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Math March 20, 2013 Spring Break Work ____________________________ ____________________________ Dear Parents, ____________________________

Attached is the Spring Break Work for Math class. There are 6 sets of task cards. Please make sure you are using RACE on each and every problem. Know: means you underline what you need to know to solve the problem. Show: means you show your thinking. Woah: means you need to check your work. Not using RACE on each problem will result in incomplete break work. Please have it complete on Wednesday April 3rd. Having complete work will earn you a $500 Inwood dollars. Please plan on doing 2 problems a day, and you can look at the attached calendar if you have questions. It is important for you remember and think about how important it is for you to work hard over Spring Break. The New York State Exams are in about two weeks. If you have any questions, please email Mr. Grullon. Jose.Grullon@Inwoodacademy.org

Have a great Spring Break!!

MR. G

March 2013 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 20


Spring Break Work Distributed 21

Saturday 23

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Day 1: Task Card

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Day 2: Task Card

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Day 3: Task Card

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Day 4: Close Reading

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Day 5: Task Card

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Day 6: Task Card

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Day 7: Close Reading

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Spring Break Work Due

Day 1:
Compare the difference in height between Billy and Johnny. Billy is 5 3 and Johnny is 49 inches tall. Who is taller in inches and demonstrate how you know.

Day 2:
Complete the line plot below based on the data. There are four packs of gum that weigh of a pound, three packs weigh , and two packs weigh gum packs in pounds being sold at the candy story. . Find the total weight of

Day 3:
How many cubic units are in the following figure?

Day 4:

Name___________________________ Date__________________ Close Reading: Step 1: Read for the Gist What is this reading mostly about? Jot down some initial thoughts about what the gist of this article is about.

Step 2: Identify Key Vocabulary and Ask Questions! Now is the time to annotate the text and identify key text elements. In this section write down key vocabulary terms that we dont know or that you want to define.

Focus on our Questions: What do we need to know? Focal question: What are mountain gorillas? Describe them.

The why. What is happening to them?

Then why again, why does this matter? Why is this something we should know?

Day 5:
What is the volume of the following rectangular prism?

Day 6:
Sam was drawing on the white board. After he finished 3/4 of the picture, he decided he did not like his picture. He erased 2/8 of it. How much is left of the drawing?

Day 7:

An Animal-Lover at Work
TFK talks to a conservation expert about the Matschies tree kangaroo
JANUARY 25, 2012 By TFK Kid Reporter Rachel Ayres

COURTESY AYERS FAMILY / BRUCE BEEHLER CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL

A Matschie's tree kangaroo in Papua New Guinea, its native habitat.

When you are trying to save an endangered species, it helps when its cute like the Matschies tree kangaroo. The cuddly mammal naturally lives in one place in the world: the Huon Peninsula in Papua New Guinea, near Australia.

All About Tree Kangaroos


The Matschies tree kangaroo is one of 10 species of tree kangaroos, all of which are endangered or threatened. Dabek chose to work to save the Matschies tree kangaroo because she had studied them in captivity and because of their isolation from the other species in the wild. A tree kangaroo is typically about the size of a raccoon and weighs around 19 pounds. It has a pouch and a long tail. But unlike the regular kangaroo, tree kangaroos have longer front legs, long claws and thick fur. They live in the high canopy of the rainforest, about 100 to 150 feet in the air. Matschies are orange and brown with a face that looks like a teddy bear . They can leap 60 feet to the ground from trees without getting hurt.

A Hero Among Us
In 1996, Dr. Lisa Dabek helped found the Tree Kangaroo Conservation Program (TKCP). Now, 15 years later, though still endangered, Matschies tree kangaroo populations are stabilizing. Much of the success is due to the work of Dabek, Senior Conservation Scientist at the Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle, Washington, and Director of the TKCP. According to Dabek, TKCP needed to fix their habitat and work with local clans, some of whom use them for food and ceremonial clothing. We and the clans made a compromise, Dabek told TFK Kid Reporter Rachel Ayres. The clans would dedicate a part of their land as a no hunting area. But they could continue to hunt on their other land. Together they set aside 180,000 acres of land. They called this a Wildlife Bank. We have four things here at TKCP we really believe in, Dabek explains. One is conserving the tree kangaroos. Two is protecting their habitat. Three is looking at what the community needs, such as helping their schools and health care. And four is training, such as training people to manage the forest and to monitor tree kangaroo populations. TKCP has also helped locals sell their coffee. This gives them a way to make money that does not affect tree kangaroos or their habitat. They are now selling coffee to Caffe Vita in Seattle.

Introducing: Crittercams!
In 2009, National Geographic worked with TKCP to put Crittercams on the tree kangaroo. This gave scientists a window in to what their daily life was like. With the cameras, they discovered that tree kangaroos eat many species of plants, including orchids, moss, bark and leaves. We also discovered that the tree kangaroos are crepuscular, which means they are active in the morning, rest a lot during the day, and are active again in the dusk, said Dabek. Animal behavior has always been interesting to Dr. Dabek. When I was 8 years old, a friend and I wrote down what we wanted to be when we grew up and sealed it inside an envelope to open when we were teenagers. Dabek says. When I opened it I was reminded that I wanted to be an animal trainer. And that is kind of what I am today.

Name___________________________ Date__________________ Close Reading: Step 1: Read for the Gist What is this reading mostly about? Jot down some initial thoughts about what the gist of this article is about.

Step 2: Identify Key Vocabulary and Ask Questions! Now is the time to annotate the text and identify key text elements. In this section write down key vocabulary terms that we dont know or that you want to define.

Focus on our Questions: What do we need to know? Focal question: What are Matschies? Describe them.

The why. What is happening to them? Why are they endangered?

Then why again, why does this matter? Why is this something we should know?

What can we do about it? What can adults and students do about it?