Rugby. With more and more countries taking part in
the Rugby World Cup, it's more popular than ever. But
rugby is a relatively recent sport. According (Q legend, it
began in 1823 at Rugby School. The boys were playing
football one d"lY when one of them, William Webb Ellis,
picked up the ball and ran with it, and so the game
of rugby was born. It was different from the modern
g.1me in many ways. For example, players could hit
their opponents - and they didn'l get a rtxl card! In fact,
before matches, the teams met to agree on the rules.
The rul es of the modem game were not drawn up until
187 1. And did you know that .
Page 81, Exercise 1
Tanya: Hello, it 's half-past five on Saturday, time
for radiochill .org's weekly sports report. And leT's
start with loday's fOOTba ll. Abi?
Abi: Hello, everyone. Yes, today was a good day
for Bristol City, but nOt so good for Bristol Rovers.
BristOl .c.i.n: beat Doncaster nvo-one at home this
after noon with goals from Clarke and MacDonald
but Bristol Rovers lost two-nil away at Chester. Dan
Smit h also got a red card. Up in the Premier l eague,
the leaders Arsenal won comfortably at home to
Newcastle, three-nil, and Manchester United stay
in place after their draw against Li verpool
last Ilight. We'll have all the results later in the
programme. But now, athletics. Tanya?
Tanya: Yes, today is the second day of international
athletics right here in Bristol. This afternoon we
saw the Russian girl, Svedana Sokolova, wi n the
women's one hundred metres final. She juSt beat
the Canadian Sindy Turner by twO hundredths
of a second! Meanwhile, in the men's discus, the
Romanian, Alexandru Telegdy threw an amazing
seventy-three met res to win that eve,nr for Romania.
Abi: Nothing for Britain?
Tanya: I'm afraid not, Abi, though we came close
in the long jump. Clive Bell jumped a personal best
of eight metres but finished second to the American,
Max Willis. The competition finishes tomorrow
afternoon with the marathon. That starts in the
Millennium Square at twO o'clock and finishes in
the stadium.
Abi: And now, ice hockey. An important match
for Bristol Warriors tonight against w -of-the-table
Coventry. We really need the points, so why don't
you get down there and give them some suPPOrt.
The games starts at seven-thirty at the John Nike ice
rink in Frogmore Street.
Tanya: And finally those football results we
promised you. First, the Premier League. Arsenal
three, Newcastle nil. Chelsea one, Birmingham nil.
Everton three, Bolton one.
Page 81, Exercise 3
1: Today was a good day for Bristol.G.tr.
2: Manchester United stay in ~ place after
their draw against Liverpool last night.
3: She just beat the Canadian Sindy Turner by two
hundredths of a second.
4: The Romanian, Alexandru Tclegdy, threw an
amazing seventy-t hree metres.
5: An important match for Bristol \Varriors tonight
against w -of-the-table Coventry.
Module 9, Detectives
Page 85, Exercise 3
A, Jessica FI cher
Jessica Retcher used to be a high school teacher. When
she retired, she began to write murder mysteries. She
quickly became a famous writer and is uery rich. She
bought an aparnnent in New York and she became more
glamorous. She is an excellent deteCtive. She investigateS
very carefully. She looks for motives and eliminateS
suspectS. She usually catches the murderer herself; she
then talks to him or her and then tells the police!
B, Sherlock Holmes
Sherlock Holmes, assisted by his friend, Dr Watson, is
probably the most famous detective in the world. He is
a fictional detecti ve, of course, but many people think he
really existed. His house at 221 B Baker Srreet in London
is a tourist attraction and there are statues of him in
England, Scotland, Switzerland and Japan. We always
imagine him with a special type of pipe. and a special
type of hat bur the creator of Sherlock Holmes, the writer
Arthur Conan Doyle, never described the pipe. or hat in
detail. Sherlock Holmes has an amazing knowledge of
many subjects and his main hobbies include playing the
violin and, surprisingly, boxing!
C, Adrian Monk
Woman: Adrian Monk used to be a detective in the
San Francisco Police Depamnent but in 1997 his wife
\vas murdered. Monk never recovered from the shock
and since then, he has suffered !Tom a variety of nervous
disorders and phobias. He is afraid of almost everything,
including crowds and heights and hates anything that is
dirty. Because of this, he is on psychiatric leave trom [he
police deparnnent. However, he continues to help the
police with their investigations and hopes to return to the
police force one day. He doesn't rely on modern methods
such as DNA testing but he is certainly a brilliant
detectiyc, with a photographic memory and an amazing
ability to put together small clues.
0, Gil Grissom
Man: Gil Grissom was a biologist but then he got a job
with the las Vegas Police Depamllcm. He leads a team
of crime scene im·estigators. They use modern methods
for finding criminals, such as fingerprints and DNA
matching. He loves his work but he's not very good with
people and doesn't have any dose personal relationships.
His main hobby is studying insects and in his free time he
loves going on roller coasters at amusement parks!
Page 91, Exercise 2
A: Okay, so tell me about the case.
B: Well , a cleaner found the body in the main
office at about seven thirty.
A: Dead?
B: Oh, yes, very dead, sir.
A: And who's the victim?
B: A 'Mr Brown'. He is, or was, the manager of
the company.
A: Murder weapon?
B: A knife, sir. An ordi nary kitchen knife.
A: How do you know?
B: We found the knife outside in the car park. It's
gOt blood on it. We're checking the blood group.
A: Right. Do you have any suspecrs?
B: Yes ... his wi fe.
A: And what's her motive?
B: Apparently Mr Brown was seeing another
woman.
A: And what evidence do we have that she killed
him?
B: The knife is from the Brown's house. And it's
got Mrs Brown's fingerprints on it.
A: And my kitchen knife has got my fingerprints
on it. It doesn't make me a murderer.
B: No, sir.
A: Does she have an alibi?
B: She says she was at home all night with her
young child. She phoned her husband's office and
his mobile phone, bur he didn't answer. She thought
he was with the ' other woman'.
A: Okay. Where is she now?
B: In the interview room.
A: Right, I'll see her now.
2
A: Right, tell us about this kidnapping.
C: Well, Danny Cole is eighteen. He's the son of
Peter Cole.
A: I know, the milli onaire businessman.
C: That's right. And, basically, the kidnappers want
a million pounds.
A: And if Mr Cole doesn't give them the money?
C: Well, they don't say exactly but I think they're
senous.
A: Mm. Any suspects?
C: It could be that group from Bristol. They left a
similar kind of phone message in that kidnapping
in March.
A: When do they want the money?
C: Saturday, midnight.
A: That gives us two days.
C: The kidnappers don't know M.r Cole has spoken
to us.
A: Okay, but I need to spea k to Mr Cole. Get him
on the phone now.
C: Sure.
Page 91, Exercise 4
1: How do you know?
2: Do you have any suspects?
3: Does she have an alibi?
4: Where is she now?
4: When do they want the money?
Module 10, Imagination
Page 95, Exercise 2
A
I think it's a really impressive painting. I love the clever
way the artist has used different shades of green. I guess
it makes the painting really peaceful, do you know what
I mean? It's quite abstract, tOO, but you can see things in
the picture. It looks like a forest with a tree on the left
and a house at the back. There's a wall or something
at the bottom and maybe a door on the right. It's very
relaxing. If you look at it for a long time, you can see
other things. I mean, I can see a man's face, eyes, nose
and mouth, in the middle, and it looks as if he's reading
a book. Can you see that, or is it me?
B
I love this painting. It's one of my favourites, you know.
You can spend ages looki ng at it. At first, it all looks
very realistic but a bit complicated. You can see the
sky, the rocks, the trees and the water. But then, when
you look again, you see the reflections of the swans.
Suddenly, you can see three elephams standing by the
lake! It's really surprising and a bit confusing at first. It's
like onc of those optical illusions where you can see two
different things at the same time. I think it's very clever
and imaginative.
C
This picture is reall y weird! If you look at rain falling,
you can imagine different things and this looks as if
it's raining men, businessmen in hats and overcoats.
The men and the houses arc very realistic and ordinary
and that makes it even more unusual. It's not a very
colourful picture but I like the pale blue sky. The
problem for me is that the main idea of the picture is
a bit ridiculous. I know it's supposed to be a joke but
I just don't think it's very funny. I mean, it's not really
very imaginative, just men falling like rain, and that's it.
Page 101, Exercise 2
1
Sue: Hey Ben, have you heard about Steve and his
gi rl friend?
Ben: No, I haven't.
Sue: Well, they've been together for ages, haven't
they? And then yesterday afternoon she told him it
was all over. Just like that ! I saw him in the street.
Ben: I never liked her myself. By the way, what's on
telly tonight? Oh, it's Wednesday! Great, there's the
Milan-Arsenal game on! I completely forgot about it.
Sue: Not football again! As I was saying, J saw
Steve in the street. He looked terrible, poor thing.
And he's such a good guy. You're right about his
girlfriend. She was a bit .
Ben: A bit strange?
Sue: Yeah, that's right ... strange. Did you see
that dress she wore at our party? By the way, I'd
better starr getting ready for romorrow. We've got
gmndma's birthday party, you know. It's her eighry-
sixth birthday!
Ben: Do we have to go? I hate that kind of party.
Anyway, I've got to do twO more of my maths
problcms before the match starts. I'd better get on
with it. See you later.
Sue: All right.
2
Tom: Did I tell you my dad's getting a new laptop
for work? He says I can use his old one. It's still quite
new.
Katy: Lucky yout I'd really like a good laptop.
We've just got the old computer at home. It's soooo
slow on the Net.
Tom: By the way, how did the driving lesson go?
Katy: It was awful! I was going along the street,
really slowly. And this lorry came up behind me. It
got really close and I gOt nervous.
Tom: It's horrible when they do that. That reminds
me of once when we were in France, on holiday.
There was this huge lorry and we .
Katy: Well, as I was sayi ng, this lorry was just
behind me. I kept looking in the mirror and I didn't
notice a car on the corner in from of me. It suddenly
hit us. My driving instructor was really angry.
Tom: Do you mean you hit the car, or the car came
out of a side street and hit you?
Katy: Well, I suppose I hit the car. It was parked.
Tom: Parked? You mean you hit a parked car!?
That's JUSt what happened when I had my first
driving lesson. Did it do much damage?
Katy: No, not much. Luckily.
Tom: My crash was a nightmare. The car was badly
damaged. They wok me to hospital but I wasn't
badly hurt.
Katy: Hey, Tom. Have you seen the time? We're
going to be late for class!
Tom: Yeah, we' d better go.
WORKBOOK ANSWER KEY
Module 1 Communication
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 conversat ion 3 phone
4 messaging 5 language 6 service
7 nenvork 8 messages
Exercise 2 2 sign language (the others
all use a compurcr) 3 body language (t he
onl y non-verbal fo rm of communication)
4 telephone (all the others involve
communicating face to face) 5 face to face
conversati on (all t he others are based on
writing)
Exercise 3 1 a 2 c 3 c
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
1 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 warning 3 mean 4 noise
5 receive 6 tell 7 identify 8 tail
Exercise 2 2 arc singing 3 ' m doing
4 communicate 5 understand 6 harks
Exercise 3 2 OCt ) daj 3 at the tiiOiltCdl
4 new 5 a+w,'lp 6 nrttt
Exercise 4 2 a 3 c 4 b 5 c 6 d 7 a 8 b
Exercise 5 2 How long have you been
interested in animals? 3 What arc you
working on at the moment ? 4 What do
you do every day? 5 Is birdsong changing
nowadays ? 6 Why is that happening?
7 How many people do yOLl usually work
with ? 8 Have you published an art icle yet?
Exercise 6 2 ' ve been 3 ' ve gOt
4 ' m anachingl've attached 5 's li ved 6 's
7 ' re trying 8 understands 9 says
10 does n't say 11 likes 12 's playing
Exercise 7 1 Have you received a text
message yet today? 2 Are you writing a lor
of e-mails at the moment ? 3 Do you like
communicating by phone? 4 Have you ever
used sign language? or Do you ever use sign
language? 5 How many e-mails do yo u send
every week? 6 How often do you use instant
messaging?
2 Skills
Exercise 1 2 e 3 c 4 a 5 b 6 f
Exercise 2 2 I 3 I 4 C 5 I 6 C 7 C 8 I
Exercise 3 2 give away 3 meet up 'l.vith
4 get down to 5 get on wit h
6 keep in touch wi t h 7 hand in
Exercise 4 2 off 3 gOt 4 to 5 tOok
6 take
Exercise 5 2 since 3 for 4 since 5 for
6 si nce 7 since 8 for
Exercise 6 2 hand in 3 meet up with
4 keep in touch with 5 give away
6 get down ro
Exercise 7 1 I haven' t seen my best friend
since... 2 I' ve li ved in my house fo r
3 I've had this Engli sh book for ...
4 I haven't had a party since .
5 I haven' t bought a CD for ...
6 I' ve known my best fr iend since
3 Communication
Exercise 1 2 a 3 rime 4 Come 5 back
6 of 7 on 8 stuff
Exercise 2 2 Didn' t we agree on that ?
3 Don' t you think so, roo?
4 Didn' t yOll know? 5 Don' t you like it?
Exercise 3 2 Haven' t you seen it?
3 Didn' t we agree on that? 4 Don' t you
5 Don' t you agree ?
126 Exercise 4 2 b 3 , 4 a 5 b 6 a
Exercise 5 2 I agree with yOLl 3 I t hink
so, roo 4 What do you think ? 5 I don' t
th ink so. 6 Yes, definitel y.
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Exercise 7 2 I 3 C 4 C 5 I 6 I
Reading Corner 1
Exercise 1 2 information 3 subjecr
4 newest 5 top
Exercise 2 b
Exercise 3 2 c 3 e 4 a 5 d
Exercise 4 2 Tina S 3 KayJay 4 James
5 TK and Eddie X 6 Mikey J 7 KayJay
Exercise 5 2 T 3 F 4 F 5 F 6 T 7 F 8 T
Exercise 6 1 a 2 b 3 b 4 a 5 a 6 b
Exercise 7 Srudents' own answers
Language Check 1
Exercise 1 2 e 3 c 4 f 5 h 6 d 7 a 8 b
Exercise 2 1 in 2 with 3 keep 4 llP
5 give 6 with 7 take 8 get
Exercise 3 1 Have yo u ever owned ' 've
never had 2 is the dog barking' thinks
3 haven' t yOLl writren "m revising
4 do animals do , warn
5 are you learning' 've fa llen
Exercise 4 1 fo r 2 since 3 for 4 since
5 since
Exercise 5 1 definitely 2 rrue 3 so
4 think 5 ask
Module 2 News
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 puzzles 3 news 4 gossip
5 letters 6 headli nes 7 crosswords
8 cartoons 9 interviews 10 articles
11 advice 12 horoscopes 13 reviews
14 forecasts mystery word: quest ionnaires
Exercise 2 2 spo rts reports 3 problem
page 4 game sho ws 5 chat shows
Exercise 3 3 I 2 5 4
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
4 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 marriage 3 wedding day
4 wedding anni versary 5 party 6 success
7 reward
Exercise 2 2 runway 3 Passengers
4 take-off 5 security 6 deck 7 terrified
Exercise 3 1 rang 2 saw ' was walking
3 caught I was tryi ng 4 were making ' got
5 rescued ' were putting our
6 arrived I were wai t ing
Exercise 4 2 YES 3 NO 4 YES 5 NO
Exercise 5 2 were laughing 3 found
4 rook 5 was checking 6 realised
7 had disappeared 8 had just got off
9 put 10 posted 11 was serving 12 escaped
13 made 14 had travelled 15 broke our
Exercise 6 4 2 6 1 5 3
Exercise 7 Students' own answers
5 Skills
Exercise 1 2 e 3 d 4 c 5 b 6 a
Exercise 2 2 ten-minute 3 brightly-
colo ured 4 never-ending 5 well-o rganised
6 easy-going 7 good-looki ng 8 dark-skinned
9 well -known
Exercise 3 2 c 3 c 4 h 5 a 6 d 7 g 8 b
Exercise 4 2 Before begi nning t he press
confe rence, rhe actor refused to talk abour his
di vorce. 3 After hearing the weather forecast,
we decided to stay in. 4 Before reading t he
arricle, I tried to understand the headline.
5 After finishi ng the arricle, Leo wrote a lener
to the editor. 6 Before going to rhe march,
Fiona read a sports magazine.
Exercise 5 1 Aftcr getting up, my mum.
2 Before doi ng our exams, my friend and I ...
3 After doing my homework yesterday, I .
4 Before handing in my last project, I ...
5 After arriving at school today, my friends
6 Before givi ng us a test, our teacher.
Exercise 6 1 c 2 b 3 a 4 d 5 b
6 Communication
Exercise 1 2 go ahead 3 I mean
4 YOLl know 5 honestl y 6 awfu l
Exercise 2 2 well 3 nightma re 4 bad
5 sorry 6 worry 7 berter 8 so
Exercise 3 1 Pre tty good really. \'(Ie won
t he bas ket ball match and I was top scorer.
' Great! Well done.' Thanks. 2 How's it
going? I Nor very well. I just failed my music
exam. I Never mind. You can always take it
agal n. ' Yes, I suppose you' re right.
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
Exercise 5 2 hockey 3 £275 4 Thursday
14t h Apri l 5 www.schoolnewslgarden
6 1,000 met res
Writing Challenge
Exercise 1 1 Ian 2 Amy 3 Amy's sister
4 Amy and her friends 5 Amy and her fami ly
Exercise 2 1 a 2 b 3 a
Exercise 3 2 I' ve just fi nished my exams,
3 It's great! 4 ... but Uwe had a great
t ime on all t he rides. 5 I'm looking forward
to it . .. 6 Well , I mll st go now. 7 I' ve got to
srart packing my stuff.
Exercise 4 2 d 3 h 4 a 5 f 6 c 7 b 8 g
Exercise 5 Swde nts' own answers
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1 2 _, 3 offeT, enjoy
4 decide, m-oke 5 ""'"', let 6 avoid, ""'P
Exercise 2 1 verb + -ing 2 verb + to
infiniti ve 3 ve rb + object + to infiniti ve
4 verb + object + infin itive
Exercise 3 2 b 3 b 4 b
Exercise 4 2 do 3 watching 4 to help
5 doing 6 stay 7 to do
Exercise 5 2 let my friends borrow
3 want to q uest ion 4 rell us to be
5 advise us to savc 6 suggest buying
7 refuse to spend 8 try nor to believe
Language Check 2
Exercise 1 1 review 2 crossword
3 game show 4 headl ine 5 fo recast
6 pcoblem page 7 sports reports
Exercise 2 1 e 2 h 3 b 4 i 5 f 6 g
7 d 8 c 9 a
Exercise 3 1 was listening 2 was
deli vering 3 bit 4 had seen 5 had escaped
6 arrived 7 was waiti ng 8 pushed 9 had
bitten
Exercise 4 1 watch 2 to Ll se 3 ro have
4 come 5 do 6 reading
Exercise 5 1 or 2 mind 3 bener
4 are 5 reall y
Module 3 Communities
Get Ready
Exercise 1
Houses: block of fla ts, semi-detached house,
mo bi le home, terraced ho use, cottage,
detached house, bungalow
Areas: a rural area, rhe city centre, the
suburbs, an inner city area
Local facili ties: youth club, corner shop, park,
vi llage shop, spo n s centre
Exercise 2 2 bungalow 3 semi -detached
house 4 mobile home
Exercise 3 downtown, tra il er
Exercise 4
Area: a rural area
House: cortage
Number of relations: 4
Number of frie"ds: 2
Local facili ties: village shop, primary school,
church hall
Problems; no spon s centre or yout h club,
nothing for young people to do at weekends,
bad public tra nspon
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
7 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 hel p your local community
3 develop as individuals 4 learn ro survi ve
5 find your way 6 colleer litter 7 moniror
water pollut ion 8 plant trees 9 learn fi r st aid
10 collect money
Exercise 2 2 've been camping
3 have you been working 4 have you been
doing 5 Has Jane been learning
6 have been thinking
Exercise 3 2 has been raining
3 has collected 4 have you been going
5 have joined 6 been collecting
Exercise 4 2 have been preparing
3 've already earned 4 've been worki ng
5 've juSt joined 6 've been thinking
7 haven' t decided 8 've been
9 've been practi sing 10 haven't earned
11 've been waiting
Exercise 5 1 Have you been doing a lot o f
sport? 2 Has it been raining a lot? 3 Have
you and your fri ends been going out a lot?
4 Have you been helping at home a lot?
Exercise 6 Students' own answe rs
8 Skills
Exercise 1 2 wearing 3 yobs 4 truth
5 trouble 6 behave 7 communi ty 8 street
9 judge 10 volunteers 11 raised 12 ha ve
Exercise 2 2 1 3 C 4 C 5 1 6 C 7 C 8 1
Exercise 3 2 rurn up 3 meet up with
4 hang around 5 pur on 6 chill out
Exercise 4 2 carry 3 up 4 Start 5 li p
Exercise 5 2 b 3 a 4 b 5 a
Exercise 6 3 My friends and I don't hang
around in t he streets. 4 Don' t forget to put
on yOut hat. or Don' t forget to put your hat
on. 5 What time did they turn up at the
parry? 6 We looked up rhe information on
the Internet. or We looked the information up
on the Internet.
Exercise 7 2 hang around 3 meer up wi t h
4 put on 5 set up 6 put up 7 care about
8 rum up
9 Communication
Exercise 1 2 Yuck 3 COllle on
4 Remember 5 You'll do anything 6 a bit
7 somewhere else 8 Maybe 9 a lot
Exercise 2 2 could 3 Wil3t 4 you fancy
5 ' d rather 6 make it 7 Why don't we
Exercise 3 11 6 1 8 3 12 9 2
5 4 7 10
Exercise 4 Suggested answers 2 I'd
rather go for a walk. 3 I'd rather chill our at
home. 4 We'd rather go shopping.
5 I' d rather go ice skating
6 We' d rather play basketball.
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
Exercise 6 2 NO 3 YES 4 NO 5 NO
6 YES
Reading Corner 2
Exercise 1 2 The fir st communities in
North America. 3 How did immigration
develop? 4 Why arc rhere different
communities in the USA? 5 A group who
had no choice 6 The situation today
Exercise 2
Florida: Spanish
Massachusetts; a Native Ameri can language
Virginia: English
PellllsyllJallia: German
Louisiana: Caj un
Exercise 3 3 1 4 6 2 8 5 7
Exercise 4 2 F 3 F 4 T 5 T 6 F
Exercise 5 2 links 3 inhabitants 4 tribes
5 settlements 6 crcated 7 famine 8 caused
9 slaves 10 agriculrure 11 admit 12 ethnic
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Language Check 3
Exercise 1 1 bungalow 2 cottage
3 mobile home 4 suburbs 5 rural area
6 local shop 7 youth club
Exercise 2 1 put on 2 rum lip 3 pur up
4 care about 5 meet lip 6 hang around
7 chill Out 8 carry out
Exercise 3 1 've been reading I have you
finished 2 haven't left I 's been raining
3 haven't arrived / 've been waiting
4 has been studying I hasn't taken
5 ha ve been col1ecting I've rai sed
Exercise 4 1 take off 2 care o f t hem
3 rake parr in 4 look it up 5 put it up
Exercise 5 1 going 2 go 3 What 4 make
5 Sounds
Module 4 (ash
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 coins 3 cas h 4 bank
account 5 cheque book 6 bank notes
7 make 8 borrow 9 lend 10 credit card
11 salary
Exercise 2 2 salary (the others are verbs)
3 cash (rhe others are plastic)
4 spend (rhe others involve keeping money)
5 cheque books (the others are real money)
Exercise 3 1 Vicky 2 Ali 3 Jake
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
10 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 go on sale 3 in excellent
condi tion 4 sign 5 do nate 6 personalise 7
charity auction 8 hold 9 certificate
Exercise 2 2 has been set up 3 are sold
4 can be bought 5 mustn' t be sold
6 arc made
Exercise 3 2 a 3 b 4 a 5 b 6 a
Exercise 4 2 was bought for
$165,000,000 on eSay. 3 have been sold on
eSay. 4 can be bought from people in other
countries. 5 mustn't be sold at rhe auction.
6 wi ll be raised for charity.
Exercise 5 2 is the yen used (f)
3 are Aust ralian bank nares madc (c)
4 might t he euro be adopted (h)
5 was the dollar bi ll introd uced (cl
6 can a dollar bill be used (b)
7 are your bank derai ls recognised (d )
8 might cash be replaced by (a)
Exercise 6 2 want 3 can be sold 4 take
5 can be brought 6 won' t sell
Exercise 7 2 came 3 were sold 4 was
bo ught 5 were raised 6 have al ready spent
7 wi ll be organi sed
11 Skills
Exercise 1 2 cloth and leather 3 wood
4 paper and glass 5 tin 6 plastic 7 copper,
bronze and iron 8 stone
Exercise 2 2 b 3 c 4 c 5 b 6 a
Exercise 3 2 tTtOnej 3 ~ 4 wom;m
5 """'" 6 lrr=l 7 1""'"
Exercise 4 2 e 3 d 4 f 5 g 6 b 7 a
Exercise 5 2 The book was so good that
the whole class read it. 3 It was such a bad
Storm that the electricity went off. 4 The
shop was so expensive t hat no-one went
there. 5 It was such a long play that some
people got bored. 6 The blog was so good
that everyone visited it.
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Exercise 7 Students' own answers
12 Communication
Exercise 1 2 weird 3 have 4 by 5 you
6 bet 7 one 8 slightly 9 one
Exercise 2 2 I'm terribly sorry aboU[ thar.
3 I reall y apologise about t his.
4 Ha ve you got a receipt, please?
5 Thanks a lot. 6 Would you like a refund or
would )'ou like to choose a replacement?
Exercise 3 2 I'm afraid there's a problem
with it. 3 Have you gor a receipt, please?
4 Well, 1 rcally arol ogise about this.
5 I'd like a refund, please.
6 And I'm sorry again about the other game.
7 And thanks very much. 8 Not at all.
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
Exercise 5 1 c 2 a 3 b 4 b 5 c
Writing Challenge
Exercise 1 2 c 3 a 4 b
Exercise 2 2 T 3 T 4 F 5 F
Exercise 3 b because of c because
d Since
Exercise 4 2 Since I am a regular
customer, please send me a replacement as
soon as possible. 3 I am unable to use the
mo bi le because it was damaged in the post.
4 I did not receive my order because of a
problem on your websi te. 5 As you have not
given me a refund, I will not order from you
again.
Exercise 5 2 a 3 b 4 e 5 c 6 d
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1 2 I think the Euro pe is an
interesti ng cont inent. 3 Have you ever been
to the United States? 4 I'd like to go ro the
Athens one day. 5 You can take boat trips
on the Thames in London.
6 =Ate Lake Garda is the largest lake in Italy.
7 The Irish Sea separates Ireland and Great
Brita in. 8 The Pacific Ocean covers one
third of the Earth. 9 Do yOll know who first
climbed the Everest? 10 K2 is a mountain in
the Himalayas. 11 =Ate Baffin Island is the
largest island in Canada. 12 We alwa ys go
o n holiday ro the Canary Islands.
Exercise 2 2 The Czech Republic
3 The Alps 4 The Canary Islands 5 Athens
6 Montenegro 7 Moscow 8 Serbia
9 Hungary 10 The Baltic
Exercise 3 2 - 3 the 4 - 5 the 6 -
7 - 8 the 9 - 10 - 11 The 12 - 13 -
Exercise 4 a 3 b 2 c I
Exercise 5 Students' own . nswee< 12i
Language Check 4
Exercise 1 1 lend 2 earn 3 bank account
4 moncy 5 spend
Exerdse 2 2 a 3 c 4 b 5 f 6 d
Exercise 3 1 bag 2 carron 3 bar 4 slice
5 pile
Exercise 4 1 The curo is used 'in a lot of
countries. 2 The car was sold in an auction.
3 A lot of money has been raised this year.
4 All kinds of things can be sold on the
Internet. 5 An Internet auction will be held
next month.
Exercise 5 1 made 2 was interviewed
3 explained 4 was bought 5 will be buiJr
Exercise 6 1 the 2 the 3 the 4 - 5 -
Exercise 7 1 I' m afraid 2 I'm 3 receipt
4 Would 5 refund
Module 5 Water
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 six hundred and eight
3 one hundred and seventeen 4 five hundred
and fifry·eighr 5 o nc hundred and forry-seven
6 four hundred and ninety-two Total f WO
thousand, onc hundred and fifty-eight
Exercise 2 2 g 3 d 4 f 5 a 6 h 7 c 8 e
Exerdse 3 2 F 3 T 4 F 5 F 6 T
Exerdse 4 1 a 2 b 3 c 4 b 5 b 6 a
13 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 our 3 carrying 4 si nk
5 locate 6 floor 7 searched 8 valuable
Exercise 2 2 a 3 a 4 b
Exercise 3 2 mi ght find some coins
3 can' t be any wrecks near here
4 could have been valuable 5 may have been
unstable 6 mUSt have sunk in bad weather
Exerdse 4 2 b 3 a 4 c 5 a 6 b 7 d
Exercise 5 2 have sunk 3 have come
4 he 5 have t3ken 6 have carried
7 have been 8 have called 9 be
Exercise 6 2 could 3 could 4 must
5 can't 6 might
Exercise 7 Students' own answers
14 Skills
Exercise 1 1 river, lake, waterfall
2 glacier 3 hill , mountain 4 forest 5 island
6 gorge, canyon 7 marsh, swamp
Exercise 2 1 a 2 e 3 d 4 c
Exercise 3 2 lighT 3 n=ine 4 heavy
5 roekr 6 ,v«!<
Exercise 4 2 snow-capped mountain
3 wide variety 4 loud noise 5 pine forest
6 breathtaking sight 7 deep lake
8 rare ani mal
Exercise 5 3 Although the glacier was
melting, it still looked spectacular. 4 Despite
bei ng tOO narrow for cars, the gorge attl:"acts
hundreds of visi tors. 5 Despite losing my
camera, I have some great memories of t he
holiday. 6 Ahhough it was very dark in the
forest, we took phoros of some owls.
Exercise 6 1 snow-capped 2 breathtaking
3 good 4 an amazing 5 exotic
15 Communication
Exercise 1 2 tell 3 with 4 are
5 world-class 6 at 7 partner 8 nest
9 threats 10 wi ld
Exerdse 2
b Okay, you can to adopt a panda as part of
a W\VF programme.
128 c Right, I'm going to talk abom giant pandas
and the wildlife organisation WWF.
d Well, it works wit h the Chinese government
to protect the panda and its habitat.
e The main reason for rhi s is the clearing of
areas of forest for farming.
f First, where are pandas from?
9 Finally, what can you do to help?
h Next to, how long do they li ve?
i Another problem is poaching.
j Now, let's look at the threats to the giant
panda.
Exercise 3 2 f 3 h 4 j 5 e 6 d 7 g 8 b
Exercise 4 2 Dye r 3 4. 8 4 seals 5 teeth
6 wide 7 rubbish
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
Reading Corner 3
Exercise 1
1 Who decided to live in the sea. / He played
cards after dark / With his best friend - a
shark!
2 Whose clothes were terribl y messy. / She
went to some classes / Bought a smart hat
and glasses,
Exercise 2 1 b 2 a 3 b
Exercise 3 The poem descri bes a lake.
Exercise 4 2 summer 3 autumn 4 winter
Exercise 5 1 around 2 they have free time
3 fly to warmer pl aces 4 the ice will melt
Exercise 6 2 shore or more, (score)
3 white, (light) 4 play, (say) 5 swi m, (slim)
6 fli es, (size)
Exercise 7 2 b 3 f 4 d 5 a 6 e
Exercise 8 1 tide 2 float 3 reach 4 flow
and motion
Exercise 9 Suggested answers
1 He/She is a teenager or young adulr.
2 He/She likes the sea, though the sea makes
himlher ask many questions.
3 He/She wams to travel by ship and widen
hi slher knowledge and experience.
Exercise 10 Students' own answers
Language Check 5
Exercise 1 1 point 2 and 3 million
4 quarter 5 thirds 6 billion
Exercise 2 1 river 2 swamp 3 forest
4 isla nd 5 waterfall 6 gorge 7 glacier
8 lake 9 mountain
Exercise 3 1 might 2 not 3 can't 4 must
5 could 6 can' t 7 may
Exercise 4 1 can't have gOt lost 2 might
have missed the pl ane 3 could have dropped
your wa llet in tOwn 4 mUSt have given you
my address 5 may have left us a message
6 can't have moved the piano by himself
7 must have broken the window
8 might have left the computer on
Exercise 5 1 at 2 reason 3 problem
4 So 5 Okay
Module 6 Save the Planet
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 recycling 3 greenhouse gas
4 energy-saving 5 wind farms 6 climate
change 7 hybrid 8 solar 9 deforestarion
mys tery word: renewabl e
Exercise 2 2 coal 3 pollution 4 drought
5 fossil fuel s 6 wind farms 7 organic
8 Recycle
Exercise 3 global warming, recycl ing,
saving energy
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
16 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 produce 3 save 4 keep
5 insta ll 6 save 7 grow 8 go
Exercise 2 Srudents' own answers
Exercise 3 2 ' 11 be living 3 will you be
doing 4 will the team be playing 5 won't be
coming 6 Wi ll you be studyi ng 7 won't be
working 8 will be getting
Exercise 4 2 Tim, Lisa and Paul wilJ be
choosing plants. 3 the whole class will be
coll ecting rubbish from the area. 4 the whole
class will be preparing the ground. 5 Matt,
Lucy and Sall y will be planting vegetables.
6 Jo, Amy and Ca ra will be watering the
ground. 7 the whole class will be rel axi ng in
rhe sunshi ne.
Exercise 5
2 We'l l be having lunch soon. Would you like
me to make you a sandwich?
3 Will you be using your camera raday? I'd
like to borrow it.
4 I'll be finishing work early. Shall I coll ect
the chil dren from school?
5 Wi ll you be seeing Matt later? Can you give
him t his birthday card?
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Exercise 7
1 Will you be going into town? Can/Could
you get a phone card for my mobile?
2 I won't be using my computer nexr week.
Would you li ke to borrow it?
3 Will you be doing the maths homework this
evening? Can/Could you help me wi th it?
4 I'll be ordering some concert tickets on the
Internet. Shall I get one for you? Of Would
you li ke me to get one for you?
17 Skills
Exercise 1 2 consumers 3 developing
4 organic 5 toxic pesticides
6 get a decent wage 7 child labour
8 a good deal
Exerdse 2 2 d 3 a 4 d 5 c
Exerdse 3
get: ready, home, a headache, at something, a
bus, a discount, a good deal
take: a break, a look, a bus, an hour, photos,
a holiday
with both verbs: a bus
Exercise 4 1 take/get a bus
2 took some great photos / take a look
3 've gOt a headache / take a break
4 get home / get ready 5 take a hol iday / get
us a 20% discount / get a good deal
Exercise 5 2 a 3 d 4 f 5 c 6 b
Exercise 6 1 get/take 2 get 3 take
4 rake to get 5 get 6 take
Exercise 7 Students' own answers
18 Communication
Exercise 1 2 Why's 3 Apparentl y
4 That's 5 past 6 looked 7 leant 8 checked
Exercise 2 2 got shown 3 got taken
4 got checked 5 gOt invited
Exercise 3 Students' own answers
Exercise 4 2 problem 3 something
4 couple 5 weren't 6 explain 7 exactly
8 why 9 So 10 mean 11 interesting
Exercise 5 1 b 2 c 3 a 4 a 5 b 6 c
Writing Challenge
Exercise 1
Exercise 2
Exercise 3
2 b
3 b
4 b
3 I 4 2
lT 2F3T4 F
Exercise 4 1 however (paragraph 3)
2 so that (paragraph 1) 3 for example
(paragraph 2) 4 in order ro (paragraph 1)
5 to sum up (paragraph 4)
Exercise 5 2 However 3 For example
4 to 5 in order to 6 To sum up 7 so that
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1 2 was able 3 shouldn't
4 taken 5 needn't 6 should
Exercise 2 2 a 3 a 4 b
Exercise 3 2 had to sell our car.
3 could have entered the competition.
4 shouldn't have gone out in the rain.
5 wasn't able CO finish the exam.
6 should have called the police.
Exercise 4 2 could have won 3 shouldn't
have stayed 4 Were you able co find
5 should have checked 6 had to finish
Language Check 6
Exercise 1 2 h 3 c 4 b 5 a 6 f 7 g
8 d 9 e
Exercise 2 1 take 2 take 3 get 4 take
5 get 6 take 7 get
Exercise 3 1 will be lying / 'II send
2 will you be doing / '11 be 3 'II be studying /
'11 phone 4 Will you be seeing / '11 take
5 Will you be driving / ' lJ give
Exercise 4 1 [ needn' t have watered the
garden. 2 You should have apologised.
3 Jake had to leave early. 4 They could have
escaped. 5 We were able co answer all the
questions.
Exercise 5 1 questions 2 Sure 3 weren'r
4 So 5 mean
Module 7 Fashion
Get Ready
Exercise 1 1 Students' own answers
2 denim, corduroy, leather, linen, silk, wooll y
3 2 jumper 3 jeans, trousers 4 shoes, boots 5
shirt, blouse, T-shirt, top
4 Top: checked, plain BOHom: polka-dot,
striped
Exercise 2 1 Aisha - c 2 Eddie - d
3 Lynn - b 4 Vikram - a
19 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 loose 3 waist 4 fash ion
designer 5 cardigan 6 comfortable
Exercise 2 2 g 3 e 4 c 5 b 6 a 7 d
Exercise 3 2 usc 3 would 4 would
5 used to 6 wouldn't 7 didn' t 8 wear
Exercise 4 2 would / used to 3 used co /
would 4 would / used to 5 used to / wtmhi
6 used to / ~ 7 ,vmrkI / used to
8 wot:tld / used to
Exercise 5 2 d 3 a 4 d 5 a 6 c
Exercise 6 2 would you put on 3 would
you dress 4 Did they use to have 5 did you
use to go shopping 6 would clothes last
Exercise 7 2 used to have 3 didn't use ro
get on with 4 didn't use to do well 5 used
to play .6 didn't use to enjoy
Exercise 8 Students' own answers
20 Skills
Exercise 1 2 advertising 3 attractive
4 covers 5 career 6 success 7 dull
8 photographers
Exercise 2 2 in 3 at 4 for 5 by
Exercise 3 2 in / for 3 out of 4 around
5 over 6 above
Exercise 4 2 What docs he look like?
3 What's he like? 4 What does he look like?
5 What does he like? 6 What's he like?
Exercise 5 1 on 2 on 3 in 4 by 5 on
6 in
Exercise 6 1 I 2 C 3 I 4 I 5 C 6 C
71 8 C
21 Communication
Exercise lI b 2 b 3 a 4 b 5 b 6 a
Exercise 2 1 shades / original
2 style guru / cover 3 pale 4 my type
Exercise 3 2 His car looks like it's new.
3 Lisa looks like her Dad. 4 Jo's trainers
look like they were very expensive.
5 Paul always looks (pretty/very) smart for
work. 6 It looks like it's going ro rain.
Exercise 4 2 Underneath 3 with 4 go
5 shade 6 matching 7 suit 8 looks 9 round
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
Exercise 6 2 c 3 c 4 a 5 b
Reading Corner 4
Exercise 1 b science fiction
Exercise 2 2 could 3 weren't 4 wasn't
Exercise 3 2 F 3 F 4 T 5 F
Exercise 4 1 b 2 a 3 a 4 b 5 b
Exercise 5 4 2 7 6 1 8 3 5
Exercise 6 2 h 3 f 4 a 5 b 6 g 7 c 8 e
Exercise 7
1 There was a problem with the ship's
computers.
2 There was a war between robots and
humans and the robots won.
3 Students' own answers
Language Check 7
Exercise 1
General style: casual, trendy, scruffy
Types of clothes/shoes: knee-length, high-
heeled
Materials: silk, denim,
Patterns: checked, striped,
Faces: pretty, handsome
Exercise 2 1 in /during 2 for 3 By 4 in
5 on / over
Exercise 3 use 2 wouldn't 3 used to
4 Did you use to have 5 Did 6 used to
7 to wear 8 used to 9 would
Exercise 4 1 look 2 does 3 What 4 like
5 looks 6 Does
Exercise 5 1 matching 2 Underneath
3 round 4 suit 5 look
Module 8
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 sky diving (all the others are
in or on water) 3 horse racing (none of the
others involve an animal) 4 discus (all the
others involve an opponent) 5 wrestling (all
the others require equipment) 6 scuba diving
(all the others arc races)
Exercise 2 2 ice hockey 3 horse racing
4 marathon 5 surfing 6 boxing
Exercise 3 1 a 2 c 3 d 4 b 5 b
Exercise 4 Students' own answers
22 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 broken 3 gymnastics
4 va ulter 5 Athletics 6 scored 7 beaten
8 referees 9 champion 10 runner
Exercise 2
2 admitted (that) she had been worried about
the players' health.
3 replied (that) the fans didn't like the new
manager.
4 announced (that) he was going to run the
marathon.
5 predicted (that) Sally Owen would win the
next race.
6 thought (that ) paragliding was getting more
popular.
Exercise 3 2 The athletics start at 2.45
p.m. 3 All the athletes have trained ve ry
hard . 4 The horse Midnight Silver isn't
running today. 5 It's going to be a difficult
match between Chelsea and Arsenal 6 I think
Arsenal will win
Exercise 4 2 d 3 b 4 e 5 c 6 a
2 The referee said he had given out six yellow
cards in that match.
3 The team's fan said they wouldn'r come and
watch them ever again.
4 The opposition's fan said their tcam was
definitely the best.
5 The coach said they hadn' t trained hard
enough before the match.
6 The goalkeeper said he had tried to save as
many goals as possible.
Exercise 5 2 looked 3 could have
4 was making 5 would win 6 had bought
7 was going 8 me
Exercise 6 Students' own answers
23 Skills
Exercise 1 2 cheat 3 take 4 gymnast
5 competitor 6 winner 7 come 8 event
mystery word: champion
Exercise 2 2 drop out of 3 give out
4 get away with 5 let everyone down
6 give up 7 speak out
Exercise 3 2 on 3 down 4 down 5 up
6 off 7 off 8 up
Exercise 4
2 At my school we do most team sports,
apart from water polo.
3 Instead of training on \V'cdnesday, we met
on Friday.
4 As well as getting a medal, I also got a
certificate for winning the racc.
5 I haven't tried a lot of winter spOrtS, apart
from skiing.
6 Instead of going to thc match, we watched
it on TV.
Exercise 5 2 b fencing 3 a korfball
4 e triathlon
24 Communication
Exercise 1 2 out 3 tracked 4 sample
5 keep 6 business 7 on 8 be
Exercise 2 2 a 3 b 4 a
Exercise 3 2 You shouldn't buy any more
clot hes. 3 You should get a Saturday job.
4 If I were you, I'd stop using my mobilc
all the time. 5 You'd better be more careful
wi th money.
Exercise 4 2 b 3 a 4 c 5 d
Exercise 5 2 shouldn't turn up 3 had
better practise 4 had better be 5 should go
to bed 6 shouldn't break
Exercise 6 2 You should go to the
doctor's. 3 You shouldn't give up now.
4 If I were you, I'd stop working.
5 You' d better apologise. 6 You shouldn't go
to bed late.
Exercise 7 Students' own answers
Exercise 8 2 b 3 c 4 a 5 c 6 c
12
130
Writing Challenge
Exercise 1 2 f 3 c 4 " 5 c 6 b
Exercise 2 2 a quarter 3 at the weekend
4 early 5 very few 6 Fewer
Exercise 3 2 However 3 instead of
4 too 5 Although 6 apart from 7 Finally
8 Aswellas •
Exercise 4 Srudcnts' own answers
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1 2 most of 3 Some 4 neither
5 Most of 6 none of
Exercise 2 2 b 3 a 4 b 5 a 6 a
Exercise 3 2 of 3 - 4 of 5 - 6 - 7 of
8 -
Exercise 4 2 All the spectators were
disappointed with the result. 3 Most athletes
train very hard. 4 Both the pool and the gym
need cleaning. 5 None of the players scored
a goal. 6 Some people complained about the
price of the rickets.
Exercise 5 1 Some of my friends enjoy.
2 Both my parems like ... 3 Neither of my
gra ndparenrs were born in. 4 Most of the
srudenrs at Illy school play. 5 None of my
fami ly lives in ... 6 All students at my school
have to ...
Language Check 8
Exercise 1 1 marathon 2 rugby
3 sky diving 4 javelin 5 fencing 6 rowing
7 boxing 8 surfing
Exercise 2 1 give 2 get 3 out 4 out
5 drop 6 let 7 with
Exercise 3 1 cou ld play 2 were training
3 had lost 4 would beat 5 wasn't goi ng
6 wasn't 7 didn't play 8 had played
Exercise 4 1 Some 2 None of 3 None of
4 All 5 Both 6 Neither 7 most of
Exercise 5 1 were 2 would 3 better
4 shouldn' t 5 should
Module 9 Detectives
Get Ready
Exercise 1 2 thief 3 theft 4 clues
5 crime scene 6 footprints 7 fingerprints
8 DNA 9 witnesses 10 alibi
11 investigation 12 suspects
Exercise 2 2 victim 3 criminal
4 kidnapping 5 kidnapper 6 blood
7 murder 8 murderer 9 murder weapon
10 ransom nOte
Exercise 3 cleaned away fingerprints and
footprints at the crime scene; threw away the
ransom nOtC; called the kidnappers
25 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 h 3 " 4 b 5 f 6 j 7 e
8 1 9 d 10 c
Exercise 2 2 had been 3 where 4 had
5 had used 6 would
Exercise 3 2 I asked her if she enjoyed her
job. 3 I asked her how many countries she
had visired. 4 I asked her if she had worked
on the Flores Island sires. 5 I asked her
where she was going to work next.
Exercise 4 2 What objects have you
found? 3 How often does the club meet ?
4 Where will the club research next?
5 How many young people have joined the
club? 6 What is the club working on at the
moment?
Exercise 5 3 where 4 was 5 who
6 discovered 7 what 8 could 9 how
10 had visited 11 if 12 would
Exercise 6
2 b - He asked a tour gui de if he/she had a
map of the city.
3 f - He asked his mum if he could go to a
party on Saturday.
4 c - He asked the postman if there were any
letters for him.
5 a - He asked his history teacher when they
had ro hand in their project.
6 e - He asked the doctor how many tablets
he had to rakc a day.
Exercise 7 Srudents' own answers
26 Skills
Exercise 1 2 found the dead body
3 heard a terrible screa m 4 took out his gun
5 found hi s colleague, Annie Taylor, tied up
6 received a threatening note
Exercise 22 's the spitting image of
3 nightmare 4 heavy 5 over
6 safe and sound
Exercise 3 2 block (" - L, b - I)
3 heavy (a - I, b - L) 4 miles (a - L, b - l)
Exercise 4
2 Having gOt away with millions of pounds,
rhe criminals left the country.
3 Having read the first part of the story, I
guessed who the criminal was.
4 Having received the ransom note, the
detective contacted the kidnappers.
5 Having checked my alibi, the police officers
let me go.
6 Havi ng watched The HOI/lid of the
Baskervilles on TV, 1 decided to read the
book.
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
Exercise 6 1 b 2 d 3 c 4 " 5 b
27 Communication
Exercise 1
2 Could I talk ro you, please? I I' m afraid I'm
busy.
3 Is it okay if I ask you some questions? I Go
ahead.
4 Could you help me with my homework? I
Of cou rse.
5 Do you mind if we take pharos? I I' m sorry,
you can' t.
6 Will you leave this library? I Okay. Let's go.
Exercise 2 Sliggested answers
1 Do you mind if I borrow your mobile? I
I'm sorry, the battery's nm alit.
2 Could you turn that TV down, please? I Of
course.
3 Do you think I coul d try your new
computer game? I Sure. Go ahead.
4 I've got a lot to do this afternoon. Do you
think you could rake the dog for a walk? I
Sure, no problem.
5 Is it okay if I have a glass of cola? I Go
ahead.
Exercise 3 2 Could 3 busy 4 minutes
5 allergic 6 ridiculous 7 take 8 time
Exercise 4
2 Cou ld you tell me when the next bus
leaves?
3 Do you know if our team won?
4 Could you tell us who Mrs Clarke is?
5 Do you know if there's a music shop near
here?
6 Could you tell me what the time is? I ... tell
me whar rime it is? I ... tell me the time?
Exercise 5 1 Sanchez 2 mind 3 think 4
London 5 theft 6 murder
Reading Corner 5
Exercise 1 1 was 2 lent 3 suspect
Exercise 2 2 F 3 T 4 F 5 F
Exercise 3 Students' own answers
Exercise 4 2 6 4 7 1 5 3
Exercise 5 2 in the museum
3 rhe necklace 4 Derek 5 Derek
6 the loud bang 7 the museum
Exercise 6 1 Because somebody paid him
to steal it. 2- 5 Students' own answers
Language Check 9
Exercise 1 1 motive 2 fingerprints
3 murder 4 crime 5 witnesses 6 theft
7 nOte 8 an alibi 9 kidnapper
Exercise 2 1 over 2 image 3 heavy
4 miles 5 nightmare 6 light
Exercise 3 1 liked 2 would 3 if
4 Adam was 5 where 6 had 7 were
8 my brother was
Exercise 4
1 Do you know if the post office is open?
2 Do you know what rime the match starts ?
3 Do you know if Helen is at home?
4 Do you know why Leo has gone home?
5 Do you know if we have gOt any stamps?
6 Do you know where I put my mobile?
7 Do you know if there are any biscuits left?
Exercise 5 1 busy 2 mind 3 sorry
4 okay 5 ahead
ModuLe 10 Imagination
Get Ready
Exercise 1
s V I M P R E S S V
L P S F H E Q N L \VI C
B T R A C M L
J
V Y T N E L N P X S E
A F R 'tI E I R D K Y M
C 0 N F U S G Iv N
E
J
L \VI N T Y M B C
D N F Q M B R F 0 E
H 0 P E A C E F U I. X
F T Y V E \VI N M N I \VI
\VI T D C Z X R B N E
X L Z A C R C
y
N C
Exercise 2 2 surprising 3 relaxing
4 unusual 5 complicated 6 colourful
7 ridiculous 8 clever
X
I
u
c
L
o
B
V
Q
M
p
28 Vocabulary and Grammar
Exercise 1 2 genius 3 relationship
4 works of art 5 composed a masterpiece
6 extraordinary talent 7 logical 8 admired
Exercise 2 2 would nOt exist I hadn't run
3 hadn't met I wouldn't have formed
4 would have been I hadn't played
5 wouldn't have created I hadn't been
6 had stayed I wouldn't have found out
Exercise 3
2 If the film hadn't gOt good reviews, we
wouldn't have gone to see ir.
3 If you had had art lessons, you would hay e
learnt to draw.
4 If John had been ve ry good at physics, he
wou 1£1 have studied astronomy.
5 If -' hadn't been able to read music, I
wouldn't have gOt a parr in the orchestra.
6 If she had explained the abstract painting,
wou ld have understood it.
Exercise 4
2 If] had known painting was such fun, I
would have taken it up years ago.
3 If he hadn't had a dream abour the
characters, he wouldn't have written the
stories.
I
-.otIIII

4 If they hadn' t been interested in art, they
would never have met.
S If the weather hadn' t been so awful, my
photos would have come out better.
6 If she had had morc money, she would have
bought t he violin.
Exercise 5 2 would you hdve gone I been
able 3 would you have done I had had
4 would you have bought recentl y I had had
5 would you have done I hadn't gone
6 would you have been I had been born
29 Skills
Exercise 1 2 aliens 3 Earth 4 destroy
5 galaxy 6 spaceshi p 7 program
Exercise 2 2 dangerous 3 galactic
4 t ypical 5 expensive 7 existence
8 argument 9 designer 10 explanation
Exercise 3
2 How far was the galaxy which t he aliens
came from?
3 She's the astronaut who everyone in
inrerested in.
4 This is t he story which I won a prize for.
5 I liked t he characters who you made up.
6 This is the science ficti on writer who I told
you about.
Exercise 4 2 entertainment 3 appearance
4 colourful 5 imagination 6 legendary
7 tourist
Exercise 5 1 d 2 b 3 f 4 e
30 Communication
Exercise 1 2 album 3 be 4 Thanks
5 as 6 Luckil y 7 amazi ng 8 to
Exercise 2 2 As 1 was saying 3 By ehe
way 4 Changing the subject 5 Lee's talk
ahout that latcr.
Exercise 3 Students' own answcrs
Exercise 4 1 b 2 c 3 b 4 b 5 c
Writing ChaLLenge
Exercise 1 2 T 3 F 4 T 5 T
Exercise 2 2 a 3 b 4 a
Exercise 3 b Meanwhile C After d When
e during 1 whi le 9 Afterwards h suddenly
Exercise 4 2 Then 3 While 4 When 5
duri ng
Exercise 5 Students' own answers
Understanding Grammar
Exercise 1 1 could (present) 2 hadn't told
(past ) 3 understood (presenr) 4 had taken
(past) 5 could (present) 6 had played (past)
Exercise 2 2 I wish I hadn't dropped Out
of the competition. 3 I wish we had gOt
tickets for t he competition. 4 I wis h 1 had
studied music at school. 5 1 wish they could
come to the party. 6 I wish I had finished my
painting.
Exercise 3 2 I wish I hadn't gone to that
hairdresser. 3 I wi sh I had trained harder.
4 I wish I cou ld play the guitar. 5 I wish I
knew the answer. 6 I wish I hadn't worn
these shoes.
Language Check 10
Exercise 1 1 complicated 2 abstract
3 ridiculous 4 weird 5 clever 6 imaginative
7 colourful
Exercise 2 1 thoughtful 2 legendary
3 appearance 4 selfish 5 tourist
6 explanation 7 famous 8 entertainment
Exercise 3 1 wouldn't have had I had
driven 2 had played I would have won
3 wo uld have gone out I hadn't rained
4 hadn' t gone I wouldn' t have met
5 would have said I had seen
Exercise 4 1 hadn 't 2 could 3 was
4 had studied 5 had come
Exercise 5 1 By 2 As 3 Changing
4 Let's 5 about
132
WORKBOOK TAPESCRIPT
Module 1 Communication
Page 3, Exercise 3 (Track 2)
1 Ellen
I've gOI a mobile phone - and I' ve gOt:l computer in
my bedroom - so I send text mess;lges and e-mails to
my friends. But the most important t hing for me is
sign language. My little brother can't hear, so we use
signing to communicate with him. It 's a real language:
juSt like talking bee ro face, really.
2 Nick
I had 3 mobile phone but I lost it last momh, so I
can't send texts. At school, we all talk face to face,
of course, but I couldn't live without my computer at
t he weekends and in the evenings. Instant messaging
is the beSt way to communicate. I contact my friends
and we chat for hours. And I've h3d messages from
people in lots of different countries.
3 Susie
People think I'm old-fashioned, but I hate using
cellphones or e-mail to communicate. All my friends
live ncar me, so I like to talk to them face to face. You
just communica te bener t h ~ H way, because of voice
and body language. E-mail and instant messaging are
so fast t hat people sound rude.
Page 9, Exercise 7 (Track 3)
Fiona: Hi, Paul. What did you think of the fi lm on
TV last night? If you ask me, it was a bit silly.
Paul: Yes, I thought so, too. The plot was really
stupid. And I didn't understand the ending. I prefer
watching films at t he cinema anyway. They' re much
better on the big screen, with a good sound system.
Fiona: Oh, I don'r think so. I'd much rather see films
on DVD at home. It's always noisy in the cinema :
peopl e ea t sweets and have drinks. And someone
always stands up during the most important scene.
Paul : Yes, but what about films with special effects?
You have to see films like j ames Bond and The Lord
of the Rings on the big screen.
Fiona: Sorry, I don't agree. We've got the latest TV
at home, so the screen and t he sound are very good.
And the best t hing is rhat you can watch films when
you want to.
Paul : BUI it's important to sec films in a group. It's
great when everyone is frightened or when everyone
laughs at the same ri me.
Fiona: That's not important to me. I'm happy to
watch a film by myself - or with my fa mily and
friends. It's the story that's the imponant thing.
Paul : That's true. I'm interested in the plot of a film,
too. BUI it's important to go ro the ci nema to support
the film industr)'. If we all watch DVDs at home, we
won't have good films in 50 years' time.
Fiona: No, I don't agree with you. There' ll always be
good films. The difference now is that people have the
choice: to go to the cinema or 10 watch at home.
Paul : Okay, then let's go and see the next Star Wars
film at the cinema? You must wam to see that on a
big screeR.
Fiona: No thanks. I' m happy to wait a few months
for the DVD.
Paul : All right .. but I sti ll don't understand.
Module 2 News
Page 13, Exercise 3 (Track 4)
Presenter: And now, over to the news room for an
update on today's news.
Newsreader: Abroad, the main story is still the
ea rthquake in Japan. Rescue services are continuing
to search the area. Up to now 14 people have been
found and taken to hospi tal. The Prime Minister has
offered support to the japanese government.
Closer to home, there was a big traffic jam in the
town centre this morning when a bus broke down in
{he High Street. A lot of children were late for school.
One shopkeeper sa id 'Thi s js very bad for business.'
[n the world of celebrity, members of the girl band
Girl Talk have announced that t hey are going to spliL
They say they will always remain friends. but they
won't be making any more CDs together.
And now football : Arsenallx-at Chelsea three-one,
but t he match between Manchester United and Asron
Vi ll a has been post poned, due to t he bad weather.
And finally over to Janet for the latest forecast . janet,
what's going to happen with all this snow?
Janet: Well, there is little change today and
tomorrow. The snow will continue to fall during
t he night, making travel conditions very difficult.
Temperatures will fall below freezi ng, so don't drive
unless you have to - and do keep warm.
Page 19, Exercise 5 (Track 5)
Hi everyone and welcome to 'Schools News' . There's
a lot to update you on today sO let's get smrted.
First: sporr. The under-16s football team won their
match against Greybridge School 4-2, so well done,
team! In hockey, the captain of the gi rls' team scored
six goals and our team won the championship.
Congratulations to everyone in the hockey team.
Next, our charity events. We. raised £275 for the
chi ldren's home in our sponsored walk. Thanks to
everyone who took part in the wal k - and to all
the sponsors of course. There's a change to the date
of our next event. The charity concert won't be on
Friday the 15th of April, it will be on Thursday the
14th. You can buy tickets from the school office.
And now, some news on our environmental projects.
The cleani ng up of the a rea around school was very
successful, but we need volunteers to help with the
nature ga rden. Mrs Clarke and Mr Hill from the
Science Department a re leading the project. There is
information on the school website. Please sign up ro
help build the garden at: www.schoolnewslgarden.
That's www. schoolnews/garden
Fi n:dly, some news about individ ual students. Diane
Nichols has JUSt passed her Grade 7 Music exam;
jim Andrews came first in the 1000m in the athletics
competition; and Su Lee gOt the lead part in the City
Theatre's production of The SOl/lid of MI/sic. Well
done, guys! Thar's all from me for today.
Module 3 Communities
Page 23, Exercise 4 (Track 6)
I' m fourteen and my name's Cerys. That's a Welsh
name - I'm from north Wales. [ live with my family in
a rural area. The countryside is beautiful, but the area
is very quiet. We live in a cO£tage in a small village.
The conage is over a hundred yea rs old and it's
very pretty - the type of house you sec on a picture
postcard.
We don't ha\'e much family in this area. My
grandfather died lasr year, so my grandmot her lives
with us: there's my mum, dad, granny and me in the
cottage now. My sister is at university in London,
and my aunt and uncle emigrated to Austra lia when
I was little. So, there afe just four family members
in the village. And friends? Well , I go to school in
the nearest town and most of my friends live t here.
J ust two of my friends li ve in this vi ll age: Angie and
Charlotte. Because it's a rural area. we don't have
many facilities. There's the village shop of course,
a primary school, and the church hall. We don't
have a spOrtS centre or a youth dub. That's one of
the bi ggest problems round here: there's nothing for
young people to do at weekends. And t he public
transport is really bad, too.
Page 29, Exercise 6 (Track 7)
Chris: Look at the date, Lucy. It's the end of term in
tWO weeks. Why don't we have a party?
Lucy: Sounds great! We could book a room in the
sports centre.
Chris: Yes, the sports centre is lIi ce - but it would
be very expensive. What about t he youth d ub? They
have a big room. And it's very cheap.
Lucy: Good idea. Let's go for the youth dub.
Chris: Right. Now what about the dare?
Lucy: The last day of term is Frida)' the 17th, so let's
ha\'e the party then.
Chris: Yes, but everyone wi ll be tired after a week
at school. We could have the parr)' the next day - on
the Sat urday.
Lucy: But lots of people do different activities on a
Saturday, so they won't be able to make it. I think
Friday is the best dilY.
Chris: Sorry, but I'd much rat her have it on the
Saturday.
Lucy: O kay, we can't decide now. Let's ask the rest
of the class. We call have a \'ote, and then choose the
day.
Chris: Sure. What about music? I've got a 10£ of
CDs - Franz Ferdinand, Green Day, the Foo Fighters:
why don't 1 be the OJ?
Lucy: Brill iant! That will save us some money.
And we could ask people to bring food: pizzas,
sandwiches, crisps, drinks . .. That'll be cheaper than
ordering the food from a cafe.
Chris: You're right. What about the rime for the
party?
Lucy: How about starting at 9 p.m. ?
Chris: That's a bit late. I'd rather start at eight
because we'll need to tidy up the room at eleven.
Lucy: You're right. That would be only three hours, so
we need to start earlier. Okay, so we'll start the party at
eight o'clock but we still need to decide the date.
Chris: Yeah, that's it. I'm really looking forward to
it now ...
Module 4 Cash
Page 33, Exercise 3 (Track 8)
Ali : I get £20 a week: £10 pocket money and £10 from
my Saturday job. I put half of the money into my bank
account because I' m saving for a new bike. [ spend
the rest. I spend most of my cash on my mobile. And
I sometimes buy CDs. I'm usually broke at the end of
rhe week so I hilve to borrow money from my brother.
Jake: My pocket mone}' is £15. [ don't ha ve a part-
time job. I can't afford to save any money, so I don't
have a bank account. My mum pays for my mobile,
but I don't have to buy phone credit. I spend about
three quarters of my money on CDs. The rest is spent
on cincma tickets or magazi nes. I don't usually buy
sweets or drinks.
Vicky: I' m really luck}': I have a part-timc job and I
get poc ket money from my mum and dad. And then
my gra ndma gives me money jf I do jobs around the
house for her, so I get about £30 a week. I pur £10
in my bank aCCou nt, so that's about a third. Then I
spend the rest! I buy a CD every week for about £10
- and the rest goes on magazines. 1 buy t hree or four
fashion magazines every week.
Page 39, Exercise 5 (Track 9)
One
Assistant : That's £59.98, please.
Woman: I haven't got any cash with me. Can I pay
by credit card?
Assis tant: Sorry. The card machine isn't working.
Woman: Oh, okay. Can I pay by cheque, then?
AssIstant: Yes, thars fine.
Two
Girl: Dad, can I borrow £20?
Dad: Wh y? You had £10 pockct money last weekcnd.
Girl: Yes, but I spent that on Mum's birthday. I need
some money for t he school trip.
Dad: You don't need £20 for the school trip - that's
tOO much. Here's £15 - you can borrow that until
you get paid for your Saturday job.
Girl : Okay, Dad, thanks.
Three
Assis tant: Can I help you?
Man: Yes, can [ have a slice of chocolate cake and a
glass of omnge juice, please?
Assistant : There you are. Would you [ike a hor
drink, too? The hot chocolate is very good.
Man: No, thallks. JUSt the cake alld the juice, please.
Four
Boy: On, no. I don't believe ir.
Girl : What's the matter?
Boy: I've got to go back to the clothes shop.
Girl : Why? Are the jeans the wron
p
si ze?
Boy: No, the jeans are fine. The T-shirr is damaged -
there's a hole in the sleeve. I' ll take it back tomorrow
after school.
Fi ve
Girl : I bought this double CO yesterday but I'm
afraid there's a problem wi t h it.
Assis t a nt : Oh, is it damaged?
Gi rl : No, but one of the CDs is missing. Look, COl is
here but there isn't a C02.
Assista nt : Oh, I'm really sorry abou t thar. Would
you like a replacement?
Girl : Yes, that would be great, thanks.
Module 5 Water
Page 43, Exercise 5 (Track 10)
Okay, now let's check the answers to the water quiz.
Right , question 1 - how much salt water is there on
earth ? Well, the answer is A. Ninet y-seven per cent
salt water - isn't that amazing?
Okay, now question 2. ' One hal f of the world's fresh
water can be found in one country. Which one?' The
answer is B - Canada. It must be beca use of all the
lakes there.
Question 3: ' How much water falls annually on the
town of Arica in Chile, the driest inhabited place on
Earth?' The answer is C - Arica gets only 0.7 mm of
water a yea r. Can you imagine that?
Okay, on to questi on 4 - the number of days in the
rainfall cycle. The answer is B - it takes 10 days for
rainfall to retu rn to the sky to make new rain.
Quest ion 5: living witholll water. You would only
live 5 to 7 days without water, so the answer is B.
You could last longer without food, so it shows how
important water is.
Now the last question - the country that uses most
water. The answer is A - Egypt. Surprised? Well,
Egypt uses a huge amount of water for irrigation alld
growing crops.
Okay, let's add up the scores in that round ...
Page 45, Exercise 6 (Track 11)
One
{Soull ds of a tellnis matchJ
Spectators: Well played! Brilliant !
Two
{Sollnd of a big cat roaring!
Three
{Sound of a computer keyboard!
Four
{Sound of people laughing]
Fi ve
[Soulld of a child cryingJ
Six
[Sol/nd of car homs}
Page 49, Exercise 4 (Track 12)
Right, I'm going to talk about Great White Sharks.
Most people think of them as dangerous killers, bur,
in fa ct, they are in danger from humans. First, where
can they be found? Well, there are Grea t Whites
in cool, coastal waters off South Africa, Ausualia,
Californi a and other areas. The biggest known
population is found around Dyer Isla nd - that's
D-Y-E-R, South Africa.
Next, what does the Great White look like? On
average, adults are 4 to 4.8 long and t hey
weigh up to 1,900 kilos. The tOp of the shark's body
is grey bur the lower part is white, whi ch gives them
the name ' Great White' .
Now, let's look at how they live. Great White Sharks
arc good hunters. They live on seals, sea lions and
even whales. They have powerful tails that help them
to swim at up to 24 kilometres an hour. They have a
very good sense of smell and can detect other a nimals
in the water from a long di stance.
So, why arc Great White Sharks in danger? The main
reason for t hi s seems to be fishing, as sharks can
get caught in nets and then die. Anot her problem is
money - sharks can be caught and killed for their
jaws and teeth. Some people will pa y thousa nds of
dollars for a large set of teeth from a Great White.
Finall y, what can you do to help? Well , you can join
an organisat ion [hat helps to protect sharks and all
sea life. The White Shark Trust has a 'supporr-a-
shark' programme, and \'(I\X'F - the World Wide Fund
for Nature - a lso does work [Q protect sharks. And
please remember to take all your rubbish home from
the beach and help to keep our seas clean.
Right, that's about it. Thanks a lot for listening.
Module 6 Save the Planet
Page 53, Exercise 3 (Track 13)
Charlie: Phew, it's hot ! And it's onl y Apri l.
Linds ay: I know. It 's getting hotter and honer every
year. It must be globa l warming.
Mike: Do you believe in that ?
Lindsay: Of course. The climate is changing all over
the world. Some places afe suffering droughts, so they
ca n't grow food, and other places are getting floods.
Cha rlie: That's true, but I think there are other
problems, too. What about all the rubbi sh that we
produce? We don't recycle enough. Look at all the
rubbish around school. There's paper, plastic bonles,
and cans everywhere.
Mike: That's because some people are lazy. But t here
are simple things that you can do to save energy and
help the environment. We've just fitted energy-savi ng
light bul bs in our school- and we turn off all lights
and computers when the rooms arc empty. And some
new houses have solar panels to generate electricity.
Cha rli e: Not much use in the winter.
Mike: Very funny! You can store the energy produced
by the panels. Anyway, every little helps.
Lindsay: Mike's right. We can all do something.
People JUSt need information to help them.
Page 59, Exercise 5 (Track 14)
Inte rvi ewer: Hello and welcome to ' Protect our
Planet'. Today I' m tal king to ha ve Harry Dean. Harry
has JUSt won a prize for hi s envi ronmental project.
Harry, can you tell us something about it?
Harry: Sure, no problem. First, I didn' t work alone
on the project. The prize was won by a team of five,
four friends and myself.
Inte rviewer: 1 see. So what did you do?
Ha rry: Well, we set up a transport project at our
school. We already had a recycling and energy
project, but we wanted to do something to limit air
pollution and greenhouse gases. We did a survey and
counted the number of cars that came to school each
da y. It was incredible. There were hundreds. And
most cars had only two people in them - the dri ver
and one student. Sometimes people from the same
street were driving to school in different cars.
Interviewer: So what did you do?
Harry: We took photos of the traffic jams outside
school, and we checked the levels of air pollut ion. \'('e
also calculated the cost of the journeys.
Inte rviewer: What do you mean exactl y?
Harry: Well, we wanted people to understand that
usi ng a ca r with just two people in heavy traffi c is
expensive. You use more petrol that way.
Interviewer: That's true. So what did you do then?
Harry: We gave a presentation to the school. People
couldn't believe it when they saw the information.
Then we organised a new system for transport. \Ve
asked people from the same street TO travel together.
Any car with JUSt twO people had TO pay a fine of
one pound. Now all the cars have four or five people
in them. Students who walk or cycle to school get
poims. They can exchange t he points for after-school
activities. Some classes ha ve competiti ons to see who
can win the most points.
Intervi e wer: That's great! Now, one more question -
what prize did you and the tea m win?
Ha rry: We each got a new bike, of course. Very.
Module 7 Fashion
Page 63, Exercise 2 (Track 15)
One - Alsha
I love clot hes and shopping. I would describe my
look as 'styli sh'. I like designer labels and I would
never wear torn or baggy clothes - too scruffy ! My
favourite clothes are my black, knee-length trousers,
my striped shirt and my flat, pointed boots. They're
really cool. Lots of people my age wear jeans, T-shirts
and woolly hats - no way!
Two - Eddie
I like clothes, but I don' t buy designer sruff.
suppose my style is 'casual' . I wear jeans most of
t he rime when I'm !lOt at school. I li ke T-shirts and
sweatShirts, but I don't wear a hoodie very often. My
favourite clothes are my jeans, a T-shirt my brother
brought me from New York, trainers and my leather
jacket. I think it's a cool look - not formal.
Three - Lynn
[ love sportS and being outside, so I never wear
formal clothes. I' m a skateboarder, so my favourite
cl othes arc skater fashion. I wear baggy T-shirrs and
baggy, torn jeans, alld boots. [ never wear Coats or
jackets because I live in my hoodi e. When it's really
cold, I also wear a black woolly hat. I think it's very
cool and trendy. My mum says 1 look scruffy but I
like my look.
Four - Vlkram
People at my school say I'm trendy. I' d say I have
an alternative style. I like st reet fashion more than
designer labels. At the moment my fa vou rite clothes
are my t ight black denim jeans, pointed boots, a
white shirt and a striped, silk wai stcoat. [ sometimes
wear hats, 100, but never baseball caps or woolly
hats. My parents would like me ro be smart, but 1
think clothes should be fun.
Page 69, Exercise 6 (Track 16)
One
Ke lly: Lisa, look! Andy's here.
Li s a : Which one is And)'?
Ke lly: The boy over there with dark spiky hair. He's
wearing baggy jeans.
Li s a : The one wearing the
Kell y: No, he's wearing a hoodi e. He's gorgeous!
Two
Boy: These hoodies are nice, Mum.
Mum: You are 1101 having a hoodie - you' ll look like
a yob. T his jumper is nice.
Boy: Mum, it's got a round neck. !'lIlook like a gi rl
if I wear thar. Ca n I have one of these T-shirts?
Mum: Yes, okay. But why do you have to wear such
baggy clothes?
Three
Mum: What are you wearing? You can't go to
granny's in a mini-skirt, sleevel ess top and boots! Put
on your st riped dress and fIat shoes.
Penny: No way! I hate that dress. It's so old-
fashioned. What about my stri ped skirt?
Mum: Yes, okay. At least it's knee-lengt h.
Pe nny: And I'll wear my white T-shi rt and sandals.
Mum: Good. But please hurry up.
Four
Leo: Hey, Mel, what do you think of my new
clothes? I'm a style guru, aren't I?
Me l: Well, the jeans go wi th the T-shirt. But I'm nor
sure aboU( (he jacke( .
Leo: Wh)'? Do you think it's tOO big?
Me l: Not exactl y. [ think the sleeves are too short.
You can sec your wrists and your watch.
Leo: Oh, Mel! That's the fashion. All the models are
weari ng this style.
Fi ve
Good afternoon, ladies and gent lemen. We have a
special offer in the clothes department - girls' polo-
133
134
neck jumpers;:art' reduced from £l5.99 [0 £9.99. That's
£9.99 for polo-neck jumpers in a range of colou(s. You
will find the clothes department all the sixth floor.
Module 8 Sport
Page 73, Exercise 3 (Track 17)
Interviewer: Er, excuse me? C;n I ask you a few
questions about sport, please? We're doing a survey.
II will only take five minutes.
Ellen: Yes, sure.
Interviewer: Thanks. The first question is about
different types of sport. Which category of spon do
you prefer to watch on TV: 'personal-achievement'
sports like long jump, racing like a marathon, or
sports ;:ag3inst one opponent, like boxing?
Ellen: Oh, I hate boxing! And I don·t enjoy racing
much, so I think personal-achievement sports arc the
mOSt interesting.
Interviewer: Okay, thanks. Next question. Which of
these team games do you like to watch: cricket, rugby,
basketball or hockey?
Ellen: Well, my dati loves cricket - but [ don't Ieall y
understand it. I never watch rugby or hockey, but I do
like watching basketball.
Interviewer: Right. Question 3. Which of these te;:am
games do you play every week: football, basketb311,
hockey or volleyball?
Ellen: I go to a girls' school we don·r play
foorbali. I play volleyball every Friday, but I never
play the other two.
Interviewer: Okay. Next question. Which of these
more unusual sports would you like to try: fencing,
water polo or ice hockey?
Ellen: Hmm. I' m hopeless at skating, so I don't think
ice hockey is for me. But w3ter polo or fenci ng sound
fun. I think I'd go for water polo because I'm quite a
good swimmer.
Interviewer: Good ... One bst questi on. H:lve you
ever tried any of these adventure sports: surfi ng,
scuba diving, sky diving or paragliding?
Ellen: Well, I'm terrified of heights, so I've never tried
sky diving or paragliding. I'd love to try scuba diving,
but J haven·t yet. But [did go surfing on holiday
- and it was great fun.
Interviewer: Okay, that's great. Thanks 3 lot.
Page 79, Exercise 8 (Track 18)
Coach: Okay, everyone, li sten up, please. That was
a good training session, but we need to talk about
the team's performance in the last few weeks. \'(Ie've
lost fOlfr of the last six matches, so we need to
improve. Don't feel bad about the matches we lost.
It's important to learn from rhe mistakes, but you
shouldn't worry about the pas!.
Girl : But what should we do to start winning again?
Coach: The first thing is training. If you don't come
to the sessions, then YOll won't play well in matches.
Training is very important and you shouldn't miss
allY [r3ining session, unless you' re really ill or you
have a serious problem.
And the next thing is understanding your opponeor.
You need to know the other team's strengths and
weaknesses. So, you should go ro watch rn:nches as
often 35 you can. That wa)" you can see who are the
beSt players and how they play.
Okay, the next match is in two weeks, so you'd better
well. One thing [ want you to do is watch a
video of [he City College team. We're playing them in
the next match.
diet. Remember that you need a good diet
to be able to play well. That means a balance of
different food gwups. Two thirds of your diet should
be carbohydrates - that's things like pasta, rice or
potatoes - wi th the rest divided between protein and
fruit and vegetables.
Boy: And wh:n abour drinks?
Coach: Good question, Dean. Yes, you need to
drink, bur you'd bener avoid tea and coffee. Things
like w3ter and fruit juices are good - and not JUSt on
hot days. You need to drink day - at least 6-8
glasses. Now, let's talk a little bit about.
Module 9 Detectives
Page 83, Exercise 3 (Track 19)
Detective: Okay, let's have a look at the crime scene
and I'll also illlerview the staff .. . Ri ght, Mrs Evans:
you arc the cleaner.
Mrs Evans: Yes, that's right.
Detective : And yOlI were here when Lady Barnford
w;:as kidn;:apped.
Mrs Evans: Yes, she was taken from her bedroom.
But I've tidied everything up now.
Detective : What!? Have you entered the crime scene?
Mrs Evans: Yes - I picked up all the broken glass
from the window and cleaned the boot marks off the
carpet. And there was a lot of white powder on all
the furniture, so I dusted it all.
Detective: You du- But you have taken away all the
fingerprint and footprint evidence! Those were really
imporranr clues.
Mrs Evans: Well, Lady B.1Tnford's bedroom mUSt be
tidy. Oh - and I threw away the note they left.
Detective: What note?
Mrs Evans: The note from the men. I threw it away
after I rang the number.
Detective: You contacted the kidnappers? Ha\·e you
gone crazy?
Mrs Evans : Well, I wanted to give them a piece of
my mind. I told them, 'You bring Lady Barnford back
now and never mind thi s £500,000 ransom.' I expect
they'll be here later.
Detective : Where is the nOte now?
Mrs Evans: Oh, it's gone in rhe rubbish. The dustbin
men always come on Monda y mornings.
Detective: I JUSt don't believe it. How ca n I
invcstigat e a crime with absolutel}' no evidence?
Page 89, Exercise 5 (Track 20)
Mike: Hello. Today's revi ewer is Angela, and she's
going [Q tell us about a new detective story that she
has enjoyed.
Angela: Thanks. Yes, the book I wanted to
recommend is called O'le HUlldred Slfspects. It's by
an American writer called Monica Sanchez - that's
5-A-N-C-H-E-Z.
The main character is the detective, Harry Lee. The
unusual thing about him is that he used to be a thief!
He's given up his life of crime of course, and he's
become a detective. J-Ie's vcry observant and he's got
an analytical mind, but the most important thing is
that he knows how criminals think.
The story is set in New York and london. The
descriptions of the people and the places are very
clear. You can almost hear the busy streets of
,\-Lll1hattan as you read.
The action starts wi th the theh of a priceless paiming
from a New York gallery. Then the p;:ainting is sold
at auction in London. During the story, Harry Lee
comes across more and more people who could have
stolen the painting. He keeps a list of the suspects,
and by about halfway there are a hundred! - that's
where we get the title 01le Hllndred Suspects.
He interviews everyone on the list. Of course, most of
them have alibis. And there arc some interesting clues
for the re:lder to spot. At the end of the investig;:ation,
Harry has just two suspeCtS on his list. But then there
is a murder and that changes everything.
I won't give away the ending in case some of you
want to rcad the story. Overall, I think this is an
interesting :lIld creative book, with a clever story. I
think I would give it four stars.
Mike: Thank you, Angela. Now, if anyone has any
questions they would like to ask, you get in touch.
Module 10 Imagination
Page 93 , Exercise 3 (Track 21)
Now listen carefully. We're going to try an exercise in
imagination. In from of you is a half-fin ished picture.
I'd like you to listen and draw what I tell you.
Right. There·s a river running through the countryside
and there's a boat on the ri ver bank. Draw a person
in the boat.
Now: opposite the boat, on the other side of the ri ver,
draw a tree.
Then dr3w a mountain in the distance - a long way
behind the tree.
It's a lovely hot day, so draw the sun up in the sky.
And now some animals: draw;:a few birds in the sky.
And an animal in the water: you choose the animal.
Okay. Now comp;:are your picture with a parmer.
Page 99, Exercise 4 (Track 22)
One
Woman: Wow! Look at this picrure. Isn't it weird!
The sky is black, but the sun is shining. And the
people are carrying umbrellas even though it isn't
raining. It's a bit confusing. What do you think it's
trying to say?
Two
Boy: I had a really strange dream last night.
Girl : Reall y? What happened?
Boy: Well, I was flying across the sky really fast - ;:and
I was laughing and joking with all my friends.
Girl: TIlat 's nOt so strange. You were probably
thinking about your holiday and (he flight.
Boy: No, I wasn't in;:a plane: I was on the back of a
big bird!
Girl: Right. Th;:at is weird.
Three
Interviewer: So, what do you do to help your
creativity? Do you listen to other musicians?
Musician: No. I can't listen to music when I'm
writing songs myself. Some people say they dr3w or
paint, but the best thing for me is travelling.
Interviewe r: Really? Do you mean going 3broad?
Musician: Yes. [ visit other countries and I get a lot
of inspi ration.
Four
Teacher: Now it's time for the prize for the special
creativity projt'Ct. There wcre lots of ideas for this:
painting a picture for the school hall, writing a new
school song ... But the class that showed the greatest
imagination was SC with their poetry on school life.
Here's Tom from Sc.
Tom: Thank you for this prize. None of us had
written poems before, bur it was a lot more
interesting than JUSt doing a painting.
Teacher: Well done, all of you!
Five
Girl: My little brother is so cle,'er!
Boy: Why? What can he do?
Girl: Well , he's only six but he can draw rea ll y well.
And he's gOt a good voice.
Boy: What things does he si ng?
Girl: He sings chi ldren's songs while my dad plays
the guitar.
PEARSON
Longman

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