GEOTECHNICAL CONSTRUCTION: TECHNICAL TRAINING SERIES

State of Practice: Micropile Structural and Geotechnical Design
Presented by:

Jonathan K. Bennett, PE, D.GE
Presented to:

DFI / ADSC Micropile Seminar, Salt Lake City, UT March 21, 2013

Introduction
This Session’s Objectives: • Explore the state of practice in terms of design. We’ll Do That By Covering: • • • • A Quick Introduction to Micropiles in General Current Design Codes and Practice Design Example and Comparison Micropile Research Findings that Extend the State of Practice

2

What is a Micropile?

3

What is a Micropile?
Said another way, A Micropile is a pile that… • • • • • Is drilled and grouted, Is 12 inches or less in diameter, Is a replacement vs a displacement pile, Is typically reinforced, and May or may not have steel casing left in place  permanently.

4

Micropile Installation
• Micropiles are typically installed by drilling them into  the ground using either cased or uncased construction  and rotary, rotary percussive or down‐hole hammer  drilling systems. Temporary or permanent casing can be utilized for  installation of micropiles where support of the drilled  hole sides is required (caving soils). Generally, the hole is drilled and cleaned, the  reinforcing core inserted into the hole and then the  hole is grouted from the bottom up using a tremie grouting methods. Where rock drilling is required, rotary percussive or  down hole hammer equipment is used for rapid hole  advancement.

5

Micropile Features
• Micropiles can be installed at angles and are  able to resist both axial and lateral loads.  • Micropiles develop their axial capacity  primarily through the bond between grout  and soil or rock in the bonded zone of the  pile. Because of this, micropiles provide both  tension and compression resistance thus  making them useful in a variety of  applications.  • They are installed using mostly the same  drilling and grouting equipment that is used  for tiebacks and soil nailing.
6

Micropile Features
• Because of the installation methods used  (DHH and rotary percussive drilling),  micropiles can be used in soil and rock  conditions where the use of conventional  deep foundation systems are not a  reasonable alternative (such as Karst  topography, where modest obstructions are  present, or in low‐headroom conditions).

7

Micropile Origins

Dr. Fernando Lizzi (January 2, 1914 – August 28, 2003) is considered the father of micropile technology
8

Micropile Origins

Dr. Lizzi started to work for the company SACIF in 1947, but shortly afterwards was the first (and for  some time, the only) civil engineer of the newly formed company, Fondedile, where he remained as  Technical Director for nearly 50 years. During this time while, Italy specifically, and Europe generally,  were being reconstructed, he developed the technology later named pali radice (root pile, micropile)  for the restoration of damaged monuments and buildings at the Scuola Angiulli in Naples. The first  international application of micropiles was seen in Germany in 1952 for the underpinning of Krupp, in  Essen‐Bochum and then the Kerkini Dam in Greece. The technique was later applied in hundreds of  works by Fondedile in various countries. Pali radice have been used extensively in the restoration of  monuments, e.g. Ponte Vecchio in Florence in 1966 and the stabilization of the Leaning Tower of  Burano in Venice. He died in Naples on August 28, 2003. [Wikipedia]
9

Micropile Origins

10

Micropile Origins

11

History and Increase in Usage
• 1950’s – Post WWII Europe – Dr. Fernando Lizzi – Root  Piles (Palo Radice) • 1970’s – US specialty contractors start to dabble with  micropiles and gradually increase capacity • 1990’s ‐ Rapid Emergence in US following FHWA Research • 1997 FHWA Micropile State of Practice Document • 2000 FHWA Micropile Guidelines • 2003 DFI Guide Specification • 2005 NHI / FHWA Micropile Reference Manual • 2006 IBC Micropile Section Adoption • 2007 AASHTO LRFD Design Specification Adoption • Increase in use since inception such that 2003 market  estimated to be in excess of $300M in US alone.
12

Types of Micropiles

13

Types of Micropiles

Typical “High Capacity  Micropile”

14

Types of Micropiles: Hollow Bar

Hollow Bar Micropile Aka “Injection Bore” or  “Self Drilling Anchor”
Advantages: • High bond transfer values. • Can be installed in caving soils  without casing.
15

Types of Micropiles: Hollow Bar

16

Types of Micropiles: Hollow Bar

17

Types of Micropiles FHWA Design Application Classifications • Case 1 – Micropile is loaded directly and that  load is resisted directly by the micropile and its  reinforcement (normal foundation micropile). • Case 2 – Micropile elements circumscribe and  internally reinforce the soil so as to theoretically  make a reinforced soil composite that resists  external loads (reticulated micropile structure).
18

Types of Micropiles FHWA Construction Type Classifications • • • • • Type A ‐ Gravity Grouted Type B – Pressure Grouted Through Casing Type C – Single Global Post Grout Type D – Multiple Repeatable Post Grout Type E* ‐ Hollow Bar

19

Micropile Materials
• Pipe Casing (typically mill secondary oilfield casing) • Solid or Hollow Reinforcing Bars • Neat Cement Grout

+

=

20

Micropile Materials: Casing
Typically, 80 ksi Mill Secondary  Oilfield Tubular is the national  norm for micropile casing.

21

Micropile Materials: Core Steel

Core steel can be solid or hollow bars and is typically ASTM  A615 grades 75, 80 or 95 or ASTM A722 Grade 150.

22

Micropile Materials: Grout
Grout used for micropiles is typically a neat water – cement mix that  may or may not contain plasticizing admixtures for flowability. 

23

Micropile Installation Equipment
Use essentially the same or similar drilling and grouting equipment  used for installation of drilled and grouted ground anchors. There is  a wide range of sizes and configurations for micropile drills.

24

Micropile Installation Equipment

25

Micropile Installation Equipment

26

Micropile Installation Equipment

27

Micropile Installation Equipment

28

Micropile Installation Equipment

29

Micropile Installation Equipment

30

Micropile Installation Equipment

31

Micropile Installation Equipment

32

Micropile Installation Equipment

33

Micropile Installation Equipment

34

Micropile Installation Equipment

35

Micropile Installation Equipment

36

Micropile Installation Equipment

37

Micropile Installation Equipment

38

Micropile Installation Equipment

39

Micropile Installation Equipment

40

Micropile Installation Equipment

41

Micropile Installation Equipment

42

Micropile Applications
• Foundation Piles · Foundation Support through Difficult Subsurface  Conditions • Foundation Underpinning / Retrofit • Slope Stabilization • Earth Retention (A‐Frame & Reticulated Structures) • Vertical Soil Reinforcement – Micropiles for Settlement  Control in Soft Soils • Ground Source Heating / Cooling – Energy Piles

43

Micropile Applications

44

Difficult Subsurface Conditions
Karst is a distinctive topography in which the landscape is largely shaped by the dissolving  action of water on carbonate bedrock (usually limestone, dolomite, or marble). This geologic process, occurring over long periods of time, results in unusual surface and  subsurface features ranging from sinkholes, vertical shafts, disappearing streams, and  springs, to complex underground drainage systems and caves.

45

Karst Features

46

Karst Features: Pinnacled Limestone

47

Karst Features: Pinnacled Limestone

48

Karst Map

49

Micropile Feasibility
Micropiles are most cost effective when one or more of the  following conditions exist: • • • • • • Difficult subsurface conditions, e.g. soils with boulders, or  debris, existing foundations, high groundwater, etc. Restricted access or limited overhead clearance. Subsurface voids (karst). Vibrations and noise must be minimized. Settlement must be minimized. Relatively high unit loads are required (50k – 1000k) and  other drilling methods are ineffective.
50

Micropile Design Fundamentally, Micropile design is the process of  properly matching micropile components and  overall configuration to the loads required. In the interest of time and for simplicity, we will be  examining design from the perspective of  structural and geotechnical design for resisting  axial loads only.

51

Micropile Design
Load Transfer Mechanism • For micropiles, the axial load is resisted primarily by  the grout‐to‐soil or grout‐to‐rock bond capacity in  the bonded zone of the pile. This allows resistance  to both tension and compression forces. • End bearing is not typically considered except in the  case of a casing only micropile with a minimal rock  socket. In that case, we rely on the confinement  condition of the rock socket to provide resistance far  in excess of what would typically be considered  based on published bearing capacities.
52

Micropile Design Load Transfer – Fully Bonded

53

Micropile Design Load Transfer – Socketed Casing

54

Micropile Design Load Transfer – Cased w/ Reinforcing

55

Micropile Design
Basic Considerations for Micropile Design • Determination of Axial and Lateral Loading  Conditions • Micropile Structural Design
· Cased Section · Uncased Section

• • • •

Geotechnical Design Capacity Pile to Foundation Connection Deformations / Serviceability Verification of Assumptions through Testing and QC
56

Micropile Design
Micropile Design Guides and Specifications • • • • • • • • • 1997 FHWA Micropile State of Practice 2000 FHWA Micropile Guidelines 2003 DFI Guide Specification 2005 NHI/FHWA Micropile Reference Manual 2006 IBC Micropile Section (2009 Rev) 2007 AASHTO LRFD Design Specification (2010 Rev) Forthcoming ADSC / DFI Micropile Specification Forthcoming AASHTO LRFD Construction Specification Forthcoming NHI/FHWA Reference Manual Revions (LRFD)
57

Micropile Design

58

Micropile Design Current Design Approaches for Micropiles • Service Load Design
– Federal Highway Administration Manuals – International Building Code – Most Local Building Codes

• LRFD Design
– AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications – Forthcoming FHWA / NHI Manual
59

Micropile Design

60

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD

Service Load or Working Load Design Service Load ≤ Ultimate Load / FS Allowable Stress or Working Stress Design Actual Stress ≤ Yield or Ultimate Stress / FS

61

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD

Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD)  utilizes various Load Factors with magnitudes  based on type of load to account for variability  in loading and various Resistance Factors of  varying magnitudes based on material or  resistance type to account for variability in  resistance.

62

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD

63

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD

(FHWA, 1997)
64

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD LOAD COMBINATIONS
Building codes specify different load combinations for ASD and LRFD due to the  difference in the way loads are considered in the two different methods. The  combinations below are from ASCE 7 and the 2010 IBC. ASD Load Combinations D+F D+H+F+L+T D+H+F+(Lr or S or R) D+H+F+0.75(L+T)+0.75(Lr or S or R) D+H+F+(W or 0.7E) D+H+F+0.75(W or 0.7E)+0.75L+0.75(Lr or  S or R) 0.6D+W+H 0.6D+0.7E+H
65

LRFD Load Combinations 1.4(D+F) 1.2(D+F+T)+1.6(L+H)+0.5(Lr or S or R) 1.2D+1.6(Lr or S or R)+(L or 0.8W) 1.2D+1.6W+L+0.5(Lr or S or R) 1.2D+1.0E+L+0.2S 0.9D+1.6W+1.6H 0.9D+1.0E+1.6H

Micropile Design SLD vs LRFD It is difficult to directly compare SLD results and  LRFD results because in LRFD, the factored loads  used in computing required resistance vary  based on how much of different types of load  are present because load factors are different  for different types of load. Otherwise, the  relationship between SLD and LRFD would be  the simple relationship: Load Factor / Resistance Factor = Factor of  Safety
66

Micropile Structural Design Basic Considerations for Micropile Structural  Design • Cased Length Analysis / Design • Uncased Length Analysis / Design • Design of Components in those zones • You might include pile cap connection design in  the structural design category.
67

Micropile Structural Design

68

Micropile Structural Design
• Compression Strength (Ultimate)
• Puc = fc’ Ag + Fy As

• Compression Strength (Allowable)
• Pac = A fc’ Ag + B Fy Ac + C Fy Ab

• Tension Strength (Ultimate)
• Put = Fy As

• Tension Strength (Allowable)
• Pat = D Fy As
• Where A, B, C and D are reduction factors which express the allowable stresses as a  percentage of ultimate stress. The magnitude of these reduction factors varies depending on  which design code you are using. The core assumption with regard to the above compressive strength formulas is that the pile  is sufficiently supported along its length by soil or rock such that buckling cannot occur. Most  soils will provide a level of support that is sufficient to preclude outright buckling. However,  the stiffness of the overburden soils can effect the actual pile capacity. This is not taken into  account in the formulas.

69

Micropile Structural Design ‐ FHWA • Compression Strength (Allowable)
• Pac = 0.40 fc’ Ag + 0.47 Fy As

• Tension Strength (Allowable)
• Pat = 0.55 Fy Ab

• Maximum Test Load (Allowable)
• Ptc = 0.8 (fc’ Ag + Fy As) • Ptt = 0.8 Fy Ab for ASTM A615 material • Ptt = 0.8 Fu Ab for ASTM A722 material
70

Micropile Structural Design ‐ IBC • Compression Loading
• Pac = 0.33 fc’ Ag + 0.40 Fy As

• Tension Loading
• Pat = 0.60 Fy Ab (same as PTI)

• Steel yield stress limited to 80 ksi. • Steel reinforcement must carry at least 40% of  the load.

71

Micropile Structural Design Comparison
FHWA Design Criteria
Compression: Tension: Pa = 0.40fc’Ag + 0.47FyAb Pa = 0.55FyAb

DFI / IBC Design Criteria
Compression: Tension: Pa = 0.33fc’Ag + 0.40FyAb Pa = 0.60FyAb (same as PTI) Fy = 87 ksi max (strain compatibility ) Fy = 87 ksi max (strain compatibility ) Fy = 80 ksi max 0.40FyAb >= 0.40Pa
72

Imposed Limitations
FHWA Compression: DFI Compression: IBC Compression: IBC Compression:

Micropile Structural Design

73

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD

74

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD Note that in this format, the product of load  factors and mean load effects are combined as  opposed to combining load effects alone. This  differs from traditional Working Stress or Service  Load analysis where the load effects alone are  combined without load factors. 

75

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD 10.9.3.10.2 ‐ Axial Compressive Resistance

76

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD 10.9.3.10.2 ‐ Axial Compressive Resistance 10.9.3.10.2a ‐ Cased Length

77

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD 10.9.3.10.2 ‐ Axial Compressive Resistance 10.9.3.10.2b ‐ Uncased Length

78

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD 10.9.3.10.3 ‐ Axial Tension Resistance

79

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD
Section 10.5 – Limit States and Resistance Factors 10.5.5 – Resistance Factors 10.5.5.2.5 – Micropiles Resistance factors shall be selected from Table 10.5.5.2.5‐1 based on  the method used for determining the nominal axial pile resistance. If  the resistance factors provided in Table 10.5.5.2.5‐1 are to be applied  to piles in potentially creeping soils, highly plastic soils, weak rock, or  other marginal ground type, the resistance factor values in the Table  should be reduced by 20 percent to reflect greater design uncertainty. The resistance factors in Table 10.5.5.2.5‐1 were calibrated by fitting to  ASD procedures tempered with engineering judgment. The resistance  factors in Table 10.5.5.2.5.‐2 for structural resistance were calibrated  by fitting to ASD procedures and are equal to or slightly more  conservative than corresponding resistance factors from Section 5 of  the AASHTO LRFD Specifications for reinforced concrete column design.
80

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD

81

Micropile Structural Design ‐ LRFD

82

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design – Comparison Compression Case FHWA ASD Pac = 0.40 fc’ Ag + 0.47 fy As IBC ASD Pac = 0.33 fc’ Ag + 0.40 fy As AASHTO LRFD EQUIVALENT ASD FORMULA Pac = 0.36 fc’ Ag + 0.425 fy As  (LFavg = 1.5) (LFavg = 1.42) Pac = 0.38 fc’ Ag + 0.45 fy As  
83

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design – Comparison Tension Case FHWA ASD Pat = 0.55 fy Ab IBC ASD Pat = 0.60 fy Ab AASHTO LRFD EQUIVALENT ASD FORMULA Pat = 0.533 fy Ab (LFavg = 1.5) (LFavg = 1.42) Pat = 0.563 fy Ab
84

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison
Micropile Information (Given) Casing Size: Casing Strength: 7” OD X 0.500” N80 Mill Secondary Fy = 80 ksi minimum #18 Full Length ASTM A615 Gr 80 Fy = 80 ksi fc’ = 4000 psi 40.00’ Limestone 7.5” = 0.625’ 1.00’
85

Core Size: Core Strength:

Grout Strength: Cased Length: Rock Type: Socket Diameter: Plunge Length:

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison
Basic Cross Section Properties
#18 Bar Core, 7”OD X 0.500” Casing,  7.5” Socket Diameter CASED SECTION Abar = 4.00 in2 (#18) Acasing = 3.1416(ro2‐ri2) = 10.21 in2 Agrout = 3.1416(3)2‐4.00 = 24.27 in2 UNCASED SECTION Abar = 4.00 in2 (#18) Agrout = 3.1416(3.75)2‐4.00 = 40.18 in2
86

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Compression Structural Design– Cased Length

87

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Compression Structural Design ‐ Uncased Length

88

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Tension Structural Design

89

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Tension Structural Design

90

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design ‐ Comparison
Compression  Allowable Service  Load – Cased Length FHWA ASD IBC ASD AASHTO LRFD  (LFavg=1.50) AASHTO LRFD  (LFavg=1.42) 573 k 487 k 518 k 547 k Compression  Allowable Service  Load – Uncased  Length 215 k 181 k 194 k 205 k Tension  Allowable  Service Load 176 k 192 k 171 k 180 k

91

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design ‐ Comparison
Compression Allowable Service Load Cased Length
580

560

540 Axial Load (kips)

520

500

480

460

440 FHWA ASD IBC ASD AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.50) AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.42)

92

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design ‐ Comparison
Compression Allowable Service Load Uncased Length
220

210

200 Axial Load (kips)

190

180

170

160 FHWA ASD IBC ASD AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.50) AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.42)

93

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Comparison Structural Design ‐ Comparison
Tension Allowable Service Load
195

190

185 Axial Load (kips)

180

175

170

165

160 FHWA ASD IBC ASD AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.50) AASHTO LRFD (LF = 1.42)

94

Micropile / Foundation Connection

95

Micropile Geotechnical Design
• For design purposes, micropiles are usually assumed  to transfer their load to the ground through grout‐ to‐ground skin friction, without any contribution  from end bearing (FHWA, 1997). • This assumption results in a pile that is for the most  part geotechnically equivalent in tension and  compression.  • Suggested bond values can be found in the FHWA  Manuals as well as in the PTI Recommendations for  Prestressed Rock and Soil Anchors.
96

Micropile Geotechnical Design

97

Micropile Geotechnical Design
Allowable Geotechnical Capacity ‐ FHWA •

• IBC Code does not offer specific guidance for  bond values for geotechnical design of micropiles.
98

Micropile Geotechnical Design
Summary of Typical Grout to Ground Bond Values for Preliminary Micropile Design
Soil / Rock Description Type A English (psi) min max avg Silt and Clay (some sand) soft, medium plastic Silt and Clay (some sand) stiff, dense to very dense Sand (some silt) fine, loose-medium dense Sand (some silt, gravel) fine-coarse, med-very dense Gravel (some sand) medium-very dense Glacial Till (silt, sand, gravel) medium-very dense, cemented Soft Shales fresh-moderate fracturing little to no weathering Slates and Hard Shales fresh-moderate fracturing little to no weathering Limestone fresh-moderate fracturing little to no weathering Sandstone fresh-moderate fracturing little to no weathering Granite and Basalt fresh-moderate fracturing little to no weathering Type A - Gravity grout only. Type B - Pressure grouted through the casing during casing withdrawal. Type C - Primary grout placed under gravity head, then one phase of secondary "global" pressure grouting. Type D - Primary grout placed under gravity head, then one or more phases of secondary "global" pressure grouting. 5.1 7.3 10.2 13.8 13.8 13.8 29.7 10.2 17.4 21.0 31.2 38.4 27.6 79.8 7.6 12.3 15.6 22.5 26.1 20.7 54.8 SI (kPa) min max avg 35 50 70 95 95 95 205 70 120 52.5 85 Typical Range of Grout-to-Ground Nominal Strength Type B Type C English (psi) SI (kPa) English (psi) SI (kPa) min max avg min max avg min max avg min max avg 5.1 10.2 13.8 27.6 27.6 52.2 52.2 45.0 -9.4 18.9 18.9 34.8 34.8 29.4 -35 70 70 120 120 95 -95 190 190 360 360 310 -65 130 130 240 240 7.3 13.8 13.8 21.0 21.0 17.4 27.6 27.6 52.2 52.2 45.0 -12.3 20.7 20.7 36.6 36.6 31.2 -50 95 95 145 145 120 -120 190 190 360 360 310 -85 Type D English (psi) SI (kPa) min max avg min max avg 7.3 21.0 27.6 34.8 55.8 55.8 48.6 -14.1 20.7 24.3 38.4 38.4 33.0 -50 95 95 145 145 120 -145 97.5

142.5 13.8 142.5 13.8 252.5 21.0 252.5 21.0 215 -17.4 --

190 142.5 240 167.5 385 385 265 265

145 107.5 10.2 215 265 155 180 17.4 17.4

190 142.5 13.8 550 377.5 --

202.5 17.4 ---

335 227.5 ---

74.7 200.2 137.4

515

1380 947.5

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

150.1 300.2 225.2 1035 2070 1553

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

75.4 250.2 162.8

520

1725 1123

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

200.2 609.2 404.7 1380 4200 2790

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

99

Micropile Geotechnical Design

100

Micropile Geotechnical Design

101

Micropile Geotechnical Design ‐ LRFD Section 10.9.3 – Strength Limit State Design 10.9.3.5 – Nominal Axial Compression  Resistance of a Single Micropile Micropiles shall be designed to resist failure of  the bonded length in soil and rock, or for  micropiles bearing on rock, failure of the rock at  the micropile tip.
102

Micropile Geotechnical Design ‐ LRFD Section 10.9.3.5 – Nominal Axial Compression  Resistance of a Single Micropile
The factored resistance of a micropile, RR, shall be taken as:

103

Micropile Geotechnical Design ‐ LRFD Section 10.9.3.5 – Nominal Axial Compression  Resistance of a Single Micropile

104

Micropile Geotechnical Design ‐ LRFD

105

Micropile Testing – LRFD Verification
Section 10.9.3 – Strength Limit State Design 10.9.3.5 – Nominal Axial Compression Resistance of a Single  Micropile 10.9.3.5.4 – Micropile Load Test The load test shall follow the procedures specified in ASTM  D1143 for compression and ASTM D3689 for tension. The  loading procedure should follow the Quick Load Test Method,  unless detailed longer‐term load settlement data is needed, in  which case the standard loading procedure should be used.  Unless specified otherwise by the Engineer, the pile axial  (nominal) resistance shall be determined from the test data  using the Davisson Method as presented in Article 10.7.3.8.2.
106

Micropile Structural Design – LRFD Limitations
• Load Combinations and Load Factors in Section 3 (Table  3.4.1‐1) were developed specifically for bridges and may  not be applicable to other structures. • Current Resistance Factors are calibrated based on fitting to  ASD, not on reliability theory. Therefore does not truly  reflect reliability based design at this time except in format. • No Strength Limit State Checks for lateral loads. Not  enough consensus exists in terms of design methodology  for LRFD. • Includes strain compatibility related stress limitations which  have been shown to be erroneous for reinforcing in a  confined condition. • Davisson is the criteria for determining the Resistance of a  micropile. Davisson is considered by many to be overly  conservative and inappropriate for micropiles.
107

Micropile Testing
• It is typical for any substantial micropile project to include  some sort of testing program. • Generally based on ASTM D1143 Quick Test. • The older FHWA specifications prescribed testing to 2.5 X  Service Design Load. • Newer FHWA publications recommend 2.0 X DL. 2.0 DL is  appropriate in most cases. Test to 2.0 DL for best economy. • Tension testing is generally considered to be conservative  compared to compression testing because it neglects any end  bearing and is often more economical for checking capacity.  However tension test results will not give representative  movement results for compression case. • Compression testing requires anchors to hold down testing  apparatus adding to cost but gives representative results for  compression loading.
108

Micropile Testing

109

Micropile Testing

110

Micropile New Frontiers
ADSC / DFI Joint Micropile Committee
The Micropile Committee is a joint committee comprised of  members from both the ADSC‐IAFD and the Deep Foundations  Institute (DFI), and is comprised of interested engineering  professionals dedicated to providing:  • primary assistance in the writing of applicable specifications  • review, commentary and formal acceptance of design and  construction specifications  • a network of industry professionals to perform research  necessary for the advancement of Micropile technologies 
111

Micropile New Frontiers
Committee Objectives
• Have four (4) committee meetings per year to conduct the  business of the Committee, • Sponsor and execute one (1) to two (2) industry educational  seminars each year, • Canvas the committee membership to investigate future research  activities and needs that may be suitable to participate in or  recommend to the ADSC IASC (Industry Advancement Steering  Committee) or DFI Committee Project Fund for sponsorship.

112

Micropile New Frontiers
Specifications
• • • • • • DFI / ADSC Guide to Drafting a Specification for Micropiles AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specification – Micropiles AASHTO LRFD Bridge Construction Specifications – Micropiles Input on Development and Maintenance of IBC Micropiles Section Currently updating DFI / ADSC Micropile Guide Specification Will provide input on New FHWA / NHI Micropile Manual

113

Micropile New Frontiers
Research
• • • • Micropile Strain Compatibility Testing Micropile Bearing Plates: Are They Necessary Position Paper on the Use of Mill Secondary Casing  Reticulated Micropile State of Practice

114

Micropile New Frontiers
Micropile Strain Compatibility Testing

115

Micropile New Frontiers
Micropile Bearing Plates: Are They Necessary

116

Micropile New Frontiers
Position Paper on the Use of Mill Secondary Casing 

117

Micropile New Frontiers
Reticulated Micropile State of Practice

118

Questions?

What’s a  Micropile?

119

Questions?

General Q & A
120

Questions?
For more information on micropiles:
• • • • • • Upcoming DFI / ADSC Micropile Seminars – Annual or Semi‐Annual DFI Micropile Committee Q&A Website (www.dfi.org) My personal blog on Micropile Design and Construction www.micropile.org MD&C on Facebook www.facebook.com/Micropiles FHWA Geotechnical Engineering Library Contact me and I will schedule a time to come to your office and provide  specific micropile training tailored to your needs. Jon Bennett – j_bennett@brayman.com (724) 443‐1533 x54107 Office / (304) 707‐4840 Mobile
121

Questions?

THANK YOU!
for Your Time and Attention

122

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful

Master Your Semester with Scribd & The New York Times

Special offer for students: Only $4.99/month.

Master Your Semester with a Special Offer from Scribd & The New York Times

Cancel anytime.