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The Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) Project consists of various infrastructure projects for development of new industrial

cities in the DMIC region. The projects are to be implemented at the State level in partnership with the State Governments. The process of land acquisition/ land procurement is in progress in the States of Haryana, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Gujarat and Maharashtra and master planning has started in Uttar Pradesh. Following industrial cities have been taken up for development in a phased manner:

Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Name of the Node

State

Dadri-Noida-Ghaziabad Investment Region Manesar-Bawal Investment Region Khushkera-Bhiwadi-Neemrana Investment Region Pithampur-Dhar-Mhow Investment Region Ahmedabad-Dholera Investment Region Shendra-Bidkin Industrial Park City near Aurangabad Dighi Port Industrial Area

Uttar Pradesh Haryana Rajasthan Madhya Pradesh Gujarat Maharashtra Maharashtra

Government of India (GoI) approved the financial and institutional structure and financial assistance for the development of industrial cities in the DMIC in September, 2011

The industrial cities would be launched with the development of townships of 25-50 sq km which are envisaged to be completed by the end of 2018. The developments planned under the project are expected to result in the following benefits: i. Increase in the industrial output

ii. Increase in employment opportunities in the manufacturing/ processing industry besides upgrading and developing their skills thus making them partners in the growth process. iii. Increase in the exports from the region.

iv. development of industrial cities with world class infrastructure which would involve/attract an estimated investment of around US$ 90-100 billion over the next thirty years. As per the perspective plan of the entire DMIC region, the industrial output is expected to be tripled in the next 5 years after the implementation of first phase of the cities.

The report Global Hunger Index (GHI) 2012 by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) is based on three equ ally weighted indicators, namely undernourishment (proportion of undernourished people as percentage of population), child underweight and child mortality. This report mentions that India has lagged behind in improving its GHI score despite strong economic growth along with the statement that GHI data is based partly on outdated data. The approach in dealing with the nutrition challenges has been two pronged: First is the Multi-sectoral approach for accelerated action on the determinants of malnutrition in targeting nutrition in schemes/ programmes of all the sectors. The second approach is the direct and specific interventions targeted towards the vulnerable groups such as children below 6 years, adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating mothers. The Government has accorded high priority to the issue of malnutrition especially among children and women including young girls and is implementing several schemes/programmes through State Governments/UT Administrations. The schemes/programmes include the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), National Rural Health Mission (NRHM), Mid-Day Meal Scheme, Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (RGSEAG) namely SABLA, Indira Gandhi Matritva SahyogYojna (IGMSY) as direct targeted interventions. Besides, indirect multi-sectoral interventions include Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS), National Horticulture Mission, National Food Security Mission, Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS), Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan, National Rural Drinking Water Programme etc. All these schemes have potential to address one or other aspect of Nutrition.

Strategy for Checking Child Mortality

Under the National Rural Health Mission, the following key interventions are being implemented to bring down the mortality rate of children across all the States of the country: (1) Promotion of Institutional Delivery through Janani Suraksha Yojana JSY: Promoting Institutional delivery by skilled birth attendant is key to reducing both maternal and neo-natal mortality. (2) Emphasis on facility based newborn care at different levels to reduce Child Mortality: Setting up of facilities for care of Sick Newborn such as Special New Born Care Units SNCUs, New Born Stabilization Units NBSUs and New Born Baby Corners NBCCs at different levels is a thrust area under NRHM. (3) Capacity building of health care providers: Various trainings are being conducted under NRHM to train doctors, nurses and ANM for early diagnosis and case management of common ailments of children and care of mother during pregnancy and delivery. These trainings are on IMNCI, NSSK, SBA, LSAS, EMOC, BMOC etc. (4) Management of Malnutrition: Nutritional Rehabilitation Centres have been established for management of severe acute malnutrition. (5) Appropriate infant and young child feeding practices are being promoted in convergence with Ministry of Woman and Child Development. Village Health and Nutrition Days VHNDs are organized for imparting nutritional counselling to mothers and to improve child care practices. (6) Universal Immunization Programme: Vaccination protects children against many life threatening diseases such as Tuberculosis, Diphtheria, Pertussis, Polio, Tetanus, Hepatitis B and Measles. Infants are thus immunized against seven vaccine preventable diseases every year. The Government of India supports the vaccine programme by supply of vaccines and syringes, Cold chain equipments and provision of operational costs. (7) Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakaram(JSSK): A new initiative namely Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakaram JSSK has been launched on 1st June, 2011, which entitles all pregnant women delivering in public health institutions to absolutely free and no expense delivery including Caesarean section. The initiative stipulates free drugs, diagnostics, blood and diet, besides free transport from home to institution, between facilities in case of a referral and drop back home. Similar entitlements have been put in place for all sick newborns accessing public health institutions for treatment till one year of age. (8) Home based new born care HBNC: Home based newborn care through ASHAs has been initiated by providing incentive of Rs. 250. The purpose of Home Based New Born Care is to improve new born practices at the community level and early detection and referral of sick new born babies. (9) Mother and Child Tracking System: A name based Mother and Child Tracking System has been put in place which is web based to ensure registration and tracking of all pregnant women and new born babies so that provision of regular and complete services to them can be ensured. In the 12th five year plan, the Government of India has set a target to reduce Infant Mortality rate of 25 per thousand live births by 2017. The states have been assigned state specific targets based on their existing Child Mortality indicators. The screening of all children up to 18 years of age is also being strengthened for early detection of birth defects, disabilities, deficiencies and diseases and their management under Rashtriya Bal Swasthya Karyakaram in order to improve child survival and development. Encouraging Farmers to Take up Organic Farming on a Massive Scale

Demand for organic food items is on the rise during the last few years. Organic products are costlier in the country due to demand by consumers for chemical residue free food grown by nature friendly methods without the use of synthetic inputs. Government is promoting production of organic crops, fruits and vegetables etc. through various schemes viz National Horticulture Mission (NHM), Horticulture Mission for North East and Himalayan States (HMNEH), Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY), National Project on Management of Soil Health and Fertility (NPMSHF), National Project on Organic Farming (NPOF), Network Project on Organic Farming under Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) and various schemes of Agricultural and Processed Food Products Export Development Authority (APEDA). There is no provision of Minimum Support Price (MSP) in respect of organic farm produce. However, the Government is promoting organic farming by providing incentives to cultivators of organic food products under the National Horticulture Mission (NHM) @ Rs. 10,000/- per hectare for maximum area of four hectare per beneficiary, setting up of vermicompost units @ 50% of the cost, subject to a maximum of Rs. 30,000/- per beneficiary and organic farming certification @ Rs. 5.00 lakh for group of farmers covering an area of 50 hectare. Assistance for organic food promotion is also available under Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY) for projects formulated and approved by the State Level Sanctioning Committee.

National Centre for Cold Chain Development for Building Cold Chain Infrastructure in the Country

To recommend standards and protocols for cold chain infrastructure/building including post harvest management National Centre for Cold Chain Development (NCCD) has been constituted as an autonomous body by the Government and has been registered under societies registration Act 1860. The aims and objectives of the Society are: i. to harmonize with international standards and best practices and suggest mechanism for bench marking and certification of infrastructure/building, process and services provided by cold chain industry. ii. To suggest indicative guidelines for preparation of project reports for potential investors/entrepreneurs. iii. To assess and develop appropriate IT-based management information system for the cold chain infrastructure. iv. To undertake and coordinate Research and Development (R&D) work required for development of cold chain industry in consultation with stakeholders. v. To undertake and coordinate the task of Human Resource Development (HRD) and capacity building. It may also conduct in-house training, short-term/long courses relevant for cold chain development. vi. To launch publicity campaign to educate the stakeholders including awareness building about the benefits of integrated cold chain. vii. To recommend appropriate policy framework relating to development of cold chain. viii. To facilitate and foster the development of multi-modal transportation facilities for perishable agricultural, horticultural and allied commodities and establishment of National Green Grid Perishable Commodities. The Government is implementing National Horticulture Mission (NHM), Horticulture Mission for North East and Himalayan States (HMNEH) and programme of National Horticulture Board (NHB) for development of horticulture which includes financial assistance for setting up of cold storages.

Sustantial Rise in Allocation for Farm Schemes; New Schemes on Nutri-Farms, Farmer Producer Organisations, Livestock

Union budget for 2013-14, presented in Parliament by Finance Minister, Shri P. Chidambaram, on 28th February 2013 supports the agriculture sector in a big way.
While the existing provisions have been continued, a number of new initiatives have been taken for bringing in more investment to this sector, promoting growth in key areas and farmers welfare. Food sector as a whole has also been supported with higher provision for food subsidies, market intervention and imports. These will help in attaining food security for all and containing food inflation. The following are the major provisions relating to agriculture and food sector in the budget: Agriculture Ministry gets `27,049 crore, an increase of 22 percent over the Revised Estimates (RE) of the current year. Plan outlay for agriculture has been raised considerably: total Plan outlay for Agriculture Ministry: `17095 crore (2012-13 RE: 13787 cr); out of this, for agricultural research: `3,415 crore (2012-13 RE: 2520 cr). Agricultural credit target has been fixed at `700,000 crore.. The target was `575,000 crore for 2012-13, which is likely to be exceeded.

The interest subvention scheme for short-term crop loans will be continued next year also. A farmer who repays the loan on time will be able to get credit at 4 percent per annum. The interest subvention scheme has so far been applied to loans given by public sector banks, RRBs and cooperative banks. This is being extended to crop loans borrowed from private sector scheduled commercial banks for loans given within the service area of the branch concerned.

Bringing Green Revolution to Eastern India (BGREI) has been a remarkable success. Assam, Bihar, Chhattisgarh and West Bengal have increased their contribution to rice production. The scheme is being continued, with an allocation of `1000 crore in 2013-14.

The original Green Revolution States face the problem of stagnating yields and over-exploitation of water resources. The answer lies in crop diversification. `500 crore has been allocated in the Budget for a programme of crop diversification that would promote technological innovation and encourage farmers to choose crop alternatives. The Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana is intended to mobilise higher investment in agriculture. `9,954 crore is being allocated to this scheme. The National Food Security Mission, a scheme intended to bridge yield gaps of major crops, has been provided `2,250 crore.

The allocation for the integrated watershed programme has been raised from `3,050 crore in 2012-13 (BE) to `5,387 crore. This will help small and marginal farmers who are vulnerable everywhere especially in drought prone and ecologically-stressed regions. Watershed management techniques help in improving productivity of land and water use. On suggestion from eminent agricultural scientists, a pilot programme is to be started on Nutri-Farms for introducing new crop varieties that are rich in micro-nutrients such as iron-rich bajra, protein-rich maize and zinc-rich wheat. `200 crore has been allocated to start the pilots. Ministry of Agriculture will formulate a scheme on this. It is hoped that agri businesses and farmers will come together to start pilots in the districts most affected by malnutrition. The National Institute of Biotic Stress Management for addressing plant protection issues will be established at Raipur, Chhattisgarh. The Indian Institute of Agricultural Bio-technology will be established at Ranchi, Jharkhand and will serve as a centre of excellence in agricultural bio-technology. A pilot scheme to replant and rejuvenate coconut gardens that was implemented in some districts of Kerala and the Andaman & Nicobar Islands will be extended to the entire State of Kerala. An additional sum of `75 crore has been allocated for this scheme in 2013-14. Farmer Producer Organizations (FPO), including Farmer Producer Companies (FPC), have emerged as aggregators of farm produce and link farmers directly to markets. Matching equity grants will be provided to registered FPOs upto a maximum of `10 lakh per FPO to enable them to leverage working capital from financial institutions. `50 crore is being provided for this purpose. Besides, a Credit Guarantee Fund will also be created in the Small Farmers Agri Business Corporation with an init ial corpus of `100 crore. Finance Minister has urged State Governments to support such FPOs through necessary amendments to the APMC Act and in other ways. The National Livestock Mission will be launched in 2013-14 to attract investment and to enhance productivity of livestock, taking into account local agro-climatic conditions. `307 crore have been provided for the Mission. There will be a sub Mission in NLM for increasing the availability of feed and fodder. SUBSIDIES A sum of `10,000 crore has been kept for the National Food Security Act. The Government hopes that the Bill for this will be passed by Parliament as early as possible. This allocation is over and above the normal provision for food subsidy, towards the incremental cost that is likely under the Act. `90,000 crore have been provided for food subsidy [including expenditure likely on implementation of the Food Security Act] as against 2012-13 RE of `85,000 crore. The subsidy is used in TPDS operations and foodgrain procurement. In addition, provisions have been made for subsidy on import of pulses (`250 crore) and edible oils (`318.34 crore). Other subsidies that will benefit the agricultural sector directly or indirectly are: fertilizer subsidy: `65,971.5 crore; interest subvention on farm credit: `6,000 crore; price support by Jute and Cotton Corporations: `255 crore.
Outcome of Doha Climate Change Conference 2012 The key outcomes of the eighteenth Conference of Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) held in Doha, Qatar from November 26 to December 8, 2012 include amendment of the Kyoto Protocol to implement the second commitment period for emissions reductions by developed country parties under the Protocol; successful conclusion of the work under the Bali Action Plan (BAP); and planning further work under the Durban Platform (DP) for Enhanced Action for post-2020 arrangements agreed to at Durban last year. The Conference addressed all the three issues and came out with a package, which balanced the interests and obligations of various countries. This was stated by Shrimati Jayanthi Natarajan Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Environment and Forests, in the Rajya Sabha today, in a written reply to a question by Shri Y.S.Chowdary. The Minister further stated that At the Doha Conference, India pursued the strategy of working together with the Group of77 & China in order to protect the overall interests of developing countries. During the Conference, India raised the issues of equity in climate change related actions and commitments, technology-related Intellectual Property Rights (IPRs) and unilateral measures taken by some countries in the name of climate change and succeeded in having these issues included in the ongoing work of various bodies of the Convention. India successfully defended the nature of its voluntary domestic goal of reducing emissions intensity of its Gross Domestic Product (GDP) by 20-25% by 2020 in comparison with 2005 level and ensured that agriculture, a sensitive sector of our economy, was not included in the mitigation work programme proposed to be launched at the global level, the Minister added.

Schemes for Economic Empowerment of Poor Women


The Ministry of Women and Child Development is implementing various schemes for womens economic empowerment namely, Rashtriya Mahila Kosh (RMK), Support to Training & Employment Programme for Women (STEP), Priyadarshini besides National Mission for Empowerment of Women (NMEW) and Indira Gandhi Matritva Sahyog Yojana (IGMSY). Rashtriya Mahila Kosh (RMK) was set up in 1993 to meet the credit needs of poor women in the informal sector for income generation and household activities. Since its inception upto 31.1.2013, RMK has sanctioned Rs. 342.90 crore microfinance loans and released Rs. 278.89 crore benefiting over 7.19 lakh poor women beneficiaries. The Ministry has been administering the Support to Training and Employment Programme for Women (STEP) as a Central Sector Scheme since 1986-87, to provide sustainable employment and income generation for marginalized and asset-less rural and urban poor women across the country. During last ten years, 3.90 lakh women beneficiaries have been benefitted under the STEP Scheme. Priyadarshini, is a Self Help Group (SHG) based project implemented by the Ministry for holistic empowerment of women and adolescent girls. The actual implementation of the scheme was started in April, 2011. The scheme is being implemented in 7 districts of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar. Since inception, 56738 beneficiaries have been covered under Priyadarshini scheme. Indira Gandhi Matritva Sahyog Yojana (IGMSY) is a Conditional Cash Transfer scheme for pregnant and lactating (P&L) women introduced in the October 2010 to contribute to better enabling environment by providing cash incentives for improved health and nutrition to pregnant and nursing mothers. 6.74 lakh women beneficiaries have been covered under the IGMSY scheme since inception. National Mission for Empowerment of Women (NMEW) is an initiative of the Government of India for empowering women holistically, with a mandate to strengthen inter-sectoral convergence. Further, the Government is also implementing other schemes like Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, National Rural Livelihood Mission, etc for economic empowerment.

Monuments and Antiquities (NMMA) was approved for the period 2007 2012 in the XI five year plan to prepare a National database on built heritage, sites and antiquities from secondary sources
There have been attempts from time to time to penetrate cyber networks operating in Government. These attacks have been observed to be originating from the cyber space of a number of countries including China. It has been observed that the attackers are compromising computer systems located in different parts of the World and use masquerading techniques and hidden servers to hide the identity of actual system from which the attacks are being launched. Hence, it is difficult to attribute cyber attack to a particular country. A sophisticated virus called as Stuxnet was reported to be spreading worldwide since July 2010. The virus targets Industria l Control Systems. The following specific steps were taken by the Government immediately after the threat was reported: (i) Alerts and advisories about the Stuxnet threat were issued on website of the Indian Computer Emergency Response Team (CERT-In). Measures to be taken to detect infected systems, dis-infect the same and prevent further propagation were advised to all critical sector organizations in the country. (ii) Government in association with Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and security vendors tracked the infected systems and advised the owners of the systems to disinfect the same. Workshops were conducted by CERT-In and other government agencies jointly for critical sector organizations to create awareness and suggest steps to be taken to counter the threat. Further, the government has taken the following measures to protect cyber networks: Department of Information Technology and Electronics has circulated Computer Security Guidelines and Cyber Security Policy to all the Ministries/ Departments on taking steps to prevent, detect and mitigate cyber attacks. All Central Government Ministries/ Departments and State/Union Territory Governments have been advised to conduct security audit of entire Information Technology Infrastructure, including websites, periodically to discover gaps with respect to security practices and take appropriate corrective actions. Setting up of Early Warning and Response to cyber security incidents through the Indian Computer Emergency Response Team (C ERT-In) and to have collaboration at national and international level for information sharing and mitigation of cyber attacks. CERT-In regularly publishes Security Guidelines and advisories for safeguarding computer systems and these are widely circulated. CERT-In also conducts security workshops and training programs on regular basis to enhance user awareness. The Crisis Management Plan for countering cyber attacks and cyber terrorism was prepared and circulated for implementatio n by all Ministries/ Departments of Central Government, State Government and their organizations and critical sectors. CERT-In is conducting mock cyber security drills to enable assessment of preparation of organizations to withstand cyber attacks.

The Information Technology Act, 2000 as amended by the Information Technology (Amendment) Act, 2008 has been enforced on 27.10.2009. The Act provides legal framework to address the issues connected with security breaches of information technology infrastructure. National Informatics Centre (NIC) managing Govt. websites and providing e -mail service is implementing measures to secure the Govt. IT infrastructure from cyber attacks.

The Electronic Project Proposal System (e-PPS) is a web-based system that encompasses the complete life-cycle of funding of R&D projects, beginning with online submission of project proposals for funds, to monitoring and management of funded projects. It supports the processes for Online submission of project proposals Evaluation of proposals by experts Project recommendations Project Monitoring e-PPS replaces the existing manual system of project funding wherein the Project Investigators (PI) submit hard copies of R&D proposals, which are presented to a Working Group and based on the recommendations of the Working Group the proposals are further processed in DeitY. It is a One-Go Dash-Board to see the projects from initiation to completion. It reduces the total processing time of proposals and aids easy dissemination of project information.

Sea erosion:The Rashtriya Tatiya Sanrakshan Pariyojana (NCPP) was initiated with a view to explore the possibility of funding of coastal protection works through external assistance. After discussion between Government of India and Asian Development Bank (ADB) for funding on coastal protection works, the ADB approved grant for Project Preparatory Technical Assistance (PPTA). Impact of climate change : The climate change in polar regions have impacts on Indian monsoon. The Arctic and Antarctic regions are known to be very sensitive to global climate change. Hence, it is highly desirable to improve our understanding of how they respond to climate change, and how those responses in turn affect both regional and global climate. Hence, it is perceived that the Polar Regions can potentially display climate diversity in various spatial and temporal scales, which ultimately affects the monsoon weather and climate over the Indian sub-continent. Government has a plan to study it. Emphasizing the need for building an expanded monitoring of climate change, as well as building appropriate R & D efforts on the possible responses and feedbacks of the Polar Regions to climate change, a research study has been formulated. In order to engage the international science community on these activities, a concept note was prepared and discussed during the Belmont Forum (a group of the world`s major and emerging economies and funders of global environmental change research and international science councils) meeting held in New Delhi during 27-28 February, 2013. Brain Drain: Ministry of Science and Technology is implementing several initiatives, including fellowships, to attract Indian scientists who have settled in various parts of the world for pursuing scientific research in India in their respective field of expertise as well as in home country research programs. Details are as follows: A. The Department of Science and Technology (DST) has been implementing two schemes to encourage researchers and scientists working abroad to find work opportunities in India: (i) Ramanujan Fellowships to attract brilliant scientists and engineers from all over the world to take up scientific research positions in India. The Ramanujan Fellows can work in any of the scientific institutions and universities in the country and they are eligible for receiving regular research grants through the extramural funding schemes of various S&T agencies of the Government of India. The duration of Ramanujan Fellowship is five years. The value of the fellowship is Rs.75,000/per month for five years. Each Fellow, in addition, receives a Research Grant of Rs.5.00 lakh per annum. Since inception, 184 Indian origin scientists working abroad have been offered this Fellowship. (ii) Innovation in Science Pursuit for Inspired Research (INSPIRE) Faculty Award under Assured Opportunity for Research Careers (AORC) scheme initiated during the year 2011-12, provides opportunity to the scientists within 32 years of age and who have completed their doctoral research from any recognized university/ academic institution in the world. Each INSPIRE Faculty Awardee receives a consolidated amount equivalent to the scale of the Assistant Professor of an IIT as Fellowship amount with Rs.7 lakh per year as Research Grant for 5 years. Since inception, 33 candidates of Indian origin including NRIs having PhD degrees have been selected for award so far. B. The Department of Biotechnology (DBT) has been implementing three schemes to encourage researchers and scientists working abroad to find work opportunities in India: (i) Wellcome-DBT India Alliance: Biomedical Research Fellowship Career Programme: DBT has entered into an alliance with Wellcome Trust (WT) to launch a three-tier fellowship programme on biomedical research at post-doctoral level. The programme has been established since September 2009 and functions as the Wellcome-Trust DBT Indian Alliance. The Department of Biotechnology and the Wellcome Trust each have committed Pounds Sterling 8 million per year, for a period of ten years. The fellowship funding programme is established to attract a strong cohort of qualified scientists working abroad to seek career opportunities in India. So far 64 fellowship awards have been granted of which 30 have been from the best overseas laboratories and are now located at various Indian institutes. (ii) Ramalingaswamy Re-entry Fellowship: The scheme was initiated in 2006 by DBT for Indian scientists who are working in overseas institutions/universities and would like to return to :2: India to pursue their research interests. The fellowship is given for a period of five years initially and could also be considered for another term based on a fresh appraisal depending upon the progress made. Under the scheme each awardee receives a fellowship amount of Rs 75,000 per month

(consolidated), House Rent Allowance Rs 7,500 pm and research/ contingency grant of Rs 5.00 lakhs per year. From this year onwards (2012-13) the research/contingency grant has been increased from Rs 5.00 lakhs to Rs 10.00 lakhs for first year, Rs 7.5 lakhs for 2nd year and Rs 5.00 lakhs third year. So far 147 scientists have been selected in the last five batches and 102 fellows from overseas laboratories have been relocated to various Indian host institutes. This year (201213) 136 applications has been received and are being reviewed for section of up to 50 candidates. (iii)Young Investigator Meet (YIM): It is organized every year in India and overseas to create awareness amongst scientists working in overseas laboratories of the various job opportunities available in India. So far in the past 4 years, 45 YIM attendees have secured faculty positions at various labs in India, 20 of these have been awarded different Indian fellowships i.e., DBT-Wellcome Trust, Ramanujan Fellowship, Ramalingaswami Re-entry Fellowships. C. The Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) has conceptualized and made operational a scheme to attract scientists/technologists of Indian origin (STIOs), who are given a designation of Outstanding Scientists, STIO. They are appointed at an identified CSIR labor atory so as to nurture a research field in their area of expertise. Government is focusing on devising more opportunities for making fullest use of Indian scientific talent to work in Indian academia & scientific research institutions and laboratories. The Department of Biotechnology has started three major new science clusters in the National Capital Region (NCR), Mohali and Bangalore; and have expanded its institutional and other programs to provide excellent opportunities and working environment to attract he best Indian scientists working abroad to work in India.

Salient features of national telecom policy

Strive to create One Nation - One License across services and service areas. Achieve One Nation - Full Mobile Number Portability and work towards One Nation - Free Roaming. To orient, review and harmonise the legal, regulatory and licensing framework in a time bound manner to enable seamless delivery of converged services in technology and service neutral environment. Convergence would cover: o Convergence of services i.e. convergence of voice, data, video, Internet telephony (VoIP), value added services and broadcasting services o Convergence of networks i.e. convergence of access network, carriage network (NLD/ ILD) and broadcast network o Convergence of devices i.e. telephone, Personal Computer, Television, Radio, set top boxes and other connected devices. To move towards Unified Licence regime to exploit the attendant benefits of convergence, spectrum liberalisation and facilitate delinking of the licensing of Networks from the delivery of Services to the end users to enable operators to optimally and efficiently utilise their networks and spectrum by sharing active and passive infrastructure. Put in place a simplified Merger & Acquisition regime in telecom service sector while ensuring adequate competition. To facilitate resale at the service level under the proposed licensing regime both wholesale and retail. To delink spectrum in respect of all future licences. Spectrum shall be made available at a price determined through market related processes. To frame appropriate Policies for new licensing framework, migration of existing licensees to new framework, exit policy, measures for ensuring adequate competition etc. in consultation with TRAI. To facilitate convergence of local cable TV networks post digitalisation. To put in place an appropriate regulatory framework for delivery of VAS at affordable price to fuel growth in entrepreneurship, innovation and provision of region specific content in regional languages. To put in place a framework to regulate the carriage charges, which are content neutral and based on the bandwidth utilisation. Reposition the mobile phone from a mere communication device to an instrument of empowerment that combines communication with proof of identity, fully secure financial and other transaction capability, multi-lingual services and a whole range of other capabilities that ride on them and transcend the literacy barrier. Spectrum Management Ensure adequate availability of spectrum and its allocation in a transparent manner through market related processes. Make available additional 300 MHz spectrum for IMT services by the year 2017 and another 200 MHz by 2020. To move at the earliest towards liberalisation of spectrum to enable use of spectrum in any band to provide any service in any technology as well as to permit spectrum pooling, sharing and later, trading to enable optimal utilisation of spectrum through appropriate regulatory framework.. To undertake periodic audit of spectrum utilisation to ensure its efficient use. To refarm spectrum and allot alternative frequency bands or media to service providers from time to time to make spectrum available for introduction of new technologies for telecom applications. To prepare a roadmap for availability of additional spectrum every 5 years. Broadband and Rural Telephony Increase rural teledensity from the current level of around 39 to 70 by the year 2017 and 100 by the year 2020. . To recognise telecom, including broadband connectivity as a basic necessity like education and health and work towards Right to Broadband.

Provide affordable and reliable broadband-on-demand by the year 2015 and to achieve 175 million broadband connections by the year 2017 and 600 million by the year 2020 at minimum 2 Mbps download speed and making available higher speeds of at least 100 Mbps on demand. Provide high speed and high quality broadband access to all village panchayats through a combination of technologies by the year 2014 and progressively to all villages and habitations by 2020.

R&D, Manufacturing and Standardization of Telecommunication Equipment Promote the ecosystem for design, Research and Development, IPR creation, testing, standardization and manufacturing i.e. complete value chain for domestic production of telecommunication equipment to meetIndian telecom sector demand to the extent of 60% and 80% with a minimum value addition of 45% and 65% by the year 2017 and 2020 respectively Create a corpus to promote indigenous R&D, IPR creation, entrepreneurship, manufacturing, commercialisation and deployment of state-of-the-art telecom products and services during the 12th five year plan period. To promote setting up of Telecommunications Standard Development Organisation (TSDO) as an autonomous body with effective participation of the government, industry, R&D centres, service providers, and academia to drive consensus regarding standards to meet national requirements including security needs. Provide preference to domestically manufactured telecommunication products, in procurement of those telecommunication products which have security implications for the country and in Government procurement for its own use, consistent with our World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments. Telecom Infrastructure/ RoW issues, Green Telecom, Clear Skyline, Mitigation efforts during disasters and emergencies To work towards recognition of telecom as Infrastructure Sector for both wireline and wireless and extension of the benefits available to infrastructure sectors to telecom sector also, to realize true potential of ICT for development. To facilitate increased use of alternative sources (Renewable Energy Technologies) of energy for powering telecom networks through active participation of all the stakeholders the government, the telecom industry and the consumer for green telecommunications. Sector specific schemes and targets for promotion of green technologies will be finalised in consultation with Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) and other stakeholders.

quality of Service and protection of Consumer Interest To strengthen the regulator for ensuring compliance of the prescribed performance standards and Quality of Service (QoS) parameters by the Telecom Service Providers To formulate a Code of Practice for Sales and Marketing Communications to improve transparency as well as address security issues relating to Customer Acquisition To undertake legislative measures to bring disputes between telecom consumers and service providers within the jurisdiction of Consumer Forums established under Consumer Protection Act. Security To create an institutional framework through regulatory measures to ensure that safe-to-connectdevices are inducted into the Telecom Network and service providers take measures for ensuring the security of the network.. To ensure security in an increasingly insecure cyber space, indigenously manufactured multi-functional SIM cards with indigenously designed chips incorporating specific laid down standards are considered critical. Skill Development and Public Sector To assess the manpower requirement at different skill and expertise levels by partnering with National Skill Development Council and industry to identify the relevant needs of the sector and prepare a roadmap. Cloud Services To recognise that cloud computing will significantly speed up design and roll out of services, enable social networking and participative governance and e-Commerce on a scale which was not possible with traditional technology solutions. To take new policy initiatives to ensure rapid expansion of new services and technologies at globally competitive prices by addressing the concerns of cloud users and other stakeholders including specific steps that need to be taken for lowering the cost of service delivery.

Telecom Enterprise Services, Data Use New technologies and IPV 6 compliant Networks To facilitate the role of new technologies in furthering public welfare and enhanced customer choices through affordable access and efficient service delivery. The emergence of new service formats such as Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications (e.g. remotely operated irrigation pumps, smart grid etc.) represent tremendous opportunities, especially as their roll-out becomes more widespread.

To recognize the importance of the new Internet Protocol IPv6 to start offering new IP based services on the new protocol and to encourage new and innovative IPv6 based applications in different sectors of the economy by enabling participatory approach of all stake holders.

Financing of Telecom Sector

To create a Telecom Finance Corporation as a vehicle to mobilize and channelize financing for telecom projects in order to facilitate investment in the telecom sector. To rationalize taxes, duties and levies affecting the sector and work towards providing a stable fiscal regime to stimulate investments and making services more affordable.

Role of Regulator, Changes in legislation To review the TRAI Act with a view to addressing regulatory inadequacies/ impediments in effective discharge of its functions. To undertake a comprehensive review of Indian Telegraph Act and its rules and other allied legislations with a view to making them consistent with and in furtherance of the above policy objectives. OPERATIONALISATION OF THE POLICY To take suitable facilitatory measures to encourage existing service providers to rapidly migrate to the new regime in a uniformly liberalised environment with a level playing field. Policy will be operationalized by bringing out detailed guidelines, as may be considered appropriate, from time to time. The NTP-12, inter-alia, has following Objectives on promoting R & D, Telecom Equipment Manufacturing and standardization of Telecommunication Equipment: Promote innovation, indigenous R&D and manufacturing to serve domestic and global markets, by increasing skills and competencies. Create a corpus to promote indigenous R&D, IPR creation, entrepreneurship, manufacturing, commercialisation and deployment of state-of-theart telecom products and services during the 12th five year plan period. Promote the ecosystem for design, Research and Development, IPR creation, testing, standardization and manufacturing i.e. complete value chain for domestic production of telecommunication equipment to meet Indian telecom sector demand to the extent of 60% and 80% with a minimum value addition of 45% and 65% by the year 2017 and 2020 respectively. Provide preference to domestically manufactured telecommunication products, in procurement of those telecommunication products which have security implications for the country and in Government procurement for its own use, consistent with our World Trade Organization (WTO) commitments. Develop and establish standards to meet national requirements, generate IPRs, and participate in international standardization bodies to contribute in formulation of global standards, thereby making India a leading nation in the area of international telecom standardization. Put in place appropriate fiscal and financial incentives required for indigenous manufacturers of telecom products and R&D institutions.

Mega Food Parks for Creating Efficient Supply Chain from Farm to Market Successful implementation of Mega Food Park Scheme by the Ministry of Agriculture and Food Processing Industries is expected to provide remunerative price to farmers, reduce wastage of agricultural produce, build capacity of producers and processors and create efficient supply chain from farm to market. The Ministry of Agriculture and Food Processing Industries has so far approved 30 Mega Food Park projects out of which 14 pro jects have been accorded Final approval and the remaining 16 projects have been accorded In-principle approval. Out of the 14 projects which have been accorded Final Approval, 2 projects in Andhra Pradesh and Uttarakhand are partially operational while 2 others in Assam and West Bengal are nearing completion. 5 more projects, one each in Punjab, Jharkhand, Karnataka, Gujarat and Tripura are expected to be completed in 2013-14. The remaining 5 projects in the States of Madhya Pradesh, Bihar, Odisha, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra are likely to be completed in 2014-15. It is expected that on an average, each project will have around 30-35 food processing units with a collective investment of Rs 250 crores that would eventually lead to an annual turnover of about Rs 450-500 crores and creation of direct and indirect employment to the extent of about 30,000 persons. The Ministry has already initiated process for seeking approval of the Competent Authority for upscaling of the Scheme. The new Mega Food Park Scheme provides for both forward and backward linkages. The minimum land requirement has been enhanced in the new scheme from 30 acres to 50 acres. The maximum grant admissible is Rs. 50.00 crores in case of a Mega Food Park. The Mega Food Park projects are implemented by Special Purpose

Vehicle (SPV) which is a body corporate registered under Indian Companies Act, 1956. The SPV comprises at least 3 independent members including at least one food processor. The Mega Food Park Scheme operates on a hub and spoke model in which Central Processing Centre is net worked with Primary Processing Centers and Collection Centers. STEPS TAKEN TO INCREACE HDI Some of the steps taken under NRHM for improving the situation are:

Regular ANC care at health facilities and home visits by ASHA Personalized monitoring of pregnant women, the new born and the post partum woman through MCTS Promotion of institutional delivery through JSY, increase in delivery points and improvement in referral transport. JSSK Increase in number of SNCU for managing preterm and sick neonates Promotion of exclusive breast feeding Reduction in incidence of diarrhoea through improvement in hygiene by measures such as hand washing and management of diarrhoea through Zinc and ORS supplementation. Extension of immunization coverage The various disease control programs against Malaria, Kala Azar, filaria, TB (RNTCP) etc have improved the burden of disease and mortality due to major infectious diseases in all stages of life. In order to tackle the impact of Non-communicable diseases, Government of India has launched the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and stroke (NPCDCS) in 2010 in 100 districts of 21 States with a focus on an awareness generation for behaviour and life style changes, early diagnosis and referral to higher facilities for appropriate management. It has also been envisaged to build capacity at various levels of health care systems for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of NCDs.

Millenium development goal


The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) adopted during the U.N. Millennium Summit, 2000 by 189 countries including India consists of eight goals which are sought to be achieved during the period 1990 to 2015. The Millennium Development Goal (MDG) -1 is regarding Eradication of Extreme Poverty and Hunger, which have 2 targets namely, (i) Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the percentage of population below the National Poverty Line and (ii) Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger. The indicator for measuring target two is the prevalence of underweight children under three years of age. Thus from the estimated 52% in 1990, the proportion of underweight children below 3 years is required to be reduced to 26% by 2015. All-India trend of the proportion of underweight children below 3 years of age shows India is going slow in eliminating the effect of malnourishment as the prevalence of underweight has declined by 3 percentage points during 1998-99 to 2005-06 , from about 43 percent to about 40 percent (as per the National Family Health Survey, 2005-06). At this historical rate of decline the proportion of underweight children is expected to come down to about 33% only by 2015 vis--vis the 2015 target level of 26% falling short of the target. The problem of malnutrition is complex, multi-dimensional and inter-generational in nature, and cannot be improved by a single sector alone. Poverty and hunger along with household food insecurity, illiteracy and lack of awareness especially in women, access to health services, availability of safe drinking water, sanitation and proper environmental conditions are some of the determinants of malnutrition. In fact, improvement in malnutrition is linked to achievement of six of the Millennium Development Goals. The approach in dealing with the nutrition challenges has been two pronged: First is the Multi-sectoral approach for accelerated action on the determinants of malnutrition in targeting nutrition in schemes/ programmes of all the sectors. The second approach is the direct and specific interventions targeted towards the vulnerable groups such as children below 6 years, adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating mothers. The Government has accorded high priority to the issue of malnutrition especially among children and women including young girls and is implementing several schemes/programmes through State Governments/UT Administrations including Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. The schemes/programmes include the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), National Rural Health Mission (NRHM), Mid-Day Meal Scheme, Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (RGSEAG) namely SABLA, Indira Gandhi Matritva Sahyog Yojana (IGMSY) as direct targeted interventions. Besides, indirect multi-sectoral interventions include Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS), National Horticulture Mission, National Food Security Mission, Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS), Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan, National Rural Drinking Water Programme etc. All these schemes have potential to address one or other aspect of Nutrition. Recently Government has approved the strengthening and restructuring of ICDS with special focus on pregnant and lactating mothers and children under three. The restructured and strengthened ICDS will be rolled out in three phases with focus on the 200 high burden districts for malnutrition during 2012-13 (which includes 15 districts in Gujarat, 27 districts in Madhya Pradesh and 41 districts in Uttar Pradesh); additional 200 districts in 2013-14 including districts from the special category States and NER and the remaining districts in 2014-15. Further, an Information Education and Communication Campaign (IEC) to generate awareness against malnutrition has been launched in the country including Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh .

NATIONAL MISSION FOR WOMEN:

National Mission for Empowerment of Women (NMEW) is an initiative of the Government of India (GOI) for empowering women holistically. It is conceived as an umbrella mission with a mandate to strengthen inter-sectoral convergence and facilitate the process of coordinating all the womens welfare and socio economic development programmes across ministries and departments. The salient features of the National Mission for Empowerment of Women (NMEW) are: 1. To ensure economic empowerment of women. 2. To ensure that violence against women is eliminated progressively. 3. To ensure social empowerment of women with emphasis on health and education. 4. To oversee gender mainstreaming of programmes, policies, institutional arrangements and processes of participating Ministries, Institutions and Organizations. 5. To undertake awareness generation as well as advocacy activities to fuel demand for benefits under various schemes and programmes and create, if required, structures at district, tehsiland village level with the involvement of Panchayats for their fulfillment.

The National Mission Authority (NMA) comprises of the following: I. Honble Prime Minister II. Minister of Finance III. Minister of Human Resource Development IV. Minister of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation V. Minister of Rural Development VI. Minister of Panchayati Raj VII. Minister of Agriculture & Cooperation VIII. Minister of Health & Family Welfare IX. Minister of Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises X. Minister of Law & Justice XI. Minister of Environment & Forests XII. Minister of Labour& Employment XIII. Minister of Social Justice & Empowerment XIV. Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission XV. MOS(IC), M/o. WCD. XVI. Chairperson, National Commission of Women XVII. Two Chief Ministers XVIII. Five Civil Society Members.

The Mission does not involve direct delivery of benefits to individual beneficiaries. Funds have been released for the pilot project in Pali district in Rajasthan as well as for setting up SRCWs in different States. The total funds earmarked for the duration 2010-15 is Rs 14134.53 lakhs. The BE for the year 2012-13 is Rs 2500.00 lakhs while the RE for the year 2012-13 is Rs 1100.00 lakhs. 23 State Resource Centres for Women (SRCW) have been established under State Mission Authority (SMA) in different States/UTs.

RESTRUCTURING ICDS
In order to address various programmatic, management and institutional gaps and to meet administrative and operational challenges that had crept the ICDS over the years, Government approved the proposal for Strengthening and Restructuring of ICDS Scheme with an over-all budget allocation of Rs. 1,23,580 crore during th 12 Five Year Plan. The Administrative Approvals in this regard have since been issued to the States/UTs.

Restructured and Strengthened ICDS will be rolled out in all the Districts in three years as per following details: I. II. III. In 200 high burden districts in the first year (2012-13); In additional 200 districts in second year (2013-14) (i.e. w.e.f. 1.4.2013) including districts from special category States and NER; In remaining districts in third year (2014-15) (i.e. w.e.f. 1.4.2014).

The key features of Strengthened and Restructured ICDS inter-alia include addressing the gaps and challenges with (a) special focus on children under 3 years and pregnant and lactating mothers (b) strengthening and repackaging of services including ,care and nutrition counseling services and care of severely underweight children (c) a provision for an additional Anganwadi Worker cum Nutrition Counselor for focus on children under 3 years of age and to improve the family contact, care and nutrition counseling for P&L Mothers in the selected 200 high-burden districts across the country, besides having provision of link worker, 5% crche cum Anganwadi centre (d) focus on Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) (e) forging strong institutional and programmatic convergence particularly, at the district, block and village levels (f) models providing flexibility at local levels for community participation (g) introduction of APIP (h) improving Supplementary Nutrition Programme including cost revision, (i) provision for construction and improvement of buildings of Anganwadi centres (j) allocating adequate financial

resources for other components including Monitoring and Management and Information System(MIS), Training and use of Information and communication technology (ICT), (k) to put ICDS in a mission mode etc. and (l) revision of financial norms etc.

The Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme is a centrally sponsored Scheme implemented by States/UTs across the country. The responsibility for implementation of ICDS Programme, providing supplementary nutrition under it and management thereof rests with States/UTs. The complaints received in respect of misuse/irregularities in procurement/distribution of supplementary nutrition and other shortcoming/anomalies under ICDS Scheme are forwarded to concerned States/UTs for taking appropriate action. Complaints which are serious in nature, report from State Governments/UT Administrations is sought. During the last calendar year, 69 complaints - State of Uttar Pradesh (23), Bihar (13), Rajasthan (6), Delhi (6), Jharkhand (4), Haryana (3), Maharashtra (3), Odisha (3), Assam (2), Madhya Pradesh (2), Uttrakhand (1), Andhra Pradesh (1), Chhattisgarh (1) and A&N Island (1) - were received in respect of misuse/irregularities in procurement/distribution of supplementary nutrition and other shortcoming/anomalies under ICDS Scheme.

The complaints of such irregularities are forwarded to the concerned State Governments for remedial action. During review meetings, the States/UTs are also requested for improving all services under ICDS Scheme including Supplementary Nutrition Programme. The Government of India has also introduced five tier monitoring and supervision mechanism at National, State, District, Block and Anganwadi level and issued guidelines on 31.3.2011 for better implementation of the ICDS Scheme including SNP.

BIOSECURITY AUTHORITY Agriculture and FPI Minister, Shri Sharad Pawar introduced a Bill in the Lok Sabha today to provide for establishment of an Authority for prevention, control, eradication and management of pests and diseases of plants and animals and unwanted organisms. The proposed legislation will ensure agricultural biosecurity of the country for common benefit and for safeguarding the agricultural economy. It will also meet international obligations of India for facilitating imports and exports of plants, plant products, animals, animal products, aquatic organisms and regulation of agriculturally important micro organisms. The Bill seeks to bring together the plant, animal and marine protection and quarantine set ups under a high powered body an Authority - with adequate powers. The Authoritys mandate will cover the four sectors of agricultural biosecurity, viz. plant health, animal health, living aquatic resources (fisheries, etc.) and agriculturally important micro-organisms. Why the need for a common authority on agricultural biosecurity? The liberalisation of global trade in agriculture has opened new avenues for growth and diversification of agriculture, but it has also brought in many challenges. There is an increased risk of introduction of exotic pests and weeds in the country with the potential to cause serious economic losses. Advances in genetic engineering leading to the introduction and release of living modified organisms or their products (e.g. genetically modified organisms) require proper risk assessment and management. Climate change has the potential to alter the habitat of known pests and even cause introduction of new pests. We have to contend with the ever increasing threat of bio-terrorism. The emergence and spread of transboundary diseases such as the avian influenza and the Ug-99 wheat stem rust fungus pose new threats to human, animal and plant safety. A number of plant diseases, animal diseases, marine diseases and pests have been introduced into India through import of seeds, planting material, livestock and livestock products previously. Many of them, including weeds such as Parthenium, Phalaris minor and Lanatana camara, have got established in the country and continue to cause enormous economic losses every year.

Over the years, systems have been developed and put in place separately for protection of plant, animal and marine health. The existing systems including infrastructure for agricultural biosecurity of the country need major changes to meet the emerging challenges which have highlighted agricultural biosecurity as an urgent issue requiring policies and technological capabilities to prevent, detect, and respond to such threats. An integrated approach towards agricultural biosecurity would not only increase the national capacity to protect human health, agricultural production and livelihood, safeguard the environment, and protect against uncertain technologies and products, but also equip the country to meet obligations under international trade and sanitary and phytosanitary agreements in food and agricultural products. In a harmonised and integrated system, various authorities would work together towards the common goal of agricultural biosecurity utilising expertise from various organisations under the Ministries of Agriculture, Commerce and

Industry, Defence, Environment and Forests, Health and Family Welfare, Home Affairs, Rural Development, and Science and Technology. An autonomous Authority would be required for administeringbiosecurity. Such an authority would improve safety, efficiency, transparency and compliance of quarantine and pest management regulations and respond swiftly to contain emergent biosecurity problems. It will also ensure conduct of biosecure international trade in agriculture.

OBJECTIVES OF PYKKA The Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Youth Affairs & Sports Shri Jitendra Singh has said that the objectives of Panchayat Yuva Krida aur Khel Abhiyan (PYKKA) are as under:(i) To create a network of basic sports infrastructure throughout the country; (ii) To provide universal access to sports in rural areas and promote a sports culture; (iii) To harness available and potential sporting talent among rural youth, through a well designed competition structure starting from the block level.

The Minister said, under the PYKKA scheme, the financial assistance is provided to the States/UTs to conduct the annual sports competitions at the Block, District, State and National Level. The State-wise position of the number of players benefited during the financial year 2011-12 are as Annexure. The competitions during financial year 2012-13 are under progress. However, information is being collected for compilation from States/UTs. Shri Singh said, under the PYKKA Scheme the fund is not allocated States/UTs-wise. The Grant-in-Aid provided to the States/UTs after receiving the proposals for infrastructure development of playfields in Village Panchayats/Block Panchayats. The financial pattern to the States/UTs under PYKKA scheme is as under:Financial Pattern under PYKKA Scheme 1.1 One-time Seed Capital Grant: Rs. 1 lakh to each village panchayat having minimum 4,600 population (national average) with additional funding on prorata basis for additional population size beyond the national average. This will be contributed on 75:25 basis between the Central Government and State Governments for normal States and on 90:10 basis for Special Category States. In other words, the Central grant will be Rs. 75,000/- per village panchayat for normal States and Rs. 90,000/- per village panchayat for Special Category States. The balance amount of Rs. 25,000/- per village panchayat in respect of normal States and Rs. 10,000/- per village panchayat in respect of Special Category States will have to come as State contribution. 1.2 A uniform grant of Rs. 5 lakh to each block panchayat. The sharing pattern between the Central Government and State Governments will be 75:25 for normal States and 90:10 for Special Category States. In other words, the Central grant will be Rs. 3.75 lakh per block panchayat for normal States and Rs. 4.50 lakh per block panchayat for Special Category States. The balance amount of Rs. 1.25 lakh per block panchayat in respect of normal States and Rs. 50,000/- per blockpanchayat in respect of Special Category States will have to come as State contribution

SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION


The Government has announced the Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) Policy-2013 which interalia aspires `positioning India among the top five global scientific powers`. Accordingly, the STI Policy seeks to: (i) Enhance India`s global share of scientific publications from the present 3.5% to 7.0 %; (ii) Establish world class infrastructure for Research and Development (R&D) in some select areas; (iii) Make careers in science, research and innovation attractive enough for talented and bright minds; ((iv) Create an environment for enhanced private sector participation in R&D, technology and innovation; (v) Seed S&T based high risk Innovation; (vi) Participate in international R&D projects that are high cost and high science. A strong and viable Science, Research and innovation System for High Technologyled path for India (SRISHTI) is the goal of the new STI policy. As per UNESCO`s Global Science Report India`s global ranking in Science is commensurate with its Full Time Equivalent of R&D personnel engaged in R & D. A bibliometric study commissioned by the Department of Science and Technology indicates that India`s science publication share has increased from 1.8% in 2001 to 3.5% in 2011. China has been investing significant national resources in scientific research during the last decade. South Korea also invests significantly into Research and Development (R&D). The Government has taken note of China`s higher performance in R&D relative to India. However, there is no significant gap between India and China in critical technology areas such as space, software, vaccines, and renewable energy. SOLAR WAR

The United States action of complaining against India in the World Trade Organisation over the Indian governments so -called domestic content requirement for solar modules used in the projects awarded under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission has brought to the fore a major divide in the Indian solar industry and the governments predicament over it. In India, the solar power industry is a 3-year-old baby. On the solar power generation side, the total installed solar power capacity in India in 2010 was 18 MW. Today, it is 1,200 MW, and at least another 500 MW will be added this year. On the solar power equipment side, Indian manufacturers have capacity to produce about 1,900 MW of modules that will generate electricity when the suns rays fall on them. Both these segments need to be nurtured. But who first, given that today the two happen to be on opposite sides? Indian manufacturers want protection against the much cheaper products from abroad, especially from the Chinese crystalline silicon manufacturers and the American thin film manufacturers, both of whom often bring in cheap funding for their buyers. India has an ambitious target of 22,000 MW of solar capacity by 2022, and where is the sense, ask the module manufacturers, in rolling out a $40 billion programme if the domestic producers have no share of it. The project developers stress that it is only smart to let them buy their equipment from the cheapest sources in the world, so that a culture of setting up solar plants develops first. Force them to buy locally, the costs will stunt the growth of the fledgling industry and neither the power producers nor the module makers will be in business. On a knifes edge In trying to tread the fine line between these two positions, the government of India has triggered off what some people are calling solar wars. The National Solar Mission (NSM) is being rolled out in phases, and for the first batch of the first phase, the government said that those project developers who opt for the crystalline silicon modules, shall buy only those made in India. For the second batch, it went a step down in the value chain and said that even the cells will have to be made in India. This is what has got the United States goat. This rule did not apply to thin film, simply bec ause there is no thin film module manufacturer in India to buy from. As a consequence of this, most of the project developers went in for imported thin film modules. This domestic content requirement was only for projects awarded under the NSM and not for those set up under the various states programmes. Notably, of the 1,200 MW of capacity in India today, about 850 MW has come under Gujarats programme. Most of those putting up projects under the states programmes are therefore importing their modules. Thus, the NSM projects are importing thin films (mainly from the U.S.), those under states programmes are importing crystalli ne silicon modules (mainly from China) and nobody is buying from Indian manufacturers. Giving in

Against this backdrop, India initiated anti-dumping investigations in November last year against manufacturers in China, USA, Taiwan and Malaysia, deferring to the pleas of the domestic manufacturing industry. The solar power generators were promptly up in arms, pleading that the duty would make their upcoming projects unviable, given that most of them were won under thin-margin tariffs determined through competitive bidding processes. Now, the U.S. has taken India to WTO over the domestic content requirement (DCR) under the NSM. India is likely to argue that the NSM is in the nature of government procurement because the power is bought by a government-owned company. India is not a signatory to the Agreement on Government Procurement, hence, no violation. Secondly, India will argue that the DCR rules have truly caused no damage to any overseas manufacturers, because it is applied on a very small portion of the countrys goals, the rules do not cover states programmes. A Mexican standoff And thus you have the solar war with the Indian government initiating anti-dumping duty and US government taking India to WTO. This echoes what is happening elsewhere in the world China, USA and EU are all similarly sword-crossed with each other. Regardless of which way these moves go, the fundamental question remains how to balance the conflicting interests of manufacturers and project developers? There are no quick and easy answers, but one way out could be to encourage Indian companies to acquire technologies abroad for technology alone could be the answer to the advantage of scale that the American and Chinese companies have. Such technologies are available and are being acquired. For instance, a South Korean company, Hanwha, which took over the German major, Q-Cells, last year, also bought Crystal Solar of the US for just $23 million. Crystal Solar is developing cutting edge solar manufacturing technologies. Hanergy, a Chinese company, took over the American company, Miasole, recently, but it also acquired another division of QCells, called Solibro. The Chinese and the Koreans have an eye on emerging technologies. Why not Indian companies?

JNNSM
Following the launch of the Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission, (JNNSM) in 2010 the domestic manufacturing capacity of SPV cells and modules has increased from about 200 MW to 2000 MW. One of the important objectives of the JNNSM is to promote domestic manufacturing in solar energy sector and certain domestic content requirements were made mandatory in various schemes of JNNSM Phase-I. The Government has also extended the benefits of excise duty exemption on finished products and of concessional customs duty on raw materials and equipment required for manufacturing, to encourage domestic industry. However, recently there have been reports in media of some of manufacturers facing difficulties in operating their plants to full capacity in the absence of adequate orders resulting from intense cost competition with suppliers of imported cells/modules. On the other hand, from the electricity consumers interest point of view, another objective of the JNNSM is to also progressively reduce the cost of solar power. This can be achieved through continuous research as well as through induction of latest, state-of-art technologies. In this regard, besides increased support to research projects, benefits of concessional customs duty is being provided for imports of the finished solar products/equipments also. INCENTIVE TO WIND POWER PROJECT The Government is promoting wind power projects in the country including in the coastal regions through private sector investment by providing fiscal and promotional incentives such as concessional import duty on certain components of wind electric generators, excise duty exemption to manufacturers. 10 years tax holiday on income generated from wind power projects is also available. Loans for installing windmills are available from Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency (IREDA) and other Financial Institutions. Technical support including wind resource assessment is provided by the Centre for Wind Energy Technology (CWET), Chennai. This apart, preferential tariff is being provided in potential states.

CPI & WPI The Labour Bureau compiles and maintains segment specific three different series of Index numbers viz. (i). Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base 2001=100, (ii). Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural Labourer on base 1986-87=100, (iii). Consumer Price Index Numbers for Rural Labourer on base 1986-87=100. Besides, the Consumer Price Index encompassing the entire rural and urban population is compiled by the Central Statistics Office, Ministry of Statistics &Programme Implementation. These indices measure relative changes in prices of selected goods and services consumed by indexed population over a period of time. Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers Consumer Price Index Numbers for Industrial Workers on base 2001=100 are being compiled and maintained by Labour Bureau, Ministry of Labour & Employment in respect of All-India and 78 constituent centres. The All-India Index for CPI-IW is a weighted average index of centres indices. These indices are compiled on monthly basis and are released on the last working day of th e succeeding month. Consumer Price Index Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers

The Labour Bureau is also compiling CPI Numbers for Agricultural and Rural Labourers separately for 20 States and All-India. These indices are released on monthly basis by 20th of every succeeding month.

The headline inflation used as a macro economic indicator is based on Wholesale Price Index (WPI) compiled by the office of Economic Advisor, Department of Industrial Policy &Promotion, Ministry of Commerce & Industry. Inflation reflecting change in retail prices of goods and services consumed by the working population is measured with the help of CPI (IW

CHILD LABOUR
As per 2001 census, the total number of working children between the age group 5-14 years in the country was 1.26 crore out of which there were approximately 12 lakh children found working in the hazardous occupations/processes which are covered under Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Act, 1986. However, in the Survey conducted by NSSO, in 2004-05 the numbers of working children were estimated at 90.75 lakh which includes 1.01 lakh working children in the state of Punjab. As per NSSO survey 2009-10, the working children are estimated at 49.84 lakh including 0.48 lakh working children from Punjab, which shows a declining trend.

Grants released during the last five years and current year, year-wise and State-wise (including Punjab) under NCLP are annexed. The funds allocated under NCLP Scheme to the Project Societies headed by District Magistrate/Collector at District level are utilised for rehabilitation of child labour through special schools. The Project Societies regularly submit Utilisation Certificates, Audited Accounts, Annual Progress Report and Quarterly Progress Report to the Ministry.

Elimination of child labour is an area of great concern and Government of India is committed to address the issue. Considering the magnitude and nature of problem Government is following a multi-pronged strategy to tackle the problem of childlabour. It comprises of statutory and legislative measures, rescue & rehabilitation, universal primary education alongwith social protection, poverty alleviation and employment generation. The objective is to create an environment where families are not compelled to send their children to work. The Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Act, 1986, prohibits the employment of children below the age of 14 years in 18 Occupations and 65 Processes. The Act regulates the working conditions of children where they are not prohibited from working. Any person who employs a child in any occupation or process where employment of children is prohibited under the Child Labour Act, is liable for punishment with imprisonment or with fine. For rehabilitation of child labour the Government is implementing the National Child Labour Project Scheme since 1988. The scheme seeks educational rehabilitation of children working in hazardous occupations and processes. Under the Project, children rescued/withdrawn from work are enrolled in the special schools, where they are provided with bridge education, vocational training, nutrition, stipend, health care, etc. before being mainstreamed into formal education system. The Ministry is also running the awareness generation programme against the evil of child labour. With the persistent effort of the Government through implementation different schemes the number of child labour in the country has been reduced considerably. The existing legislation and policy framed by the Government have yielded positive results.

BLACK SHARK TORPEDO


The Black Shark is a type of heavyweight torpedo recently developed by Whitehead Alenia Sistemi Subacquei (WASS) and is most closely associated with the French Scorpenesubmarines as well as being deployed on some 209 class submarines. HUMAN DEVELOPMENT INDEX

The latest Human Development Index (HDI) 2011 prepared by the UNDP ranks India at 134 out of 187 countries and its HDI is shown as 0.547 which is an improvement of 5.39% (HDI was 0.519 in 2010 HDI part). The health aspects are reflected in life expectancy at birth which is shown as 65.4 year in HDI 2011 against 64.4 year in HDI 2010. High IMR and Under 5 MR are the major factors in lowering Life Expectancy at Birth. MMR also needs improvement. A target of 25/1000 for IMR and 100/100,000 live births for MMR has been prescribed by the 12 Five Year plan document for the end of 2017. Some of the steps taken under NRHM for improving the situation are: Regular ANC care at health facilities and home visits by ASHA Personalized monitoring of pregnant women, the new born and the post-partum woman through MCTS Promotion of institutional delivery through JSY, increase in delivery points and improvement in referral transport. JSSK Increase in number of SNCU for managing preterm and sick neonates Promotion of exclusive breast feeding Reduction in incidence of diarrhoea through improvement in hygiene by measures such as hand washing and management of diarrhoea through Zinc and ORS supplementation. Extension of immunization coverage The various disease control programs against Malaria, Kala Azar, filaria, TB (RNTCP) etc have improved the burden of disease and mortality due to major infectious diseases in all stages of life. In order to tackle the impact of Non-communicable diseases, Government of India has launched the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Diseases and stroke (NPCDCS) in 2010 in 100 districts of 21 States with a focus on an awareness generation for behaviour and life style changes, early diagnosis and referral to higher facilities for appropriate management. It has also been envisaged to build capacity at various levels of health care systems for prevention, diagnosis and treatment of NCDs.

INCLUDING PRI IN PDS


Various measures have been taken by the Government to involve Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) in the implementation of Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS). The Public Distribution System (Control) Order 2001, notified on August 31, 2001, mandates the State and Union Territory (UT) Governments to involve the PRIs in finalizing the list of beneficiaries belonging to Below Poverty Line (BPL) and Antyodaya Anna Yojana (AAY) categories, monitoring the functioning of the Fair Price Shops (FPSs), inspect FPS records, etc. This information was given by the Minister of consumer affairs, food and public distribution Prof. K.V. Thomas in a written reply in Rajya Sabha today. He said that further, as part of the Nine Point Action Plan evolved in consultation with States/UTs in July 2006 for curbing leakages/diversion of foodgrains, with a view to ensure transparency, States/UTs have been requested to involve elected PRI members in distribution of foodgrains and for giving FPS licenses to Village Panchayats and Urban Local Bodies among others.

PEG SCHEME TO AUGMENT FOOD GRAIN STORAGE The Government is implementing the Private Entrepreneurs Guarantee (PEG) Scheme to augment the covered storage capacity through private entrepreneurs, Central Warehousing Corporation (CWC) and State Warehousing Corporations (SWCs) COMPUTERIZATION OF PDS
Computerization of Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) has been taken up in consultation with States/Union Territories (UTs) with a view to ensure correct identification of beneficiaries, distribution of TPDS commodities to deserving beneficiaries, elimination of bogus/duplicate ration cards, etc. It would also enable timely availability of foodgrains at Fair Price Shop (FPS) level, check leakages/diversion of foodgrains, introduce transparency and public accountability in implementation of TPDS, etc. This information was given by the Minister of Consumer Affairs, Food and Public Distribution, Prof. K.V. Thomas in a written reply in Lok Sabha today. He said that the Government has initiated implementation of Component-I of the scheme for End-to-end Computerisation of Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS) Operations, which comprises digitization of ration cards/beneficiary and other databases, computerization of supply-chain management, setting up of transparency portal and grievance redressal mechanism. Details of the present status of implementation of TPDS as reported by States/UTs from time to time are annexed. As per the timelines stipulated under the scheme, digitization of beneficiary database is to be completed by March, 2013 and computerisation of supply-chain management is to be completed by October, 2013 by all States/UTs. Prof Thomas said that computerization of TPDS is being implemented as a Mission Mode Project (MMP) under the National e-Governance Plan (NeGP) by the Central Government. As per MMP guidelines, a dedicated institutional mechanism by way of an Empowered Committee (EC) and a Central Project eMission Team (CPeMT) for computerization of TPDS has been set up. States/UTs have also been requested to establish a two-tier structure at their level comprising a State Apex Committee as well as a State Project e-Mission Team (SPeMT). Detailed guidelines for end-to-end Computerisation of TPDS have been issued to all States/UTs. Action Plan for computerization of TPDS have also been received from all States/UTs. The application software prepared by National Informatics Centre (NIC) has been shared by it with State Information Officers (SIOs) of NIC. To ensure the implementation of Computerization of TPDS, the progress is also being reviewed in various meetings, conferences, etc. End-to-end Computerisation of TPDS inter-alia envisages use of biometric information of the beneficiaries through Aadhaar/ National Population Register (NPR) for their identification for issuance of foodgrains, weeding out of bogus and ineligible ration cards/units, etc. However, use of biometric information for FPS level transactions is not covered under Component-I of the scheme. There is no specific proposal for use of Radio Frequency Identification devices, cash for food, etc. at present.

Interventions under National Rural Health Mission to reduce Infant mortality rate in the country
There was no increase in infant mortality rate between the period 2003-2008. However, Indias infant mortality rate in 2003 was 60 per 1000 live births (SRS 2003) and which has decreased to 53 per 1000 live births (SRS 2008) in 2008. Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme is a universal scheme. However, it is a self selecting scheme. There are 7025 operational projects and 13.31 lakh operational AWCs in the entire country as on January 2013. Each and every child below 6 years and pregnant and lactating mothers are eligible and have access to the services under the scheme. However, as the scheme is self selecting, 927.66 lakh beneficiaries which include 746.81 lakh children (6 months to 6 years) and 180.85 lakh pregnant and lactating mothers (January 2013) have availed the services. Thus as per current reports and calculations, about 55% of children under 6 years are availing the ICDS services. Under National Rural Health Mission, the following interventions are being implemented to reduce Infant mortality rate in the country: 1) Promotion of Institutional Delivery through Janani SurakshaYojana (JSY) and Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakram(JSSK): Promoting Institutional delivery to ensure skilled birth attendance is key to reducing both maternal and neo-natal mortality. JSY incentivizes pregnant women to opt for institutional delivery and provides for cash assistance. JSSK entitles all pregnant women to absolutely free and zero expense delivery including caesarean section operation in Government health facilities and provides for free to and fro transport, food, drugs and diagnostics. Similar entitlements have also been put in place for infants.

2) Strengthening Facility based newborn care: Newborn care corners (NBCC) are being set up at all health facilities where deliveries take place to provide essential newborn care at birth to all new born babies; Special New Born Care Units (SNCUs) at District Hospitals and New Born Stabilization Units (NBSUs) at FRUs are being set up for the care of sick newborn. As on date 401 SNCUs, 1542 NBSUs and 11508 NBCCs are functional across the country. 3) Home Based Newborn Care (HBNC): Home based newborn care through ASHA has recently been initiated to improve new born care practices at the community level and for early detection and referral of sick new born babies. 4) Capacity building of health care providers: Various trainings are being conducted under National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) to build and upgrade the skills of doctors, nurses and ANM for early diagnosis and case management of common ailments of children and care of newborn at time of birth. These trainings include Integrated Management of Neo-natal and Childhood Illness (IMINCI) and Navjaat Shishu Surakshta Karyakaram(NSSK). A total of 5.88 lakh health care workers have been trained in IMNCI in 505 districts and 89,962 health workers trained in NSSK so far. 5) Management of Malnutrition: Emphasis is being laid on reduction of malnutrition which is an important underlying cause of child mortality. 605 Nutritional Rehabilitation Centres have been established for management of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM). Iron and Folic Acid is also provided to children for prevention of anaemia. Recently, weekly Iron and Folic Acid has initiated for adolescent population. As breastfeeding reduces infant mortality, exclusive breastfeeding for first six months and appropriate infant and young child feeding practices are being promoted in convergence with Ministry of Woman and Child Development. 6) Village Health and Nutrition Days (VHNDs) are also being organized for imparting nutritional counselling to mothers and to improve child care practices. 7) Universal Immunization Program (UIP): Vaccination against seven diseases is provided to all children under UIP. Government of India supports the vaccine program by supply of vaccines and syringes, cold chain equipments and provision of operational costs. UIP targets to immunize 2.7 crore infants against seven vaccine preventable diseases every year. Second dose of Measles has also been incorporated in the universal Immunization programme and Pentavalent vaccine has also been introduced in 7 states. Year 2012-13 has been declared as Year of intensification of Routine Immunization. 8) Mother and Child Tracking System: A name based Mother and Child Tracking System has been put in place which is web based to enable tracking of all pregnant women and newborns so as to monitor and ensure that complete services are provided to them. States are encouraged to send SMS alerts to beneficiaries reminding them of the dates on which services are due and generate beneficiary-wise due list of services with due dates for ANMs on a weekly basis.

SEPRATE CADRE OF OFFICER FOR RURAL AREAS


The Government, in consultation with Medical Council of India (MCI), has prepared a course namely, Bachelor of Science (Community Health) which was earlier named as Bachelor of Rural Health Care (BRHC) course. The main objective of the proposed course is to create mid-level public health professionals who will primarily be deployed at Sub Centres and would possess the necessary public health and ambulatory care competencies to serve the rural population. In Writ Petition (C) No. 13208 of 2009 in the matter of MeenakshiGautham and others, the petitioners have prayed the court to enforce the recommendations of the Government appointed Task Force on medical education under its National Rural Health Mission and direct the Government to introduce a short-term course for training health workers for primary healthcare in rural areas. The Honble Delhi High Court while hearing the case had urged the Central Council of Health & Family Welfare to look into all the facets and take a broadest view in a holistic manner so that the health, which is the requisite concern of the every living being, can be adequately addressed to. The Government has decided to implement the B.Sc. (CH) course to create a cadre of mid-level primary health workers and appointed the National Board of Examinations as the executing agency for implementing the course. Vegetable initiative for Urban Clusters (VIUC) for Enhancing Vegetable Production and Productivity The Government has launched a new scheme on Vegetable Initiative for Urban Clusters (VIUC) during 2011-12 as a sub-scheme of Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY) for addressing all concerns related to demand and supply side of the vegetable sector, enhancing vegetable production & productivity and encouraging establishment of an efficient supply chain in one major urban centre in each State which is either the State capital or any other city having a population of one million or above. In case, if there is no such city which satisfies this criteria, then other urban cluster closer to one million population is selected for the purpose. At present, all State capital cities are covered under the scheme except Haryana and Jammu & Kashmir where Gurgaon, Jammu & Srinagar have been taken up under the scheme respectively. The scheme encourages mobilization of farmers into groups/ associations and their tie-up with financial institutions and aggregators. Besides VIUC, Government is implementing schemes on (i) National Horticulture Mission (NHM) and (ii) Horticulture Mission for North East and Himalayan States (HMNEH) for the development of horticulture including vegetable in the country. Assistance is being extended for vegetable development activities such as seed production, protected cultivation, organic farming, Integrated Nutrient Management (INM)/ Integrated Pest Management (IPM) measures as well as creation of infrastructure for post harvest management and Marketing of fruits and vegetables.

National Mission on Micro Irrigation (NMMI) is also being implemented to increase the productivity of crops including vegetables through drip and sprinkler system of irrigation Special Purpose Vehicle for Management of Mega Food Parks The execution, ownership and management of the Mega Food Park is vested with a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV). The main eligibility criteria of the SPV is indicated below: i. The SPV shall be a Body Corporate registered under the Companies Act. ii. Each SPV would have at least three entrepreneurs / business units, with the entrepreneurs being independent of each other and business units with no common directors. iii. The promoter holding maximum equity in the SPV will be the lead promoter. The lead promoter will be primarily responsible for co-ordination with all stakeholders including with the Ministry of Food Processing Industries to ensure effective implementation of the project. iv. At least 26 percent of equity of the SPV should be held by food processor(s) within the SPV. v. The combined net worth of shareholders of the SPV should not be less than Rs.50 crore with food processor(s) having at least Rs. 10 crore of net worth. vi. Each member in SPV must have a net worth at least 1.5 times of their proposed equity contribution in order to ensure requisite contribution for the project. vii. The SPV needs to bring in at least 20 percent of the total project cost as equity in general areas and at least 10 percent of the total project cost in difficult and hilly areas. The objective of Mega Food Parks Scheme is to provide state of the art infrastructure for Food Processing Industries in a demand driven manner with an effective supply chain management from farm gate to market. The Scheme envisages a cluster-based approach and Hub and Spoke Model comprising of farm proximate facilities such as Collection Centres, Primary Processing Centers (PPC) linked with a Central Processing Centre (CPC). The Ministry has so far approved 30 Mega Food Park projects out of which 14 projects have been accorded Final approval and the remaining 16 projects have been accorded In-principle approval. Out of the 14 finally approved projects, 2 projects, one each in Andhra Pradesh and Uttarakhand are partially operational. The Ministry has already initiated process for seeking approval of the Competent Authority for upscaling of the Scheme to set up more Mega Food Parks in the country. INDIA AND SECURITY COUNCIL EXPANSION The issue of reform of the UN Security Council is being discussed in inter-governmental negotiations which started in the UN General Assembly in March 2009, mainly due to efforts by India and other like-minded countries. In December 2009, India was able to build support for upgrading the negotiations to text-based negotiations. So far, eight rounds of the inter-governmental negotiations have taken place. In these meetings, a large number of the Member States have expressed their preference for a reform model based on expansion in both the permanent and non-permanent categories of membership. The Chair of the inter-governmental negotiations is expected to call for the next round of negotiations soon. India has working with other like-minded countries for building support among the UN membership for expansion of the UN Security Council in both categories of its membership as well as for Indias candidature for permanent membership of an expanded Security Council. As part of these efforts, India is a member of the G-4, along with Brazil, Germany and Japan. India is also a member of the L.69 Group of pro-reform developing countries, which have been engaged with the African Union (AU), the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) and others to proactively push for early reforms of the Council. Among the permanent members of the Security Council, UK, France, USA and Russia have supported the candidature of India for permanent membership of an expanded Council at the highest level. As regards China, in joint statements issued with India at the highest level, it has been mentioned that the Chinese side understands and supports India`s aspirations to play a greater role in the United Nations, including in the Security Council. A large number of countries have supported Indias initiatives for reform of the Council as well as endorsed its candidature for permanent membership. This has been expressed in various forms and fora including in bilateral discussions with the Government of India. Indias performance as a nonpermanent member of the Security Council during 2011-2012 has also significantly strengthened Indias claim to permanent membership. However, a pre-requisite for India being considered for permanent membership of the UNSC is an agreement being reached among the UN membership on the nature and size of expansion of the Security Council, in accordance with the provisions of the UN Charter. Accordingly, India has been actively making

efforts to build support among the UN Member States for an urgent reform and expansion of the Security Council in both permanent and nonpermanent categories of its membership. STEPS TAKEN BY GOVT FOR GENDER EQUALITY The Government of India regularly conducts awareness generation programmes and publicity campaigns on rights of women including gender sensitization through workshops, fairs, cultural programmes, seminars, training programmes etc. through the National Mission for Empowerment of Women (NMEW) and through the autonomous institutions under the Ministry including the National Commission for Women (NCW) and National Institute of Public Corporation and Child Development(NIPCCD). Advertisements are regularly brought out in the print and electronic media to create awareness in this regard. Article 15(3) of the Constitution of India empowers the State to make special provisions for women and children. The Government of India has already enacted a number of legislations to address gender based discrimination. Ministry of Women & Child Development implements the Rajiv Gandhi Scheme for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (SABLA) for the all round development of adolescent girls of 11-18 years. The Human Development Report, 2011of the United Nation provides the following information with regard to gender discrimination:

Country

Seats in National Labour force Population with atleastSecondary participation rate** Parliament* (% for Education*** (% ages 25 and older) (%) women women) Banglades 18.6 58.7 30.8 h India Nepal Sri Lanka 10.7 33.2 5.3 32.8 63.3 34.2 26.6 17.9 56

CONSUMER PROTECTION
The Government gives very higher priority to consumer protection and it is taking all steps to further strengthen consumer redressel fora. The Consumer Protection Act is being reviewed to make it more effective. A range of reforms have been proposed in the Act for this purpose and to speed up grievance redressing process. Awareness campaign is being planned to make common man more assertive about his or her rights as consumers. Department of Consumer Affairs is also exploring the possibility of producing tele-serials educating and empowering the consumers of their rights and responsibilities, as tele-serials have a mass appeal. This was stated by Prof. K.V. Thomas, Minister for Consumer Affairs, Food and public Distribution while addressing the conference of the Presidents of State Commissions and the Secretaries in-charge of Consumer Affairs of the States/UTs here today. The Minister reiterated that States should make use of financial assistance provided by his Ministry for strengthening consumer protection mechanism in their states. Full text of Ministers address is as follows: It gives me immense pleasure to be amongst you on the happy occasion of celebration of World Consumer Rights Day, today. I also express my gratitude to all the dignitaries present here, who have been magnanimous enough to be a part of this celebration by being present here despite their multifarious commitments. As the world celebrates this day by endorsing and dedicating it to the guidelines for consumer protection adopted by the United Nations in 1985, it becomes imperative that celebration of this day does not become just an annual feature in our country. Emerging signals indicate that India is going to be among the top three economies of the world sooner than later. It cannot be denied that consumer is an important facet of a countrys economic order, as consumerism is manifested economically in the chronic purchasing of new goods and services. Therefore, whether a country succeeds as an economic power depends on the quality of goods it manufactures and services it provides. Here, the certifying authority is the consumer. A country that does not satisfies its consumers on the quality of products and services cannot aspire to be a world economic power. I would like to briefly touch upon the initiatives of the Department of Consumer Affairs in ensuring that we have an energetic consumer protection movement in the country to protect the consumer, to make him aware of his rights and responsibilities thereby indirectly contributing to a vibrant economic order in the country. The Consumer Protection Act, 1986 was enacted to provide better protection of the interest of the consumer, to establish consumer councils and other authorities for the settlement of consumer disputes with little hassle for the consumer, with the provisions of the Act being compensatory, instead of being punitive or preventive in nature. The Act has been a landmark in social welfare legislations. You would be happy to know that the Acts completion of 25 years of its existence in the service of the consumer was marked by the release of a special commemorative postage

stamp by our Respected Rashtrapati ji on 29th November, 2012. Successful campaigns like Jago Grahak Jago have achieved high recognition with the consumers. These campaigns are undergoing changes to keep up with the times, and of late, I have been complimented for the improvement in the content and quality of these advertisements issued by the Department through print and electronic media. The Department of Consumer Affairs is also exploring the possibility of producing tele-serials educating and empowering the consumers on their rights and responsibilities, as tele-serials have a mass appeal which we can make the most use of. Another intervention is the creation of Consumer Welfare Fund in 1992 with the objective of providing financial assistance to promote and protect the welfare of the consumer, create consumer awareness and strengthen consumer movement in the country, particularly in the rural areas. Similarly, Legal Metrology Act has been passed in April, 2011 for the benefit of consumers laying down specific standards in weight and measurement. But, our efforts do not end here. As we progress, as the economy develops, it throws newer challenges for us to face. I may like to reiterate here that the success of consumer protection movement in the country relies on smooth and successful cooperation between the Central and the State Governments/UTs. You all will agree that a co-operative approach will result in uniform implementation of consumer protection laws and rules across all jurisdictions. There are no two opinions when it comes to protection of consumers, and together we can achieve that goal. I am happy to inform the audience that a range of reforms in the Consumer Protection Act has been proposed by the Department of Consumer Affairs, which I am sure, will have an effect on the laws administered by the States/UTs. These changes, it is hoped, will further benefit the consumers and speed up grievance redressing processes. Last year, on the same occasion, I expressed the collective concern on various issues on which unfortunately many States/UTs had been found wanting in proactive efforts. To cite a few, many States/UTs do not have an exclusive Department for consumer affairs, and setting up of the State Commissions, District Fora and the State Consumer Protection Councils, the District Consumer Protection Councils have not taken place in many States/UTs. I would once again reiterate that such States/UTs make use of financial assistance provided by the Department of Consumer Affairs, Government of India to strengthen consumer protection mechanism in their States/UTs. They can make use of software provided by the GOI free of cost and the training facilities meant for staff handling help lines. One thing we must keep in mind is that consumer fora at all levels do not become like Civil Courts with litigations terrorising consumers from approaching them. The fora must be consumer friendly. Other connected issues like uniform and reasonably good pay scales to members of consumer fora, separate cadre for the supporting staff and selection of competent persons as Members need our immediate attention. All these and other issues, I am sure, will be discussed in the Business Session scheduled for tomorrow so that we could come to an understanding of our strengths and weaknesses to be able to grow strong in the area of consumer protection. Now, I would like to broach upon the 26th Report of the Standing Committee on Food, Consumer Affairs and Public Distribution on The Consumer Protection (Amendment) Bill, 2011. While presenting its report to the Lok Sabha after examination of the Bill introduced in Lok Sabha on 16.12.2011, the Committee had made several observations which need to be addressed by us, by the Central Government as well as the States/UTs. My Secretary, Shri Pankaj Agrawal, had already sent a letter on 20th February, 2013 to all the Chief Secretaries of the States/UTs, drawing their attention to the concerns expressed by the Committee, observations which have to be looked into by the concerned States/UTs. Mainly these issues relate to nonfunctioning of fora at various levels in some States/UTs, vacancies in the fora, need for uniformity with regard to remuneration to the President/Members and staff of fora, non-maintenance of data relating to disposal and pendency of cases, its monitoring mechanism, the need for meetings of Consumer Protection Councils to be held periodically, etc. I would request all the States/UTs to kindly act upon the observations of the Committee and favour us with their Action Taken Reports immediately so that amendments to this important Act could see the light of the day. I am sure, with all your cooperation we will be able to provide a healthy and strong consumer protection mechanism to the people of the country. With these words, I would like to conclude my address and hope that this Conference will prove to be an occasion where challenges lying ahead are not just understood but accepted in right and collective earnest to be tackled to ensure strong economic progress in the country.

OBJECTIVE OF MAHATMA GANDHI PRAVASI SURAKSHA YOJNA


The objectives of Mahatma Gandhi Pravasi Suraksha Yojana (MGPSY) is to encourage and enable overseas Indian workers having Emigration Check Required (ECR) passports going to ECR countries, to (a) save for their return and resettlement, (b) save for their old age and (c) obtain a Life Insurance cover against natural death during the period of coverage. The scheme envisages a co-contribution of Rs.1000/- by Government to overseas Indian workers who save Rs.4000/- per annum so that on return to India, a MGPSY subscriber can utilise these savings for return and resettlement purposes, and also get benefits on the lines of Swavalamban pension Scheme, for which also Government contributes Rs.1000/- (Rs.2000/- in case of females) for a pension contribution of between Rs.1000/- and Rs.12, 000/- by the subscriber CAT REFORM

Union Minister of State for Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions Shri V Narayansamy said that there is an urgent need to strengthen Central Administrative Tribunal( CAT) and make it more effective. Speaking as Special Guest at the daylong All India Conference of the members of Central Administrative Tribunal here today he said to streamline the functioning of Administrative Tribunals, a proposal to amend Administrative Tribunal Act 1985 is under active consideration of the Government. The Minister said one of the main amendments proposed is to authorize Chairman of the Administrative Tribunals to delegate his powers regarding Transfer petitions. The Bill was referred to the Department related Parliament Standing Committee and the Committee has submitted

its report on the proposed amendments. He also informed the conference that another proposal to bring about uniformity of tenure, service conditions etc. of the members of all judicial tribunals is under consideration of the Government. To evolve a consensus on these issues, an Inter Ministerial Group has been set up the Minister added. Commending the achievements of the CAT Shri Narayansamy said There is still room for improvement in its efficiency. It is observed that by the end of January,2013, 805 cases were pending for more than five years. We should definitely look into this aspect and try to minimize such pendency. I would, therefore, request the Chairman and members of the tribunal to accelerate the pace of disposal of cases. The conference was presided by Union Minister of Law and Justice Dr. Ashwani Kumar. He said that CAT has come a long way since its inception and now the need of the hour is to handle so many cases lying pending with more efficiency. Chief Justice of India, Mr. Justice Altamas Kabir as Chief Guest assured that more Government employees would be in a position to get speedy justice for their grievances. Mr. Justice Syed Rafat Alam, Chairman CAT, assured that CAT would now try its level best to reduce the disposal time of the case from two years to one calendar year or lesser time. The main purpose of the Conference was to deliberate on certain issues concerning the Tribunal and to improve the working conditions of the institution and also to chalk out various measures to be adopted to arrest the pendency of cases. The Central Administrative Tribunal came into existence in November 1985 and is entrusted with the task of adjudicating complaints and other service matters pertaining to the Central Government employees as well as employees of PSUs and organizations so notified under Section 14 (2) of the Act by the Government. The day long conference is being attended by all the 65 members from the 17 regular Benches and the Principal Bench of CAT.

NATIONAL MISSION ON FOOD PROCESSING Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) has launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme - National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) during 2012-13 of 12th Five Year Plan. The basic objective of NMFP is decentralization of implementation of the schemes, leading to substantial participation of State Governments/UTs. NMFP is likely to improve significantly the Ministrys outreach in terms of planning, supervision and monitoring of various schemes.

All the State Governments have been empowered to receive the applications, sanction and release of grant-in-aid to the eligible beneficiaries under the NMFP. States also have flexibility in selection of location of projects as well as beneficiaries, to harness the potential of value addition by using locally grown raw material including fruits and vegetables. This initiative is likely to augment the capacity of the food processors forupscaling their operations by adoption of new technologies including skill upgradation. These above initiative would help in reducing the spoilage of fruits and vegetables across all the States/UTs.
Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) had launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme - National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) during 2012-13 of 12th Five Year Plan. The basic objective of NMFP is decentralization of implementation of the schemes, leading to substantial participation of State Governments/UTs. NMFP is likely to improve significantly the Ministrys outreach in terms of planning, supervision and monitoring of various schemes.

The salient features of the National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) are: (i) to realize the Ministrys next leap forward in terms of ensuing requisite growth impetus and value addition to the sector; (ii) decentralized approach; (iii) greater role of State/UTs; (iv) better outreach; and (v) effective supervision and monitoring. The Major Programmes/Schemes covered under NMFP during 2012-13 are: i) Scheme for Technology Up-gradation / Establishment / Modernisation of Food Processing Industries.
Scheme for Cold Chain, Value Addition and Preservation Infrastructure for Non-Horticultural Products. Scheme for Human Resource Development (HRD) (a) (b) (c) Creation of Infrastructure Facilities for Running Degree/ Diploma/ Certificate Courses in Food Processing Technology.

ii) iii)

Entrepreneurship Development Program (EDP) Food Processing Training Centre (FPTC)

iv) a. b. c. d.

Scheme for Promotional Activities Organizing Seminar/Workshops Conducting Studies/Surveys Support to Exhibitions/Fairs Advertisement & Publicity

Another scheme in order to assist the entrepreneurs and domestic agro-processing industries for adoption of newtechnologies, is the Scheme for Technology Upgradation/ Establishment/ Modernisation of Food Processing Industries which has been subsumed in the NMFP w.e.f. 1.4.2012 (2012-13). This scheme aims at creation of new processing capacity by adoption of new technologies and upgradation of existing processing capabilities in sectors like Milk, Fruit & Vegetables, Meat, Poultry, fishery, wine, consumer items, oil seeds, rice milling, flour milling, pulse. Under the scheme, the Ministry extends financial assistance in the form of grant-in-aid to entrepreneurs @ 25% of the cost of Plant & Machinery and Technical Civil Works subject to a maximum of Rs. 50 lakhs in general areas & @33.33% subject to a maximum of Rs. 75 lakhs in North-Eastern and difficult areas.

The adoption of new and latest technologies by the food processors by availing financial assistance under the above scheme of the Mission, may help in improving the quality of food products as per the national / international standards, thereby increasing countries share of process food in the world.

This information was given today by Minister of State for Agriculture and Food Processing Industries, Dr CharanDas Mahant in a written reply to Rajya Sabha questions.

SCHEME FOR MODERNISING COLD STORAGE

Department of Agriculture & Cooperation under Ministry of Agriculture is implementing National Horticulture Mission (NHM) scheme for development of Horticulture in the country which includes assistance for post harvest management. Under the component of post harvest management, 40% credit linked back ended subsidy in general areas and 55% in scheduled area is available for setting up of new cold storages and expansion of existing capacity. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc. The component of establishment of cold storage, expansion, modernization of existing cold storages is project based. National Horticulture Board (NHB) is also implementing a scheme Capital Investment Subs idy for Construction/Expansion/Modernization of Cold Storages and Storages for Horticulture Produce under which, Board is providing credit linked back-ended capital investment subsidy to the eligible organizations for creation/modernization/expansion of cold storages/CA storage @ 40% of the capital project cost in general areas and 55% in case of Hilly & scheduled areas for a maximum storage capacity of 5000 MT per project. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc. This information was given today by Minister of State for Agriculture and Food Processing Industries, Dr Charan Das Mahant in a written reply to Rajya Sabha questions.
MALNUTRITION

To address malnutrition, Prime Ministers Council on Indias Nutrition Challenges has been constituted in 2008 for policy directions, review and effective coordination between Ministries for nutrition at the Central level.

The National Nutrition Policy 1993 and the National Plan of Action on Nutrition 1995 have provided for clear cut institutional structure starting from national to grassroots level. Under this, State Government / UT Administrations are required to set up an apex State level Nutrition Council chaired by Chief Minister; an Inter-Departmental Coordinating Committee headed by the Chief Secretary, and consider constituting similar bodies at the District level.

The State Governments/UT Administration have been urged to set up State Nutrition Councils etc. Minister of State Women & Child Development and Secretary, Ministry of Women & Child Development have written to the Chief Minister and Chief Secretaries respectively of the States/UTs in this regard. Further, the need to set up the Nutrition Councils by the States/UTs has been emphasized at the meetings of the State Ministers/Secretaries of Women and Child Development held from time to time. As per available information the position of setting up of State Nutrition Councils/ Committees is given below.

S.No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

State Andhra Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Assam Bihar Chandigarh Chhattisgarh Delhi Goa

Status of SNC/Mission Not constituted Constituted Not constituted. [Nutrition Board - with Director. Not constituted Not constituted Not constituted Constituted Not constituted

9 10 11 12 13

Gujarat Haryana Himachal Pradesh Jammu & Kashmir Jharkhand

14 15

Karnataka Kerala

16

Madhya Pradesh

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Maharashtra Manipur Meghalaya Mizoram Nagaland Orissa Punjab Rajasthan Sikkim Tamil Nadu Tripura Uttar Pradesh Uttarakhand West Bengal

31

Puducherry

Nutrition Mission on the anvil. Being Constituted. SNC under the chairmanship of Honble CM has been constituted. Not constituted. Being constituted now. Not constituted State have a committee with members including Child Development, World Bank, UNICEF and District Nutrition Mission etc. headed by Chief Minister. It is operational and had a meeting also. Constituted. To be made operational. Not constituted [Have a State Nutrition Bureau headed by a State nutrition officer under the administrative control of the Health Services] On 14th May, 2010, the State Assembly adopted ATAL BAL AAROGYA EVAM POSHAN MISSION referred to as AtalBal Mission Mata Jijau Mission existing. Not constituted Not constituted Constituted Not constituted Nutrition Council under the chairmanship of CM is available. Nutrition Council under the chairmanship of CM Punjab is available. State Nutrition Council and District Nutrition Council formed. Not constituted SNC constituted Not constituted. Being constituted Not constituted State Nutrition Policy is available. Constituted Not constituted. [WB formulated a State Nutrition Strategy 2008 - 2017 under HSDI in 2007 for selected districts. Taking into account the nutrition goals of 11thFive Year Plan and lessons learnt of implementing the State Nutrition Strategy 2008 - 2017. The formulation of State Nutrition Policy and a Nutrition Council is under process. Constituted

SCHEME FOR MODERNISING COLD STORAGE


Department of Agriculture & Cooperation under Ministry of Agriculture is implementing National Horticulture Mission (NHM) scheme for development of Horticulture in the country which includes assistance for post harvest management. Under the component of post harvest management, 40% credit linked back ended subsidy in general areas and 55% in scheduled area is available for setting up of new cold storages and expansion of existing capacity. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc. The component of establishment of cold storage, expansion, modernization of existing cold storages is project based. National Horticulture Board (NHB) is also implementing a scheme Capital Investment Subsidy for Construction/Expansion/Modernization of Cold Storages and Storages for Horticulture Produce under which, Board is providing credit linked back-ended capital investment subsidy to the eligible organizations for creation/modernization/expansion of cold storages/CA storage @ 40% of the capital project cost in general areas and 55% in case of Hilly & scheduled areas for a maximum storage capacity of 5000 MT per project. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc.

NATIONAL CHILD HEALTH PROGRAMME

Under National Rural Health Mission, the following interventions are being implemented to improve child health situation in the country: 1. Promotion of Institutional Delivery through JananiSurakshaYojana (JSY) and JananiShishuSurakshaKaryakram(JSSK): Promoting Institutional delivery to ensure skilled birth attendance is a key to reducing both maternal and neo-natal mortality. JSY incentivizes pregnant women to opt for institutional delivery and provides for cash assistance. JSSK entitles all pregnant women to absolutely free and zero expense delivery including caesarean section operation in Government health facilities and provides for free to and fro transport, food, drugs and diagnostics. Similar entitlements have also been put in place for sick neonates. This scheme has now been extended to cover all infants in the country. 2. Strengthening Facility based newborn care: Newborn care corners (NBCC) are being set up at all health facilities where deliveries take place to provide essential newborn care at birth to all new born babies; Special New Born Care Units (SNCUs) at District Hospitals and New Born Stabilization Units (NBSUs) at FRUs are being set up for the care of sick newborn. As on date 401 SNCUs, 1542 NBSUs and 11508 NBCCs are functional across the country. 3. Home Based Newborn Care (HBNC): Home based newborn care through ASHA has recently been initiated to improve new born care practices at the community level and for early detection and referral of sick new born babies. The schedule of home visits by ASHA consists of at least 6 visits in case of institutional deliveries, on days 3, 7, 14, 21, 28 & 42 nd days and one additional visit within 24 hours of delivery in case of home deliveries. Additional visits will be made for babies who are pre-term, low birth weight or ill. 4. Capacity building of health care providers: Various trainings are being conducted under National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) to build and upgrade the skills of doctors, nurses and ANM for early diagnosis and case management of common ailments of children and care of newborn at time of birth. These trainings include Integrated Management of Neo-natal and Childhood Illness (IMNCI) and NavjaatShishuSurakshaKaryakram (NSSK). A total of 5.8 lakh health care workers have been trained in IMNCI in 505 districts and 89,962 health workers trained in NSSK so far. 5. Management of Malnutrition: Emphasis is being laid on reduction of malnutrition which is an important underlying cause of child mortality. 605 Nutritional Rehabilitation Centres have been established for management of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM). Iron and Folic Acid is also provided to children for prevention of anaemia. Recently, weekly Iron and Folic Acid is proposed to be initiated for adolescent population. As breastfeeding reduces infant mortality, exclusive breastfeeding for first six months and appropriate infant and young child feeding practices are being promoted in convergence with Ministry of Woman and Child Development. 6. Village Health and Nutrition Days (VHNDs) are also being organized for imparting nutritional counseling to mothers and to improve child care practices. 7. Universal Immunization Program (UIP): Vaccination against seven diseases is provided to all children under UIP. Government of India supports the vaccine program by supply of vaccines and syringes, cold chain equipments and provision of operational costs. UIP targets to immunize 2.7 crore infants against seven vaccine preventable diseases every year. 21 states with more than 80% coverage have incorporated second dose of Measles in their immunizationprogram.Pentavalent vaccine has been introduced in two states of Kerala and Tamil Nadu and now expanded to six more states. Year 2012-13 has been declared as Year of intensification of Routine Immunization. India has achieved a historic milestone by remaining polio free for two full years now. WHO has taken India off the list of polio endemic countries. 8. Mother and Child Tracking System: A name based Mother and Child Tracking System has been put in place which is web based to enable tracking of all pregnant women and newborns so as to monitor and ensure that complete services are provided to them. States are encouraged to send SMS alerts to beneficiaries reminding them of the dates on which services are due and generate beneficiary-wise due list of services with due dates for ANMs on a weekly basis.

9. Recently, a new national programme RashtriyaBalSwasthyaKaryakram has been launched under National Rural Health Mission. The details of this initiative are as below: (a) The purpose of RBSK is to improve survival, development and quality of life of children in the age group of 0 to 18 years through early detection of Defects at birth, Diseases, Deficiencies, Development Delays including Disability and follow-up for appropriate management and treatment, if required (medical or surgical). RBSK envisages covering 30 common health conditions prevalent in children for early detection and free intervention and treatment. (b) The child health screening services builds on the existing school health services and will be provided through dedicated mobile health teams placed in every block. The block level dedicated mobile medical health teams would comprise of trained doctors and paramedics. (c) Existing services offered by Ministry of Women and Child Development, Social Justice and Empowerment and Education will also be optimally utilized.

DRUG
The Department has included in the Report of Working Group on Drugs & Pharmaceuticals Industry for the 12th Plan, submitted to the Planning Commission, a proposal for setting up Pharma Venture Capital Fund with an outlay of Rs. 500.00 crore for investment of identified funds into a newly created specialised private equity / Venture Capital that undertakes Research & Development (R&D) investments into companies in the Pharmaceutical industry. Besides, in November 2011, M/s. Ernst & Young Private Limited (M/s E&Y), Gurgaon, has been given an assignment as Global Level Consultant for preparation of Detailed Project Report for developing India as a Drug Discovery & Pharma Innovation Hub 2020. M/s E & Y has since submitted draft Detailed Project Report (DPR). It will be finalized in consultation with all stakeholders. Department of Industrial Policy & Promotion issued Press Note No. 3(2011 series) dated 8.11.2011 amending the existing Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) policy under which 100% FDI was permitted through automatic route. As per Press Note 3(2011 Series) issued by Department of Industrial Policy and Promotion on 08.11.2011:(i) FDI, upto 100%, under the automatic route, would continue to be permitted for Greenfield investments in the Pharmaceuticals sector. (ii) FDI upto 100%, would be permitted for Brownfield investment (i.e. investments in existing companies), in the pharmaceuticals sector, under the Government approval route.

12 5 Year Plan
The Planning Commission and the National Innovation Council are organising the first ever Hackathon on the 12th Five Year Plan (2012-17) on 6th 7thApril 2013. The Hackathon will invite citizens to innovatively communicate the Plan through creative visualizations and software applications.

th

WOMEN STATUS IN INDIA


Speaking at the occasion, Smt. Tirath said that women have made great strides economically, socially and politically in the last few decades and have benefited from the general economic development and the gender specific and gender related policies, programs and legislations of the Government. She stated that a positive progress has been noted in respect of a number of gender socio-economic indicators due to persistent efforts of all stakeholders. There have been improvement in literacy rates for women from 53.67% in 2001 to 65.45% in 2011. Also the Maternal Mortality Rate had reduced from 301 per lakh live births in 2001-03 to 212 in 2007-09. Female infant mortality rate has come down from 68 in 2001 to 48 in 2011, she noted. But at the same time she stressed on the various factors that can improve and build on these indicators and expressed concern over the most persisting and disturbing aspects that are impacting women. She stated that declining child sex ratio which has come down from 927 girls per 1000 boys in Census 2001 to 914 in Census 2011 is a cause of concern as it is no longer confined to specific geographic areas, but is increasingly being reported in almost all parts of the country including the southern States. The Minister also expressed concern about the entrenched patriarchal and societal constructs, which she stated places a womens status several notches below that of men. Smt. Tirath elaborated on the initiatives and steps taken by the Ministry of Women and Child Development to combat these, such as the Sectoral Innovation Council, and the convergence projects of the National Mission for Empowerment of Women of in 12 gender critical districts. She also stated that protection of women from exploitation and violence is crucial, for which the ministry have in place a slew of schemes and enabling legislations. Smt. Tirath stated that in the aftermath of the horrific incident of gang rape in December 2012, there have been concerted efforts on part of the Government to provide safe public places for women. The Union Budget 2013-14 announced a number of initiatives for this purpose, including the Nirbaya Fund of Rs.1000 crore and an additional sum of R.200 crore for schemes for vulnerable single/ widowed women. Smt. Tirath suggested that the High Level Committee, through their consultations should suggest innovative and effective mechanisms with inter-stakeholder cooperation that can be instituted right from the village level to ensure strict implementation of laws and justice delivery Speaking at the function, Sh. Prem Narian, Secretary, WCD said that the issues of women have always been at the centre stage of Governments priorities. The constitution of the High Level Committee is a pointer to this fact. The mandate of the Committee is extremely wide-ranging and the report of the Committee will enable the Government in implementing policies which will benefit women in the economic, social, cultural, legal or political spheres. He stated that the various development indicators clearly show that there have been improvements in the status of women on various fronts. He expressed concern over the declining child-sex ratio and the increasing rate of crime against women, which he noted was not merely a law and order

problem, but one that had social and cultural dimensions. This needs extensive deliberations and collaboration between Centre/States and civil society organizations to evolve a multi-pronged strategy, as empowerment of women should not be hampered by absence of a safe environment for women to work and live, Sh. Narain stated. Speaking at the occasion, Smt. Deepa Jain Singh, Member Secretary, HLC said that there has been comprehensive study on status of women since 1947. In this background, the first consultation by the HLC is a milestone in development of women. She stated that there have been various challenges and opportunities due to social and economical developments. However, the idea is to mainstream marginalized sections of women. She said that the focus of the consultation is to articulate a vision for women for 2030 and to set priorities and strategies to guide us towards the vision, and to identify the gaps in policy and its implementation. There is a need for vigorous debate on issues concerning status of women I order to have an inclusive approach. The recent developments such as December 16th incident have placed womens issues at the center stage of countries consciousness, she stated. The High Level Committee on Status of Women was constituted based on the recommendations of the Committee of Governors which felt that a comprehensive Report on the status of women is imperative, as the last such Report Towards Equality was brought out in 1974.

SLUM UPGRADATION INDEX TO BE FORMED


Shri Ajay Maken, Minister of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation has said that his Ministry will frame Slum Upgradation Index City Wise and State Wise for monitoring periodically the Up gradation of Slums in the country. He said for this purpose a Committee will be set-up to suggest the methodology for drafting this index. Shri Maken was speaking at a function of release of report on Housing Stock, Amenities and Assets in Slums based on House listing and Housing Census 2011 here today. Shri Maken released this report in the presence of Shri R.P. N. Singh, Minister of State for at a function organized by the office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Shri Arun Kumar Misra, Secretary Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation,Shri K. Skandan, Additional Secretary, Ministry of Home Affairs and Dr. C. Chandramouli, Registrar General and Census Commissioner, India were also present. Such datasets on slum are being brought out for the first time in the country. Flagging the important aspects of the Slum Data in the above report, Shri Maken said his Ministry will not have any distinction between Notified, Recognized and Identified slums while providing Financial assistance to the States under the Rajiv Awaas Yojana ( RAY) Scheme, the with an objective for bringing improvements of Slums. He urged the State Government to convert the notified local bodies into statutory local bodies with provision of municipalities for improving the living conditions in these towns. Complimenting the efforts of the Census organization in bringing out such important facts, Shri Maken said that this Slum Data will help in redrawing ourprogrammes/Schemes and fix priorities under various Schemes of the Ministry.

CONDITION OF SANITATION
The Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP) Report 2012 updates published by World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Children`s Fund (UNICEF), the sanitation coverage in rural areas of the country is 33% approximately as of the year 2010. Also as per Census 2011, sanitation coverage in rural areas of the country is 32.70%. The Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) seeks to make country open defecation free by the year 2022. With the revised strategy under NBA, the Government hopes to achieve the target set. Government of India has designed a paradigm shift in Total Sanitation Campaign(TSC) which is now called the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA), in the XIIth Five Year Plan. The objective of NBA is to achieve sustainable behavior change with provision of sanitary facilities in entire communities in a phased, saturation mode with Nirmal Grams as outcomes. Under NBA, following steps have been taken : A shift from motivating individual household toilet construction to covering whole communities in a Gram Panchayat saturation mode for holistic sanitation outcomes. The scope of providing incentives for individual household latrine units has been widened to cover all APL households who belong to SCs, STs, small and marginal farmers, landless labourers with homesteads, physically challenged and women headed households along-with all BPL households. Financial incentive for construction of toilets has been raised for all eligible beneficiaries to Rs. 4600/- from the earlier amount of Rs 3200/-.under NBA. In addition upto Rs. 4500/- can be spent under Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme for construction of the toilet. Along-with beneficiary contribution of Rs. 900/-, the total unit cost of toilet is now Rs. 10000/-. More emphasis on Information Education Communication (IEC).with earmarked 15% of the total outlay of district projects for IEC activities. With a view to give thrust to a new approach towards IEC, the Ministry has launched a Communication and Advocacy Strategy (2012-2017). Conjoint approach with National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) to ensure water availability for sanitation in Gram Panchayats. Focused convergence of rural sanitation with associated Ministries including Health, School Education, Women and Child Development with NBA.

AWARENESS CAMPAIGN FOR SANITATION

Information, Education and Communication (IEC) is an important component of the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) / Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA). Government of India has formulated and issued IEC Guidelines in order to provide a broad framework to the States for the implementation of IEC activities to increase awareness among rural people, generation of demand for sanitation facilities and creation of clean environment. The other major steps taken by the Government to improve IEC as part of TSC /NBA are as under: Under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) formerly known as Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), 15% of the total outlay of district projects has been earmarked for Information, Education and Communication (IEC) activities. Sanitation and Hygiene Advocacy and Communication Strategy Framework (2012-2017) has been launched. It is designed to roll out a number of activities in a phased manner, including implementation to monitoring. It also provides a framework for States to develop State-specific action plans for rolling out of the strategy. For effective dissemination of IEC messages, provision to engage Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs), village level motivators (Swachhata Doots/Sanitation Managers), field functionaries like Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA), Anganwadi Workers, School Teachers, and Bharat Nirman Volunteers has been made. Mobile messages based Communication was carried out on a pilot basis as an effective tool for dissemination of awareness on Sanitation targeting rural areas of Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Bihar, Jharkhand and Uttar Pradesh. Audio and audio-visual spots have been produced in collaboration with UNICEF, on sanitation and hygiene related messages. IEC activities are carried out at the National level, State level, District level and Gram Panchayat level. It involves mass media like TV, Radio, mobile based messages, print publicity and also use of folk media, melas, street plays, wall writings, hoardings and banners, picture frames, exhibitions, school rallies, interpersonal communication etc. Most of these IEC activities are carried out by the State Government and at the District and Gram Panchayat level, however, Union Government, in the past has also been carrying out mass media activities through TV, Radio & print. It has in collaboration with UNICEF developed TV and radio spots for telecast/broadcast. The UNICEF provides this support as part of the technical assistance provided to Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation. SCHEME FOR CHILDREN The problem of malnutrition is complex, multi-dimensional and inter-generational in nature and cannot be improved by a single sector alone. The approach to deal with the nutrition challenges has been two pronged: First is the Multi-sectoral approach for accelerated action on the determinants of malnutrition in targeting nutrition in schemes/programmes of all the sectors. The second approach is the direct and specific interventions targeted towards the vulnerable groups such as children below 6 years, adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating mothers. The Government has accorded high priority to the issue of malnutrition in the country and is implementing several schemes/programmes of different Ministries/Departments through State Governments/UT Administrations. The schemes/programmes include the Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS), National Rural Health Mission (NRHM), Mid-Day Meal Scheme(MDM), Rajiv Gandhi Schemes for Empowerment of Adolescent Girls (RGSEAG) namely SABLA, Indira Gandhi MatritvaSahyogYojna (IGMSY) as direct targeted interventions. Besides, indirect Multi-sectoral interventions include Targeted Public Distribution System (TPDS), National Horticulture Mission, National Food Security Mission, Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS), Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan, National Rural Drinking Water Programme etc. Several of the schemes namely, ICDS, NRHM, MDM, SGSY have been expanded post 2005-06.All these schemes have potential to address one or other aspect of Nutrition. Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme is one of the flagship programmes of the Government of India which aims at improving the nutritional and health status of pre-school children, laying the foundation of proper psychological development of the child; enhancing the capability of the mother to look after the normal health and nutritional needs of the child etc.ICDSScheme provides a package of six services namely supplementary nutrition, pre-school non-formal education, nutrition & health education, immunization, health check-up and referral services. ICDS Scheme has been universalised with effect from 2008-09. Government has recently approved strengthening and restructuring of Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) Scheme with a budget allocation of Rs. 1,23,580 crore during 12th Five Year Plan. The Administrative Approvals in this regard have since been issued to the States/UTs. It has been decided to roll out restructured and strengthened ICDS in three phases covering 200 high burden districts in the first year (2012-13); additional 200 districts in second year (2013-14) including districts from special category States and NER; and In remaining districts in third year (201415). Further, an Information Education and Communication Campaign (IEC) to generate awareness against malnutrition has been launched in the country. The budget under National Nutrition Mission (NNM), which has the components of the IEC campaign and the multi-sectoral programme for addressing maternal and child malnutrition in 200 high burden districts, for 2012-13 is Rs. 250 crore and for the 12th Five Year Plan is Rs. 1250 crore. Under NRHM, the Twelfth Plan strategy seeks to strengthen initiatives taken in the Eleventh Plan to expand the reach of health care and work towards the long term objective of establishing a system of Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in the country. Maternal and child care will continue to focus on reduction of IMR and MMR. The Reproductive Child Health will focus on prevention of preterm births, delivery through skill birth attendants, home based new born care, institutional delivery, universal coverage of immunisation, control and management of diseases like TB, malaria, HIV AIDS, school health check up etc. The Twelfth Plan outlay for department of Health & Family Welfare is Rs. 2,68,551crores.

CASH ASSISTANCE FOR PREGNANT AND LACTATING MOTHER The Government of India in the Ministry of Women & Child Development is implementing a centrally sponsored scheme namely, Indira Gandhi Matritva Sahyog Yojana (IGMSY), Conditional Maternity Benefit (CMB) for pregnant and lactating (P & L) women to improve their health & nutrition status to better enabling environment by providing cash incentives to pregnant and nursing mothers. It is being implemented using the platform of ICDS. The scheme was introduced in October, 2010 on pilot basis now operational in 53 selected districts. The scheme attempts to partly compensate for wage loss to Pregnant & Lactating women both prior to and after delivery of the child. The scheme envisages providing cash directly to the beneficiary through their Bank Accounts/Post Office Accounts, in response to individual fulfilling specific conditions. The scheme covers all pregnant and lactating women above 19 years of age and above for first two live births except Government/PSUs (Central & State). MODERNISING COLD STORAGE Department of Agriculture & Cooperation under Ministry of Agriculture is implementing National Horticulture Mission (NHM) scheme for development of Horticulture in the country which includes assistance for post harvest management. Under the component of post harvest management, 40% credit linked back ended subsidy in general areas and 55% in scheduled area is available for setting up of new cold storages and expansion of existing capacity. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc. The component of establishment of cold storage, expansion, modernization of existing cold storages is project based. National Horticulture Board (NHB) is also implementing a scheme Capital Investment Subsidy for Construction/Expansion/Modernization of Cold Storages and Storages for Horticulture Produce under which, Board is providing credit linked back-ended capital investment subsidy to the eligible organizations for creation/modernization/expansion of cold storages/CA storage @ 40% of the capital project cost in general areas and 55% in case of Hilly & scheduled areas for a maximum storage capacity of 5000 MT per project. The financial assistance for modernization of cold storages is provided for (i) upgradation of thermal insulation, (ii) upgradation of cooling system, refrigeration, air flow, electric installation, handling devices, safety devices etc. This information was given today by Minister of State for Agriculture and Food Processing Industries, Dr Charan Das Mahant in a written reply to Rajya Sabha questions. NUTRITION RESOURCE PLATFORM The Nutrition Resource Platform (NRP) is an initiative of Ministry of Women and Child Development, Government of India, developed with an aim to collect, collate and make available interactive knowledge resources and materials on nutrition and child development to diverse stakeholders. It serves as a digital resource on nutrition including provision for interactive forum, dissemination and exchange of information. The NRP has three domains which serve various purposes like online repository of plethora of documents, online forum and real time data collection from AWCs through Interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) etc. The platform is web enabled to maximise outreach at a relatively low cost and can be viewed at www.poshan.nic.in, www.akshayaposhan.gov.in NRP is in the course of being fully established and currently under updation.NRP is planned as a repository of information collected from sectors identified in the National Plan of Action on Nutrition to aid knowledge generation, policy formulation and improve adoption of good practices to influence behaviour change around nutrition and child care. It has reference materials on various nutrition issues relating to policy, programmes academics, materials for capacity building etc. The NRP is envisioned to provide information as user-friendly for all, including the frontline workers. Besides the numerous resource material in the form of print, audio visuals etc for generating nutrition awareness including sanitation amongst the women, the recently launched Information Education and communication campaign can also be seen and material can be downloaded for further outreach. ICDS The Integrated Child Development Services (ICDS) is a Centrally Sponsored flagship Scheme of the government. The scheme aims at holistic development of under-six children and providing nutritional and health support to pregnant and lactating mothers. Scheme provides for a package of six services viz. supplementary nutrition, immunization, referral services, health check-up, pre-school non formal education and health and nutrition education. Three of the six services namely Immunization, Health Check-up and Referral Services are delivered through Public Health system. The concept of providing a package of services is based primarily on the consideration that the overall impact will be much larger if the different services develop in an integrated manner as the efficiency of a particular service depends upon the support it receives from related services. The services under the ICDS scheme are provided at the platform of Anganwadi Centre (AWC). The ICDS is a universal but self-selecting scheme and is open to all children below six years of age and Pregnant & Lactating Mothers, irrespective of their economic and social status. The scheme is implemented through the States/UTs on a cost sharing basis in the ratio of 50:50 for supplementary nutrition (SNP) and 90:10 for other components except in the case of North Eastern States where the share of Central and State Government is in the ratio of 90:10 for all the components including SNP The Scheme has been expanded in three phases in the years 2005-06, 2007-08 and 2008-09. The scheme today operates through a network of 7025 fully operational Projects and 13.31 lakh AWCs as on January, 2013 against the cumulative total of 7076 approved Projects and 14 lakh AWCs including MiniAWCs and Anganwadi on Demand. The services are currently being provided to 9.28 crore beneficiaries of which 7.48 crore are children under six and 1.80 crore are P&L Mothers. 3.5 crore children of 3-6 years are provided pre-school education of which 1.80 crore are boys and 1.70 crore are girls.

Considering the rapid universalisation and gaps and challenges which have crept in the scheme over the years, the government has approved Strengthening and Restructuring of ICDS Scheme with an over-all budget allocation of Rs. 1,23,580 crore during 12th Five Year Plan. The ICDS Scheme envisaged implementation of Projects through Voluntary Organizations, Local Bodies, Panchayati Raj Institutions, Social Welfare Board (where these are functioning efficiently) etc., with a view to derive community support. The States have been given the autonomy, within the overall framework of the ICDS Scheme to entrust projects to a voluntary organization including NGOs for which grants to them would be provided by the concerned State Government/UT Administration. With a view to strengthen the ICDS scheme, it has been decided to assign management and operation of upto 10% projects to PRIs/NGOs/voluntary organizations under the restructured ICDS. Against an allocation of Rs.10,391 crore during the 10th Five Year Plan, the government allocated Rs.44,400 crore for the ICDS scheme during the 11th Five Year Plan. Further, during the 12th Five Year Plan, a total approved allocation of Rs. 1,23,580 crore has been made for the scheme. Any additional requirement of funds under ICDS Scheme can be met through Supplementary Demands for Grants and savings. In the existing monitoring mechanism, monthly & half yearly progress reports are prescribed at Anganwadi and Project level in States/UTs. In addition, Government has introduced 5-tier monitoring and review mechanism at National, State, District, Block and Anganwadi Levels for which guidelines were issued on 31.03.2011. Under these guidelines, the District and Block level Committees closely monitor inter-alia regularity of functioning of AWCs, monitoring and supervision visits to AWC by ICDS functionaries etc. and Anganwadi level Committee is required to review and take, as well as suggest action, to improve delivery of services at the AWC etc. In order to ensure proper functioning of AWCs, under the strengthening and restructuring of ICDS revised Management Information System (MIS), Web based MIS and provision for use of ICT has been introduced. PANCHAYAT EMPOWERMENT SCHEME

Panchayat Empowerment and Accountability Incentive Scheme (PEAIS) is a Central Sector Plan Scheme aimed at (i) incentivization of States for devolving funds, functions and functionaries (3Fs) to Panchayats and (ii) incentivization of Panchayats to put in place accountability systems to make their functioning transparent and efficient. The scheme is 100% centrally funded. Under PEAIS, State Governments/UTs are ranked on a Devolution Index which measures the extent of devolution of 3Fs by States to Panchayats. States are ranked on the DI through a study conducted by an independent organization. Since 2011-12, best performing Panchayats in the country have also been incentivized. The assessment of States along the DI follows a two stage process. The States that fulfill mandatory provisions of the Constitution qualify for further assessment on the extent of devolution. A study has been commissioned to evaluate the performance of States in 2012-13. The indicators used in the study are given below. The ranking is under process. Indicators for Panchayat Strengthening Index 2012-13 A. Basic Details of Panchayats Panchayat Elections Dissolution and Bye Elections Constitution & Functions of District Planning Committee Role of Panchayats in Parallel Bodies/Institutions Autonomy to Panchayats Functions Assigned to Panchayats and Actual Involvement of Panchayats Involvement of Panchayats in Important Schemes NFC Grants to the Panchayats State Finance Commission & Fiscal Transfer to Panchayats Empowerment of Panchayats to Impose and Collect Revenue Fund Availability with Panchayats Expenditure of Panchayats Recent Initiatives related to Finance & Accounts Accounting & Audit Social Audit Gram Sabha Transparency and Anti- Corruption Physical Infrastructure of Panchayats & e-Connectivity Panchayat Officials Training Institutions Training Activity Panchayat Assessment & Incentivization Indicators related to social audit have been included in the State level study as well as the model Panchayat level indicators. Every year model indicators and questionnaire have been refined by the Ministry. These have been circulated to all the States/UTs for adoption with suitable modifications. The Ministry held a workshop to consider improvement on indicators under PEAIS on 11th May, 2012.

B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W.

Two workshops were held to improve the State level field verification process on 18-19 and 30-31 October, 2012. On 4th 5th January, 2013, a workshop was conducted to orient National level field verification teams. NATIONAL MISSION ON FOOD PROCESSING Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) has launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme - National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) during 2012-13 of 12th Five Year Plan. The basic objective of NMFP is decentralization of implementation of the schemes, leading to substantial participation of State Governments/UTs. NMFP is likely to improve significantly the Ministrys outreach in terms of planning, supervision and monitoring of various schemes.

All the State Governments have been empowered to receive the applications, sanction and release of grant-in-aid to the eligible beneficiaries under the NMFP. States also have flexibility in selection of location of projects as well as beneficiaries, to harness the potential of value addition by using locally grown raw material including fruits and vegetables. This initiative is likely to augment the capacity of the food processors for upscaling their operations by adoption of new technologies including skill upgradation. These above initiative would help in reducing the spoilage of fruits and vegetables across all the States/UTs. Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MoFPI) had launched a Centrally Sponsored Scheme - National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) during 2012-13 of 12th Five Year Plan. The basic objective of NMFP is decentralization of implementation of the schemes, leading to substantial participation of State Governments/UTs. NMFP is likely to improve significantly the Ministrys outreach in terms of planning, supervision and monitoring of various schemes. The salient features of the National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) are: (i) torealize the Ministrys next leap forward in terms of ensuing requisite growth impetus and value addition to the sector; (ii) decentralized approach; (iii) greater role of State/UTs; (iv) better outreach; and (v) effective supervision and monitoring. The Major Programmes/Schemes covered under NMFP during 2012-13 are:

i)

Scheme for Technology Up-gradation / Establishment / Modernisationof Food Processing Industries.

ii) iii)

Scheme for Cold Chain, Value Addition and Preservation Infrastructure for Non-Horticultural Products. Scheme for Human Resource Development (HRD) (a) Creation of Infrastructure Facilities for Running Degree/ Diploma/ Certificate Courses in Food Processing Technology.

(b) (c)

Entrepreneurship Development Program (EDP) Food Processing Training Centre (FPTC)

iv) a. b. c. d.

Scheme for Promotional Activities Organizing Seminar/Workshops Conducting Studies/Surveys Support to Exhibitions/Fairs Advertisement & Publicity

Another scheme in order to assist the entrepreneurs and domestic agro-processing industries for adoption of new technologies, is the Scheme for Technology Upgradation/ Establishment/Modernisation of Food Processing Industries which has been subsumed in the NMFP w.e.f. 1.4.2012 (2012-13). This scheme aims at creation of new processing capacity by adoption of new technologies and up-gradation of existing processing capabilities in sectors like Milk, Fruit & Vegetables, Meat, Poultry, fishery, wine, consumer items, oil seeds, rice milling, flour milling, pulse. Under the scheme, the Ministry extends financial assistance in the form of grant-in-aid to entrepreneurs @ 25% of the cost of Plant & Machinery and Technical Civil Works subject to a maximum of Rs. 50 lakhs in general areas & @33.33% subject to a maximum of Rs. 75 lakhs in North-Eastern and difficult areas.

The adoption of new and latest technologies by the food processors by availing financial assistance under the above scheme of the Mission, may help in improving the quality of food products as per the national / international standards, thereby increasing countries share of process food in the world. ESSENTIAL DRUG
The objective of the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM) is that the drugs included in it are adequate to meet the common contemporary health needs of the general population of the country. It is one of the key instruments in balanced healthcare delivery system of a country. It is the general obligation of the health administrators to ensure abundant availability of these drugs in the country. The primary purpose of NLEM is to promote rational use of medicines considering the three important aspects i.e. cost, safety and efficacy. Furthermore, it promotes prescription by generic names. It is revised and updated from time to time in the context of contemporary knowledge of use of therapeutic products. The first NLEM was prepared and released in 1996. This list was subsequently revised in 2003. To address the issues of changing disease prevalence, treatment modalities, introduction of newer medicines and identification of unacceptable riskbenefit profile as well as therapeutic profile of some medicines, a Core Committee of Experts from various subjects specialities was constituted by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare by Order dated 6th July, 2010 under the chairmanship of Dr. Y.K. Gupta, Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, AIIMS, New Delhi, to update the NLEM, 2003. The Core Committee obtained the opinion/views through a National C onsultation Meet for Revision of National List of Essential Medicines organized by the Department of Pharmacology, AIIMS and the Central Drugs Standard Control Organization (CDSCO) on December 3-4, 2010. Experts from different disciplines from medical and pharmaceutical institutes and hospitals from across the country and concerned Government agencies participated. The recommendations of the Workshop were further deliberated upon by the Expert Core Committee on 4th January, 2011 and 31st January, 2011 at CDSCO and the NLEM, 2011 was finalized. The NLEM, 2011 contains 348 medicines belonging to 27 therapeutic categories such as antineoplastic, anti-cancer, immunological, anti-infective Cardiovascular, ophthalmological preparations, Diuretics, anti-allergic etc. Medicines have also been categorized based on essentiality at different levels of healthcare viz. (i) 181 Medicines for Primary (P), Secondary (S) and Tertiary (T) healthcare. (ii) 106 Medicines for Secondary(S) and Tertiary(T) healthcare (iii) 61 medicines for Tertiary (T) healthcare. No committee has been constituted to revise NLEM after 2011. The Government has no information that the Honble Supreme Court has made any observation over the delay in the preparation of revised list of essential drugs. The above information was given by the Union Minister for Health & Family Welfare, ShriGhulamNabi Azad in a written reply to a question in the LokSabha today. JUNK FOODS

Although the term Junk Food has not been defined under the Food Safety and Standards Act, 2006 and Rules / Regulations made thereunder, foods which have high fat, salt and sugar, with little or no protein, minerals and vitamins are considered as unhealthy foods and belong to the category of fast foods. As per Food Safety and Standards (Packaging and Labelling) Regulations, 2011, every pre-packaged food is required to contain on the label, a list of ingredients in the descending order and nutrition information, calorie in Kcal, carbohydrate, protein and fat in gm/100 gm or ml/100 ml. Food in which hydrogenated vegetable fat or bakery shortening is used is required to declare on the label that hydrogenated vegetable fats or bakery shortening used contain trans-fat. The Food Safety and Standards Authority of India (FSSAI), the nodal agency set-up for the purpose of laying down science-based standards for articles of food and to regulate their manufacture, storage, distribution, sale and import, to ensure availability of safe and wholesome food for human consumption, has not received any such recommendation from the World Health Organization (WHO). This Ministry has requested the Chief Ministers and the Health Ministers of the all States/UTs and the Minister of Human Resources Development to consider issuing appropriate directions to the schools and colleges for withdrawing foods high in saturated fat and carbonated drinks from their canteens and promoting healthy food habits, and that children must be made aware of the benefits of consumption of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. RKVY MODIFIED
Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana (RKVY) is to be continued in the Twelfth Plan with certain modifications on the basis of the experience gained so far and the discussions with Planning Commission and suggestions of the States. Now, the scheme is proposed to have three channels/streams i.e. (i) Production growth for increasing production and productivity; (ii) development of agricultural infrastructure and assets; and (iii) Focused interventions/schemes (sub-schemes). Twenty per cent of the annual outlay of modified Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana is to be earmarked for focused interventions (subschemes) and forty per cent each for production growth and infrastructure development respectively. Department of Agriculture & Cooperation is implementing a number of schemes for increasing foodgrains production in the country including Maharashtra such as Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana; National Food Security Mission; Macro management of Agriculture; Integrated Scheme on Oilseeds, Pulses, Oil Palm and Maize; Support to State Extension Programmes for Extension Reforms; etc. Due to these schemes and other efforts, the foodgrains production has increased from 230.77 million tonne in 2007-08 to 259.32 million tonne in 2011-12.

GREEN INDIA SCHEME

The Scheme Green India is being run by the Ministry of the Environment and Forests. The National Mission for Green India is a new initiative by the Ministry of Environment and Forests under the National Action Plan for Climate Change (NAPCC) which is implemented throughout the country. The mission aims to increase forest & tree cover on 5 million ha area, improve quality of forest cover on another 5 million ha area, ameliorate forest based livelihood of local communities and also to improve ecosystem services such as carbon sequestration, biodiversity & hydrological services. POLLUTION MEASURING CRITERION
National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) were notified in November, 2009 with criteria for 12 pollutants. Out of these, three pollutants, namely, Sulphur Dioxide (SO2), PM10 (particles having aerodynamic diameter less than or, equal to 10 micron) and Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) are monitored under National Air Monitoring Programme (NAMP) at 542 locations in 223 cities, towns and industrial areas across the country. The data is collated and compiled by Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB). This was stated by Shrimati Jayanthi Natarajan Minister of State (Independent Charge) for Environment and Forests, in the Rajya Sabha today, in a written reply to a question by Shri Shanta Kumar. The Minister further stated that as per analysis of data for three years (i.e., 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-2011), levels of SO2 (annual average) is not exceeded the standards in any city. However, NO2 and PM10 have exceeded the standards in a number of cities monitored: it is the maximum level of NO2 in one city whereas, PM10 in another city. Therefore, it is not possible to name a city having maximum air pollution. The Minister further stated that steps taken by the Central Government for control air pollution include formulation of a Comprehensive Policy for Abatement of Pollution, supply of improved autofuel, tightening of vehicular and industrial emission norms, mandatory environmental clearance for specified industries, management of municipal, hazardous and bio-medical wastes, promotion of cleaner technologies, strengthening the network of air quality monitoring stations, assessment of pollution load, source apportionment studies, preparation and implementation of action plans for major cities & critically polluted areas, public awareness etc,

INDIA ACHIEVEMENT OF MDG Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are eight international development goals set by the United Nations which member countries, including India, have agreed to achieve by the year 2015. MDGs directly pertaining to Health Sector and the progress made by India is as under: Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality: Target is to reduce Under Five Mortality Rate (U5MR) by two thirds between 1990 & 2015. In case of India, it translates into a goal of reducing U5MR to less than 39 per 1000 live births by 2015. As per the WHO/UNICEF report countdown to 2015 on maternal, newborn & child survival (released in June 2012), India has made insufficient progress with respect to U5M R. However, as per the latest available estimates from the office of Registrar General of India (RGI), the U5MR was 55 per 1000 live births in 2011. India has been achieving a consistent decline of 5 points each year during the period 2008-2010. There has been a further decline of 4 points in 2011. At this pace, India is expected to reach the MDG target. Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health: Target is to reduce Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) by three quarters between 1990 & 2015. As per the estimates of MMR released by the WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA and the World Bank, India requires to reduce MMR from 600 in 1990 to 150 per 100,000 live births in 2015. As per the report countdown to 2015 on maternal, newborn & child survival, Ind ia is making progress to achieve MDG-5. Further, as per the latest estimates released by the office of RGI, the MMR in India stands at 212 per 100,000 live births during 2007-2009. Assuming that the 5.5% rate of annual decline observed during 2004-06 and 2007-09 will continue, Indias MMR is likely to reduce to 143 per 100,000 live births in 2015, achieving the MDG target. Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases. Target is to halt by 2015 and begin to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS and the incidence of malaria and other major diseases. The progress made so far in this regard is as under: In case of HIV/AIDS, new annual HIV infections have declined by 57% during the last decade from 2.74 lakhs in 2000 to 1.16 lakhs in 2011. In case of malaria, Annual Parasitic Incidence has been brought down from 2.57 cases per 1000 population in 1990 to 1.10 cases per 1000 population in 2011. In case of Tuberculosis, prevalence in India has come down by 57.5% from 586 per 100,000 population in 1990 to 249 per 100,000 population in 2009. Mortality has reduced by 45.2% from 42 per 100,000 population to 23 per 100,000 population during this period.

The National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) was launched in 2005 with the aim to improve the availability of and access to quality health care including Maternal and Child Health services and disease control programmes particularly to rural population throughout the country, with a special focus on 18 States with weak public health indicators and infrastructure. The following steps have been taken by the Government to achieve the MDG indicators in the health sector in the country. For reducing child mortality, the steps taken include Integrated Management of Neo-natal & childhood illness, training of ASHAs (Accredited Social Health Activist) in Home based new born care, Navajat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram, setting up of sick new born care units at district hospitals, promoting exclusive breastfeeding and complementary feeding, strengthening routine immunisation programme, focussing on reduction in morbidity and mortality due to Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) and Diarrhoeal Diseases, name based tracking of pregnant women and children, etc.

For improving maternal health, the steps taken include promoting institutional deliveries, strengthening of infrastructure, Strengthening of Essential and Emergency Obstetric Care services, Strengthening Referral Systems, launching of Janani Shishu Suraksha Karyakaram, Maternal Death Review, organising village health and nutrition days, engagement of ASHA at community level, introduction of integrated mother and child health card, etc. The steps taken to control diseases like HIV / AIDs, Malaria and Tuberculosis include early diagnosis and treatment, improving monitoring and evaluation, strengthening human resources, involvement of NGOs, Private sector and community, providing services near to the doorstep of community, etc. STATE ENCOURAGED TO SET UP FOOD PROCESSING UNITS
Ministry of Food Processing Industries (MFPI), with an intention to make concerned efforts for growth and development of food processing sector, is encouraging State Governments to frame Food Processing Policies aiming at creating rural infrastructure, raising level of food processing, generating farm level employment and over all enabling environment keeping in view the requirements of the States. States of Karnataka, Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Andhra Pradesh and West Bengal have formulated separate State Processing Policies and Punjab, Tripura, Chhattisgarh, Haryana and Odisha are having their Food Processing Policies as a part of the Industrial Policy. The Government has approved taking up preparatory activities/advance action by the States under the National Mission on Food Processing (NMFP) during the 12th Five Year Plan w.e.f. 1st April, 2012 (2012-13). Approval has been accorded to the States to initiate action for finalization of State Vision Document on food processing under the National Mission on Food Processing. The finalization of the State Vision Document will enable the States to frame suitable food processing policies to cater to the specific needs of respective States. URBAN SANITAION The national rating for cities has been launched by the Government of India to achieve the goals of the National Urban Sanitation Policy (NUSP) which aims at making Indian cities and towns totally sanitized, healthy, and livable. The first such exercise undertaken during 2009-2010 with publication of results in May 2010rated 423 cities (with population greater than 100,000) for their performance across various aspects of sanitation. The Ministry of Urban Development acts as a facilitator in framing broad policies, programmes and guidelines on Urban Sanitation. The Central Government supplements the efforts of State Governments/Union Territories in providing sanitation facilities through various schemes as follows: i. In order to supplement the effort of State Governments, the Ministry of Urban Development launched Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM) in 2005 with a view to provide financial assistance for creating infrastructure facilities in all the urban areas of the country including sanitation with a reform oriented agenda. The cities are supported through Urban Infrastructure & Governance (UIG) Sub-Mission of JNNURM and Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme for Small and Medium Towns (UIDSSMT).Projects in the sectors of Sewerage, Drainage and Solid Waste Management are supported through grant of Additional Central Assistance (ACA). ii. Ministry of Urban Development has also formulated a Scheme for Urban Infrastructure Development Scheme in Satellite Towns/Magnets of Million plus Cities (UIDSST). The objectives of this scheme amongst others are to develop urban infrastructure facilities such as water supply, sewerage, drainage and solid waste management etc. at Satellite towns/ Counter Magnets around seven mega-cities. iii. The Ministry has also launched North Eastern Region Urban Development Programme (NERUDP). The capital cities of the five states are covered in the first phase viz., Agartala (Tripura), Aizawl (Mizoram), Gangtok (Sikkim), Kohima (Nagaland) and Shillong (Meghalaya). Solid Waste Management Projects are also supported under this scheme.

PM COUNCIL ON NUTRITION CHALLENGE The Prime Ministers National Council on Indias Nutrition Challenges during its first meeting on 24th November. 2010, agreed upon the following decisions:

(i) The ICDS requires strengthening and restructuring. The Ministry of Women & Child Development will take steps in this direction, with special focus on pregnant and lactating mothers and children under three. The ICDS also needs to forge strong institutional convergence with National Rural Health Mission and Total Sanitation Campaign particularly at the district and village level. It needs to provide flexibility for local action and empower mothers in particular and the community in general to have a stake in the programme. [Action: Ministry of Women and Child Development in consultation with Planning Commission and other relevant Ministries]

(ii) A multi-sectoral programme to address the maternal and child malnutrition in selected 200 high-burden districts would be prepared. This programme will bring together various national programmes through strong institutional and programmatic convergence at the State, District, Block and Village levels. While designing this programme the suggestion made by the Deputy

Chairman, Planning Commission about alternate models may be considered. [Action: Ministries of Women and Child Development in consultation with the Planning Commission, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare and other relevant Ministries] (iii) A nationwide information, education and communication campaign, coordinated by the Ministry of Women & Child Development, in consultation with the Planning Commission and Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, would be launched against malnutrition so as to address issues of status of women, the care of pregnant mothers and children under two, breastfeeding, and the importance of balanced nutrition, health, hygiene and sanitation. [Action: Ministry of WCD] (iv) The Ministries that deal with Health, Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation, School Education, Agriculture and Food & Public Distribution will bring strong nutrition focus to their programme. [Action the relevant Ministries]

INTERNATIONAL TELECOM REGULATION


The global review of International Telecom Regulations (ITRs) was held in the World Conference on International Telecommunications (WCIT-12) at Dubai during 3-14 December, 2012. The ITRs will come into force on 1st January, 2015 and India has not signed the ITRs. Further the ITRs only deal with international telecommunication and they dont deal with internet. With regard to mobile users, there are provisions in ITRs that operating agencies provide free of charge, transparent information to end users on international telecommunication services including international roaming prices and the associated relevant conditions in a timely manner. There are also provisions to promote competition in international roaming services and prices with satisfactory quality. The review of ITRs was completed on 14.12.2012 during WCIT-12 at Dubai. India did not sign the ITRs, however made the following statement. India supports the proposed ITRs and the Resolutions 1,2,4 and 5. We support the broad thrust of Resolution plenary 3 regarding an enabling environment for the greater growth of the Internet, particularly its recognition of the multi-stakeholder nature of the Internet and its wider social and economic impact within and across countries around the world. India considers that this resolution should reflect the current and emerging global realities and the dynamics of the Internet. We need to consider the wider ramifications of this Resolution before taking a decision on signing of the ITRs. We would therefore like to undertake necessary consultations at home before announcing our final decision." Post WCIT-12, no new consultations have taken place, and hence there is no change in the governments stand so far on ITRs.

E PANCHAYAT IN MISSION MODE


An Expert Group chaired by Director General, National Informatics Centre, on Information Technology (IT) Programmes of the Ministry of Panchayati Raj (MoPR), had recommended preparation of plans incorporating a minimum computing environment for all three tiers of Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs). Accordingly, the MoPR formulated the e-Panchayat Mission Mode Project (MMP) wherein 11 Core Common Applications (together called Panchayat Enterprise Suite) were planned addressing all aspects of Panchayats fu nctioning viz. from internal core functions such as Planning, Monitoring, Implementation, Budgeting, Accounting, Social Audit, etc to citizen service delivery like issue of certificates, licenses etc. Four of these Applications namely PRIASoft, PlanPlus, National PanchayatPortal and Local Governance Directory have been in use by the States for two years. Six more Applications namely Area Profiler, ServicePlus, Asset Directory, ActionSoft, Social Audit and Trainings Management were launched on the occasion of National Panchayat Day on 24th April, 2012 and training is being imparted on these Applications before their adoption. Under e-Panchayat MMP, so far, no funds have been released to States/UTs for procurement of any hardware including computers. However, the States/UTs have been advised to utilize available funds from other sources such as 13th Central Finance Commission grants, Ma hatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS), Backward Regions Grant Fund (BRGF), State funds, etc. for procuring IT infrastructure including computers at Panchayats. Due to differentials in levels of availability of infrastructure as well as preparedness of the States for e-enablement, no time frame has been fixed for computerization of all the Panchayats in the country during the Twelfth Five Year Plan.

ORGAN DONATION
Government of India has enacted the Transplantation of Human Organs (Amendment) Act 2011 which has made following provisions for simplifying the procedure for human organ donation: i. Retrieval Centres and their registration for retrieval of organs from deceased donors. ii. Swap Donation included.

iii. Mandatory inquiry by the Registered Medical Practitioner of a hospital in consultation with transplant coordinator (if available) from the near relative(s) of potential donor admitted in Intensive Care Unit and informing them about the option to donate and if they consent to donate, inform the retrieval centre for retrieval of organs. iv. Mandatory Transplant Coordinator in all registered hospitals under the Act for coordinating all matters relating to removal or transplantation of huma n organs or tissues or both and for assisting the authority for removal of human organs. v. Constitution of Brain death certification committee has been simplified. vi. National Human Organs and Tissues Removal and Storage Network and National Registry of Donors and recipients of Human Organs. vii. Enucleation of corneas has been permitted by a trained technician. To create awareness for organ and tissue donation among the stakeholders and general public, Indian Organ Donation Day is celebra ted in the month of rd th November, every year since the year 2010. Recently, the 3 Indian Organ Donation Day was organized on 30 November 2012 at Safdarjung Hospital New Delhi. A stall was set up during the India International Trade fair at New Delhi in 2012 to spread the message of Deceased Organ Donation among the public. Regional Organ Donation Awareness workshops were organized in coordination with State Governments during 2011-2012 in the cities of Bangalore, Hyderabad, Puducherry, Chennai, Kolkata, Ahmedabad, Pune, Chandigarh, &Thiruvanananthapuram for increasing the awareness among public for organ and tissue donation.

REFORMS IN HEALTH SECTOR


The Eleventh Plan highlighted various health issues in the country, which inter-alia included high Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR), Infant Mortality Rate (IMR) and Total Fertility Rate (TFR) and called for initiatives for improving health care indicators. Various initiatives taken by Ministry of Health and Family Welfare in partnership with States/UTs have resulted in improvement of health care indicators in the country. MMR in India declined from 254 per one lakh live births for the period 2004-06 to 212 per one lakh live births during the period 2007-09. IMR registered a decline of 14 points from 58 per 1000 live births in 2005 to 44 per 1000 live births in 2011. TFR declined from 2.6 in 2008 to 2.5 in 2010.

Government has taken several steps during the Eleventh Plan which inter alia, included the following :
Effective implementation of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) to provide primary and secondary healthcare. The main focus areas of NRHM include improvement in heath infrastructure, providing adequate human resources to man health facilities and to provide quality health care service. Effective planning and implementation of Reproductive Child Health (RCH) related intervention which inter-alia include development of Community Health Centres (CHCs) as First Referral Units (FRUs), Upgradation of Primary Health Centres (PHCs) as 24x7 PHCs, implementation ofJananiSurakshaYojana (JSY) and JananiShishuSurakshaKaryakaram (JSSK), Life Saving Anesthetics Skills (LSAS) and Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) training of doctors, improved ante-natal, intra-natal and post natal care, development of Special Newborn Care Units (SNCUs), Newborn Care Units (NBCUs) and Newborn Care Corners (NBCCs), Home based newborn care, distribution of contraceptives through Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs), improving access to spacing and terminal methods etc. Making available tertiaryhealth care services through strengthening of hospitals and establishment of AIIMS like institutions in the country. Up-gradation of existing Government medical colleges across the country. Effective Implementation of programmes for control of communicable and non-communicable diseases. Mainstreaming of Indian System of Medicine and Homeopathy. Increased public allocation for health programmes. Moreover, the Twelfth Plan strategy is to strengthen initiatives taken in the Eleventh Plan to further expand the reach of health care with focus on vulnerable and marginalized sections of population. The Plan envisages substantial expansion and strengthening of the public health systems and provision of robust primary health care.

As per the 12th Five Year Plan document, total public funding by the Centre and States, plan and non-plan, on core health is envisaged to increase to 1.87 per cent of GDP by the end of the Twelfth Plan. When viewed in the perspective of the broader health sector, the total Government expenditure as a proportion of GDP is envisaged to increase to 3.04 per cent by the end of the Twelfth Plan. The allocation of 12 th Five Year Plan for Ministry of Health and Family Welfare has been substantially increased to Rs. 300018 crore.

STORAGE PREERVATION OF FOODS


The Government has taken a number of steps to address the problem of storage and preservation of food products. These include encouraging reforms in agricultural marketing sector to facilitate private sector investments, implementation of Central Sector Schemes, namely, Development/ Strengthening of Agricultural Marketing Infrastructure, Grading and Standardization (AMIGS), National Horticulture Mission (NHM) and Horticulture Mission for North East and Himalayan States (HMNEH). Further, another scheme Grameen Bhandaran Yojana is also being implemented under which rural godowns are being established to provide scientific storage facilities for arresting losses in terms of wastage and quality Long and fragmented supply chains, inadequate post-harvest infrastructure such as cold storages and cold chain logistics, lack of proper transport facilities and poor road connectivity, translate into wastages of agricultural produce in the country. Fruits and vegetable, being perishable in nature, are prone to higher percentage of losses than foodgrains. As per the report of Central Institute of Post Harvest Engineering and Technology (ICAR), published in September, 2012, based on nationwide sample survey, conducted during 2005 to 2007, the losses for selected cereals are in the range of 2.8% to 4.7%, while in the case of pulses, it is 3.4% to 5.0%. The annual wastage of fruits and vegetables is estimated in the range of 5.8% to 18%.

FARM MECHANIZATION IN 12

th

PLAN

A new strategy is being formulated for farm mechanization during the Twelfth Five Year Plan. The aims & objectives of the proposed Sub Mission on Agricultural Mechanization (SMAM) under National Mission on agricultural Extension & Technology are as under: Increasing the reach of farm mechanization to small and marginal farmers; Establishment of Custom Hiring Centre to offset the adverse economies of scale arising due to small landholding and high co st of individual ownership. Passing on the benefit of hi-tech, high value and hi-productive agricultural machinery to farmers through creating hubs for such farm equipment; Promotion farm mechanization through demonstration and capacity building activities ; and Ensuring quality control of newly developed agricultural machinery.

CABINET COMMITTEE ON INVESTMENT The Cabinet in its meeting held on 13.12.2012 approved the proposal of D/o Economic Affairs for constituting a new Cabinet committee on Investment. Accordingly, the Cabinet Committee on Investment was constituted by the Cabinet Secretariat letter no 1/11/3/2012-Cab dated 02.01.2013. The functions of the Committee are as under: (i) to identify key projects required to be implemented on a time-bound basis, involving investment of Rs 1000 cr or more, or any other critical projects, as may be specified by the Committee, in sectors such as infrastructure, manufacturing, etc.;

(ii) to prescribe time limits for issue of requisite approvals and clearances by the Ministries/Departments concerned in respect of projects in identified sectors;

(iii) to monitor the progress of identified projects including the time prescribed/taken to obtain each approval each approval/clearance and delays, if any;

(iv) to review implementation of projects, that have been delayed beyond the stipulated timeframe, including issues causing delay in grant of clearance/approvals; (v) to review the procedures followed by Ministries/Departments to grant/refuse approvals and clearances;

(vi) to take decision regarding grant/refusal of approval/clearance of specific projects that are unduly delayed , if deemed necessary;

(vii) to consider and decide measures required for expeditiously granting/refusing approvals/clearances in identified sectors including simplification of rules/procedures followed by the respective Ministries/Departments for decision making; and

(viii) to require statutory authorities to discharge functions and exercise powers under the relevant law/regulation within the prescribed time frames for promoting investment and economic growth. 2. Accordingly, all the concerned Ministries/Departments have been requested to review projects, both in public and private sectors, having investment of Rs 1000 cr or more that are pending on account of delay in according clearances/approvals and to formulate and circulate the proposals for the consideration of the CCI, after due inter-ministerial consultations, in respect of such delayed projects. If the Administrative Ministry/ Department feels that a proposal needs to be considered by the Committee of Secretaries first, it should send a note/proposal for consideration by the Committee of Secretaries to the Cabinet Secretariat. 3.Security Clearance for Exploration and Production activities in NELP Blocks 3.1 In the first meeting of the CCI held on 30.1.2013, the proposal of M/o Petroleum and Natural Gas regarding Clearance for Carrying Out Exploration and Production Activities in NELP Oil & Gas Blocks was considered. The contracts for 40 blocks under consideration were awarded between April 2000 and June 2010. However, security clearance was withdrawn between February 2010 and May 2012. The issue was pending since then. According to the Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, an investment of US$ 13.42 billion has already been made in these 40 blocks and an investment of US$ 2.542 billion is envisaged in the next 3-4 years. The Committee noted that exploration and production activities have been allowed by Ministry of Commerce in respect of one block. The CCI directed M/o Petroleum & Natural Gas and M/o Defence to evolve workable solution in respect of seven blocks within 30 days and to examine the conditions attached by the M/o Defence in respect of 32 blocks in terms of their essentiality and/or feasibility within 3 months. 3.2 The CCI in its meeting held on 20.3.2013 considered the proposal of the M/o Petroleum and Natural Gas and approved the conditional clearance given in respect of 5 blocks. Total investment made in these blocks is US$ 10.546 billion (about Rs 56,921 cr) and investment envisaged is US$ 0.29 billion (about Rs 1,566 cr). The bottlenecks in respect of other 31 other blocks are in advanced stage of resolution. The CCI has directed that outstanding issues be resolved within a week.

4. Pooling of Price of Imported Coal with Domestic Coal Investment made in a number of thermal power projects are not being optimally utilized at present due to shortage of domestic coal. This situation could be remedied by plugging the gap between demand and supply through import of coal. However, the price of imported coal is higher than the price of domestic coal. In view ofthis,on 5.2.2013, the Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs considered the proposal of the Ministry of Coal regarding Pooling of Price of Imported Coal with Domestic Coal and approved the broad guidelines for the pricing and pass through of higher cost of the imported coal. T he Committee also directed that the proposal based on the approved guidelines be placed within 5 weeks. 5. Location of North Karanpura Super Thermal Power Project of NTPC In the second meeting of the CCI held on 20.02.2013, two proposals, one each of the M/o Coal and M/o Power regarding North Karanpura Super Thermal Power Project (NKSTPP)(3*660 MW) by NTPC. The project location falls in a potential coal bearing area containing coal reserve of about 6 billion tonne.The project has been pending since March 2000 on the issue of the location of the project. The CCI decided that the power plant be constructed at the present site with some specific conditions. The Committee also decided, in principle, to restore the original coal linkage granted to the plant with certain stipulations. According to the Ministry of Power, this project would lead to an investment of about Rs 14000 cr and generation of 1980 MW of power. 6. Environment and Forest Clearance to Coal Mining projects

7. Decision taken to streamline the processes relating to Environment and Forest Clearances: Meeting of the CCI held on 20 March 2013

7.2 Environment Clearance (EC) for mining projects

7.3 Environment Clearance (EC) and Forest Clearance (FC) for linear projects.

7.4 Environment Clearance (EC) and Forest Clearance (FC) for other projects

7.4.3 The CCI was informed that a Committee has been constituted under Dr. K. Kasturirangan, Member, Planning Commission, to review the provisions of EIA Notifications, 2006 relating to building, roads and SEZ projects. The Committee is to give its report by 22.03.2013. The CCI directed the MoEF that the decisions on the recommendations of the Committee should be taken expeditiously.