DALLAS POST

Vol. 122 No. 3
THE BACK MOUNTAIN’S NEWSPAPER SINCE 1889
MARCH 24 - 30, 2013
The
50¢
ANEDITIONOF THE TIMES LEADER www.mydallaspost.com WILKES-BARRE, PA.
Rock Stahovic, of Plains, was skepti-
cal at first. When he found a message on
his answering machine telling him he
had won a grand prize, he wasn’t sure
he believed it. “I didn’t call back right
away,” he said.
“The message didn’t give a whole lot
of information,” Stahovic explained. “It
said I was the winner of a sweepstakes
through my ShurSave loyalty card.”
But Stahovic had never entered a con-
test.
The message said Stahovic had won
100,000 Boxtops for Education which
translates into $10,000 for the school of
his choice.
The message asked him to verify that
he didn’t work for Associated Whole-
salers Inc. (the parent company of the
Shursave/Shurfine grocery cooperative)
or for General Mills which sponsors the
Boxtops for Education program. The
caller also needed Stahovic’s age, ad-
dress and the school he would choose to
receive the money.
“That was it,” Stahovic said.
He and his wife, Robyn, decided not
to respond immediately to the call. Ac-
cording to Robyn, they almost deleted
the message.
But after a week of thinking it over
and doing some Internet research, the
couple decided to return the message.
And are they glad they did!
The Stahovics are winners of the only
prize in a tri-state area that includes
Pennsylvania, Maryland and Delaware.
They have chosen to donate the $10,000
to their children’s school, the Trucks-
ville Early Childhood Education Center,
affiliated with the Trucksville United
Methodist Church.
Once Rock called in the information,
he learned he had been automatically
entered in the tri-state sweepstakes by
using his loyalty card at either Schiel’s
Market on George Avenue in Wilkes-
Barre or Gerrity’s in Luzerne. Both
stores issue ShurSave rewards cards and
the winning entry could have come from
either store.
The next step was for the Trucksville
school to send in an affidavit.
Director Marjorie Adams said that ev-
eryone at the school is ecstatic about the
$10K sweepstakes goes to education center
When Alvin Cragle began
his job as secretary-treasurer of
Lehman Twp. 35 years ago, his
office technology consisted of a
calculator. He used handwritten
ledgers and disbursements and
all checks were written by hand.
Today, he serves Lehman
Twp. as treasurer and works
from a fully-equipped home of-
fice, equipped by the township
with a personal computer and
all the peripherals and software
he needs. The township also has
a full-time secretary now.
But whether low-tech or high-
tech, the job is one Cragle feels
he does well. “I invite anyone to
audit my books at any time,” he
said.
Cragle, 77, has lived in Lehm-
an Twp. for 57 years. He and his
wife, Phyllis, both graduated
fromLake-Lehman High School.
When they married, they settled
in the township.
“We built our own house,”
Cragle said of the house on the
same road his wife grew up that
the couple has lived in since
they were married. Cragle grew
up in Hunlock Creek.
The Cragles raised two sons
in the township. Kevin, and his
wife, Debbie, live in the Falls
area. Todd and his wife, Wanda,
live in Lehman with their two
daughters, Cassandra, a sopho-
more at Wilkes University, and
Taylor, a sixth-grader at Lake-
Lehman Middle School.
Cragle was in the steel busi-
ness when the position of Lehm-
an Twp. treasurer opened. His
boss at the time was council
president in Clarks Summit and
told him, “Anytime you have the
opportunity to do community
service, take it.”
When that boss, the president
of McGregor Architectural Iron
Company, became ill, he turned
his company over to Cragle to
run. For Cragle, it was a case of
being in the right place at the
right time. But he points out
that it was the wrong time, too,
because of the illness and subse-
quent death of his employer, a
man he greatly admired.
While Cragle pursued his
career, he worked as secretary-
treasurer of Lehman Twp. for 15
years before pleading for help.
Then, the late Jon Rogers took
over the secretarial duties.
Cragle was quick to point out
his valued relationship with Rog-
ers and with township supervi-
sors David Sutton, Raymond
Iwanowski and Douglas W. Ide.
“These guys are the best three
Alvin Cragle
counts up
service to
community
Alvin Cragle has financially
manuevered Lehman Twp. as
treasurer for the past 35 years.
See CRAGLE, Page 12
See SWEEPSTAKES, Page 12
The little girl and her best
friend, Sarah, liked most of the
same things - peach pie, pick-
ing pepperoni off pizza and
playing Frisbee.
What made them different
was that Sarah rolled while her
friend walked.
The two met when Sarah
was the new girl at school and
their teacher asked the little
girl to show Sarah around. The
little girl wasn’t sure what to
do at first because Sarah was
in a wheelchair. It wasn’t long,
though, before she was pushing
Sarah around the school and
the duo became known to ev-
eryone as “two peas in a pod.”
The girls loved to go for ice
cream, even though they dif-
fered on flavors, and enjoyed
pajama parties where they
hid under the covers and read
spooky stories by flashlight.
“I saw only the wheelchair at
first,” the little girl said of her
new best friend. “Now, I see
Sarah first and she’s cool.”
Sarah and her friend were
introduced to children at the
Back Mountain Head Start
Center by Sandra Wegrzyno-
wicz, program specialist, and
Colleen Kustrin, program
director, from Step By Step
Inc., a private, non-profit cor-
poration devoted to providing
community support services
to children and adults in Penn-
Learning about disabilities
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Quinn Lyons, Autumn Krochta, Addyson Jacobs and their Head Start
teacher Tanya DeWolf are read to about children with disabilities. See LEARNING, Page 12
taking the plunge
Polar Bear Plunge ParticiPants Brave cold, wind and snow
By DOTTY MARTIN - dmartin@mydallaspost.com
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE DALLAS POST
Kathleen Pajor, center left, of Luzerne, Russ Keeler, of Kingston, and Gerry Finnerty, of Harveys Lake, jump into 39-degree water at Harveys
Lake for the Polar Bear Plunge to benefit the American Cancer Society.
A
s if 33 degree air temperature and 39 degree
water temperature weren’t cold enough,
Gerry Finnerty dumped six blocks of ice into
Harveys Lake - just to make sure he really was
participating in a Polar Bear Plunge.
Finnerty and about 100 other brave souls weathered
cold, wind and even snow to make the Ninth Annual
Polar Bear Plunge, held March 16 at Garrity’s Real Es-
tate office in Harveys Lake, a success.
Monies raised from the event, which has raised be-
tween $5,000 and $7,000 every year, benefit the Ameri-
can Cancer Society. This year’s organizers were hoping
to top the $7,000 mark.
Started by Allison Boris in 2005 in memory of her fa-
ther, Buddy, who passed away from cancer, the event
has become the senior completion project of Lake-
Lehman students every year since. Only once in the last
nine years was the event cancelled because of weather.
See PLUNGE, Page 10
By SUSAN DENNEY
Dallas Post Correspondent
By DOTTY MARTIN
dmartin@mydallaspost.com
By SUSAN DENNEY
Dallas Post Correspondent
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
The Dallas Post
15 NORTH MAIN STREET, WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
570-675-5211
news@mydallaspost.com • FAX 570-675-3650
Display Advertising Deadline: Tuesdays at 12 noon
Contact Diane McGee at 970-7153
The Dallas Post has a variety of advertising rates and programs.
The Dallas Post satisfies most co-op ad programs and offers creative services at no charge. Combination rates with
The Abington Journal, Clarks Summit and the Sunday Dispatch, Pittston are available.
Coverage Area: The Dallas Post covers the
Back Mountain community which includes the
Dallas and Lake-Lehman School Districts. We
try to get to as many events as possible, but
staff and space limitations make it impossible
to cover everything. If you have news about
your family, town or organization please send
it to us and we’ll try to get it in. Photographs
are welcome. Send them two ways, by mail to
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 or by
e-mail to news@mydallaspost.com. E-mail is
the best and most timely method for submis-
sion. E-mailed photos should be in JPEG
format with a resolution of at least 200 dpi. The
deadline for all copy is Tuesday at noon. prior
to publication. Corrections, clarifications? The
Dallas Post will correct errors of fact or clarify
any misunderstandings, call 675-5211. Have
a story idea? Please call, we’d like to hear
about it. Letters: The Dallas Post prints letters
of local interest. Send letters to: Editor, The
Dallas Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711. All letters must be signed and include a
daytime phone number for verification.
You can now purchase any photo
that appears in The Dallas Post
from The Times Leader photo store.
Simply log onto www.timesleader.
com/photostore and click on the link
for The Dallas Post.
Orders for subscriptions received by
Friday at noon will begin the follow-
ing week. Please inform us of dam-
age or delay, call 829-5000. The
Dallas Post is published weekly by
Impressions Media, $25 per year in
Luzerne, Lackawanna & Wyoming
Counties (PA), $29 in NJ, NY and
all other PA counties, $32 all other
states. Periodicals postage paid
at Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701-9996
POSTMASTER: Send address
change to The Dallas Post, 15 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711
ADVERTISING
NEWS
WANT A PHOTO?
CIRCULATION
puzzles
See ANSWERS, Page 10
Meet Bella
Meet our sweet Bella -
beautiful inside and out.
She is a 5-year-old long-
haired calico. She is a little
shy and would do best with
no small children or dogs.
As with all of our cats, she
is indoors only.
You can visit Bella and her
friends at
BLUE CHIP ANIMAL
FARMS REFUGE
974 Lockville Road, Dallas
VISITING HOURS
Tuesday, Thursday, Satur-
day and Sunday
Noon to 5 p.m.
Other hours by appoint-
ment
Call: 333-5265
Email: questions@bcfanim-
alrefuge.org
The following transfers of Back Moun-
tain properties have been recorded
in the Luzerne County Office of the
Recorder of Deeds for the week of
March 11, 2013:
Timothy F. and Carolyn K. Foran to
Anthony J. Banta, Unit 2, Building A,
Dallas Township; $257,000
Sean M. McAndrewto Sean M.
McAndrewand Dierdre Ueberroth,
86Fire Cut Road, Kingston Township;
$10
John Halbing and Donna Klug to
Jacalyn S. Leu, Lot 6, 10Firehouse
Road, Lake Township; $175,000
Rodney D. and Elsie L. Kriebel to
James Edward Kelley, Lot 2 Haider
Subdivision, Ross Township; $25,000
Midfirst Bank to John and Allison
Stempien, Ross Township; $31,200
Patricia Ann Nagle Lorah to Erskine
Harris, Lot 1, Kingston Township;
$185,500
George M. III and Michael Barnard
and Susan B. Newell to Sandra F.
and Daniel Leroy Mattis, 399Elm-
crest Drive, Dallas Township; $240,000
pROpeRTY TRANsFeRs
Because of incorrect
information supplied to
The Dallas Post, the name
of Rich Kerpovich was mis-
spelled in the “Your Space”
photo of the 1959 Trucks-
ville Tigers baseball team
that appeared in the March
17 issue. The Dallas Post
regrets the error.
FOR THe ReCORD
SeNIOR CeNteR MeNU
Senior citizens centers sponsored
by the Area Agency on Aging for
Luzerne and Wyoming Counties of-
fer hot noon meals Monday through
Friday to people 60 years of age or
older.
The following is the menu for the
week of March 25:
MONDAY: Barbeque chicken sand-
wich, vegetable barley soup, broccoli
salad, whole wheat sandwich roll,
crackers, chocolate pudding pie,
margarine, milk and coffee.
TUESDAY: Swedish meatballs,
sugar snap peas, buttered noodles,
rye bread, warmspiced pears, mar-
garine, milk and coffee.
WEDNESDAY: Easter special lun-
cheon - Stuffed chicken breast with
gravy, dinner roll, mixed vegetables,
scalloped potatoes, cake, margarine,
milk and coffee.
THURSDAY: Roast ham, parsley
boiled potatoes, lima beans, whole
wheat dinner roll, diced peaches,
margarine, milk and coffee.
FRIDAY: Centers closed for Good
Friday holiday.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 3 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
In an effort to provide the
most up-to-date information
to holders of small games of
chance licenses, Rep. Karen
Boback (R-Columbia/Lu-
zerne/Wyoming) will host a
Small Games of Chance Semi-
nar from 6 to 9 p.m. on Thurs-
day, April 18 at the Lemmond
Theater at Walsh Hall on the
campus of Misericordia Uni-
versity in Dallas.
“Because of the recent
changes made to the Small
Games of Chance Act, many
organizations have contacted
my offices with questions and
concerns about the new re-
quirements,” said Boback.
“This type of event is a great
way to address any questions
or concerns our nonprofits
might still have.”
A representative from the
Pennsylvania State Police Bu-
reau of Liquor Enforcement
Unit will be in attendance to
discuss the changes to the law
and how it will be enforced.
Those interested in attend-
ing this seminar should RSVP
by April 4 by contacting one
of Boback’s district offices in
Tunkhannock at 836-4777 or
Hunlock Creek at 477-3752.
Seminar will
address small
games of chance
Township supervisors passed
a resolution on March 19 to
adopt consumer fireworks regu-
lations.
The state already has laws
regulating the use of fireworks,
but the township’s resolution
would give it the authority to
require residents to obtain a per-
mit.
The resolution defines con-
sumer fireworks as “any combus-
tible or explosive composition
or any substance or combina-
tion of substances, intended to
produce visible and/or audible
effects by combustion.”
The term doesn’t include
ground or hand-held sparklers,
novelties or toy caps.
The resolution was adopted
as a result of complaints from
residents and to set guidelines
for the use of fireworks within
the township.
Information required on the
permit application includes the
name, address and phone num-
ber of the applicant; the address
of the site where the fireworks
are to be used; the name, ad-
dress and phone number of the
owners or tenants of the site;
and the credentials of the per-
son in charge of the fireworks
display.
Fireworks will not be permit-
ted after 11 pm.
“They key thing is, if there
are complaints, and there is no
permit, the police can shut it
down,” township solicitor Tom
Brennan said of fireworks dis-
plays.
“If they do have a permit and
they are in violation, they’re shut
down. We’re not out to penalize
our citizens. We’re just trying to
protect their rights.”
Fireworks
resolutions
adopted
DALLAS TOWNSHIP
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Dallas Post Correspondent
The Eighth Annual Mother’s Day In-
tertribal Powwow with free admission
will be held Mother’s Day weekend,
May11-12, at the NoxenFire Co. grounds
on Stull Road, Noxen, Wyoming County.
Vendors may set up on Friday, May 10.
The event, which honors all mothers,
is a gathering for all people that benefits
the Noxen Fire Co.
All dancers and vendors must register
before setting up.
The Circle opens at 10 a.m. both days
with storytelling by Grace Dove. Circle
hours are noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and
noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Grand Entry of
all dignitaries and dancers in full regalia
will start at noon.
Richard Gray Owl Greene will serve
as emcee.
Head Male Dancer is Joseph Spirit
Wolf with Junior Head Male Dancer
Zack Magdin. Female Dancer is DiAnne
Running Wolf with Junior Head Female
Dancer Crystal Greene.
All drums are welcome.
The event will feature Native Ameri-
can dancing, drumming, storytelling,
children’s dances, fry bread by Carolyn,
crafts, beadwork, leatherwork, books,
CDs, jewelry, beads and beading sup-
plies, t-shirts, blankets, food by the
Noxen Fire Company and much more.
A Sloppy Joe “Wimpie” contest will be
held Friday evening and is free to enter
with the winner receiving a cash prize.
Meals will be provided for dancers and
vendors; the Saturday evening meal is
potluck.
Participants are asked to bring a dish
to share as well as place settings.
Wash stations will be available.
Camping is allowed but electricity is
limited and costs $7 per day. No camp-
ing spaces will be reserved; spaces are
assigned on a first-come/first-served
basis.
Dogs are welcome but must be
leashed and cleaned up after at all times.
Participants should bring lawn chairs.
Alcohol, drugs, guns and politics of
any kind are not allowed. The commit-
tee has the right to remove anyone.
Volunteers are needed and may call
Natalie “Wisteria” at 947-2097 or email
Wisteria18704@yahoo.com for more in-
formation.
Eighth Annual Mother’s Day Powwow slated
F
or just a $5 donation, ladies en-
joyed specialty shopping, choco-
lates, finger sandwiches, cookies,
refreshments, a goodie bag and
much more at “Ladies Night Out”
at the Back Mountain Memorial Library.
Participants learned scarf-tying techniques,
flower arranging and make-up tips while
browsing tables of handcrafted jewelry, purs-
es, accessories and cosmetics.
Raffle tickets for a handmade quilt, a gift
certificate for a salon services and a $40 item
from each vendor were also available for
purchase.
Ladies enjoy
‘night out’ at the library
Jane Balavage, of Dallas,
buys a string of tickets.
Sharon Mayernick, of Dallas,
enjoys snacks.
Mary Bartos helps Tammy McMahon, of Dallas,
with a scarf-tie design at the ‘Ladies Night Out.’
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK PHOTOS/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Ann Marie Healey, of Hughestown, and Sheila Gelb, of Carverton, enjoy the shopping and refreshments.
D
r. Fred Lub-
now, of Prince-
ton Hydro, an-
nounced at the March
19 meeting of Harveys
Lake Borough Council
that there are two out-
going projects current-
ly in progress.
The Old Lake Road
Project, as well as the
Floating Wetland Is-
land Project should
both be completed in
early June, accord-
ing to Lubnow. Dur-
ing the completion of
the Old Lake project,
storm valves will be
installed underground
in order to remove dirt
and solids, along with
preventing phosphorus
from entering the lake
and fertilizing algae.
The Floating Wetlands proj-
ect will place five floating
wetland islands in various lo-
cations within the lake. Origi-
nally 11 different sites were
selected, but six were elimi-
nated because they contained
pond weed, a rare species of
aquatic plant life.
Lubnow will update citi-
zens of the projects’ status at
the borough’s April council
meeting.
He will also present a map
and photos of the floating
wetland islands.
In addition, the Harveys
Lake Borough Environmental
Action Committee holds its
meetings at 7 p.m. on the sec-
ond Tuesday of each month
at the municipal authority
building.
The public is invited to at-
tend one of these meetings to
learn more about the projects.
Councilwoman Michell’e
Boice said the borough is pur-
suing the collection of delin-
quent garbage bills and said
“something has to be done”
regarding unpaid garbage
bills. Boice added that “ev-
eryone has to pay their fair
share.”
Mayor Clarence Hogan ex-
pressed his appreciation to
Michael Rush for his donation
of four commercial combina-
tion printer/copier/fax ma-
chines to the borough’s police
department.
Councilman Larry Radel an-
nounced that the borough’s
roads are in good condition
after salting and plowing and
added that Harveys Lake po-
lice vehicles have been ser-
viced.
Council has approved the
nomination of borough resi-
dent Jason Miller to the Envi-
ronmental Advisory Commit-
tee.
The Harveys Lake Fire and
Ambulance Company will
hold its Lenten Fish Fry on
Friday, March 29.
Cost for adults is $8 and $5
for children.
The meals can be pre-or-
dered by calling Charles at
760-5506, April at 574-1453
or the borough’s fire station at
639-5167.
There will be an Easter egg
hunt from 10 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, March 30 at the Har-
veys Lake Litrtle League Field.
The next borough council
meeting will be held at 7:30
p.m. on Wednesday, April 17.
Council
discusses
borough
projects
HARVEYS LAKE
BOROUGH
DALLAS BOROUGH
By CAMILLE FIOTI
Dallas Post Correspondent
Council unanimously approved a re-
quest Wednesday from Verizon Wireless
to build a cell tower behind the Twin
Stacks Center, but only if 17 conditions
are met.
One of the conditions requires 6-foot
buffer of plants or screening to be placed
along the entire length of the roadway
section bordering the Bluff Pointe town-
houses.
Other conditions include camouflag-
ing the tower and supports to blend
into the surroundings, maintain general
liability insurance in the amount of $1
million per incident and property dam-
age insurance also in the amount of $1
million per incident to cover the tower,
antenna and structures.
Verizon Wireless must also obtain fi-
nal approval from the County Planning
Commission prior to construction.
Three hearings were held since Janu-
ary to hear testimony from Verizon and
opponents of the tower. Last month,
project engineer Andy Petersohn tes-
tified a new tower is needed because
cellphone and wireless device traffic —
primarily from students at Misericordia
University — is expected to soon over-
whelm existing cell towers and could
slow service for all area subscribers or
even prevent calls from connecting.
In other business, council:
· Announced the annual spring clean-
up will be May 6-11 at the municipal
building. The hours of operation will be
7:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Fri-
day and 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. Resi-
dents should contact the borough office
for more information.
· Announced the curbside yard waste
collection will begin the week of May
13, weather permitting. Residents are
required to pay an annual fee of $25 for
the service.
· Authorized a contract with Kuhar-
chik Construction Inc. relating to traf-
fic signal improvements at the intersec-
tion of state routes 309 and 415 in the
amount of $41,726.
The borough will hold its annual Eas-
ter Egg Hunt at noon Saturday, March
23 at the Kenneth Young Memorial
Park.
Cell phone tower must meet 17 conditions
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 4 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
NOW OPEN FOR
THE SEASON!
DARLING & SONS’
FARMS &
GREENHOUSES
38 Hildebrandt Road, Dallas, PA 18612
570-675-2080
Easter Flowers • Pansies • Violas
Full Supply of Palm Crosses
EASTER
Lilies, Mums, Hyacinths, Daffodils, Tulips, Palm Crosses, Dutch Gardens, Azaleas
SPRING
Bedding & Vegetable Plants, Hanging Baskets, Combination Pots, Geraniums,
Gerber Daisies, Hibiscus, Perennials, soil, and much more!
Mother’s Day & Memorial Day Flowers
SUMMER
Fresh Home Grown Vegetables
Sweet Corn, Tomatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Cucumbers, Pickles, Dill,Peppers,
Onions, Scallions, Cabbage, Broccoli, Caulifower, Eggplant, Hot Peppers,
Green Beans, Yellow Beans, Potatoes, Red Beets, Canning Tomatoes
FALL
Beautiful Fall Mums, Pumpkins, Gourds, Winter Squash, 50 lbs. Potatoes,
Corn Stalks, Indian Corn, Wreaths, Decorations, Slates, & Slate Holders
WINTER
Poinsettias, Christmas Trees, Stand Straight Drilling and Tree Stands. Wreaths,
Garland, Boughs, Cemetery Pots & Logs, Grave Blankets, Decorations, & Slates
BABIS - Mary Kelley, 91, of
Lansdale and formerly of Dallas, died
Tuesday, March 12, 2013, at Dock
Terrace.
She was born Dec. 3, 1921 in
Philadelphia and was a former active
member of Dallas Methodist Church.
Surviving are her children, Susan
Kelley Misson, Lansdale; Bill, Griffin,
Ga.; Janet Kelley Strickland, Barn-
stead, N.H.; and Bob, Stroudsburg;
eight grandchildren; 15 great-grand-
children; a brother, Daniel Wilson,
Elkins Park.
Memorial donations to Seaside
Home, c/o Pat Smith, Treasurer, 117
Old Pennell Road, Media, PA 19063.
DAY - Helen S., of Dallas, died Sun-
day, March 10, 2013, at home.
She was born June 27, 1929 and
was educated in Wilkes-Barre schools.
Upon her husband’s discharge from
the military, they moved to the
family farm in Hunlock Creek. She
continued to be employed by the U.S.
government and the Veterans Admin-
istration.
Upon retiring, she did volunteer
work at John Heinz Center.
She was a member of Holy Resur-
rection Orthodox Cathedral, North
Main Street, Wilkes-Barre.
Surviving are her husband, Edward
A. Day, with whom she celebrated her
60th wedding anniversary in Febru-
ary; her three children, Edward A. Jr.,
Exton; Cynthia O’Brien, Rochester,
Minn.; and Christine Menard, Tyler,
Texas; six grandchildren; a brother,
Andrew Skordinski.
Memorial donations to Interna-
tional Orthodox Christian Charities
(www.iocc.org), or to St. John Or-
thodox Church in Tyler, Texas (www.
stjohnofdamacus.org).
GOODWIN - Marjorie H., 85,
Beaumont, died Wednesday, March
14, 2013.
She was born in Beaumont and was
a graduate of Beaumont High School
and Wyoming Seminary Dean School
of Business.
She was formerly employed in
the bookkeeping department of
Fowler Dick and Walker, The Boston
Store and as a teacher’s aide by the
Tunkhannock Area School District.
Surviving are her children, Sandra,
Beaumont; and Curtis, Shavertown;
one granddaughter.
GRABOWSKI - Douglas Neil
“Doug,” 49, formerly of Benton, died
unexpectedly Sunday, March 17, 2013
at his home in Briar Creek Township.
He was born Jan. 7, 1964 in Peru,
Ind. and was a 1982 graduate of Ben-
ton High School where he was an ex-
cellent basketball player. He attended
Luzerne County Community College
for two years and served in the U. S.
Air Force for four years.
He had been employed as a sales
representative at Homestead Furni-
ture in Nescopeck since 1998. He had
previously worked for Howell’s TV
and Flick Brothers in Bloomsburg.
He was a member of the Dallas
Baptist Church and also had attended
the Bloomsburg Southern Baptist
Church.
Surviving are his parents, Ronald L.
and Carol J. (Whitesell) Grabowski,
of Berwick and formerly of Ben-
ton; his wife, Kelly L. (Stackhouse)
Grabowski, whom he married on
Sept. 26, 2010; , a brother, Mark, of
Bolivar, Mo.; a sister, Catherine Kline,
of Berwick; two nieces; three neph-
ews; his mother-in-law and father–in-
law, Guy and Nancy Stackhouse, of
Benton.
Memorial donations to the Ameri-
can Diabetes Association , P. O. Box
4383, Bethlehem, PA 18018.
HIGGINS - Edward Jackson, 63, of
Shavertown, died Sunday, March 10,
2013, at home.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre on
Aug. 25, 1949 and graduated from
Lake-Lehman High School in 1968
where he was an outstanding wres-
tler, later to become a member of the
Lake-Lehman Wrestling Club Hall of
Fame.
He was an IBEW Local 163 member
where he served his apprenticeship
and was employed as an electrician
for 40 years, retiring last year due to
illness.
He was president of the Luzerne
County Branch of ABATE Motorcycle
Club.
Surviving are his daughter, Amy
Chilcote, of Shavertown; son, Edward
M., of Kunkle; sisters, Donna Phillips,
of Kingston; and Violet Milbrodt, of
Noxen; three grandchildren; aunts,
uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins.
Memorial donations to MOA Pre-
scription Drug Assistance Program,
382 Pierce St., Kingston, PA 18702.
JOHNSON - Ruth A., 94, of Har-
veys Lake, died Monday, March 11,
2013.
She was born in Rochester, N.Y. on
June 7, 1918 and graduated in 1936
from the former Laketon High School
where she was a star basketball
player. She resided at Harveys Lake
for most of her life.
Surviving are a daughter, Dianne
Gregg; a grandson; three great-
grandsons; and a great-great-grand-
son.
Memorial donations to the Harveys
Lake Fire and Ambulance Company,
1349 Lakeside Drive, Harveys Lake,
PA 18618.
McCLOSKEY - Donald Vincent,
of Lehman Township and formerly of
Taylor, died Wednesday, March 13,
2013, at Lakeside Nursing and Reha-
bilitation Center in Harveys Lake.
He was born in Scranton on Oct.
17, 1937 and was a 1957 graduate of
St. Francis Preparatory School, Spring
Grove. He attended Notre Dame
University and St. Francis University
of Loretto.
He was employed as a salesman
and manager for many years, includ-
ing at Bell Electric, Scranton, and
retiring from Bob O’Leary Sports
Supplements, Scranton.
He volunteered many years as a
coach and served as president of
Taylor Missy Softball League. He
coached many teams at the Taylor
Community Basketball League and
was a scorekeeper for the Bishop Han-
nan girls basketball team.
Surviving are a son, Joseph Kad-
lubowski, Dickson City; two daugh-
ters, Ann Marie Michlowski, Virginia;
and Kelly Sabaluski, Lehman; many
grandchildren.
O’TOOLE - Betty J., 90, of Dallas,
died Wednesday, March 13, 2013, at
Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre
and was a graduate of Meyers High
School, class of 1940. She retired as a
librarian with the Millburn Public Li-
brary in Millburn, N.J., after 25 years
of civil service.
Surviving are brother, Jack Kish-
baugh, Westmont, N.J.; nieces and
nephews.
ROWLANDS - Marian P., 95, died
Friday, March 15, 2013, at Mercy
Center, Dallas, where she resided
since 2011.
She was born in Wilkes-Barre and
was a graduate of E. L. Meyers High
School, class of 1935.
Surviving are her daughter, Sharon
Randolph, of Dallas and Naples,
Fla.; and son, Robert M., Dallas; four
grandchildren; three great-grandsons;
a sister, Elizabeth Parnell, Platts-
burgh, N.Y.; nieces and nephews.
Memorial donations to Mercy
Center, Box 307, Lake Street, Dallas,
PA 18612.
SAVICKAS - Billie J., 73, of Dallas
and formerly of Irving, Texas, died
Monday, March 11, 2013, at Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital.
She was orn in Crockett, Texas and
worked in the oil industry in both the
United States and abroad.
Surviving are her husband of 36
years, John S. Savickas, Dallas; three
daughters, Lisa Cone, Longview,
Texas; Brandy Hatfield, Seattle;
and Jennifer Boedeker, Katy, Texas;
six grandchildren; a sister, Patricia
Hardy; and her cat, Callie.
Memorial donations to Shriners
Hospitals for Children, 3551 N. Broad
St., Philadelphia, PA 19140.
SKAPURA - Celia H., 98, formerly
of Fairmount Springs, died Wednes-
day, March 13, 2013, at the Lakeside
Health and Rehabilitation Center,
Harveys Lake, where she had been
staying for the past 11 years.
She was born June 7, 1914 in Fair-
mount Springs, was a housekeeper in
New York City and then helped her
late husband operate a chicken farm
in Fairmount Springs.
She was a member of Holy Spirit
Parish/St. Martha’s Church, Fair-
mount Springs.
Surviving are a daughter, Helen
Bogdon, Dallas; six grandchildren;
four great-grandchildren; and a sister,
Frances Pavalonis, Benton.
Memorial donations to the Al-
zheimer’s Association , 57 N. Franklin
St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701.
STROH - Glenn R., 83, of Shaver-
town, died Sunday, March 10, 2013,
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
He was born in Wilkes-Barre and
was a graduate of Kingston Township
High School, Class of 1947.
Prior to his retirement, he was a
longtime employee of Air Products
and Chemicals, Hanover Township,
where he worked as a pipe-fitter and
welder.
He was a life member of the George
M. Dallas Masonic Lodge 531, Dallas
and of Shavertown United Methodist
Church.
Surviving are daughters, Carol
Dietrick, Harveys Lake; and Judith
Bankus, Wyoming; a grandson; a sis-
ter, Shirley S. Nicely, Dallas; nieces.
STROUD - Marion E., 91, of Sweet
Valley, died Saturday, March 16, 2013,
at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital.
She was born April 14, 1921 in
Dallas, graduated from the former
Lehman High School in 1940 and
had been employed as a florist for
Hillside Farms in Trucksville for
many years.
She was a member of the Sweet Val-
ley Church of Christ and was a past
Worth Matron of the Shick-Shawnee
Order of the Eastern Star.
Surviving are her children, Carol
Holbert, of Allentown; Dick, of Sweet
Valley; Don, of Sweet Valley; Kathleen
Anderson, of Dallas; Allan, of Dallas,
and Janet Tuzinski, of Harrisburg; 14
grandchildren and 20 great-grandchil-
dren.
ZAKJAWSKI - Cecelia (Ceil), 90,
of Shavertown, died Tuesday, March
12, 2013, at Hospice Community
Care, Inpatient Unit, Geisinger South
Wilkes-Barre.
She was born on Oct. 3, 1922 in
Ashley and was a graduate of the
former Ashley High School, Class of
1940.
Prior to her retirement, she was
employed for nine years as an as-
sembler for Encon Inc., Dallas. In
her earlier years, she was employed
for 18 years as an inspector for the
former Woodbury Manufacturing Co.,
Wilkes-Barre.
She was a faithful member of St.
Frances X. Cabrini Roman Catholic
Church, Carverton.
Surviving are her daughter, Diane
Kleynowski, Trucksville; one grand-
daughter; sister, Dolores Wojewodzki,
Whitehall; nieces and nephews.
Memorial donations to the Ameri-
can Cancer Society, 712 S. Keyser
Ave., Taylor, PA 18517.
OBITUARIES
MEMBER FDIC
Our personal loans are called “Blank Loans” so you can fill in the blank. With competi-
tive rates and terms, the Blank Loan is a sensible way to get some work done around the
house, buy a new car, and even pay down some bills. And — the best part — decisions
are made right here in town. Usually in one business day or less. So, stop into your
local branch to apply, and see how we can help you meet every banking need, every day.
We’ll show you what it means to Bank Happy.
firstlibertybank.com
PERSONAL BANKI NG • BUSI NESS BANKI NG • WEALTH MANAGEMENT
*We really wanted some happy metrics, so we gave our intern a stopwatch and told him to start counting. Annual Percentage Rate (APR) accurate
as of 3/1/13 and is subject to change without notice. Subject to credit approval. While other promotional rates are currently being offered, loan must
be secured and be in the best credit score pricing tier to receive the best rate. Not available for loans secured by a mobile home, for the refinance
of existing First Liberty Bank & Trust, N.A. debt, Time Notes, or for debt consolidation for financial relief. Example: A $10,000, 36-month, fixed-rate
installment loan requires monthly payments of $292.11 (assuming 30 days to first payment, no insurance was purchased, and no lien protection fees
were added). Minimum loan size is $2,000. Smaller payments, longer terms, alternative rates and other unsecured options are available. First Liberty
Bank & Trust is a division of Community Bank, N.A.
• APR FOR 36 MONTHS ONOUR PERSONAL LOANS
*
• NUMBER OF HAPPY SMILES EXCHANGED
EVERY MINUTE INOUR BRANCHES
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 5 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
ToAGrandOpeningSpecial
*APY (Annual Percentage Yield) effective March 18, 2013. APY is based on quarterly compounding. At maturity, certificate will
automatically renew to a 12 month fixed rate certificate of deposit. You will have 10 calendar days after maturity to withdraw the funds
without penalty. You must have a First Keystone checking account to receive promotional CDrate. Minimumto open is $1,000. Maximum
$50,000 per tax reported owner during this promotion. Penalty may be assessed for early withdrawal. Must be opened in person at the
Dallas, Kingston, Hanover, Mountain Top or Plymouth office. Offer may be terminated without notice.
15 Month, Fixed Rate
.80
%
Certificate Of Deposit (CD)
APY*
Join us in celebrating the opening of our new Dallas branch. Visit one of our
branches in Dallas, Kingston, Hanover Township, Mountain Top or Plymouth
and open a First Keystone Community Bank Certificate of Deposit today!
If you have questions about high-performing savings plans, stop by any First
Keystone office — where our door is open to you and your family.
8 8 8 - 7 5 9 - 2 2 6 6 | www. F KCBa n k . c o m
Dallas Branch Now Open
Irem Shrine Circus
April 1 -6

Kingston Armory
Our 64th Year
Presented by the Nobles of the Uniformed Units of Irem
Show Times: Mon 1:30 p.m. & 7:00 p.m., Tue 6:30 p.m.
Wed, Thur & Fri 10:00 a.m. & 7:00 p.m.
Sat 1:30 p.m. & 7:00 p.m.
General admission $6

Reserved seating $11, $15 & $20
For reservations call 714-0783
Tickets available at Irem Shrine Circus Office: 22 E. Union St., Kingston 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.
109th Armory, Kingston 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
The Kingston Township Board of Supervisors and members of the Kingston Township Recreation Commis-
sion recently awarded prizes to first, second and third-place winners in the Kingston Township’s Annual
Holiday House Contest. The first-place house was 392 Harris Hill Road, second place was 14 Mapleleaf Road
and third place was 54 Carverton Road. From left, are Sam Barbose, supervisor; Ed and Amy Kwak and son,
second-place winners; Mr. and Mrs. Mike Dzanko, first-place winners; Jeff Box, supervisor chairman; Rich
Wydra, recreation commission chairman; Shirley Moyer, supervisor vice chair; Jim Reino, supervisor; Mary
Wargo, recreation commission secretary; and Stacy Murray, recreation commission member.
KT holiday house winners honored
EASTER EGG HUNT SET
The Franklin Twp. Volunteer
Fire Company will host its an-
nual children’s Easter Egg Hunt
at 2 p.m. today, March 24 at
the fire hall, 329 Orange Road,
Dallas.
The children will be grouped
accordingly and all under the
age of 12 are eligible to partici-
pate. The children are welcome
to come early to make a craft.
Doors will open at 1:30 p.m.
Light refreshments will be
served. For additional informa-
tion, call 333-5970.
HAM RAFFLE TODAY
Daddow-Isaacs Dallas Ameri-
can Legion Post 672 will hold
its annual ham raffle at 1 p.m. to-
day, March 24 at the Post home.
Monies raised will support
community activities sponsored
by the Legion.
For further information, call
Clarence J. Michael at 675-0488.
CONTRA DANCE SET
A New England Contra dance
featuring music by fiddler Ryck
Kaiser and friends along with
calling by Ted Crane will be held
at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 6 at
the Church of Christ Uniting,
776 Market St., Kingston. No
partner or previous experience
is necessary.
Admission is $9 for adults
with reduced admission for
families. Further information is
available at 333-4007.
CRAFT AND FLEA MARKET
An inside and outside craft
and flea market will be held
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Satur-
day, April 6 at the Dallas Eastern
Star Building Association, 15
Foster St., Dallas.
Lunch will consist of home-
made soups, whimpies, hot
dogs, haluski and homemade
desserts. Welsh cookies will also
be on sale.
For vendor information, call
Dianne Corby at 675-4893.
ALL-DAY BINGO SET
An all-day Bingo will be
held on Sunday, April 14 at the
Northmoreland Twp. Fire Hall in
Centermoreland.
Doors open at 12:01 p.m. and
early birds begin at 1:30 p.m. A
dinner will be served at approxi-
mately 4:30 p.m.
For reservations, call Jim or
Carol at 333-4906.
BUS TRIP PLANNED
Irem Women’s Auxiliary will
host a bus trip on Thursday, May
23 to the Hunterdon Playhouse
to see “Wake Up Darling.” The
price is $85 and includes bus,
lunch and the show. For more in-
formation, call Janet Stritzinger
at 824-6418 or Suanne Moses at
822-4976.
CIVIC BRIEFS
The Forty Fort branch of Citi-
zens Bank is exhibiting artwork
by Charles “Woody” Woodworth,
a well-known artist from Hunlock
Creek. The exhibit features a dis-
play of ecclesiastical architecture
created in a variety of artistic
media. Included are images of St.
John’s Church, St. Peter’s United
Church of Christ, St. Ignatius Ro-
man Catholic Church, St. John
the Baptist Church, Fairmount
Springs UnitedMethodist Church
and Reyburn Bible Church.
Woodworth has been painting
and drawing for decades. He is re-
tired from Design Galleries as an
assistant director.
The public is invited to view
this exhibit in the lobby of Citi-
zens Bank, Wyoming Avenue and
Welles Street, Forty Fort through
the end of March.
Woodworth displays work at Citizens Bank
Charles “Woody” Woodworth is exhibiting his artwork at the
Forty Fort branch of Citizens Bank through the end of March.
The Dallas Lions Club started its Hometown
Hero Banner Project in 2011 to honor local vet-
erans, both past and present for their service to
our country.
The project was very well received with a lot
of local support and positive comments and, al-
though it was established as a one-year event, the
Lions received many requests for sponsorships af-
ter the cutoff date.
To satisfy those new requests, the Lions Club
extended the project through 2012.
Again in 2012, there were many requests re-
ceived for sponsorships after the cutoff date.
The 2013 cutoff date is March 31 and this will
be the final year for the Lions Hometown Hero
Banner Project.
As was the case in previous years, all former
banners will be on display with the new 2013 ban-
ners.
Frontier Communications supplies the man-
power to secure and remove the banners to the
poles. Without their support, this endeavor would
not have been possible.
The Lions Club anticipates that, with the 2013
sponsors, there will be approximately 100 banners
throughout the streets of Dallas.
The banners will be displayed from Memorial
Day through Veterans Day. At the conclusion of
this year’s project, arrangements will be made to
distribute the banners to their sponsors or family
members.
Sponsorship forms are available at Dallas Bor-
ough Office, Back Mountain Memorial Library,
Dallas American Legion Post #672 and NAPA
Auto Parts, Dallas.
For additional information, contact project
chairman Don Berlew at 675-4360 or 760-6147 or
any member of the Dallas Lions Club.
This will be final year for Hometown Heroes Project
FREE Basic Home Security System
$34.99 Per Month
with Police, Fire, Medical Response, Spy Cameras, Nanny Cams, and More
$99 Installation Fee
Owned and Operated
by Former Law
Enforcement Officers
CENTURY SECURITY SERVICE
CENTURY MEDICAL RESPONSE
1-800-927-0524
Wilkes-Barre • Allentown
Philadelphia • Harrisburg
Reading • Las Vegas
Dubai UAE
Authorized Dealer
Free $50 Visa Debit Card w/ purchase of Home or
Commercial Security System & Monitoring Agreement
Find us on
Facebook
210 Carverton Road
Trucksville
For more information or
to schedule a
complimentary consultation
call us at
570.763.4364
You’re ready to retire,
but is your smile?
Call us before you do.
We can help you keep your smile for a lifetime.
Download
Our New
Mobile
App
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 6A SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
The Dallas Post
www.mydallaspost.com
C o m m u n i t y N e w s p a p e r G r o u p
THE TIMES LEADER
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 18711 - 570-675-5211
news@mydallaspost.com
Joe Butkiewicz
EXECUTIVE EDITOR
829-7249
jbutkiewicz@timesleader.com
Dotty Martin
EDITOR
970-7440
dmartin@mydallaspost.com
Diane McGee
Advertising
970-7153
dmcgee@timesleader.com
“Doing the PSSA tests
for Pennsylvania. The
writing test is three
days long.”
Hannah Ostrowski
Orange
“The PSSA state tests
that prove how smart
we are. They are freak-
ishly long.”
Calvin Polacheck
Dallas
“Reading because I
get confused with the
words and don’t know
what they are and
then I’m sad.”
Jordan Artmont
Trucksville
“My teacher. She is
strict and a real neat
freak. I hope she
doesn’t get this pa-
per.”
Kevin Allen
Dallas
“PSSAs - the really
long tests that we’re
in right now.”
Ben Yanchick
Dallas
“Writing class. It
makes my hand really
tired and makes me
think too hard about
what to write.”
Carter Thompson
Dallas
“What do You liKe least about sChool?”
Memorial books at BMML
remember loved ones
New books at the library
The following memorial/
honor books have been added ot
the shelves of the Back Moun-
tain Memorial Library fof the
month of March 2013:
In memory of Florence Am-
brosino, “Wine Bites” by Bar-
bara Scott-Goodman presented
by Betsy Reichart
In memory of Mildred
Brown, “The Merck Manual of
Health and Aging,” presented by
Michael and Mary Kay McHugh
In memory of Corey Ehret,
“Hunting, Fishing and Camp-
ing” by L.L. Bean, presented by
Robert and Nancy Kline
In memory of Rosemary
McCarthy, “Nancy, the Story of
Lady Astor” by Adrian Fort, pre-
sented by The Newberry Estate
Homeowners’ Association
In memory of Dick Evans,
“Hawaii, a History” by Ruth
M. Tabrah, presented by The
Newberry Estate Homeowners’
Association; “The Economics
Book”, presented by Jacqueline
and Mark Wanko; “Jungleland”
by Christopher S. Stewart, pre-
sented by Theresa and Nick
Chipolet; “38 Nooses: Lincoln,
Little Crow and the Beginning
of the Frontier” by Scott W.
Berg, presented by The Rei-
ser Family; “Fodor’s Hawaii,”
presented by Naomi and Phil
Lascombe; “Hawaii” by Rita
Ariyoshi, presented by Bill and
Beverly Connolly; “Golf: The
Game of Lessening Failures” by
Bob Glanville, presented by Iris
and Richard Levy; “The World
Factbook 2012-2013,” present-
ed by Eileen and Fred Halsey;
“Owls” by Marianne Taylor,
presented by Bill and Patti Wat-
kins; “Island World” by Gary Y.
Okihiro, presented by Melvin
Warshal; “George F. Kennan: An
American Life” by John Lewis
Gaddis, presented by Jack and
Lou C. Conyngham; “Fifty Ma-
chines that Changed the World”
by Eric Chaline, presented by
Nadine Wesolowski; “Hubble’s
Universe” by Terence Dickin-
son, presented by Rena and
John Rothschild; “Golf: The Art
of the Mental Game” by Dr. Jo-
seph Parent, presented by Stella
Bobrowski.
The following new books
have been added to the shelves
at the Back Mountain Memo-
rial Library, 96 Huntsville Road,
Dallas, for the month of Febru-
ary 2013:
EXPRESS
“The Storyteller” by Jodi Pi-
coult, “Calculated in Death” by
J.D. Robb, “The Sound of Bro-
ken Glass” by Deborah Crom-
bie, “Alex Cross, Run” by James
Patterson, “Gotcha!” by Fern
Michaels
FICTION
“The Storyteller” by Jodi Pi-
coult, “Calculated in Death” by
J.D. Robb, “The Sound of Bro-
ken Glass” by Deborah Crom-
bie, “Alex Cross, Run” by James
Patterson, “Gotcha” by Fern
Michaels
NONFICTION
“One Good Deed” by Erin
McHugh, “Freedom National:
The Destruction of Slavery in
the U.S., 1861-1865” by James
Oakes
SCIENCE FICTION
“A Memory of Light” by Rob-
ert Jordan
LARGE PRINT
FICTION
“NYPD Red” by James Pat-
terson, “Merry Christmas, Alex
Cross” by James Patterson
BOOKS ON CD
“Kinsey and Me” by Sue Graf-
ton, “Empire and Honor” by
W.E.B. Griffin, “Collateral Dam-
age” by Stuart Woods, “The
Fifth Assassin” by Brad Meltzer,
“The Husband List” by Janet
Evanovich
YOUNG ADULT
“In Darkness” by Nick Lake,
“Monstrous Beauty” by Eliza-
beth Fama, “The Revolution of
Evelyn Serrano” by Sonia Man-
zano, “Bomb: The Race to Build
and Steal the World’s Most
Dangerous Weapon” by Steve
Sheinkin, “Finale” by Becca
Fitzpatrick
The following new books
have been added to the shelves
of the Back Mountain Memorial
Library for the month of March
2013:
EXPRESS
“The Striker” by Clive Cussler
FICTION
“The Striker” by Clive
Cussler, “The Aviator’s Wife”
by Melanie Benjamin, “Politi-
cal Suicide” by Michael Palmer,
“Mastermind” by Maria Kon-
nikova, “The Accursed” by
Joyce Carol Oates, “Golden
Dawn” by Thomas M. Kostigen,
“The Night Ranger” by Alex
Berenson, “The Forbidden Sis-
ter” by V.C. Andrews, “The Ab-
sent One” by Jussi Adler-Olsen,
“Crystal Cove” by Lisa Kleypas
NONFICTION
“Gemstone Settings” by An-
astasia Young, “Sugar in the
Blood: A Family’s Story of Slav-
ery and Empire” by Andrea Stu-
art, “Who Stole the American
Dream?” by Hedrick Smith,
“Take Charge of Your Talent” by
Don Maruska.
“YOUR SPACE” is reserved specifi-
cally for Dallas Post readers who have
something they’d like to share with fellow
readers. Submitted items may include
photographs or short stories and should be
sent via email to news@mydallaspost.com,
by fax to 675-3650 or by mail to The Dallas
Post, 15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711.
Information must include the submit-
ting person’s name, address and telephone
number in the event we have questions.
Readers wishing to have their photos
returned should include a self-addressed/
stamped envelope. Items will be published
in the order in which they are received.
The editor of The Dallas Post reserves
the right to reject any items submitted for
publication.
YOUR SPACE
Six-year-old Nathaniel Xavier Patla shows off his St. Patrick’s Day spirit with Fred the Bear at the Back Mountain Memorial Library.
Nathaniel is the son of Ed and Krista Patla, of Harveys Lake. His mom took this photo.
20 YEARS AGO - 1993
For only the second time
in the district’s history, Lake-
Lehman High School will be
represented at the All-Eastern
Conference Regional Con-
cert, an elite
group of high
school musi-
cians from
11 northeast-
ern states.
Selected by
their high
scores at last
year’s State
Band auditions, saxophonist
Robert Trescavage will play in
the All-District Band and trum-
peter C.J. Link will join the or-
chestra.
Recently, a team of students
from Dallas Middle School
took part in the annual Math
Counts competition. The team
was selected from eighth grade
Algebra students and the sev-
enth grade mathematic stu-
dents in the Gifted Program.
The team won the trophy for
Most Improved School in the
regional competition at the
Penn State Lehman campus.
Tem members were: David
Choe, Joy Morgan, Justin
Jumper, Michael Zalatimo and
David Williams.
Lake-Lehman High School
will present the musical, “The
Wizard of Oz” March 25 in
the high school auditorium.
Major roles will be played by:
Courtney Heiser (Dorothy),
Meaghan Ruddy (wicked
witch), Jeremy Smith (Wizard
of Oz), Jay McCarroll (coward-
ly lion), Eric Wagner (tin man),
Ryan Heiser (scarecrow), and
Stephanie Faerber (Sorceress
of the North).
30 YEARS AGO - 1983
Lehman Brownie Troop 641
and Junior Troop 626 recently
took part in Boscov’s Depart-
ment Store’s 21st anniversary
celebration for the Girl Scouts
from Penn’s Woods Council.
The Brownies won two beauti-
ful ribbons; a first prize overall
for their table display on “What
Brownies Do” and a first place
ribbon for their poster on the
theme, “We’ve Found A New
World.” Members of Troop
641 are: Lisa Gunn, Joanna
Arndt, Karen Komsisky, Chris-
tina Jones, Sara Yoblonski,
Lynn Turner, Betty Spencer,
Christina Conrad, Tracy Mar-
gellina, Judy Andrejko, Diana
Shoemaker, Marla Roskos,
Cheryl Gunn, Kathy Gunn, Sue
Niezgoda, Margie and Rose
Langdon and Heather Dieffen-
bacher.
Dallas and Lake-Lehman
were among 14 schools to send
teams to Penn State’s recent
“JETS” academic competition.
JETS is the college’s Junior
Engineering Technical Society
and the competition, called
“TEAMS” (Tests of Engineer-
ing Aptitude, Mathematics and
Science), is geared to gauge
the students’ abilities in seven
areas: mathematics, physics,
chemistry, biology, engineering
graphics, English and engineer-
ing calculations. Lake-Lehman
High School participants in-
cluded Phil Winter, Joe Yanchu-
nas, Hipp Evans, John Gabriel,
Ray Iwanowski, George Steltz,
Tony Javer and Jonathan Pres-
ton. Dallas Area High School
participants included Tom Su-
dol, Mark Drasnin, Marjorie
Myers, Karen Reabuck, Mark
Rosing, Larry Polacheck, Brad
Rhone and Sean Havey.
40 YEARS AGO - 1973
The annual Spring Concert
of the Lake-Lehman Black and
Gold Knights high school band
will be held in April, under
the direction of John Milaus-
kas. At the concert, the Color
Guard will execute a military
routine. Members of the Col-
or Guard include Tim Shaw,
Leonard Martin, Earl Cunning-
ham, Mark Wallo, drum major;
James Harrison, Harold Cor-
nell and Chuck Taylor.
A performance of “Up the
Down Staircase” will be pre-
sented by the junior class of
Lake-Lehman High School
March 30 in the school audito-
rium. The leading role of Syl-
via Barrett is being played by
Kathy Yockavitch. Other actors
include Jane Salansky, Mark
Wallo and Sam Brown.
50 YEARS AGO - 1963
Dallas Methodist Church
honored two Girl Scouts on
Sunday and presented them
with the God and Community
Award. They were Debbie Se-
vockas and MiriamMohr, mem-
bers of Troop 27, Mrs. Donald
D. Smith, leader, Mrs. Harvey
Kitchen, assistant leader.
Three Girl Scouts fromTroop
115 have been chosen as models
in the Girl Scout Week Fashion
Show to be held at Isaac Long’s
on Saturday afternoon. Susan
Owens, Trucksville, Molly
MacDowell and Karen Kitchen
will represent the Intermediate
Troop, led by Mrs. Donald Ed-
wards, Shavertown.
Several Dallas Junior High
School students, chorus mem-
bers at the school, won honors
in the Eisteddfod, held last
Saturday in Dr. Edwards’ Me-
morial Church, Edwardsville.
Dottie Philo, Mimi Mohr, Joyce
Hughes and Linda Nicol were
awarded for their performanc-
es.
60 YEARS AGO - 1953
Members of the Westmo-
reland Hi-Y Club entertained
their dads at a father and son
banquet at Westmoreland High
School Cafeteria recently.
Members and guests included
Ralph Fitch Sr., Ralph Fitch
Jr., John Stahl, John Williams,
John Johnson, Johnnie John-
son, Robert McQuilkin, George
Davis, Robert Davis, David
Robertson, Dave Robertson,
Allen Robertson, Harry Ell
Jr., Ralph Ell, Andrew Duda,
Marshall Downes Sr., Marshall
Downes Jr., Kenneth Thomas,
C. G. Poynton, George Poyn-
ton, Ray Gutoski, WilliamShaf-
fer, Ted Lengel, Donald T. Wil-
liams, Donald Williams, Milton
Evans, Paul Evans, John Backo
Jr., W. Frank Trimble, Charles
A. James, Charles C. James,
James Godtfring, Tommy Jen-
kins, and Thomas Jenkins.
Mrs. Gordon Austin, Main
Road, Shavertown entertained
members of the Harmony Club
at the home of her daughter,
Mrs. Herbert Jones, Maple
Street, Shavertown, on Fri-
day. Present were: Mesdames
Byron Kester, Henry Phillips,
Weldon Carle, William Llewe-
lyn, Russell Race, Carl Smith,
Butch Smith, Harry Sweppen-
heiser, Wesley Schoonover,
Herbert Jones, Jack Cook, Wil-
liam Johns, Willard Race, Mary
Lou May and Sheila May.
70 YEARS AGO - 1943
The girls’ basketball team
of Laketon High School won
the championship of the Back
Mountain League. Members of
the team are: Shorty Gulitis,
Mary Delaney, Bertha Kern,
Audrey Boone, Jean Newhart,
Betty Ann Newhart, captain
and star player; Margaret Bom-
bay, Lois Grey, Doris Kocher,
Marjorie Shiner, Elaine Avery,
Naomi Hunsinger and Frances
Crispell.
Helen Koslofsky, 23-year-
old Harveys Lake soprano,
will achieve the goal of every
striving young soloist tomor-
row night when she appears in
Carnegie Hall, New York.
Women of Rotary were
guests of their husbands at a
dinner party held at Lundy’s
last Thursday evening. Guest
speaker was Edwin Steckel of
West Va., who gave demonstra-
tions designed to prove that
everyone has an ear for music.
Present were: Mr. and Mrs. L.F.
Kingsley, Mr. and Mrs. L.L.
Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Har-
old Payne, Mr. and Mrs. George
Metz, Mr. and Mrs. Nesbitt
Garinger, Mr. and Mrs. Paul
Warriner, Mr. and Mrs. Peter
Jurchak, Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Bodycomb and John Nichol-
son.
The Dallas Post has been in
existence for 122 years. Infor-
mation for “Only Yesterday”
is taken from back issues of the
newspaper and reprinted here
exactly as it first appeared.
ONLY
YESTERDAY
Grotto Pizza a ‘hub for the community’
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 7 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
3130 Memorial Hwy. • Dallas (across from Agway) • 675-7427
S
N
I
P
S n’ T
I
P
S
SALON DAY SPA and
Jewelry & Gifts!
50% OFF
Reg. Price
JEWELRY • PURSES • SCARVES AND ACCESSORIES
EXP. 3/30/13
By LIZ BAUMEISTER
lbaumeister@theabingtonjournal.com
What began at Harveys Lake
in 1953 as a small seasonal
restaurant called Joe’s Pizza has
evolved into a multi-location
business with three restaurants
in Northeast Pennsylvania and
several more out of state.
Known as Grotto Pizza since
1960, the restaurant continues
to thrive in and for its local
community.
Tony DeCosmo, Director of
Marketing, describes the busi-
ness as “a hub for
the community”
where people
gather for meet-
ings, fundrais-
ers and special
events. For
example, he said,
for the past 17
years, it hosted a
“Parade of Trees”
fundraisers,
which has raised
almost $150,000
for various chari-
ties since the first year.
The business supports many
community organizations,
according to owner Armand
Mascioli, such as the F.M.
Kirby Center, Luzerne County
Community College’s Joseph
A. Paglianite Culinary Institute
(named after Mascioli’s uncle
and Grotto Pizza founder), chil-
dren’s sports, Catholic schools,
the local fire department and
more.
It recently launched a new
program, Community Fund-
raiser Nights, which allows
non-profit organizations to raise
funds through the restaurant.
The restaurant is also deeply
rooted in the community
through its multi-generations of
workers and loyal customers of
many years.
“It is a retail food service
where you’re directly serving
your customers,” said Mascioli,
explaining what he enjoys must
about running Grotto Pizza.
“You kind of get it into your
blood in this business because
it’s people-oriented.”
He added that the work often
involves long
hours that are
always worth it
because of the
large customer
base.
“The real
key for us is
that we’ve been
around since
1953,” Mascioli
said. “We have
a very loyal
extended base of
customers. Some
of them travel for
many miles to get here.”
He said one aspect which
makes the restaurant unique is
the size, accomodating up to
650 people with a full range of
services: private dining, out-
door deck, sports bar, private
catering, take-out and delivery.
He added the restaurant strives
to offer the highest quality and
freshest ingredients, sticking
with its traditional recipes,
while still keeping current with
the menu.
“You never forget what you’re
good at,” he said. “We’re really
good at our pizza product.”
MEET THE OWNER:
ARMAND MASCIOLI
Favorite items on the
menu: Spaghetti with meat-
balls, lasagna, cheesesteaks,
wings and Angus burgers
Pizza topping: Pepperoni
Best thing to watch on TV
while eating pizza: Sports
Sports teams: Philadel-
phia Eagles and New York
Yankees
Hobbies: Golf and boating
BACK MOUNTAIN BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT: GROTTO PIZZA
LIZ BAUMEISETER PHOTOS/THE DALLAS POST
Owner Armand Mascioli, left, and Director of Marketing Tony DeCosmo are shown in the kitchen at Grotto Pizza, Harveys Lake.
Sarah Stredny
slices a pizza
that just came
out of the oven
at Grotto Pizza,
Harveys Lake.
Stredny has
worked at the
business for 11
years and is the
third generation
Grotto Pizza
worker from
her family. Her
grandmother,
Janice Bauer, is
still employed
there on week-
ends and is in
her 35th year.
Originally called Joe’s Pizza, Grotto Pizza, with three locations
in Pennsylvania and several out of state, began in 1953 at Har-
veys Lake. After the original building burned down, the current
one was built and renamed Grotto Pizza in 1960.
w w w .pin n aclerehabilitation .n et
2 C onvenient L ocationsTo ServeY ou!
P inna cle R eh a b ilita tion A s s ocia tes
K . B rid get B arno PT
K evin M . B a rno , M P T • K . B ridgetB a rno , P T
Sha ro n M a rra nca , M P T • H a l G la tz, M P T
M a ria H a ll, P TA • W illia m M o ntro s s , M P T
K n ee R eplacem en t?
W E C A N H E L P !
Allofourtherap istshave over
15 yearsexp erience treating yourp roblem s
B e able to w alk an d clim b stairspain free!
O u r experthan ds-on treatm en tw illim prove you r
m obility,in crease you r stren gth an d decrease you r pain . K evin M . B arno M PT
W illiam M ontrossM PT
201 Sou th M ain St.• P ittston • 602-1933
520 T hird A ve.• K in gston • 714-6460
PA066033
As Low As
$898
Complete!
Countertops
The look of Corian
®
or
granite for up to 70% less!
Don’t Replace...Resurface!
(570) 288-9400
www.KeystoneResurfacing.com
THE BARONESS - FAMILY LAW CONSULTING THE BARONESS - FAMILY LAW CONSULTING
Divorce Made Easy
• We’|| he|p you get what you want
• You can save up to 90% of regu|ar cost
Call for a free Consult : 570-814-3563
Banoxrss Juiiaxr vox Scnxriixo xna, rjn
334 S. Franklin St., Suite 201 W-B
(across from Children Service Center)
www.TeBaroness.biz TeBaroness1@comcast.net
LLC LLC
PIZZA PERFECT
696-2100
PIZZA • WINGS
AND MORE!
16 Carverton Road
Trucksville
Mon. - Thurs. 4pm to 10pm
Fri 11am to 11pm • Sat. 12:30pm to 11pm
Sun. 2pm to 10pm
SAME ORIGINAL RECIPE,
HAND MADE, HAND BAKED
Flexible Hourly Care
FREE in-home consultation. 570-270-6700 visitingangels.com
Overnight Services
FREE LOW
BACK PAIN
CONSULTATION
FREE LOW
BACK PAIN
CONSULTATION
250 Pierce St., Suite 108, Kingston (570) 287-5560
Lisa Galloway, M.D. • Steve Kriesher PA-C • Mark Hampton, D.C.
NEUROPATHY CENTER
NEUROPATHY CENTER
WWWW FREE LOW FFR RREEE EE LLOW OW OW FREE LOW FREE LOW FFR RREEE EE LLOW OW OWW FREE LOW
Spiinal Stteenosssis???
SStt nossis?????????
SS
sssis is?????
l SStt nossiis??????????
Heeerniiatteed DDDisc ??
eer er eeern eeern
HH
DDeeggeneeerattive
DDisscc Dissseasse???
PROTEC SPINAL THERAPY
MAY BE THE ANSWER FOR YOU!
www.protecspine.com
If You Suffer FromAny Of These Conditions Then
8
0
4
8
6
0
Financing Available
www.fortyfortlube.com
Like us
on Facebook
1097 Wyoming Ave
Forty Fort • 718-1501
Mon-Fri 7:30-6 • Sat 8-1
300 Pierce St.
Kingston • 283-1504
Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-1
EMISSION/SAFETY
INSPECTION
Includes all state fees. Emission 30 day
free re-test, safety, pass or fail. Exp. 4/10/13
$
35
00
+ TAX
Regular
$
47.90
Our Lady of Victory Catholic Church
HARVEYS LAKE
Invites All The Faithful To Attend
Services During Our Easter Schedule:
Palm Sunday: March 23rd (Saturday Vigil) - 4:30pm
March 24th (Sunday) - 7:00am & 10:30am
Holy Thursday: March 28th - 7:00pm
Good Friday: March 29th - 1:30pm
Stations of the Cross - Fri. March 29th - 7:00pm
Holy Saturday: March 30th - 8:00pm
(at Gate of Heaven Church, Dallas)
Easter Sunday: March 31st - 7:00am
Sunrise Mass and 10:30am Mass includes the Easter
Choir, Extra Seating in Parish Hall and the Easter Bunny
handing out treats after Mass.
Handicap Parking & Access is Available | For more information call: 639-1535
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 8 Sunday, March 24, 2013
What doyouget nowthat we
accept Geisinger HealthPlan
®
?
Achoice.
The Afliate Hospitals of Commonwealth Health: Berwick Hospital Center • First Hospital • Mid-Valley Hospital • Moses Taylor Hospital
Regional Hospital of Scranton • Special Care Hospital • Tyler Memorial Hospital • Wilkes–Barre General Hospital
More patients choose Wilkes-Barre General Hospital than
any other hospital in Northeastern Pennsylvania. And if you
have Geisinger Health Plan, Geisinger Choice, Geisinger Gold,
GHP Family, GHP Kids, or Geisinger Health Options, you now
have that choice, too. We are pleased to accept these health
plans and welcome the opportunity to take good care of
even more of our neighbors.
Tolearnmore, visit CommonwealthHealth.net, or tofind
a Commonwealthphysician, call 1-800-838-WELL.
THE NEW SHOE STORE Plus
1 Welchs Corner | Tunkhannock, PA | 570-836-1416
Your HOME for Spring Sportswear Yo
• Baseball • Soccer
• Track • Softball
15
%
OFF
ALL SPRING
SPORTS
FOOTWEAR
8
0
6
6
2
1
@6rasshopperLwos Iacebook.comlgrasshopper|awos|oc IIa I
6f88800##0fl8Nß8.00M
Res/denI/a/ º Commerc/a/ º lndusIr/a/
Tra/ned & L/censed Techn/c/ans
FREE ESTIMATES
100% CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
l8Nß 08f0
¡·$l0# Ff0¶f8M
fl08 8 1l0k 00ßlf0l
N0l0 8 ¥0l0 00ßlf0l
l8Nß N8lßl0ß8ß00
00f0 ß0f8ll0ß
F0N0f $000l߶
$0ll 108ll߶
1f00 8 $0f00 08f0
ë·$l0# Ff0¶f8M
lß800l 00ßlf0l
000# 800l f0fllllIl߶
A Loca/ Pr/vaIe Fam//y Bus/ness S/nce 1964/
0088l81 00$10Nl8$
8lN00$10Nl8$
$
25
off
WHEN YOU PREPAY FOR 7 LAWN APPLICATIONS.
NEW CUSTOMERS ONLY. CANNOT COMBINE OFFERS.
Any New Additional Service
FREE
Grub Prevention
WHEN YOU SUBSCRIBE TO GRASSHOPPERLAWNS.COM
$08$08l8l 100ßfI 68ß$$80FFl8lßN8$.00N
â¡0·Z8¡·ë11J ª 1·888·0ßll·68ß$$80FFl8
Expires 04/15/2013
â¡0·Z8¡·ë11J ª 1·888·0ßll·68ß$$80FFl8
Expires 04/15/2013
1·888·0ßll·68ß$$80FFl8 ª â¡0·Z8¡·ë11J
Offer valid at participating locations shown below. Valid on arrangements and dipped fruit boxes only. Offer expires XX/XX/XXXX. Offer code must be used when placing order. Arrangements available in a variety of sizes. Containers may vary. Delivery not
available in all areas. Cannot be combined with any other offer, promotion, coupon or coupon code. Excludes tax and delivery. Not valid on previously purchased items. Acceptance and use of coupon is subject to all applicable laws. Void where prohibited.
See store for details. EDIBLE ARRANGEMENTS® & Design and all other marks noted are trademarks of Edible Arrangements, LLC. ©2013 Edible Arrangements, LLC. All rights reserved.
EdibleArrangements.com
AN£AST£R ßUNNY F£STIVAL™
CODE XXXX
$
00 OFF
ets1ee su××v res1ìvtt

with bunny-shaped pineapple dipped in gourmet chocolate
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
1OWN ¦ 1234 M^¦N S1. ¦ (123) 45ó-7890
Order NowFor Easter.
HOP TO IT
$
5 OFF
CODE: WBTL1255
2246 WILKES-BARRE TWP. MARKETPLACE
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18702
(570) 820-0509
4/1/2013
610 Nanticoke Street, Hanover Twp.
Phone 570-825-9720 • Fax 570-825-1939
www.lucasfarms.org
LUCAS FARMS
Winter Hours — Open 7 Days A Week
9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.
SPECIALS GOOD THRU 3/29
GET YOUR EASTER FLOWERS AT OUR FARM
MARKET OR OUR SHICKSHINNY FARM STAND.
AVAILABLE MARCH 28TH-31ST
BROCCOLI
$
1
29
bunch
GREEN BELL PEPPERS
89
¢
lb.
YAMS 59
¢
lb.
BABY CARROTS 99
¢
bag
RED OR WHITE GRAPES
$
1
39
lb.
ASPARAGUS
$
1
99
lb.
SPANISH ONIONS 49
¢
lb.
CUCUMBERS
2/
1
00
CAULIFLOWER
$
1
39
head
RED BEETS 69
¢
lb.
HORSERADISH ROOT
$
2
99
lb.
Call 570-875-8722 today for details of home care eligibility.
Visit www.CareGiversAmerica.com for resources that make
understanding home care less confusing.
Can’t Make
Heads or Tails of
Home Care Options?
“We Have The Answers”
• Care Management
• Non-Medical Home Care
• Home Health
• Hospice
• Medical Supplies, and
Handyman Services
570-881-9716
HOURS: Tues. 12-5
Wed. - Fri. 10-5 • Sat. 10-2
Midway Between Tunkhannock & Dallas
570-298-2150
DELIVERY &
INSTALLATION
AVAILABLE
Change Your
Drafty Old Fireplace
Into An Effcient Heat Source
Call for an in home evaluation or
stop in our showroom to see our burning
displays and talk to our knowledgeable staff.
Many styles and sizes to choose from for a custom look.
Fireplace Gallery
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 9 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
OPEN HOUSE AT SEMINARY
Wyoming Seminary Upper
School in Kingston and Lower
School in Forty Fort are offer-
ing area elementary, middle
and high school students and
their families an opportunity to
visit either campus during the
April Visitation Day on Easter
Monday, April 1.
Visitation Day will begin at
8:15 a.m. at the Lower School,
1560 Wyoming Ave., Forty Fort.
Reservations at Lower School
are requested by Thursday,
March 28 by calling the Lower
School Admission Office at
718-6610.
The Upper School Visitation
Day program will begin at 8:45
a.m. in the Stettler Learn-
ing Resources Center, North
Sprague Avenue, Kingston.
All those interested in at-
tending Sem’s Upper School
April Visitation Day are asked
to respond by Thursday,
March 28 by calling the Upper
School Admission Office at
270-2160.
BINGO BENEFITS LOCK-IN
A Vera Bradley/Coach Bingo
will be held on Saturday, April
6 at the L:ake-Lehman Junior/
Senior High School to benefit
the Lake-Lehman Last Knight
2013 Lock-In.
Doors open at noon. Bingo
starts at 1 p.m. Cost is $20 per
person.
For information, call Amy
Spess at 239-0737.
OPEN HOUSE AT LCCC
Luzerne County Community
College will hold a Spring Open
House from 10 a.m. to noon on
Saturday, April 6 at the col-
lege’s Campus Center.
General information and
financial aid sessions will be
held and tours will be given
throughout the day.
Various departments and
programs will provide informa-
tion through demonstrations
and displays.
For more information, call
the LCCC Admissions Office at
740-0337.
MU OFFERS OPEN HOUSE
The Misericordia Univer-
sity Office of Admissions will
hold an open houses for adult
learners interested in the
Expressway Accelerated Degree
Program and for transfer stu-
dents interested in continuing
their education at Misericordia
from 4 to 7 p.m. on Tuesday,
April 9 in Room 405, Building 4
at Luzerne County Community
College, 1333 S. Prospect St.,
Nanticoke.
For more information, con-
tact the Misericordia University
Office of Admissions at 674-
6331.
BASKET BINGO PLANNED
A Gift Basket Bingo will be
held on Saturday, April 13 at
Evans Falls Elementary School.
Doors open at 10 a.m. and the
event begins at 11 a.m. Cost is
$20 for 20 games of three face
vertical Bingo cards.
Baskets include items from
local and surrounding com-
munities (day trip passes, bus
trips, night stays, event tickets,
restaurant gift certificates, gift
cards/certificates to businesses,
gift items, etc.)
There will also be raffle bas-
kets, 50/50, door prizes, a food
sale and bake sale. All profits
go to the Evans Falls PTO.
For tickets or information,
email mollymatosky@yahoo.
com or call 817-0262.
WSCCHS CLASS OF 1971 PLANS
PARTY
West Side Centeral Catholic
High School Class of 1971 will
hold a 60th birthday party from
1 to 7 p.m. on Sunday, Sept. 1
at the Grove at Checkerboard
Inn on Carverton Road, Trucks-
ville.
Formal invitations will be
forthcoming when all addresses
are finalized.
For more information,
contact Kate Bustin Taroli at
KBTaroli@gmail.com.
DHS CLASS OF 1983 PLANS
REUNION
Dallas High School Class of
1983 is planning a 30th anniver-
sary reunion for Oct. 26.
Any classmate who has not
yet received information about
the reunion and who wishes
to attend is asked to send
their current email address to
dallasclassof83@att.net or call
Sharon at (610) 737-0042.
SCHOOL BRIEFS
Six Wyoming Seminary Lower School students were recently chosen to perform in the 11th Annual
Honors Recital in the Weill Recital Hall of Carnegie Hall, New York City, on Saturday, March 30. The
students took part in the annual Northeast Pennsylvania Music Teachers Association (NEPMTA)
Carnegie Hall Competition at Marywood University in Scranton. The Sem musicians are among 78
students from the Wilkes-Barre and Scranton areas who will perform in the recital. Seen following the
NEPMTA competition are, from left, seated, Hope Austin, Dallas, fourth grade, voice; Margaret Barilla,
Dallas, third grade, voice; Christina Kaspar, Dallas, fourth grade, piano. Standing, Isabel Hou, Clarks
Summit, fifth grade, piano; Aishani Chauhan, Shavertown, fifth grade, voice; and Avani Pugazhendhi,
Mountain Top, seventh grade, piano.
Sem students to perform at Carnegie Hall
In recognition of their 100th day of school, Lehman-Jackson Elementary School students and staff members donated
boxes of food to the Back Mountain Food Pantry. The food pantry has recently experienced an increase in families
eligible for assistance. The Back Mountain Pantry is located in the building of the Trucksville United Methodist Church.
Sixth-grade students assisted in packaging the food. Fromleft, are Mrs. Doreen Johnson, sixth-grade teacher; Rachel
Price, Jodie Salanski, Keiona Roberts , Jordyn Jones, Matt Field and Mrs. Marilyn Glogowski, school principal.
Lehman-Jackson sixth-graders collect food for pantry
Nominees for Students of the Building program for the month of February at Ross Elementary School have
been announced. These students demonstrated the value of being respectful during the month and were nomi-
nated by their teachers. From left, first row, are Anthony Pollock, Tristan Purdy, Sierra Ferrey, Samantha King,
Skyler Coburn, Faith Depiero, Trista Schechterly, Morgan Eiswerth. Second row, Tracey Stanley, second-grade
teacher; Donald James, principal; Nicholas Mrochko, Eva Fine, Timmy White, Joelle Burke, Ryan Gallagher,
Ethan Adams, Wade Kreller and Jeremy Williams, third-grade teacher.
Ross Elementary February Students of the Building
BACK MOUNTAIN BOWL
Memorial Hwy Dallas • 675-5026
Eat in and Take Out!
Sicilian Pizza • Wings
Hoagies and More!
8
0
7
1
0
9
Greg Wall
GOLF SCHOOL
Choose from
4 DIFFERENT
SCHOOLS!
$
275
$
150
Two Day................
One Day................
Short Game..........
$
150
All New Create Your Own School
Over 30 School Dates Scheduled!
ALL SCHOOLS from 9am-4pm
Include Video, Lunch, Workbook &
Free Golf After the Class!
at The Inn at Pocono Manor
570-839-7110
gregwallgolfschool.com
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
puzzle answers
Continued from Page 2
This year, Lake-Lehman juniors
Rene Rismondo and Amy Wil-
liams were at the helm, shepherd-
ing plungers through the registra-
tion line, down to the lake and
encouraging them into the water
- all before they took the plunge
themselves.
The 63-year-old Finnerty, of
Harveys Lake, is a cancer survivor
himself, having beaten throat can-
cer seven years ago. He has taken
the plunge all eight years of the
event.
“Jumping into a lake in the win-
ter was always on my bucket list,”
he laughed.
Kathy Pajor, 54, of Luzerne,
sporting 1920s swimming garb,
said “Why not?” when asked why
she participates every year. Pajor
went on to admit that she’s known
several people affected by cancer
and respects the event because it
helps those afflicted with the dis-
ease.
Her daughter, 18-year-old Gil-
lian, remained on shore, all bun-
dled up as her mother made her
way to the water.
“She has a braver soul,” Gillian
said of her mother, almost admir-
ingly.
Russ Keeler, of Kingston, al-
ways wanted to jump in a frozen
lake and got involved in the Polar
Bear Plunge a few years ago after
participating in an American Can-
cer Society Relay for Life. Once
in the water, Keeler, dressed in a
frilly pink tutu with plastic pink
glasses on his head, remained in
the water for the allowed three
minutes.
Fourteen-year-old Connor Swit-
zer, of Harding, admitted to being
“cold already” long before he got
near the water while his friend,
Nick Hall, 14, of Shavertown, par-
ticipated in the event, “cuz I’m
awesome.”
Both boys are students at Wyo-
ming Seminary.
Joseph Sharon, 15, of Shaver-
town, plunged last year but admit-
ted it wasn’t as cold then. Reports
indicated the air temperature was
in the 40s for last year’s event.
Sharon’s friend, 15-year-old J.P.
Natishan, of Shavertown, stood
among a group of boys with his
pants down around his ankles and
a towel wrapped around his shoul-
ders.
From behind, his father, Jerry,
admitted, “That’s my kid!” but
sees J.P. and his buddies as “a
good bunch of boys.”
Lake-Lehman Superintendent
Jim McGovern looked a little less
excited about plunging than the
younger boys but did it, nonethe-
less.
“The girls organizing this came
to me on Thursday and asked if I’d
do it,” he said. “I couldn’t say no.”
After being helped out of the
lake, McGovern couldn’t get to
his wife, Maureen, and a waiting
towel fast enough.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE DALLAS POST
The sign leads ‘Brave Souls’ into 39-degree water at Harveys Lake for the Polar Bear Plunge.
Lake-Lehman juniors Rene Rismondo, left, of Lehman Township,and
Amy Williams, of Sweet Valley, organizers of the 2013 Polar Bear
Plunge, give instructions before sounding the horn to start the
first wave of plungers.
plunGe
Continued from Page 1
Kingston Township announces
the appointment of Laura Slocum
as the township’s new tax collec-
tor and Karen Rose as new assis-
tant township manager.
Slocum is a lifelong resident
of Kingston Township. She and
her husband, Bartt, currently
reside in Shavertown. She at-
tended Bloomsburg University
and LCCC, graduating with an
Associate degree in Business. Slo-
cum also possesses a real estate
license and has a background in
banking.
The tax collector’s hours are
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Mondays
and Thursdays.
Rose served as tax collector
for approximately 13 years and,
for the last year, has taken on the
added responsibilities of assistant
township manager. She earned
a Bachelor of Science degree in
Business Administration and
Management from Bloomsburg
University and has an extensive
background in accounting and
real estate.
staffing changes in Kingston Twp.
Slocum Rose
The Back Mountain Bloom-
ers Garden Club announces the
Sixth Biannual Tour of Back
Mountain Gardens will be held
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Satur-
day, June 29. Six private gardens,
four inDallas andtwo inHarveys
Lake, plus the Shakespeare Gar-
den at Misericordia University
are included on this tour.
The selected gardens display
a diversity of landscape de-
signs, styles and themes. From
the small individually tended
garden to an extensive expanse
of gardens to the award-win-
ning themed knot garden at Mi-
sericordia, all offer a feast for
your eyes and wonderment at
the beauty of landscaping.
Flowers in beds, garden
swaths and pots decorating
decks and extensive manicured
walkways featuring a fountain,
a pond and a pool with pool
house, a gazebo, eclectic gar-
den sculptures, a lovely open
paddock for horses and gor-
geous views of Harveys Lake
await those who participate in
the one-day tour of gardens in
the Back Mountain.
Garden, nature and landscap-
ing workshops will be offered
by some of the area’s most rec-
ognized master gardeners, pro-
fessional landscapers and arbor-
ists. Members of the Wyoming
Valley Art League will paint en
plein air in the gardens.
All proceeds from the day’s
events will benefit the Anthra-
cite Scenic Trails Association
(ASTA), an organization de-
veloping and maintaining the
Back Mountain Trail, a former
railroad bed that has been
transformed into a recreational
trail for hiking and biking from
Luzerne Borough in the Wyo-
ming Valley to eventually reach
Ricketts Glen State Park.
To date, the Bloomers’ Gar-
den Tours in 2003, 2005, 2007,
2009 and 2011 attracted more
than 2,300 people and raised
over $38,000 for ASTA.
Tickets for the Tour of Back
Mountain Gardens are $20 per
person if purchased on or be-
fore June 22. Ticket price after
June 22 is $25.
To request a Garden Tour
brochure and registration form,
contact Julie McMonagle at
696-5082 or e-mail jjmcmon@
frontiernet.net.
The completed registration
form and payment should then
be mailed to Anthracite Scenic
Trails Association, P.O. Box
212, Dallas, PA 18612.
Bloomers plan annual Tour of Back Mountain Gardens THREE RECEIVE SCHOLARSHIPS
Three local students have been
awarded scholarships to attend
Alvernia University this fall.
Leah Benedetti, of Dallas,
has been granted the Veronica
Founder’s Scholarship to study
Occupational Therapy at. She is
a senior at Dallas Senior High
School.
Cheyenne Hunsinger, of
Tunkhannock, has been granted
the Trustees’ Scholarship to
study Nursing. She is a senior at
Tunkhannock High School.
Meghan O’Brien, of Dallas,
has been granted the Trustees’
Scholarship to study Middle
School Education. She is a senior
at Dallas Senior High School.
PSUSTUDENTS VISIT NEVADA
Penn State Wilkes-Barre honors
students finished academic
coursework in Nevada and Ari-
zona over the recent spring break.
The course, which dealt with
the culture and music of indig-
enous peoples of the American
southwest, included on-site
experiences of the Colorado River,
the engineering and workings of
Hoover Dam, the west rimof the
Grand Canyon and native folklore
and culture of the Hualapai
Americans on their nearly million-
acre reservation in Arizona.
Back Mountain students who
took part in that programinclude
Lee Kozokas, Trucksville; Randy
Thompson, Tunkhannock; Kiley
Foley, Dallas; Sydney Doyle,
Sweet Valley; Christina Pino, Dal-
las; and Randall Welsh, Hunlock
Creek.
MUSTUDENTS RECOGNIZED
Christina L. Harrison, of
Tunkhannock, and Sara J. Scott,
of Hunlock Creek, were among
Misericordia University students
recently recognized as members
of the ninth graduating class from
the Diagnostic Medical Sonogra-
phy Certificate Programduring
the annual certificate presentation
ceremony in Sandy and Marlene
Insalaco Hall on campus.
LL DIVERS COMPETE AT STATES
MatthewEdkins, a sopho-
more at Lake-Lehman, recently
competed in the 2013 PIAA
State Championships in Diving
at Bucknell University, finishing
third overall and earning a bronze
medal with a score of 407.35. Last
year, he finished in sixth place.
Also competing at the state
tournament fromLake-Lehman
was senior, Dustin Zeiler who
made his first trip to the state
contest in his 2 -ear diving career.
The Lake-Lehman divers
are coached by Erin Yurko, an
All-American diver at Clarion
University and a special education
teacher with the Lake-Lehman
School District.
DOLMANSERVES ON
MENTORING PROGRAM
Alyssa Dolman, of Trucksville,
is among 41 students serving
as mentors this semester in the
Luzerne County Juvenile Justice
College Mentoring Program. She
is a student at King’s College.
Coordinated by King’s criminal
justice and sociology depart-
ments, the programinvolves
students mentoring first-time,
non-violent juvenile offenders
fromLuzerne County. The offend-
ers meet with mentors on campus
for two supervised 90-minute ses-
sions a week for four weeks.
Asophomore history and sec-
ondary education major, Dolman
is a member of the King’s College
Theatre, the History Society and
the Education Club. She assisted
in teaching the Junior Achieve-
ment curriculumto local high
school students.
She is the daughter of Frank
and PamDolman.
This delightful fountain surrounded by beautiful landscaping
and expansive vistas will be one of six private gardens featured
during the Back Mountain Bloomers Tour of Back Mountain
Gardens on Saturday, June 29.
people Briefs
SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 PAGE 11
THE DALLAS POST
Sports
By TOMROBINSON
For The Dallas Post
Matthew Edkins merged two sporting
interests together as a young boy.
Six years later, the Lake-Lehman soph-
omore has established himself as one of
the best high school athletes in the state
at his new endeavor.
Edkins earned his second Pennsylva-
nia Interscholastic Athletic Association
state medal in Class AA boys diving
March 14 at Bucknell University with a
third-place finish at the PIAASwimming
and Diving Championships.
The son of Lake-Lehman swimming
coach Nancy Edkins, Edkins was used to
being around the pool when his mother
was coaching the sport at Misericordia
University. After spending four early
years in gymnastics, he took many of the
skills and traits necessary for success in
that sport and brought them back to the
pool.
“During gymnastics, I got an injury
with my heel,” said Edkins, who made
the switch in 2007. “Mom knew a diving
coach and signed me up for that. I kind
of got right into it.”
While the Lake-Lehman swimming
program, which does not have its own
pool, struggles, Edkins will jump into
a swim event and do the best he can to
help the team.
His training time, however, goes into
perfecting his skills as a diver. And, that
is where he has been able to help the
Black Knights make an impact at the
state level.
“You have to make sure you get all the
fine stuff down before you can get into
the more complex skills,” Edkins said.
“You just have to practice a lot.”
That practice has paid off.
Edkins won District 2 titles in both his
freshman and sophomore seasons. At
Bucknell, Edkins picked up a sixth-place
state finish as a freshman.
“I think I was just kind of going to do
my best and the medal was a nice addi-
tion,” Edkins said.
Expectations were higher this season.
“Especially with my seed, seeded
third, I wanted to make sure I stayed at
my seed or finished higher,” he said. “I’m
happy I did that.”
Like top high school athletes in other
sports, Edkins will continue his training
year-round. He coaches and participates
in the Back Mountain Dive Club. That
participation means practice for the en-
tire spring, summer and most of the fall
until high school competition returns in
early December.
Edkins will work the same dives re-
peatedly, trying to perfect them, while
doing abdominal work, push-ups for arm
strength and training to increase his leg
strength and push off from the diving
board.
In essence, he will still perform some
of the same flipping and twisting he
started as a gymnast, only he will land
in water.
Edkins led the way at the state meet
but was not the only Back Mountain
medalist at the PIAA Swimming and
Diving Championships.
Brian Stepniak took seventh in the 50-
yard and 100-yard freestyle events and
was part of a 200 freestyle relay team
that also finished seventh in Class AA
for Dallas. Marcus Wagner, Patrick Gel-
so and Jack Matusiak were also on the
relay team.
Dallas placed ninth in the team stand-
ings out of 60 teams that scored points at
the state level.
Matt Edkins is one of state’s best divers
Lake-Lehman diver Matt Edkins
has established himself as one of
the best high school athletes in
the state.
S
pecial education
teacher Liz By-
ron, originally
from Dallas, is
giving new meaning to
“going the extra mile” to
support her students.
This spring, Byron will
run 155 miles through
the Sahara Desert to
raise $50,000 for the ur-
ban public school where
she teaches.
Byron has qualified
to run in Marathon de
Sables (“Marathon of
the Sands”), a six-day,
155-mile self-supported
“ultra-marathon” – the
equivalent of six consec-
utive marathons – con-
sidered the toughest foot
race on the planet.
She is running to raise
funds to buy a classroom set
of laptop computers for her
students at Gardner Pilot
Academy (GPA), a public
school in Boston, MA where
she works as a learning spe-
cialist in GPA’s new sixth
grade, as the former elemen-
tary school begins expansion
of a K-8 school.
Byron, 28, was raised
in Dallas and now lives in
Allston, MA. She is a gradu-
ate of Bishop Hoban High
School where she competed
for the Argents in swimming,
volleyball, cross-country,
track and javelin while also
participating in an indoor
soccer league.
She is a 15-time High
School All-American and
Academic-All American, a
Pennsylvania high school
state champion, a five-time
state runner-up and has won
seven other state medals.
She was named All-State
16 times and is a 16-time
high school district champi-
on, making her the most dec-
orated high school district
athlete of all time in North-
eastern Pennsylvania.
While in high school, she
broke or reset more than 75
team and area pool records.
She was named Scholar-
Athlete of her graduating
class, was captain of the
swim team for two years and
finished her high school ca-
reer undefeated in the dual
meet season.
A former member of the
Bloomsburg Area YMCA, she
is a two-time YMCA national
champion, runner-up and has
placed in the top 16 at YMCA
Nationals numerous times.
Her parents, Tom and Joan
Byron, live in Dallas.
Byron began teaching full-
time in 2008. She earned her
undergraduate degree from
Boston College where she
was a four-year Division 1
All-American swimmer and
master’s degrees from Har-
vard Graduate School of Edu-
cation and Lesley University.
She has competed in nu-
merous other endurance chal-
lenges, including six mara-
thons, an Ironman triathlon
and several other running,
biking and swimming events.
The race begins in south-
ern Morocco on April 5.
Competitors must carry all
personal belongings and food
for the entire event in their
backpacks, running across
sand dunes and rocky ter-
rain.
Event organizers provide
only water and tents. Even in
early April, midday tempera-
tures in the Sahara can reach
120º F. Only 50-60 of the esti-
mated 800 runners are Amer-
icans, with most competitors
coming from European and
African nations.
All of the funds Byron raise
will go directly to the laptop
initiative.
She is covering all of her
own travel and registration
costs. Marathon Sports is
helping to publicize her ef-
forts.
Dallas native runs for
laptops for students
HOW TO HELP
To make a tax-deductible contri-
bution to Liz Byron’s fundraising
campaign, visit www.runforlap-
tops.org.
Dallas native Liz Byron has
qualified to run in Marathon
de Sables (“Marathon of the
Sands”), a six-day, 155-mile
self-supported “ultra-mara-
thon” – the equivalent of six
consecutive marathon.
By TOMROBINSON
For The Dallas Post
C
asey McAn-
drew, David
Payne and
Eric Gotow-
eski provided
the leadership for a suc-
cessful season by the Back
Mountain Blackhawks.
The three Dallas High
School students will be
back together on the ice
Friday night when the
Northeast Pennsylvania
Scholastic Hockey League
conducts its All-Star Game
at the Mohegan Sun Arena.
McAndrew, the team captain,
was selected to the all-star team
along with alternate captains
Payne and Gotoweski and Lake-
Lehman student Hunter Hack-
ling. The Blackhawks also had
Tom Brady, an Easton player
who joinedthe teamlast season,
selected and Northwest’s Logan
Obes listed as an alternate.
McAndrew, Payne and
Gotoweski captained Back
Mountain to a 9-5-0 record and
third place in the varsity stand-
ings. The Blackhawks then
routed Susquehanna Valley, 11-
0, in the quarterfinals before
having their season end with a
9-3 semifinal loss to Wyoming
Valley West.
“It was disappointing to lose
in the semis, but it was a good
season,” Back Mountain coach
Jack Ciaccia said.
McAndrew centered the top
line.
“He’s a well-rounded, excel-
lent hockey player,” Ciaccia
said.
Payne played both forward
and defense.
“He was tremendous for us in
tough situations,” Ciaccia said.
“He has a great wrist shot that
is very accurate.”
Gotoweski led the defense.
“He’s a very physical player,”
Ciaccia said. “For any team, it’s
nice to have that physical player
on defense that keeps an offense
on its toes when it tries to enter
your defensive zone.”
Hackling played defense.
Ciaccia praised his all-around
ability, including his work on
the special teams.
The Blackhawks drewplayers
from eight school districts on
the varsity level and six on the
junior varsity level where about
half the team was made up of
Tunkhannock players.
Most of the team’s games
were played at the Revolution
Ice Centre in Pittston, although
some games were also held at
the Coal Street Complex in Wil-
kes-Barre.
Dylan Pilger, Eric Yenchack
and goalie Corey McAndrew
were the other Dallas players on
the varsity roster.
John Butler, Alex Hoyt and
Jimmy Loeflad were the other
varsity players fromLake-Lehm-
an.
The Blackhawks also had
some swing players, who were
available for both the var-
sity and junior varsity rosters.
Those players included Patrick
Newhart and Liam Barrett from
Dallas, J.P. Natishan and Zacha-
ria Ouladelhadjahmed from
Lake-Lehman and Paul Ciaccia,
a home-schooled student from
the Lake-Lehman district.
The junior varsity team had
similar results, finishing third
in the standings with an 8-3-1
record and winning a quarterfi-
nal playoff before losing in the
semifinals.
The JV team included J.D.
Barrett from Dallas and Drew
Poslock from Lake-Lehman.
BacK MOunTain icE HOcKEY TEaM
Senior members of the Blackhawks hockey team are, front,
Sean Jenkins. From left, second row, David Payne, Hunter
Hackling, Casey McAndrew, Dylan Pilger, Eric Gotoweski and
John Butler.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE DALLAS POST
Back Mountain’s Logan Obes, left, and Pittston Area’s Tommy Schwab battle for position.
HockEy HEats up
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 12 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
With more money comes more choices. You could pay off bills,
open a savings account or invest in a portfolio of mutual funds
*
.
Whatever you choose, First Liberty Bank and Trust can help. As your
trusted hometown bank, we have the products and services to help
you really start living off your land. So, stop into a branch today
and see how we can help you meet every banking need, every day.
And Bank Happy.
MEMBER FDIC
firstlibertybank.com
*
Investment products: Not FDIC Insured. No Bank Guarantee. May Lose Value. First Liberty Bank & Trust is a division of Community Bank, N.A.
PERSONAL BANKING • BUSINESS BANKING • WEALTH MANAGEMENT
• YEARS AS YOUR TRUSTEDHOMETOWNBANK
• CHEERFUL EXPRESSIONS EXCHANGEDWITHOUR
GAS RIGHTS CUSTOMERS JUST LAST WEEK
supervisors I’ve worked with,”
he said. “I don’t want this article
to shine on Alvin. I don’t want to
take credit for the successes of
the township.”
He said that working with the
supervisors has been a pleasure.
“Ninety-nine point nine percent
of the time they tell me to pro-
ceed when I come to them with
a plan,” he said. “I have to give
them credit for allowing me to
do my job.”
Cragle also believes that poli-
tics has little to do with his work.
“You have to put the politics in
the background when serving
the public.”
One of Cragle’s biggest chal-
lenges in the last 35 years was
the lack of property reassess-
ment. Before reassessment, the
township’s tax schedule was set
at 16 mills for 15 to 20 years.
Cragle said that, without a cur-
rent reassessment, funds were
very limited. “We could only do
paving and patch work.”
When township properties
were reassessed four years ago,
property values went from $10
million to $300 million and mill-
age dropped to .57. Current mill-
age in the township is 1.45.
With more funds available,
more projects were possible.
“We’re attempting to do more
paving,” Cragle said.
He also cited a recent upgrade
of the municipal building. “We
had an energy-efficiency grant
from the federal government.
The municipal building was re-
done inside and out.”
Cragle is also pleased with the
township’s new six-bay building
for the transportation depart-
ment. The building features
amenities for road workers, in-
cluding a kitchenette and stor-
age room. He pointed out that,
after it was done, the building
was almost debt-free. And, he
said, the building would save
the township money in the long
run.
“We get four to six years of ad-
ditional life out of equipment by
getting it out of the weather,” he
said.
In Cragle’s view, the future of
Lehman Twp. as a great place to
live is both secure and bright.
“We have our own zoning and
planning commission,” he said.
“We’ve put in our regulations so
that we don’t get a whole lot of
population in one area.”
He enjoys his work for the
township and cites no hobbies,
saying his township work takes
up his time.
“It has kept my mind going
and keeps me busy.”
The secretary, road depart-
ment and police department
members recently threw a party
for Cragle to celebrate his 35th
anniversary with the township.
“It was nice to be with them,”
he said.
And the township treasurer
isn’t done yet as he would like to
continue working for the town-
ship.
“There’s a couple of years left
in me.”
cragle
Continued from Page 1
Ava DeMark, Emily Smith, Teague Stahovic, Charlotte Guilford, Maya Gross and Tait Stahovic
put some Box Tops for Education into a box at the Trucksville Education Center. The Stahovic
family from Plains took the additional step to enter the national contest and won $10,000,
which they donated to the school.
win. “It’s very exciting,” she
said. “You hear about people
winning things, but you never
know anyone who does.”
The Stahovics have request-
ed the money directly benefit
students at the school and Ad-
ams said the school board is
still in the planning stages of
how the money will be used.
Robyn said there was never
any doubt which school they
would choose to receive the
winnings. Both she and Rock
have high praise for the school
where their children attend a
play group and preschool.
Teague, 3, is in Mrs. Scian-
dra’s play group and Tait, 5, is
a student in Mrs. Strutko’s pre-
school class.
“Our oldest has been out
there for three years since he
was 2, said Rock, crediting
the school for the transforma-
tion Tait has gone through.
“My wife and I can’t take all
the credit for his maturity. The
school did it for him.”
Rock also praised the
school’s staff. “The school has
been excellent from the top
down,” praising Adams, the
finance department and the
teachers.
“You actually know the
teachers and they get to know
your child’s strengths and
weaknesses,” he added. “There
is individual teaching between
them and your child.”
The Stahovics want all the
emphasis of the lucky win to
be on the children. “We don’t
want to turn this into Rock and
Robyn. This is about the chil-
dren. We’re not seeing a penny
from this,” Rock said.
Adams was grateful to the
Stahovics for their choice.
“We have so many families
like that who go above and be-
yond for the school,” she said.
SWeePSTaKeS
Continued from Page 1
sylvania with mental illness, intellectual
disabilities and autism.
The girls andtheir personalities jumped
off the pages of “Best Friends on Wheels”
by Debra Shirley read to the children by
Wegrzynowicz in celebration of March be-
ing Intellectual Disabilities Month.
Wegrzynowicz also read “My Brother
Charlie,” written by Holly Robinson Peete
and Ryan Elizabeth Peete about a young
boy with autism, a developmental disor-
der that appears in the first three years of
life, affecting the brain’s normal develop-
ment of social and communication skills.
Through this book, the Head Start
students, who all live within the Lake-
Lehman School District, learned that
Charlie and his twin brother were born
two minutes apart but that Charlie always
struggled because “his brain works in dif-
ferent ways.”
Charlie knows lots of things, like the
names of all the United States presidents,
but he communicates differently from his
brother.
“Charlie has autism,” his twin brother
said. “But autism doesn’t have Charlie.”
Head Start student Addyson Jacobs re-
lated to Charlie when talking about her
friend Joey, an early intervention student
who, along with his fellowstudents, visits
the Head Start classroom once a week.
When asked if Joey is different from
her, Addyson stammered, “No. Him’s just
Joey!”
Gharrison Ayers could relate to Sarah
and her wheelchair as he remembered
pushing his own sister in a wheelchair
when she hurt her foot.
And Darrell Barlet summed it up best
when he said, “At home, we’re all alike.
Just like Cookie Monster.”
Kustrin, whohas beenemployedat Step
By Step Inc. for 21 years, said the purpose
of the reading programis to “Bring educa-
tion and awareness about people who are
different and to show that people appreci-
ate and enjoy the same things.”
Donna Light, head teacher at the Back
Mountain Head Start Center located in
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, echoed Kus-
trin’s thoughts.
“Children need to know that, even
though some kids are different, they can
all play and interact together,” she said.
learNINg
Continued from Page 1
Sandra Wegrzynowicz, a program spe-
cialist from Step By Step Inc., visited
the Back Mountain Head Start Center
at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church to read
about children with disabilities. With
her is Addyson Jacobs.
CHARLOTTE BARTIZEK/ FOR THE DALLAS POST
Tyler Gordon is attentive to a reading about children with disabilities.
The following new books
have been added to the
shelves at the Back Moun-
tain Memorial Library, 96
Huntsville Road, Dallas, for
the month of February 2013:
EXPRESS
“The Storyteller” by Jodi
Picoult, “Calculated in Death” by
J.D. Robb, “The Sound of Broken
Glass” by Deborah Crombie,
“Alex Cross, Run” by James
Patterson, “Gotcha!” by Fern
Michaels
FICTION
“The Storyteller” by Jodi
Picoult, “Calculated in Death” by
J.D. Robb, “The Sound of Broken
Glass” by Deborah Crombie,
“Alex Cross, Run” by James
Patterson, “Gotcha” by Fern
Michaels
NONFICTION
“One Good Deed” by Erin
McHugh, “Freedom National: The
Destruction of Slavery in the
U.S., 1861-1865” by James Oakes
SCIENCE FICTION
“A Memory of Light” by Rob-
ert Jordan
LARGE PRINT FICTION
“NYPD Red” by James Pat-
terson, “Merry Christmas, Alex
Cross” by James Patterson
BOOKS ON CD
“Kinsey and Me” by Sue
Grafton, “Empire and Honor”
by W.E.B. Griffin, “Collateral
Damage” by Stuart Woods, “The
Fifth Assassin” by Brad Meltzer,
“The Husband List” by Janet
Evanovich
YOUNG ADULT
“In Darkness” by Nick Lake,
“Monstrous Beauty” by Eliza-
beth Fama, “The Revolution
of Evelyn Serrano” by Sonia
Manzano, “Bomb: The Race to
Build and Steal the World’s Most
Dangerous Weapon” by Steve
Sheinkin, “Finale” by Becca
Fitzpatrick
The following new books have
been added to the shelves of the
Back Mountain Memorial Library
for the month of March 2013:
EXPRESS
“The Striker” by Clive Cussler
FICTION
“The Striker” by Clive Cussler,
“The Aviator’s Wife” by Melanie
Benjamin, “Political Suicide” by
Michael Palmer, “Mastermind”
by Maria Konnikova, “The Ac-
cursed” by Joyce Carol Oates,
“Golden Dawn” by Thomas M.
Kostigen, “The Night Ranger” by
Alex Berenson, “The Forbidden
Sister” by V.C. Andrews, “The
Absent One” by Jussi Adler-
Olsen, “Crystal Cove” by Lisa
Kleypas
NONFICTION
“Gemstone Settings” by Anas-
tasia Young, “Sugar in the Blood:
A Family’s Story of Slavery and
Empire” by Andrea Stuart, “Who
Stole the American Dream?” by
Hedrick Smith, “Take Charge of
Your Talent” by Don Maruska.
New booKs at
the librarY
The Dallas Rotary Club, in
association with the Dallas
Area Fall Fair Inc., will spon-
sor the Rotary Wine & Dine
Festival from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
on June 29 at the Luzerne
County Fairgrounds, Route
118, Dallas.
The event will feature tast-
ings of the finest wines and
specialty foods from the Back
Mountain and Endless Moun-
tains areas.
A variety of goods will also
be on sale by area craftsmen
and there will be musical en-
tertainment all day long.
The Dallas Rotary Club is
an all-volunteer organization
and will conduct this event to
support its various charities
such as a Christmas shop-
ping spree for less fortunate
children, book scholarships
for deserving college-bound
high school seniors, support
of the Back Mountain Food
Pantry and the Salvation
Army Kettle Drive and much
more.
Tickets are $15 in advance
and $25 at the door. Desig-
nated drivers will be admitted
for a reduced fee of $5 and be
given special identification.
Anyone wishing to partici-
pate as a wine, food or craft
vendor is asked to call Melissa
at 852-9591 or by email at sax-
onm5@hotmail.com.
rotary club of Dallas
plans Wine & Dine Festw
Members of the planning committee for the Rotary Wine &
Dine Festival set for June 29 are, from left, seated, Rotarians
Paul and Melissa Saxon, co-chairs of the event; Dallas Rotary
Club President Todd Buckley. Standing, Rotarian Joe Stager,
Rotarian Ken Chapple, Fair Association President Paul G.
Bella, Fair Treasurer Kimberly Shina, Fair Board Member Co-
lette Mahoney and Fair co-chairperson Judy Kmetz.
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 13 SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013
THIS WEEK’S FEATURE
Homemade soups,
salads, sandwiches,
bread and
quiches made from
the freshest local
ingredients.
100 E. OVERBROOK ROAD • SHAVERTOWN
6749787 • BROWNBARNCAFE.COM
OPEN FOR LUNCH
TUESDAYSATURDAY 11 A.M.3 P.M.
OPEN FOR DINNER
THURSDAYSATURDAY 5 P.M.9 P.M.
Ah! Some Chocolates
AT
Gift Certificates in all denominations are nowavailable
Lakeside
Skillet
Serving Breakfast Daily 7am
Voted Best Breakfast In the Back Mountain
Pole 279 • Lakeside Drive
Harveys Lake • 639-3500
Visit our lower level Fishtales Bar & Grill
LENTEN FEATURES AVAILABLE
Everyday - Pub Style Fish & Chips w/ coleslaw $10.99
11:30AM - 4:00PM
RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
ALL YOUR HOLIDAY FAVORITES INCLUDING…
CARVINGSTATION: BLACK OAK SMOKED HAM WITH MAPLE GLAZE & SLOW ROASTED STEAMSHIP BEEF
SOUPS: SHRIMP BISQUE & ROASTED VEGETABLE & SMOKED GOUDA CHOWDER
SALADS: CAESAR SALAD WITH STRAWBERRIES AND BACON • FRESCO GARDEN SALAD, AND FRESH FRUIT SALAD
ENTREES: SCROD STUFFED WITH CRAB IMPERIAL • CHICKEN MARSALA
PENNE WITH VODKA SAUCE • EGGPLANT PARMIGIANA • LOCALLY MADE HICKORY SMOKED KIELBASA
SIDES: GARLIC AND CHEDDAR SMASHED POTATOES • SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE
ROAST VEGETABLE & CRANBERRY BLEND • MAPLE GLAZED CARROTS
DESSERTS: ASSORTED FRESH BAKED CAKES AND PIES FROM OUR CHEFS
$24.95ADULTS | $19.95SENIORS (65 & OVER) | $9.95CHILDREN (5-11) | CHILDREN 4 & UNDER ARE FREE (TAX & GRATUITY ARE ADDITIONAL)
M E T R O
1174 Memorial Hwy • Dallas • 675-3663 themetrobarandgrill.com
No other coupons or discounts apply.
OPEN EASTER
SUNDAY7-3
Special Easter
Menu Available
Kingston • 287-9631 Exeter • 655-8801
Building? Remodeling?
See Voitek’s for all the top names, and many of the
premium brands you won’t find anywhere else.
Discount prices everyday! Free layaway!
LET US HELP YOU MAKE
YOUR DREAM KITCHEN A REALITY!
PROFILE
CAFE
MONOGRAM
MEDITATION DURING LENT AT
ST. PETER’S
St. Peter’s Church, 3832
SR 6 East, Tunkhannock, will
offer quiet music and medita-
tion Wednesdays through
March 27 as a way of opening
the “thin place” between God
and people.
Soup Supper will precede
the service. Supper begins at
6:30 p.m. and services begin
at 7 p.m.
For more information, call
St. Peter’s at 836-2233 or Rev-
erend Lou at 878-4670.
RUMMAGE SALE SET
The annual Spring Rum-
mage Sale of the Lehman-
Idetown United Methodist
Church Women will be held
from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Fri-
day, April 12 and from 9 a.m.
to noon on Saturday, April 13
at the church, 1011 Mountain-
view Drive, Lehman.
There will be a snack bar
and bake sale on Friday and
Saturday will be Bag Day.
Homemade vegetable
soup will be sold for $5 per
quart. Orders can be given to
Sabrina Major. Items in usable
condition will be accepted for
donation from April 1 to 10.
RUMMAGE SALE
The deacons of Trinity
Presbyterian Church in Dallas
have set May 31 and June 1
for their gigantic rummage
sale in the fellowship hall of
the church, 105 Irem Road,
Dallas, across from the Coun-
try Club Shopping Center.
The sale will take place
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on
Friday, May 31 and from 9
a.m. to noon on Saturday,
June 1. Saturday will be bag
day: all you can stuff into a
large brown grocery bag for
only $2.
Items available are clothing
in good condition for men,
women and children, costume
jewelry, household items,
knickknacks, collectibles,
toys, books, holiday items and
more.
CHICKEN DINNER SET
Members of the Men’s
Club of Trinity Presbyterian
Church, 105 Irem Road, Dallas
will sponsor a chicken and bis-
cuit dinner, including home-
made desserts and beverages,
from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday,
April 6 in the fellowship hall
at the rear of the church. Take-
outs will be available at 4 p.m.
Cost is $8 for adults and $4
for children.
Tickets may be purchased in
advance by calling the church
office at 675-3131 or at the
door.
ROAST BEEF SUPPER
The Lutheran Brother-
hood and St. Paul’s Lutheran
Church of Dallas will hold
their first roast beef supper
for the spring from 4 to 6:30
p.m. on April 13 at St. Paul’s
Lutheran Church, Route 118,
Dallas.
Dinner will be served family
style with takeouts available
from 3:30 p.m.
Cost is $9 for adults and
$4 for children. Reservations
are encouraged by calling
675-3859. Tickets will also be
available at the door.
St. Paul’s Lutheran Church
is wheelchair accessible.
CHURCH BRIEFS
The activities staff and dietary department at Mercy Center Skilled Nursing & Personal Care provided residents
and staff with a perfect setting to celebrate Fat Tuesday. Residents were provided with festive costume items
and entertainment was provided. From left, are Sr. Bride Pollard, Sr. Pat McCann, Sr. Dorothy McLaughlin, Sr.
Anne Paye. Second row, Debbie Dragon, personal care coordinator; Ann Marie Morgan, activity director; Colum-
bia Abostinelli, entertainer; John Evannia, trumpet player and vocalist; and Sr. Rosellen Li.
Mardi Gras celebrated at Mercy Center
With help fromDallas High School art students, Spring has sprung at the Meadows Nursing and Rehabilitation Cen-
ter, Dallas. Students painted “Spring” scenes on windows and doors throughout the center. Residents, staff, friends
and family love to watch the students paint and enjoy the artwork for weeks. This community service project is
under the direction of Dallas High School art teacher Claire Morris. Artists are, fromleft, kneeling, Joey Delamater,
Leah Benedetti, Laura Dewitt, Kendra Vanesko and Abrianna Tolmello. Standing, Dylan Pilger, Alyssa Whittle, Kather-
ine Mananacci, Julie Casey, Andrea Parmelee, Jenna Morgan, Luisa Klemm, Josie Yankovich and Lilla Amico.
DHS art students bring Spring to Meadows
SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 THE POST PAGE 14
Well-loved. Well-covered.
Fall in love with a Certified Pre-Owned Subaru.
Subaru Inspected. Certified. Covered.
º 7-year/100,000-mile Powertrain Plan
º $0 deductible*
º Factory-backed coverage
Every CertifedPre-OwnedSubaruofers:
560 Pierce Street º Kingston, PA
Just over the bridge from the courthouse
570-714-9924
wyomingvaIIeysubaru.com
WYOMING VALLEY MOTORS WYOMING VALLEY MOTORS
Subaru, Forester, Outback, Tribeca, Legacy, Impreza, WRX, STI and SUBARU BOXER are registered trademarks. *No deductible applies to standard
plans only.

Financing for well-qualifed applicants who fnance through Subaru Motors Finance. Length of contract is limited. Subject to credit and
insurance approval and vehicle availability. Take delivery from dealer stock by 10/31/12. See participating dealer for details.
º 152-point safety inspection
º CARFAX
®
vehicle History Report
º 24/7 roadside assistance
2011 Subaru Forester 2.5x Premium
Moonroof
Only 22K Miles
$
22,250
Stock #83175A
VIN # JF2SHADC1BH710879
aru Forester 2.5x Premium
0
2010 Subaru Forester 2.5x Premium
Moonroof
5 Speed
$
15,880
Stock #K3143A
VIN # JF2SH6CC8AG734602
2009 Subaru Forester LL Bean Edition
Moonroof
Leather
$
17,350
Stock #83157A
VIN # JF2SH64669H700964
2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium
Alloy Wheels
Heated Seats
$
25,994
Stock #83130A
VIN # 4S4BRBCC9C3225855
4
2011 Subaru Forester 2.5x Touring
Moonroof
LowMiles
$
25,956
Stock #83408A
VIN # JF2SHAGC8BH711944
aru Forester 2.5x Touring
6
2012 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium
Moonroof
Alloy Wheels
Heated Seats
$
25,900
Stock #83210A
VIN # 4S4BRBGC0C3288384
aru Outback 2.5i Premium
00
2012 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium
Moonroof
Alloy Wheels
Heated Seats
$
22,976
Stock #83415A
VIN # 4S3BMBG60C3008704
aru Legacy 2.5i Premium
6
2012 Subaru Outback 3.6R Limited
Moonroof
Leather
LowMiles
$
29,880
Stock #K3101A
VIN # 4S4BRDKC0C2268340
2012 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium
Heated Seats
LowMiles
Remote Starter
$
21,975
Stock #83313A
VIN # 4S3BMBC68C3012845
2008 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Limited
Moonroof
Leather
LowMiles
$
15,375
Stock #83386A
VIN # 4S3BL626087222187
2010 Subaru Legacy 2.5i Premium
Heated Seats
Alloy Wheels
All Wheel Drive
$
17,954
Stock #63703
VIN # 4S3BMBC63A3238806
u Legacy 2.5i Premium
5
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
2010 Subaru Outback 2.5i Premium
Alloy Wheels
Heated Seats
$
20,995
Stock #83298A
VIN # 4S4BRBCC4A3346662
u Outback 2.5i Premium
5
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
0.99%APR
*
*0.99% fnancing on all Subaru 2010-2013 models. 36 months with approved credit.
SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 THE POST PAGE 15
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
548 Medical/Health
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
548 Medical/Health
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
548 Medical/Health
551 Other
548 Medical/Health
551 Other
548 Medical/Health
551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
MANAGER
TRAINEES
SEND US YOUR RESUME
Expanding Burger King Franchise in the area needs
enthusiastic, aggressive people for Management
Positions. Benefits Include:
• Health Insurance Plan
• 401 (K)
• Dental And Life Insurance Available
• Bonus Plan
• Paid Vacation
• Paid Sick Days
• 45 Hour Work Week
• Competitive Salary
If You Have Pride In Your Own Ability
Send Your Resume To:
Burger King
Attn: Personnel Dept.
185 Ferguson Avenue
Shavertown, Pa 18708
E-Mail: Hr@Pdmco.Net
E.O.E.
Discover an exceptional opportunity to deliver
quality healthcare to America’s Veterans.
The Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center is currently
recruiting for the following physician specialties:
Hospitalist – Acute Care Inpatients: This position requires the
provider to work 12 hour shifts (7 days on/7 days off) including
weekends, odd tours, and holiday coverage as needed and
determined by the Chief, Medical Service. This position requires
the provider to oversee and take responsibility for the Physician
Extenders as assigned. Proof of BCLS/ACLS Certification.
Dermatologist: This position is responsible for the direct
care of patients with Dermatological conditions consulted from
different clinical settings, including ambulatory and hospitalized
patients. The care of patients with Dermatological conditions
could be in person or through Telemedicine/Virtual care. He/She
is also responsible for the supervision of assigned residents,
medical students, and physician assistants.
Proof of BCLS Certification.
Hospice/Palliative Care: The Palliative Care Physician will
be in charge of the Hospice and Palliative Care Unit. He/She will
also run outpatient and inpatient palliative care consultative
services. The physician will be in charge of establishing stan-
dards of clinical care and be responsible for overseeing the poli-
cies and procedures in this area. Proof of BCLS Certification.
In addition to an attractive salary, we offer vacation/sick leave,
health and life insurance coverage and an attractive retirement
package including a tax deferred savings plan.
Interested applicants must submit the following information:
Curriculum Vitae, Application for Physicians, Dentists, Podiatrists,
Optometrists and Chiropractors, VAF-10-
2850(http://vaww4.va.gov/vaforms),
Declaration for Federal Employment OF-306
(http://www.opm.gov/forms/pdf_fill/of0306.PDF), copy of your
current, professional license, copy of ACLS/BCLS card.
For additional information please call (570) 824-3521,
EXTENSION 7209.
Please mail your complete application package to:
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
VA MEDICAL CENTER
1111 EAST END BOULEVARD
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
ATTN: HUMAN RESOURCES/05
VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
Nursing Human Resources
Coordinator
Full time
Responsibilities include coordinating
recruitment, hiring, orientation, retention, and
performance appraisals of nursing staff.
Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources
Management or related degree required.
Excellent salary and benefit package.
Apply online, or send resume to:
Colleen Knight
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine St., Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: 344-6177/Fax: 344-6859
Jhep.org EOE
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
$900.00
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
Routes Currently Available:
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Bowman St. • Chapel St. • Hillard St.
Kidder St. • NewGrant St.
183 Daily Papers • 205 Sunday Papers
$830 Monthly Proft
WILKES-BARRE/PARSONS
Wyoming St. • Brookside St.
E. Chestnut St. • Harry St. • Madison St.
169 Daily Papers • 206 Sunday Papers
$850 Monthly Proft
WAPWALLOPEN MOTOR ROUTE
St. Mary’s Rd. • St. John’s Rd.
Moyers Grove Rd. • Sunset Rd.
94 Daily Papers • 155 Sunday Papers
$800 Monthly Proft
LEE PARK
Alexie Rd. • Betsy Ross Dr.
Constitution Ave. • David Rd. • Lee Park Ave.
252 Daily Papers • 285 Sunday Papers
$1,000 Monthly Proft
HELP WANTED
SUMMER RECREATION
CAMP STAFF
Kingston Township will accept applications for
the position of Summer Recreation Counselors
and Supervisor until 3:30 pm, April 12, 2013.
There will be five (5) full-time counselor and one
(1) full-time Supervisor and (2) part-time coun-
selor positions available for the Summer of 2013.
The program is tentatively scheduled from June
17, 2013 through August 9, 2013.
Kingston Township residency is required. All
hiring will be contingent upon Act 33 Child
Abuse and Act 34 Criminal History Clearances.
Applications and job descriptions are available at
the Kingston Township Administrative Office,
180 East Center Street, Shavertown, PA 18708,
Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
570-696-3809. Kingston Township is an Equal
Employment Opportunity and ADA Employer.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
OFFICE FURNITURE
DELIVERY DRIVER
EARN up to $800
A WEEK
DELIVERING OFFICE
FURNITURE
PLUS:
•HOME NIGHTS
•NO WEEKENDS
•SAFETY BONUSES
•SIGN ON
BONUS
•CDL AND NON
CDL POSITIONS
AVAILABLE
•HEALTH
INSURANCE
•PAID HOLIDAYS
Send resume to
Larry@
edsioffice.com
or fax:
570-501-0587
545 Marketing/
Product
GRAPHIC DESIGN/
TRAFFIC MANAGER
Wilkes-Barre/Scran-
ton advertising
agency is seeking a
talented individual to
work with existing
graphic design
department. Quali-
fied individual
should have back-
ground in graphic
design with knowl-
edge of all Adobe
products, must
have knowledge of
executing insertion
orders and would
be willing to work
directly with clients
via phone or e-mail.
Facebook, Twitter,
Google+ and Word-
press skills a plus.
Position is full time
with paid vacation
and health benefits
are available.
Please send resume
and salary require-
ments to:
seoadvertising
@yahoo.com
548 Medical/Health
Optical
Production
Part-time Mon-Fri.
- -Lens Dept.
- -Machine
Operator
- -Lens Coating
Send Resume or
apply in person
Monday-Friday
8:30am - 6pm to:
Luzerne Optical
180 N. Wilkes-
Barre Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
551 Other
BE A RIVER GUIDE!
Friendly outdoor
people needed to
guide whitewater
raft trips on the
Lehigh River. Most-
ly weekends in the
Spring, Summer and
Fall. Some week-
day work available
in July & August.
Experience helpful
but not necessary.
Contact
Marc S. Brown
570-443-9728
OR
Check out our
website at:
www.whitewater
challengers.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
554 Production/
Operations
PRINTING PRESS
OPERATOR
Growing printing
company is looking
to hire a printing
press operator.
Candidate must be
familiar with a 5
color with coater
printing press.
Please call
570-824-3557 or
send resume to
rich@blasiprinting.com
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
MARKETING/SALES
Full Time, Part Time
experienced Mar-
keting/Salesper-
sons. Identify and
connect with senior
executives, open
doors and arrange
meetings. Must
have excellent
phone skills.
Fax Resume to:
(866) 969-0690
Email to: CMCNorth
east@verizon.net
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES SALES
CAREER
OPPORTUNITY
EXPERIENCED SALES
PERSONS WANTED TO
SERVICE NEW AND
EXISTING ACCOUNTS.
COMPANY BENEFITS,
VACATION AND PAID
TRAINING. IF YOU
WANT A CAREER
AND NOT A JOB CALL
675-3283 TO
SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW
MON-FRI OR VISIT
www.cmseast.com
COCCIA COCCIA FORD FORD
LINCOLN
Due to a recent
expansion, one of
the area’s largest
& fastest growing
Dealerships is
now seeking
SALES PEOPLE
AUTOMOTIVE
SALES
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED!!
AUTO MECHANIC
CAR WASHER
Excellent pay and
benefits including
401k plan.
Apply to:
Greg Martin
577 E. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18702
570-823-8888
email:
grmartin@
cocciacars.com
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
PERSONAL
TRAINING GYM
FOR SALE
$30,000
Fully equipped, turn
key operation, six
years in business.
Owner is relocating.
570-592-2458
for details
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-’75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-’52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-’61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
’68, HANOVER 1951-
’74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
732 Exercise
Equipment
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
758 Miscellaneous
CLOTHES. Boys,
over 50 items, (lg-xl
14-16, $45, ECH
DECKS (ramps &
skateboards, over
50-$45, DVD’S, chil-
dren, various kids
shows, 12 for $25,
BOOKS, kids 25 for
$20, DVD’s 12 for
$25, WWE DVD’s 4
for $40, Skechers,
womens, size 9, 3
for $30 WWE fig-
ures, (35) with
accessories, $45,
SKATES, hockey
tour, boys sze 8,
$15, JACKETS,
womens, $40 for all.
COATS & JACKETS
(5) Boys, $40 for all,
BOARD GAMES,
Excellent, $45. Call-
for details 237-1583
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19” COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED, Vintage
Baseball Cards.
1960s, 50s, 40s
and earlier.
bob74b@msn.com
708-567-5380
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100’
x 125’. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
LUZERNE
761 North Street.
Three bedrooms
two bathrooms, fin-
ished basement for
family, workout or
office, out of flood
area, low taxes,
great elementary
school. Quiet
streets, kids can
ride bikes or skate-
board. Above
ground pool with
deck, fenced yard.
New roof, windows,
and electrical, 200
amp service. Gas
water, baseboard
heat, new gas and
hot water heater.
mitsubishi high
efficiency air condi-
tioning/heat pump.
2nd floor has cen-
tral air, 1,800 total
square feet.
Will pay 3% to real-
tor, but must be
present at time of
showing.
More info:
forsalebyowner.com
Listing ID
23937988.
Open House every
Sunday 1 until 3
p.m. until it’s sold.
$124,900
Call (570)406-2448
570-575-5087
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level house fea-
tures 2 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths, recre-
ation room with
propane stove.
3 season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
WEST PITTSTON
128 LINDEN ST.
Motivated Seller!
Beautiful Cape
Cod. 3+ bed-
rooms, 2 full
baths. Ultra-mod-
ern kitchen with
granite counter-
tops, tile floors &
laundry area. Din-
ing room has
French doors,
with laminated
floors. Plenty of
closet space. 2nd
floor master bed-
room & adjoining
den. New win-
dows, water
heater, electric,
gas furnace.
Three season
porch, mudroom
& fenced yard.
$125,900.
570-883-9943
570-212-8684
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
It's that time again!
Rent out your
apartment
with the Classifieds
570-829-7130
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS SCHOOL DISTRICT
Scenic level 2 acre
building lot is perked
& surveyed & ready
for your dream
home! Owner is sell-
ing for $95,000 but
will discount to
$70,000 if you con-
sider building a
green energy effi-
cient type home on
lot. Privately owned
& located on Lake
Louise Rd within 1/2
mile of Twin Oaks
Golf Club. For more
info 570-288-9050
after 5 pm Serious
inquiries only.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
BACK MOUNTAIN
2nd floor.
NON SMOKING
Spacious 2 bed-
room. Modern kit-
chen, separate liv-
ing & dining rooms.
Includes: heat, hot
water, cable & gar-
age. $800/month,
no pets, references,
1 month security.
570-675-4128
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
KINGSTON
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment, features
a fireplace, built-in
bookcases, large
living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen,
sun room & much
more! $525 +
utilities. Available
April 1st. Please call
570-714-8568
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, wall to wall,
off street parking,
washer/dryer hook-
up in the basement.
$510/per month.
Call (570)288-9507
KINGSTON
SECOND FLOOR
Efficiency
Apartment
Refrigerator and
stove provided. All
utilities included.
Nice neighbor-
hood. $475 per
month. Lease, first
& security deposit.
R e f e r e n c e s
required. No pets.
570-288-5569
LUZERNE
3 rooms & bath on
2nd floor. Washer,
dryer, range &
refrigerator. Off
street parking, no
pets or smoking.
$450/month + utili-
ties & security.
. 570-696-1763
LUZERNE
SPLIT SPLIT LEVEL LEVEL
STYLE STYLE
Beautiful brick
trimmed Colo-
nial, 2nd floor 2
bedroom unit
with wood pan-
eled loft. Remod-
eled completely,
maple kitchen,
all appliances,
gorgeous en-
closed porch,
covered carport,
gas fireplace,
more! $850 +
utilities. 2 YEAR
SAME RENT
LEASE, NO PETS
/ SMOKING.
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON
AMERICA AMERICA REAL REALTY TY
570-288-1422 570-288-1422
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
NANTICOKE
2nd floor, 1 bedroom
non smoking. Water
& sewer refuge
included. No pets. 1
year lease + refer-
ences. $400/month
+ security & utilities.
Call
570-735-3719
WEST WYOMING
425 West 8th Street
2nd floor, 2 bed-
room with off street
parking, washer/
dryer hook up,
stove. No pets.
$525/mo + security.
Sewer & garbage
included, other
utilities by tenant.
570-760-0458
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
WILKES-BARRE
2 bedroom apart-
ment. 1 bath. Eat in
kitchen. Closed in
terrace. Full usable
attic. $625 + utilities
& security.
Call: 718-809-3338
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
1 block from
General Hospital, 3
room apartment,
washer/dryer,
stove, refrigerator,
1st & last months
rent + security,
references
required.
Water Paid.
$525/per month
570-706-6487
After 6 p.m.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 2nd Floor
$540 + utilities.
Security, Refer-
ences, Background
check.
570-332-8792
Need to rent that
Vacation property?
Place an ad and
get started!
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
THE UL THE ULTIMA TIMATE TE
(REMODELED)
W-B General
Hospital loca-
tion. Impeccably
remodeled 1st
FLOOR. Mana-
gaed by AMERI-
CA REALTY.
Maple kitchen,
appliances, laun-
dry, 1 bedroom
with aesthetic
Victorian fire-
place, more.
$625 + utilities, 2
year same rent.
APPLI CATI ON,
EMPLOYMENT
VERI FI CATI ON,
NO PETS.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
944 Commercial
Properties
315 PLAZA
1,750 SQ. FT. &
2,400 SQ.FT
OFFICE/RETAIL
2,000 FT.
Fully Furnished
With Cubicles.
570-829-1206
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
947 Garages
ASHLEY
4,200 sq. ft.
building with two
overhead garage
doors. $300/month.
Option to buy,
leave a message.
570-592-3575
953Houses for Rent
SYLVAN LAKE
1 bedroom house
on Sylvan Lake,
$515/month, plus
utilities & one
month security.
Available April 1.
Call 570-256-7535
SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 THE POST PAGE 16
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
GATEWAY FORD INC.
Business Route 6, Tunkhannock
Serving the needs of our customers since 1971
FANTASTIC SELECTION OF USED
VEHICLES IN STOCK AT GATEWAY FORD
WE ARE THE PLACE TO BUY!
(570)-836-3135
“Bring your vehicle to Gateway Ford inc. for service and see why so many of our
customers are proud members of our Happy Owners Club.”
*Customer may not qualify for all rebates. See salesperson for detail. Plus applicable taxes, lic. & reg. fees.
2012 FORD MUSTANG V6 Automatic, 31 Mile Per Gallon, White Only $19,995
2012 FORD FUSION SEL V6, Leather, Front Wheel Drive, Silver... Only $18,995
2011 LINCOLN MKS V6, Leather, Full Size Luxury, Maroon.......... Only $24,995
2010 FORD TAURUS LIMITED V6, Leather, Only 30,000 Miles, Blue.. Only $19,995
2010 FORD FUSION SE 4 Cyl, 1 Owner, We Sold It New, Blue..... Only $13,995
2009 LINCOLN MKS All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Navigation, 1 Owner, Redfire Only $23,995
2009 FORD EDGE SEL V6, All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, 1 Owner, Black.. Only $20,995
2007 LINCOLN MKZ All Wheel Drive, Moonroof, Low Miles, RedfireOnly $17,495
2012 FORD ESCAPE XLT 4WD 4 Cyl, Auto, Great Fuel Mileage, White Only $21,995
2010 FORD EXPLORER XLT V6, Moonroof, Leather, 4x4, 7 Pass, 1 Owner, Red Only $22,995
2010 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED V6, Leather, 4x4, Only 26,000 Miles, Redfire Only $20,995
2008 FORD ESCAPE LIMITED V6, Leather, Moonroof, 1 Owner, We Sold It, Silver Only $16,995
2007 FORD EXPLORER XLT V6, 4x4, 7 Pass, Low Miles, Ready To Go, SilverOnly $12,995
2004 FORD FREESTAR LIMITED VAN Front Wheel, Leather, 4Door, Blue ...Only $8,995
2004 FORD F150 CREW CAB 4X4 LARIAT V8, Trailer Tow, White Only $10,995
953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bed-
room townhome
features hard-
wood floors on
main floor, fin-
ished basement,
large master
suite, private out-
door deck and
back yard, off
street parking,
granite counter-
tops, stainless
steel appliances,
DirecTV, high-
speed internet,
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with
brand new fur-
nace, central air
conditioning with
brand new com-
pressor, brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all
bedrooms, extra
closet space,
large basement
storage room,
wood blinds in
aLL rooms, all
yard maintenance
and snow plowing
included. This is
an end unit with
only one other
unit attached.
Rent is $1,400.
per month &
requires $1,400.
security deposit.
Minimum one
year lease
required. Must fill
out credit applica-
tion.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile. Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
A.S.A.P Hauling
Estate Cleanouts,
Attics, Cellars,
Garages, we’re
cheaper than
dumpsters!.
Free Estimates,
Same Day!
570-855-4588
1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1249 Remodeling &
Repairs
HARTH & SON’S
General
Contractor
15% off
with this ad.
570-815-8294
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
1252 Roofing &
Siding
Jim Harden
570-288-6709
New Roofs &
Repairs, Shingles,
Rubber, Slate,
Gutters, Chimney
Repairs. Credit
Cards Accepted
FREE ESTIMATES!
Licensed-Insured
EMERGENCIES
Find the car
you want
in your own
backyard.
t
i
m
e
s
l
e
a
d
e
r
a
u
t
o
s
.
c
o
m
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Over 2,000
vehicles
available
online.
t
i
m
e
s
l
e
a
d
e
r
a
u
t
o
s
.
c
o
m
\
SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 2013 THE POST PAGE 17
340 Health Care
Services
340 Health Care
Services
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
503 Accounting/
Finance
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
522 Education/
Training
503 Accounting/
Finance
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
522 Education/
Training
CAREGIVER
Mature professional woman will care for
your elderly parent or spouse in the comfort
of their own home. References available.
570-301-3571
Pre-Owned
Special Offers
Come See Why We’re The Leaders in Pre-Owned
See Our Complete Inventory At
SHERWOODCHEVROLET.COM
2013 Chevy
Mali bu 2LT
White Diamond, Auto,
Leather Int., Alloy Wheels
$
23,900
2012 Chevy
capti va fwd
Black, 4 Cylinder, Auto,
Power Equipped
$
17,900
2012 Chevy
i mpala
White, V-6,
Nicely Equipped
$
17,495
2012 Bui ck
Verano
White Diamond, Auto,
Nicely Equipped
$
21,500
2011 Chrysler
200 Li mi ted
Blue, Auto,
Leather Int.
$
17,495
2011 Chevy
Camaro 2ss/rs
Black, V-8, 6 Speed,
Leather Int.
$
29,700
2011 Chevy
Traverse lt
Silver, V-6,
Auto
$
22,200
2012 Chevy
colorado
crew cab 4x4
White, Auto,
Power Equipped
$
24,900
Only
8600
Mi les
Only
10, 000
Mi les
Only
7500
Mi les
Only
8800
Mi les
Only
6600
Mi les
Only
8700
Mi les
Only
27, 000
Mi les
Only
11, 000
Mi les
2009 Chevy Si lverado
3/4 ton crew cab 4x4
Red,
Power Equipped
$
26,995
2011 Chevy
i mpala ltz
Black, Leather Interior,
Sunroof
$
14,995
Only
35, 000
Mi les
Only
24, 000
Mi les
PAYROLL ACCOUNTANT
McCarthy Tire Service Company, one of the
largest commercial tire dealers in North America,
is seeking a full time Payroll Accountant at our
headquarters located in Wilkes-Barre, PA.
The successful candidate must have hands on
payroll administration experience using an in
house payroll system to process the weekly
payroll of the entire organization. This includes
date entry, verification of hours, reconciliation
and completion of payroll tax calculations. This
person will also be responsible for sales tax entry,
process of yearly tax returns, and the generation
of the annual W-2 forms.
Successful candidate must have at least 5-7 years
of experience in this function. Attention to detail
is crucial as well as the ability to work in a fast
paced environment. Experience in Microsoft
Word and Excel is required as this position also
assists other members of the Accounting depart-
ment with monthly general ledger account
reconciliations. Candidates must have excellent
written and verbal communication skills in order
to deal with all levels of employees and must
maintain a high level of discretion and
confidentiality.
Interested applicants may send resume
with salary history to
tschooley@mccarthytire.com or fax to
1.866.694.9499. NO phone calls please.
United One Resources is seeking full time
real estate processors. The successful candi-
dates should be able to type a minimum of 50
wpm, possess excellent phone and organiza-
tional skills, the ability to multi-task, conscien-
tious with an attention to detail, work in a fast
pace environment and successfully meet daily
goals. Previous title insurance processing,
banking or lending experience preferred but not
required. We offer a competitive benefit
package. Hours: 10am-6pm.
REAL ESTATE
PROCESSOR
For consideration,
forward your resume to:
iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com
EOE M/F/D/V
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Local area manufacturing facility has an
immediate need for a Maintenance Technician.
Applicant should have a working knowledge of
Electrical and Mechanical Systems with the
ability to read schematics and troubleshoot
various pneumatic and hydraulic systems as
well as PLC’s and motors. Candidate must have
a working knowledge of computers in an
industrial environment including hardware
configuration and troubleshooting, software
configuration and troubleshooting and some
limited network configuration and trou-
bleshooting. Must be a reliable, self starter;
able to work 6 days a week. Applicant must
have at least 5 years experience. Consideration
will be given to all relevant training and work
experience. The company offers a competitive
wage/benefits package including medical,
dental, prescription, 401(k), life insurance,
profit and team sharing. Qualified applicants
may apply by mailing a resume to:
THE TIMES LEADER
BOX 4325
15 N. MAIN STREET,
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
VIVE Health & Fitness
Is seeking professional resumes for
Yoga/Pilates Instructors, Massage
Therapists and Personal Trainers,
Membership Advisors, &
Group Exercise Instructors
Ideal candidates have a professional
certification in their respective area
of instruction, and possess leadership,
sales & communication skills.
please send cover letter and resume to:
paul@vivehealthandfitness.com
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LOST DOG, Sheltie,
by Hunlock Creek
Main Road near
Route 11 on March
17. Answers to
“Boomer” small tan
and white male. One
blue eye and one
crooked canine
tooth. Sweet nature
and a bit shy.
570-574-5482
570-204-0590
570-542-7588
LOST. Black Rosary
Beads & round fin-
ger rosary, in a
small burgundy
pouch. Sentimental
value. Gerrity’s,
Dundee or St. Nick’s
W-B. 570-675-3503
120 Found
LIKE
NEW
Used Tires
&
Batteries
for $20
& Up
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
150 Special Notices
ADOPTION: A safe,
secure life filled with
forever love awaits
your baby. Wendy
888-959-7660
Expenses paid.
310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
Selling your
Camper?
Place an ad and
find a new owner.
570-829-7130
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MERCEDES-BENZ ‘12
C300
4Matic Sport
Sedan 4-Door 3.0L
AWD. Only 7,700
miles. Black
exterior & interior.
Premium 1 pack-
age. Garage kept.
Like new $32,000
570-881-0866
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,000, OBO.
570-793-5593
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT
Part Time
Local Consulting firm
seeks a committed,
organized profes-
sional on a part-time
basis Monday
through Friday, 9am-
12pm. Primary
responsibilities will
include clerical and
administrative proce-
dures and systems,
such as filing, copy-
ing and record keep-
ing. 1-3 years experi-
ence working in an
office environment
and knowledge
of operation of
standard office
equipment required.
Send resume to:
MC2 Consulting,
90 Main St.,
Luzerne, PA 18709,
570-714-3860,
fax 570-714-7594
or email
rebeccas@
evergreenbic.com
LEGAL SECRETARY
Back Mountain
Law Office has
position for part-
time Secretary.
Knowledge of
Microsoft
Works needed.
For consideration,
Call (570) 498-7000
522 Education/
Training
Needed at our
Wilkes-Barre, Dallas &
Mountain Top
Locations.
CALL 570-905-3322
ASK FOR LAKE GEMZIK
OR EMAIL RESUME TO:
LGEMZIK@
BUILDINGBLOCKS
LEARNINGCENTER.COM
ChildCare Teachers
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Landscape
FOREPERSON
3 years experience
planting trees,
shrubbery, hard-
scaping and running
various equipment.
Valid PA Driver’s
License a must.
570-779-4346
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
LANDSCAPE
HYDROSEED
PERSONNEL
Hydroseed and soil ero-
sion control experience
helpful. Valid drivers
license a must. Top
wages paid. Unlimited
overtime.Apply in
person 9am-3pm.
Monday through Friday
and bring ID
1204 Main Street
Swoyersville
Varsity Inc.
No Calls Please
E.O.E.
LOOKING FOR
CAREER CHANGE?
WE PROVIDE INITIAL &
ONGOING TRAINING.
OUR TECHNICIANS
APPLY FERTILIZER, LIME
& WEED PREVENTATIVES
AS WELL AS INSECT
CONTROL & TURF AERA-
TION SERVICES FOR RES-
IDENTIAL & COMMER-
CIAL CUSTOMERS.
FULL TIME WORK
MONDAY-FRIDAY
8 AM – 5 PM
MUST HAVE GOOD MATH
SKILLS, CLEAN DRIVING
RECORD & PASS PHYSI-
CAL & DRUG TEST.
APPLY ONLINE AT:
WWW.GRASSHOPPER
LAWNS.COM
OR STOP IN FOR
APPLICATION AT:
470 E. STATE STREET
LARKSVILLE, PA 18651
QUESTIONS? EMAIL
BRIAN PHILLIPS AT:
GRASSHOPPER.JOBS
@GMAIL.COM
LAWN CARE
TECHNICIAN
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
FACILITY CLEANING
MANAGER
2nd shift New addi-
tion for a full time
experienced person
with no less than 5-
7 years in related
EVS- Housekeep-
ing-Custodial and
leadership knowl-
edge in the facility
cleaning industry.
Ability to manage,
work with staff,
train and be in a
working supervisory
role. Floor care
knowledge
required. This posi-
tions is 2nd shift
mainly 40-45 hours
a week 3p-12mid
some 2p-10pm.
Occasional Sat
maybe needed.
Traveling will be
required between
Luzerne-Lackawan-
na- Lehigh Valley
Area- with other
opportunities within
75 mile radius.
Working with
employees on all
facets of cleaning
will be needed.
Flexible, profession-
al and ability to
multi task under
high pressure
results. Excellent
salary- car
allowance, iPad and
phone will be
available. Clean
MVR and valid driv-
er license required.
Must be able to lift
up to 60 lbs.
Apply online:
www.sovereigncs.com
NO phone calls
please!
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVERS
WANTED
Water trucks
Class A CDL
Hazmat Certification
2 Years Minimum
Experience
Tunkhannock Area
Call Jack:
570.881.5825
DRIVERS:
Home Nightly
Hazleton, PA
Dedicated Run.
New Higher Pay!
CDL-A, 1 year
exp. required.
Estenson Logistics.
Apply:
www.goelc.com
1-866-336-9642
542 Logistics/
Transportation
OWNER OPERATORS:
100% No-Touch.
Dedicated Loads.
Bloomsburg, PA to
Lansing, MI.
2000 or newer
tractor, CDL-A, 18
months experience.
Tabitha:
800-325-7884 x4
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Hiring Experienced
Tri Axle CDL
Vacuum Truck
Drivers
and Laborers.
Must be physically
fit, reliable, have
good driving
records and
friendly attitude.
Excellent wages.
Call Mon-Fri
1 pm to 4 pm.
570-477-5818
Find your next
vehicle online.
timesleaderautos.com
T H E D A L L A S P O S T
PAGE 18 Sunday, March 24, 2013
8
0
8
2
8
3
LOCAL PROS
The Dallas Post
Call
1-800-273-7130
ROOFING
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
ELECTRICIAN
WOOD-COAL STOVES/FIREPLACES
WASHER/ DRYER/ RANGE
REFRIGERATOR
Bring in old part with model # and serial #
APPLIANCE PARTS &SUPPLY
936 Market Street, Kingston
Open 9-4:30-Sat ‘til Noon - 288-5526
APPLIANCES
AUTO BODY
PHONE: (570) 823-2211
FAX: (570) 824-0553
INSURANCE ESTIMATES • COLLISION REPAIRS
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC • QUALITY CRAFTSMANSHIP
CALL
RICK OR NICK
105 WEST SAYLOR AVE.
PLAINS, PA 18702
Rick’s Body Shop
Fender Benders
Back To Basics
DeLeur’s
I
N
C.
A Fireplace & Stove Shoppe
Dallas, PA
Hours: Tues. 9-7 • Wed., Thurs., Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-4 • Closed Sun. & Mon.
Wood, Coal, Pellet, Gas & Oil...Find out what’s RIGHT for YOU!
C
a
n
Y
O
U
R
e
a
l
l
y
A
f
f
o
r
d
N
o
t
T
o
?
FREE
LAYAWAY
Gas and Oil Prices...THRU THE ROOF!!
www.deleursbacktobasics.com 675-2266
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
ALBERT W. ASHTON
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
675-2110
Additions • Custom Decks • Drywall
Remodeling • Roofng • Masonry
Repairs of All Types
RESTORATION
Like it never even happened.
®
24-Hour
Emergency
Service
Independently
Owned and
Operated
Thomas & Dorothy Hess
Owners
SERVPRO
®
of Columbia,
Montour & Sullivan Counties
Bus: (570) 759-0966
SERVPRO
®
of Hazleton/
Harvey’s Lake
Bus: (570) 256-4485
sp8807@epix.net
servpro.com
SHREDDING SERVICE
Scott A. Davis
Owner/Operator
Shredder Sales
Scott
Own
Mobile Service
Commercial
Customers
Residential Drop-Off Available
Saturdays from 9am to noon
at our Shavertown Offce.
128 North Main St.
Shavertown, PA 18708
(570) 675-2880
www.purplepapereaters.com
HAULING
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classified
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNLL NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LE EEE DER.
timesleader.com

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful