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GREENPORT ECO ENERGY PARK

Proposal and Concept Description

Prepared by: studio a/b architects 651 W. Main St. Riverhead, NY 11901 T. 631 591 2402 With Lillian Ball for The Village of Greenport David Nyce, Mayor John W. Naylor, Jr., P.E. Director of Utilities March 20, 2013

GREENPORT ECO ENERGY PARK

The Greenport Eco Energy Park will install a two to four megawatt, self-generated electric facility using renewal energy. The waterfront property will also be developed as a public park, educational facility, conference center, and demonstration site for a range of sustainable and green infrastructure practices, becoming an important eco-tourism attraction for the East End. I. Project Summary Description

The Village of Greenport proposes the establishment of an Eco Energy Park on an 8.7 acre parcel that it owns at Clark's Beach, outside the Village limits within the jurisdiction of the Town of Southold. The site currently contains the Village outfall pipe from its sewage treatment plan. Renewable energy generation from both solar and wind installations will be designed to supplement the five-megawatt, hydroelectric power purchases already serving the Village's basic needs. The goal is to build a two-to-four megawatt, self-generated system to replace the costly, open-market purchases of additional electrical power made when demand exceeds the limits of the hydro-generation contract. Currently during peak months the overage represents a high percentage of the monthly costs, compared to a much lower percentage of consumption. For example in July, 2012, overage represented 27.8% of the power used but 78.9% of the costs. The fact that Greenport has a contained system with generating capability makes this an ideal pilot program to study long term effects and cost savings of strategies. The site will also be developed as a public park, educational facility, conference center, and demonstration site for a range of sustainable and green infrastructure practices. Education, especially as it relates to how renewable energy, natural systems and the man-made environment interact is a critical component of the project. An understanding of water, air and soil quality, causes of degradation and methods of protecting and enhancing quality will be key elements of the outreach and demonstration components. Examples of sustainable approaches applicable to domestic scales will be showcased. Designed as a public amenity providing public access to the Long Island Sound, the restored site will enhance this underused waterfront parcel and serve a wide audience, including the local populace and visitors. Trails will link this facility to other public lands including a Bay-to-Sound trail system, providing unparalleled access to a full range of natural environments. The site will be developed for delight and exploration as well as utility, serving as an eco-tourism attraction on the East End. The social, economic and environmental priorities of the triple bottom line will all be advanced by this project. II. Goals: Reduce or flat-line electrical costs for the Greenport system by generating electricity normally purchased on the open market Generate and use renewable energy Provide public access, educational and recreational opportunities serving the local populace, adult education, and tourists Promote by example sustainable practices for utility, building and site development practices, which in return will encourage private replication and expand job opportunities for local businesses involved with sustainable practices

III.

Program The proposed components are a comprehensive concept, but will be phased according to grant availability and financing scenarios. A. Components: 1. ENERGY a. One megawatt wind turbine generator on the northern section of the site near the Long Island Sound. b. One megawatt wind turbine generator at the Village sewage facility. c. Vertical axis wind turbine demonstration installation (domestic scale) d. Solar arrays and inverters to provide a 0.5 megawatt system (additional panels in Village) e. Additional solar arrays possible at the sewage treatment plant facility f. Hydro-electric demonstration g. Energy conservation program 2. SITE IMPROVEMENTS a. New Entry and Parking area to accommodate 40 parking spaces (mostly under the solar panels). Includes: i. Solar charging station for electric vehicles ii. Permeable pavement iii. Electric cart parking (for site) iv. Bicycle rack b. Stabilized route to support fire and maintenance truck access to the site and existing sewer outfall system. This can also accommodate electric carts (no public vehicles allowed past the parking area). c. Improvements to existing pathway and its termination on the beach, including stormwater collection in a series of rain gardens and rubble reconfiguration/cover. d. Overall site improvements i. Identification of native and invasive species existing on the site ii. Removal of debris (ranges from an abandoned car to concrete rubble) iii. Removal of invasive species iv. Restoration of vernal wetland areas and roadside grasses/plantings using native plants v. Stairs, path construction for safely scaling elevation changes within the site vi. Bluff protection enhancement at the base of the cliff face e. Collection of building, solar panel and path stormwater run-off for reuse, irrigation, and rain gardens. f. Proposed wetland to daylight sewer outfall for treatment and polishing for further nitrogen removal (fourth step in effluent treatment) before dispersal to the LI Sound. g. New, themed trails throughout the site with links to the Bay-to-Sound trail system being developed by the Town of Southold and Village of Greenport, including proposed trails on the adjacent, county-owned properties preserved as open space. Trail, site and building themes revolve around concepts related to the sun, earth, wind and water. h. Community garden and composting area i. Signage for entry, identification of natural species, explanation of systems, sustainable practices and other educational purposes

j.

Natural and artistic interventions underlying the park's theme, such as living bridge/fences, boardwalk, micro-wind sculpture, and "dark sky" lighting/reflective installations.

3. EDUCATION AND CONFERENCE CENTER (under solar panels) a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. Meeting/conference center Exhibition space and data monitoring presentation Kitchen Public bathrooms using composting, urine collection, gray water systems and/or other innovative wastewater treatment Bathrooms and shower facilities (if overnight stays are accommodated, could be a separate structure (phase 2) Utility room (with public viewing) Office Storage Caretakers accommodations

4. CAMPING FACILITIES Up to twenty cabins or camp sites for overnight accommodation with either integral or an additional toilet facility depending upon siting. Sample cabins can emphasize/illustrate approaches to passive solar and sundial installations, green roofs, natural ventilation, and component systems.

B.

Project Participants/Partners

Village of Greenport and Village of Greenport Electric Owner and developer of the site Greenport is a full requirements customer of the New York Power Authority (NYPA), as well as provider of emergency power generation New York Power Authority (NYPA) Provides wholesale electricity to the system Long Island Power Authority Owner of connective electric power infrastructure Department of Energy/ Brookhaven Laboratories Town of Southold Zoning jurisdiction and co-developer of Bay-to-Sound Trail System Planning Commission, Land Preservation Committee and Economic Development Council Suffolk County Park development (owner of adjacent protected properties) Evaluation of innovative on-site wastewater treatment technologies Department of Economic Development and Planning Audubon Society Potential steward of the site, nature center programming The Audubon Society currently is the steward of the adjacent County property) Cornell Cooperative Extension /Stony Brook University/Sea Grant Program The facility may be used for educational programs on East End, including industry training and certification programs, such as certification in sustainable landscape practices, best practices in irrigation, the planting and use of plants for stormwater mitigation, rain gardens, and the phytoremediation of contaminated waters or wastewater systems. Peconic Green Growth Demonstrations /installations of sustainable site and building practices, exhibition design, art coordination and presentations Group for the East End Programing and education Co-organizer for group action items relative to site clean-up, trail and garden development North Fork Environmental Council Programming, youth education, and co-organization for volunteer and civic environmental projects Greenport School System Curriculum development and field experience relative to sustainable topics Floyd Memorial Library Education programs Greenport Business Improvement District Boy/Girl Scouts The site can be used for both camping and public service programs

IV. A.

BACKGROUND
Utilities Electric

Currently the Village of Greenport manages its own electrical power, water and sewage

treatment districts. The Village of Greenport electric utility is an approximately 7.5 megawatt system with a franchise roughly covering the 11944 zip code district. It serviced over 2000 homes and businesses in 2012. Greenport is currently a full requirements customer of the New York Power Authority (NYPA), responsible for the management of the wholesale electricity market for the system. The Village facility also serves as an emergency generator for the larger utility. Approximately five megawatts of the system are derived from a hydro allocation from the Mohawk/Niagara facility in upstate New York. The other 2.5 megawatts are purchased for the Village by the NYPA on the open market, with the costs passed on to Greenport's customers. Based on the NYPA Annual Report for the Year Ended May 31, 2012, 16.8% of the supplied electrical power is lost in transmission. Whenever the instantaneous electrical demand exceeds the hydro-allotment, the overage is charged on the more expensive open market. According to the annual report, there is incremental power purchased in each month. On a municipal unit charge billing statement for 2012, the cost per kilowatt hour when supplied by hydro-generation was consistently $0.00492. The cost for incremental purchases above the hydro capacity ranged from $0.02905 to $0.22369. If one looks at July, 2012 the excess purchase is charged at a rate of $0.04789, or 9.7 times the cost of hydro power for the same time period. For the same month, if one compares the incremental to the hydro use and costs, the incremental use was 27.8% of power used, but 78.9% of the combined purchase price. Looking at the annual statement, it appears that the purchased power was 9.9% of the annual total purchase. Greenport's attraction as a tourist destination and the fact that 22.6% of the housing units are occupied seasonally, cause an upswing in usage during the summer.

Electric Use by Month


1200000 1000000 K i lowa tt Hou rs 800000 600000 400000 200000 --Residential -Commercial

Septem ber

C C0

..0

6.)

'a:, a, ,._ , Jo _o to as D 26 0 E E D C a, '


;'

_c rci
2

0 a) z 0

CD >

Cl.) u

co

LL

a,

In the fiscal year 2012, Greenport had 1,666 residential customers who consumed 43% of the power, while 371 commercial customers used 35% of the power and five industrial customers utilized 17% of the power supplied. 335 customers use electricity for all their utility needs. This weighting implies that targeted conservation measures should be considered as part of the plan. Since the project has a strong educational component, a conservation program can showcase the effectiveness of demand reduction for a portion of the proposed power utility, while still accommodating community and business expansion. For example, geothermal installations could be incentivized for targeted users (commercial and all electric users) or a municipal option suggested for heavy users of air conditioning, when electrical usage peaks. If the incentives were offered before 2016, federal incentives for both homes (30%) and businesses (10%) would lower costs even further for private applicants. Any conservation measure, whether insulation retrofits, renewable energy, or more efficient HVAC systems will also stimulate business for product suppliers and installers. Some incentives could provide multiple benefits. For example, a program that replaces showerheads with a WaterSense fixture (EPA recommended) will reduce both water and electric usage.

Electrical Utility Usage % by Customer Type


1111 Residential

Electric Utility # and Type of Customer


I Residential

0%
2%

0%
0% It Commercial

s Commercial
it Industrial

Industrial

II Public St.

III Public St. Light

Light Mun. Public St. Light Other


VI Municipal

Mun.
M Public St. Light

Other Municipal operations Other Public

operations
M Other Public

Authorities

Authorities

This project proposes replacing the incremental usage with self-generated, renewable energy. Under the existing full requirements contract, the Village cannot directly augment the Village's electrical needs without enabling legislation and dropping the full requirements NYPA customer status. Any excess electricity would be sold directly to NYPA. If the full requirement status were to be changed to a partial requirements contract, as Freeport or Rockville Center do, the Village would be forced to purchase electricity on the open market directly if there were any gap between demand and supply, most likely at even higher rates than currently charged. Any installation would need to supply all peak loading to avoid this situation. Under the existing contract NYPA purchases the incremental electricity for the Village, but negotiates prices in advance, rather than relying on instantaneous pricing for the incremental need. A reduction of need could be introduced without violating the contract by using conservation measures as

discussed previously and by having renewable energy reduce municipal and/or street lighting loads before drawing on the NYPA sources (3-5% of the total usage). Excess energy generation would still need to be addressed under this scenario. Two wind turbines of approximately one megawatt capacity each and roughly 2 to 3 megawatts of solar power are proposed (0.5 megawatts on the park site and over 2 megawatts at the sewage treatment plant. Based on an analysis from NYPA, the payback for the solar installation is 47 years for a simple payback and 22 to 47 years for wind, depending upon generation rates. There are three scenarios that would reduce the payback period. (1) NYPA could purchase the excess electricity. As part of the New York State's initiative to increase installed solar capacity, NYPA has developed a Solar Market Acceleration Program (Solar MAP) to reduce panel and soft costs. Participation in this program could reduce costs. (2)The Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) is expected to offer a solar feed tariff program, which could buy all energy generated by the installation as a separate arrangement. If this option were to be chosen, it would be independent of the current electrical contract. (3) Couple with other town utilities to meet renewable energy generation quotas. Previously, the Town of Messena offered to share the costs of wind turbine installation costs to reach this goal. (Costs of wind generation is roughly four times gas at this time, so quotas for renewable energy drive the need.) Added benefits of self-generated power would be the provision of stable or reduced prices for a financially challenged community, as well as reduced losses due to the distance between provider and user. Increased local power generation will also provide resiliency during times of emergency power outages, an increasingly frequent event for a locale impacted by climate change. B. Utilities Sewer The original plant was built with federal Works Progress Administration money during the Depression in 1935. In 2008, the Village of Greenport began the $8.1 million project of reconstructing the sewage treatment plant in response to a consent order. A stimulus allocation of $4.3 million was awarded to the project to attain a reduction in the nitrogen loading to the Long Island Sound. The new plant provides tertiary treatment, which the former plant did not. The plant design uses a combination of suspended growth and fixed growth technology for biological nutrient removal and ultraviolet sterilization, is rated for 6 mg/I, but is operating at roughly 3 mg/I of nitrogen loading, considered the best attainable technology. The design's annual energy costs, while lower than alternative options, are increased were by $110,000 .The new plant is rated for 650,000 gallons per day, but can hold up to 1.4 million gallons for a 48 hour period. Current daily usage may peak at 400,000 gallons in the summer months, with most daily averages being below 300,000 gpd. Since the concentration is also roughly half, the plant is operating at one quarter to one third its capacity. Half of the plant is shut down from September to May. Some spiking episodes are evident, but it is believed that these are caused by stormwater infiltration, which needs to be further explored and corrected. The Village aims to expand the district by another 200,000 gallons per day (equivalent of 666 dwelling units), annexing areas to both the east and west. The Village currently charges a $15,000 per dwelling hook-up fee ($50/gallon), not including direct connection costs. The plant is currently removing nitrogen at a rate below 5 mg/I, the limit of present technology, and half the maximum allowable limit for drinking water standards. But marine environments are more susceptible to nitrogen loading, with recommended ranges being approximately 0.5

mg/I. Also the marine environment responds to total loads of nitrogen, not just flow rates. This
means that the gain in water quality to the LI Sound will be lost when the expansion occurs, as 7

currently the sewage treatment system is shifting a large proportion of the nitrogen load from the Peconic Estuary to the LI Sound. There are four ways of mitigating this: 1. When expanding the sewer district, include a one-to-one relationship between uses in the two watersheds. The removals of on-site contamination from the LI Sound will match the additional loading from the Peconic Estuary. (See lines 5 in Table XXX) Divert some of the outfall to the Peconic Estuary. This will maintain existing hydrology patterns, but require a change in the SPDES permit. Reuse the treated wastewater to reduce the amount of treated effluent release Further treat the outfall to remove additional nitrogen

2. 3. 4.

This project proposes a demonstration project for the further treatment of the treated wastewater before it reaches the LI Sound by diverting a portion of the outfall through a wetland environment, using natural vegetation to uptake nitrogen. The project aims to turn wastewater into an asset at the same time that it purifies the water further. On a smaller scale, the project will demonstrate more domestic solutions to wastewater treatment in the development of its nature center and cabins. Separation of graywater, alternative wastewater treatment, and reuse options capable of being replicated for single on-site systems can be evaluated as pilot projects for potential use throughout the county. This type of demonstration is needed, where over 70% of the buildings in Suffolk County use on-site septic systems.
Nitrogen Loading

gal/day

# dwelling equivalent

#N from Hsehold

N flow mg/I from hsehold

N flow mg/I after treatment


60 60 60 30 60 30 60 10 5 5 5 5 5 5

Estimated N# to LI Sound daily


5,500 2,750 4,583 -458 4,125 3,667 -917 3,667

1 2 3

Older Sewage Plant

300,000 300,000 500,000 50,000 450,000 100,000 400,000

1,000 1,000 1,667 167 1,500 333 1,333

33 33 33 17 33 17 33

New Sewage Plant


Expansion of 200,0008/d If balance watersheds 4a Locate 25% of expansion from LI watershed 4b Add 150,000 from Peconic 5a Locate 50% of expansion from LI watershed 5b Add 100,0008/d from Peconic Estuary Watershed

2,750
Assumes 33 # N load and rate of 60 mg/1 per typical household when dispensed directlyto sewer, Assumes 16.5 # N load and rate of 30 mg/1 per typical household when dispensed to on-site septic system Source: Memorandum dated 2/22/2013 from Lomardo Associates

C. The Site: The 8.713 acre parcel lies north of Route 48 with 409.39' of road frontage, extending to the Sound with 378.64 of shoreline. The overall depth of the lot is roughly 1110 feet 1 . Existing access both to the road and beach lies along the eastern boundary, which is also listed as an "unmapped road" on some maps, and a proposed 18' sewer easement on the site plan. The bluff rises to an elevation of roughly 45 feet. Some sand mining together with natural topography has reduced the elevation of the site to approximately30 feet in the interior of the lot. There is a small bank that lines the western and southern edges of the excavation site, the remnants of sand mining. In 1936 the Village of Greenport purchased the parcel for a sewage treatment plant. The plant was eventually built further inland, on Moore's Lane, but the outfall pipe from the sewer runs 8' below the surface as a force main along the eastern property line, until reaching the gravity drop at the bluff for the outfall to the Long Island Sound. From aerial views dated 1962, it appears the lot's primary use was agriculture. The site lies on the outer edges of an area identified as being archeologically sensitive. The New York State Department of Conservation Natural Resource mapping tool shows a state regulated freshwater wetland in the southwestern section of the site, with the site being part of larger area of significant natural communities. The site lies directly under the Atlantic Flyway, making bird watching a rewarding activity, with the North Fork Audubon Society headquarters located at the nearby Inlet Pond County Park. An elementary visual inspection of the site found that most of the plants found on the site were invasive, including such species as Norway Maple, Black Locust, Russian Olive, Japanese Honeysuckle, Wineberry, Lovewort and phragmites. Since the site was once cleared for farming, it is natural that invasive plants took hold once the site was abandoned. Some natives, mostly grasses and bushes are present, including pussy willow, shadbush, bayberry, and Rosa Rugosa. The soils listed for the site by the United States Department of Agriculture include:
SOILS Bc Es RdC GP RdB MfB I Beaches ! Escarpments I Riverhead sandy loam, 8-15% slope I Gravel pits : Riverhead sandy loam, 3-8% slope 1 Montauk fine sandy loam, 13-8% slope 1 Southern quarter 1 Prime farmland i Top of the bluff , I Along the northeaster i section ! Mid-western section Prime farmland ! Somewhat limited, i seepage 0.9 i Somewhat limited, I depth to I saturation/dense material low i Location I Along the LI Shore

1 Agriculture Soil type i


I Not prime I Not prime , : Farmland of state= wide importance Not prime farmland

1 Septic Absorption 1 rating


I Not rated I Not rated i Somewhat limited, = seepage 0.9 ; Not rated

The USDA soil information is based on a scale of 1:20,000. More detailed information may be

needed during the design phase. All the soils are considered not hydric. The Septic Tank
Absorption Rating indicates the extent to which the soils are limited for use as natural treatment, usually due to the percolation rates. "Somewhat Limited" indicates that remediation may be needed for effective treatment. Only the beach and bluff base lie within the FEMA flood zones of VE, the rest of the site lies outside the FEMA flood zones.

Most of the site has been previously disturbed, either from farming or sand mining. Evidence of minor illegal dumping is scattered throughout the site, including an abandoned car and office furniture. A more deliberate disposal of broken concrete slabs with exposed rebar was used to protect the road end at the beach and cliff base. In its present condition, it could be considered a safety hazard. To deter unauthorized use, the site is now gated from the road. This project would restore the site by removing debris and invasive species, planting appropriate native species, covering the concrete debris with rock boulders and separated from the public path by plantings. The vernal wetland near the highway will be restored and the surrounding area planted as a native field. Where farmland soils remain, a community garden is proposed. Planted swales, rain gardens and recharge designs will help to control run-off, both near the solar panels/nature center, and the access roadway that slopes directly to the beach. D. Land Use The existing zoning is R80, or two-acre residential use, with a wide range of uses allowed, some as a special exemption. Two lots to the east have been purchased by Suffolk County to preserve open space, with the Audubon Society acting as stewards. Lots to the west are residential. A private campground is across Route 25, and a nursing home, hotels, condominiums, and residential enclaves are nearby. E. The Village of Greenport The Village of Greenport was first settled in the mid 1600's. Historically it was an active port during the Revolutionary War era and a major whaling port until 1859. Boatbuilding was active through World War II and commercial fishing still continues, although at reduced levels. The Greenport Village Historic District, with 254 contributing buildings, is listed with both the State and National Registry of Historic Places. In 2005 the Village opened a transient marina contiguous to the historic downtown. Greenport's commercial district is an active destination with retail, restaurants and hotels. The Village of Greenport, with its waterfront terminus of the Long Island Railroad and North Ferry terminal, frequent bus service, and public marina, attracts tourists both by sea and land. Greenport is easily walkable, with a densely built hamlet with sidewalks throughout. The Village has an average of six lots per acre, with accessory apartments allowed and two residences per lot in R-2 zone, representing the densest land use pattern on the East End and a historical, existing example of the benefits of Smart Growth concepts now espoused by regional planning efforts.. While the Village has direct access to the bay, this site is Greenport's only facility on the Long Island Sound, and is within bikable or hiking distance, lying to the northwest of the Village. Nearby residential neighborhoods that are part of hamlet of Greenport, Southold, but outside the incorporated Village, are less connected to the Downtown area and recreational amenities. The trails, walkways and bikeways being developed as part of the Bay-to-Sound Trail system, of which this project is part, will create direct links between these outlying areas and the Downtown and harbor. In reverse, the Village will be better connected to nature preserves and the Long Island Sound. The trails will allow more local trips to be made by non-polluting modes of transportation while also reducing congestion caused by leisure trips.

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F.

Demographics for the Village of Greenport


With a population of 2,197 (2010 census) and density of 1,831 people per square mile, Greenport is one of the densest communities in on the East End, supporting over three times the densities of nearby communities. Greenport also has one of the most diverse populations in the area, with the white, non-Hispanic population being 53.6% of the population. The poverty rate far exceeds that of nearby towns (25% compared to 3.1% for Southold), as well as state and federal averages. Coupled with that is a lower than average median income (58.5% of the County median). In close correlation, the Village's home ownership rate is only 47.6%.

G. Jobs
In Greenport, the prevalent occupations listed in the 2010 census were natural resources, construction and maintenance occupations at 28%, with management, business, science, and arts at 25.8% and service occupations at 24.9%. All of these occupations will benefit from an emphasis on sustainable energy, site and building best practices as described in this proposal. This project will help local people develop skill sets and knowledge that will set them apart from typical practices in their respective fields, so that their endeavors will gain status due to expertise in sustainable practices. For example, landscape care and irrigation services companies/installers could be certified for sustainable practices. Plant nurseries could provide plants and services that are suitable for rain gardens, native plant reestablishment, phytoremediation, roof gardens and living walls. Product suppliers, designers, and contractors will gain business from an educated public demanding sustainable services and products. The development of self-generated power will give the Village of Greenport some control over future costs, passing on to its district future flat-line or reduced costs for energy, while avoiding air pollution in an environmentally sensitive area where atmospheric deposition impacts surface water quality and marine life. A lower cost for energy will also support business retention and expansion within the district, stimulating new job creation. Greenport relies heavily on a tourist industry. It is one of the few locales, where the government owns leisure facilities, ranging from a marina where tall ships and large, private yachts dock, to a campground in Moore's Woods that provides the least expensive accommodation for tourists on the North Fork. Income from both the marina and campground benefits the Village of Greenport populace directly.

H. Leisure
Based on New York State needs assessments, Long Island has a critical need for camping facilities, especially with cabins. Opened in the 1970's, the McCann Campground on Moore's Lane, owned by the Village, currently has 30 campsites offering public sewer, water, and electric connections. Ten tent sites are also available along Moore's Drain. New York State park guidelines recommend 70 sites as being economically feasible. The 20-25 sites proposed here will supplement the forty already run by the Village, as well as provide cabins, the highest park need listed in the state assessment. Eastern Long Island Kampground, a private, full service, enterprise, is located across Route 48 from this site. The leisure activities proposed for this project will be suitable for a full range of ages. With an accessible route to the Long Island Sound, this proposal provides all but one of the leisure uses preferred by an older population. In addition to the quality boating, kayaking, fishing and swimming activities prevalent in the area, agro-tourism, with vineyards and farm produce, is a dominant local industry. An eco-tourism park will add a unique destination type that is compatible with the existing attractions, reinforcing Greenport's leading role as a leisure

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destination. The park will provide public access to the Sound in an area where access is often limited to private property or those with town passes. Boating, swimming, bird watching, hiking and gardening will be supported by the site's development. The NYS bike route (A-14), which starts at the Cross Sound Ferry (CT) and extends through Long Island, turns just east of the site, making the facilities easily available to long-distance and leisure bikers.

I. Education
Unfortunately, Greenport's graduation rates from high school (72.6%) and college (25.7%) are significantly lower than the surrounding communities. Greenport's high school graduation rate is 16.9% percentage points lower than the County average. This project would provide educational opportunities for both youth and adults, helping to instill an interest in learning and environmental stewardship. The Nature Center would provide a year-round resource for the Greenport School System and public Floyd Memorial Library, as well as a shared facility accommodating not-for-profit programing and educational programs. The facility could also be an East End outpost for adult learning sponsored by other colleges and universities, such as Cornell Cooperative Extension, the Sea Grant Program, or Stony Brook University.

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DEMOGRAPHIC COMPARISON
Greenport Southold Suffolk County 1,493,350 39.8 13.9% NYS USA

Population 2010 Median Age (years) % 65 + 2010 Race (%) White African American Asian Mix Race Hispanic White, not Hispanic High School +2007-2011 Bachelor's degree or higher Housing units Persons /sq mile 2010 Home ownership rate 2007-2011 $ Median value of owneroccupied housing 2007-2011 Households 2007-2011 Persons per household 2007-2011 Per capita income 2011 Median household income 20072011 Persons below poverty level 2007-2011 Mean travel time to work- min

2197 40.7 17.7%

5,748 49.7 26.6%

19,570,261 38 13.7%

313,914,040 37.1 13.3%

66.5% 10.4% 0.6% 3% 34% 53.6 72.6% 25.7% 1191 1,831 (calc) 47.6% 460,900

93.9% 0.8% 0.8% 1.2% 8.4% 89.1% 96.1% 41.9% 3,996 549.3 88.7% 536,600

85.9% 8.1% 3.6% 1.7% 17% 71% 89.5% 32.4% 572,995 1,637.4 80.8% 411,000

71.5% 17.5% 7.8% 2.2% 18% 58% 84.6% 32.5% 8,119,364 411.2 54.8% 301,000

78.1% 13.1% 5% 2.3% 16.7% 63.4% 85.4% 28.2% 132,312,404 87.4 66.1% 186,200

820 2.52 31,739 51,042 48,398 (2010) 25% 20.35 last 12 months 24.9

2,406 2.38 44,839 76,328

496,677 2.93 36,588 87,187

7,215,687 2.56 31,796 56,951

114,761,359 2.6 27,915 52,762

3.1%

5.7%

14.5%

14.3%

31.7

30.3

31.4

25.4

http://quickfacts.census.govicifd/states/36000.html http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/isf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=DEC 10 DP DPDP1

http://www.newyork - demographics.com/greenport - demographics


http://quickfacts.census.govicifdistates/36/36103.html http://www.newyork-demographics.com/southold-demographics

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V.

Community Commitment

Greenport continues to show its commitment to enhancing its natural resources, historic infrastructure and commercial district. It is one of the few communities on the East End to have a sewage treatment, water and electric districts, lowering costs for its populace, while supporting a densely built community. Committed to protecting its rich environment, economic vitality, and social equity/accessibility, Greenport has proven time and again that "Green" means more than a label, as evident in its past actions and expenditures, illustrated by the following. The Village of Greenport has proven itself able to create world class improvements, as evidenced by Mitchell Park and Marina, as well as over 200 units of subsidized housing. Its commitment to youth is evident in the development of the Skate Park and playing fields, as well as trail improvements to Moore's Woods and Pond. 1987 Created a Park District zoning category. 1988/9 Village of Greenport Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (Second one in NYS) Two Little League Softball and one Women's and Men's Softball field on Moore's Lane. Early 1990's Improvements to trails in Moore's Woods 1996-2003 Developed Mitchell Park, providing public access to the coastline downtown. Roughly five million dollars, NYS EPF funds, ISTEA, and NYSOPRHP, and NYSDEC (brownfields remediation) providing matching funds to Greenport's efforts. 2000 Built skate park, $220,000, with $50,000 from NYS Office of Children and Family Services. 2003 NYS DOT reconstructed NYS Route 25 adjacent to Mitchell Park $6.5 million. 2003 Developed the Moore's Pond Loop Trail, near campground. 50/50 grant: NYS OPRHP for $25,391.72. 2004 Installed bike lockers at the train station (MTA). Greenport installed a separated bike/pedestrian trail within Moore's Lane right-of-way, which connects the Village to the north. 2005 Built Mitchell Park Marina. $4 million with match from Empire State DC and NYS DOS. Developed a concept plan for trails through the Village and Silver Lake, generated in2007 house Finalized sale of 6.7 acres contiguous to project site to Suffolk County for preservation 2008 2008 Began complete rebuild of the sewage treatment plant ($8.1 million) Began overhaul of the electrical plant ($5.5 million) 2009 2009 Improved the neighborhood Park on Third Street, which was originally built 25 years ago with a Small Cities grant. $25,000 (VoG). 2009 Suffolk County awarded Southold Town and the Group for the East End funds for a Flora and Fauna study including Silver Lake, Moore's Drain and Woods, and Inlet County Park. This informed how and where to place trails and provided a management plan. ($35,000) Refinanced existing debt for Mitchell Park, ensuring financial stability. This allowed the 2011 Village to be able to retain the site at Clark's Beach, instead of selling it for debt

reduction. 2011 Developed a Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan Amendment, including a Harbor Management Plan, to evaluate the full village and all assets, including parks, utilities,

and interior development. 2011 Greenport signed the Climate Smart Pledge

14

VI.

Regulatory Approvals Needed and Environmental Considerations A. Town of Southold, Zoning Board of Appeals 1. Zoning Variance and special exception needed for use from the Town of Southold's Zoning Board of Appeals (R80 Zoning, Chapter 280-13) 2. Zoning Variance needed for the size and location of the wind turbine 3. Zoning Variance for setback of cabins/tent sites B. Town of Southold, Board of Trustees For work within 100' of wetlands and underwater lands C. Town of Southold, Planning 1. Site plan review 2. Environmental Impact D. Town of Southold, Building Department Building permit E. Suffolk County, Department of Economic Development and Planning, Office of Planning and Environment, Planning Commission and Council on Environmental Quality Within 500 ' of a County park, road, and Long Island Sound. F. Suffolk County Department of Public Works Driveway entrance and pedestrian crossing of Route 48 G. Suffolk County Department of Health Services Approval of sanitary treatment and well installations H. NYS Department of Environmental Conservation 1. Freshwater permit 2. Tidal Wetland permit NYS Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation On EIS record existing information on nearby archaeological sites

I.

VII.

Environmental Benefits and Issues A. Benefits 1. Reduction in greenhouse gases - uses no fuel in energy production 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 1. Air pollution reduction Nitrogen reduction in waters Site remediation removal of invasive plants and reestablishment of native species Stormwater recharge Erosion mitigation/protection will be provided and enhanced over current conditions Increased sound from wind turbine Sound is within acceptable ranges, but fluctuations can cause a sense of annoyance in approximately 5% of the population at 35-40 dBA and 18% between 40-45 dBA Impact on bird populations "Wind turbines kill far fewer birds in general each year than do many other causes linked to humans, including domestic cats and collisions with glass windows. But wind power has a disproportionate effect on certain species that are already struggling for survival. " (golden eagles). Marc Bechard, biologist Boise State University Idaho Identify mitigation actions with the North Fork Audubon Society, such as recording impacts (most birds will adjust fly pattern), limiting operation speed or operation at critical migration times. 3. 4. Visual impact, due to the height. Turbine was located to minimize impacts. Traffic safety for pedestrians crossing Route 48 15

B. Issues

2.

VIII.

A. B. C.

Potential Sources of Funding Climate Smart Communities Community Development Block Grants Environmental Facilities Corporation Environmental Protection Agency Federal Tax Incentives Long Island Regional Economic Development Council Long Island Sound Futures Fund National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NY Department of Environmental Conservation NY Department of Parks and Historic Preservation NY Department of State Costal Resource Management NY Power Authority

D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L.

M. NYSERDA N. Private Equity 0. Suffolk County Clean Water Fund 477 and other programs

16

SITE PICTURES 1/10/2013

Entry to site from Rt. 25.

Most trees are invasive (upper level)

High section facing residential site (west)

Road on west boundary by residential lots (on site)

Sand pit area

Cleared, sandy area

Sand pit facing north

Basin

Open area after passing the "entry hill"

Best looking tree in the area (on adjacent lot invasive)

Open area looking south


Swale at base of incline/end of mining area Basin

Basin Access to beach

Trash

Abandoned car

Road to Beach looking south

Road to beach

Road to beach

Top of rubble at end of road

From top of rubble, looking back at site

End of road, top of rubble

Beach looking west

Beach looking west Beach looking east

Top of rubble

Top of rubble


Rubble pile Outfall pipe

Rubble "jetty"

N.Y.S. PERMITTED DISCHARGE POINT SPDES PERMIT No. NY-0020079 OUTFALL No. 001
FOR INFORMATION ABOUT THIS PERMITTED DISCHARGE CONTACT

Permit Name: Village-of Greenpgrt Permit Contact: John W. Naylor, Jr. P.E. Permittee Phone: (631) 477-0248 x202
OR CONTACT

NYSDEC DIVISION OF WATER REGIONAL OFFICE SUNY@STONYBROOK 50 CIRCLE ROAD STONY BROOK, NY 11790-3409 PHONE: (631) 444-0405

SPDES sign

Imagined sign

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INLET POND PARK CONNECTION "JETTY LOOKOUT" "DEWDROP" RAIN GARDENS

WATER TRAIL
WIND TURBINE WIND TURBINE & CLIFF LOOKOUT

WIND TRAIL
"HORSESHOE CRAB" STORMWATER RUN-OFF MARSH "LIVING BRIDGE" "BASIN" "CHIMNEY CABIN" "EARTH NOTCH CABIN" "CAMPFIRE CIRCLE" "THE ROCK" -

EARTH TRAIL
"EARTH STRIP CABIN" CABIN w/ RAIN GARDEN OR TENT SITE, TYP. "OYSTER SHELL" GRAY WATER TREATMENT MARSH "RAMPED GARDEN" GREENHOUSE RAIN GARDEN, TYP. COMMUNITY GARDEN MOORE'S WOO CONNECTION

SUN TRAIL
SOLAR PANEL ROW, TYP. "SUNDIAL CABIN"

PROPOSED SITE PLAN 1"=160'

studio a/b architects

SERVICE TRUCK TURNING "T"

10'-WIDE STABILIZED PATH FOR BEACH AND MAINTNANCE SERVICE TRUCK ACCESS: ADA ACCESSIBLE PERMEABLE PAVEMENT

FIRE TRUCK TURNING CIRCLE

STABILIZED PATH FOR ELECTRIC GOLF-CART ONLY (EXCEPT FIRE EMERGENCY) 10'-WIDE PERMEABLE PAVEMENT WITH 5'-WIDE STABILIZED PLANTING STRIP ON BOTH SIDES 12' WIDE ONE-WAY DRIVEWAY VISITER CENTER GREENHOUSE SHARED WATER, TOILET, SHOWER AND EARTH ROOM 20' WIDE ONE-WAY DRIVEWAY PLACE FOR EXTERIOR INVERTER EQUIPMENT UNDER THE PANEL ROW 20' WIDE TWO WAY DRIVEWAY

SITE CIRCULATION PLAN 1"=160'

studio a/b architects

"CAMPFIR CIRCLE"

LECTURE HALL LOBBY OFFICE LIBRARY STORAGE CLASSROOM

"RAMPED GARDEN' GREENHOUSE ON UPPER LEVEL SHOWER AND TOILETS "EARTH ROOM' (COMMUNITY GALLERY GOLF CART PARKING ARE ELECTRIC CHARGING SOLAR PANELS ABOVE,

BUS PARKING

VISITOR CENTER AREA PLAN 1"=80'

studio a/b architects

BACKGROUND ILLUSTRATIONS
B1 B2 B3 B4 B5 B6 B7 B8 B9 B10 B11 GREENPORT AND SITE LOCATION MAP LOT LINES AND CONTOURS SITE SURVEY FLOOD ZONE MAP 1962 HISTORICAL AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH ARCHEOLOGICAL AND HISTORICAL SITES NATURAL RESOURCES SUFFOLK COUNTY BICYCLE MAP VILLAGE OF GREENPORT CONCEPTUAL TRAIL DESIGN, 2007 PREFERRED ACTIVITIES FOR OLDER POPULATION and CAMPING NEEDS BAY TO SOUND TRAIL SYSTEM

CV Id OVVII.P.M.11 MIL' ft...Meal( 11111111,

toreanpers woo,. I1

/PI

B1 GREENPORT AND SITE LOCATION MAP (Source: US Census)

B2 LOT LINES AND CONTOURS (Source: Suffolk County I-Maps)

,,/ -,'-' .,

LINE (IMMO/RN- SVNINVISINN POE VUE4UP C4FENPONT sltraft ;MENEM t


vjym Of SOOT. SURLY. COUNT, MCW YORK 1.70-0-11 1.1

KTY MAP

Af.ryVl1.r+T4RWesKi..NaIft. eluae s11 Na.10711

:S

Ns .
et:

is

Nathan Taft Cerilatn Land Surveyor

B3 SITE SURVEY (Courtesy Village of Green port)


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PACO INSURANCE RATE MAP ,... 9.4 ((,,y ,Ier ..91.1 ,.. :. /01. ...c lt GO.I .no.TY ., 14EVred2K
0) PAN u G1STH

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36104 MIMS

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I I SOUTHOLD, TOWN OF

PANEL 157 OF 1021 MAP SUFFIX: H


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MAP NUMBER
36103C0157R MAP REVISED SEPTEMBER 25, 2009
,e4tral Enitrzeme, Siamegeestol

row. usilg Onyn), rt... owl 1: a ammo. mwr Foe Coon made 1.4.M caacA ear memo.. se", mearramen Mo. maw ch.. tna FEMA Flom Mae Secce a vomu mi.

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B4 FLOOD ZONE MAP (Source: FEMA)

ILECMDS

General Lana Information


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BEL.. 20(77

BS 1962 HISTORICAL AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH (Source: Suffolk County iMap)

Legend
Archoo Sensitive Area

StatorNational Register

1 Federal Eligibility

0 National Register Listed


State Register Listed
LLW (on ly)

Listing In Progress

v
) 04NR05353 tqa ttk
,UNP01922

Stale Parks

County Boundaries Tax Credit Qualifying

1701.
90 NRD'I'D23

B6 NY STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE GIS Public Access http://pwa.parks.ny.gov/nr/

Visible Layers

Natural Resources

Ciass,fied SUsams Classified Ponds State Regulated Freshwater

Wetlands

rt

itucluanal

Staur op...7 VI in.

rives....

Rana Plants and Rare Animals Ssgmficant Natural Cornmurntes Buttered

.ant

C0

Interstate Rghways Adirondack Part Boundary

Counties

Diselerner The Tadao!' eat show al natural rosgsrcers welded by NYS DEC:, or for arhch winks f NYS Piersralitict 'Ye.; DEC Revatanaiotteefor

omit",

71043/.

Max( 722632, MinY 4555404

ManY 4552791

DISdaimer This map was prepared by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation using the most
current data available It deemed accurate but is not guaranteed NYS DEC is not responsible for any inacarracies

in the data and does not necessarily endorse any Interpretations or products (reeved horn the data

B7 NATURAL RESOURCES (Source: NYSDEC Environmental Resource Mapper)

B8 SUFFOLK COUNTY BICYCLE MAP

Prvosod 6ezero.o. ad
Paati

taweereepo

B9 VILLAGE OF GREENPORT CONCEPTUAL TRAIL DESIGN, 2007 (Source: Village of Greenport)

Trends, Issues and Needs Table 3.1 - The 10 Most Popular Activities Among New York Residents Age 60 or Greater.
Rank (1) (2) (3)
(4)

(5)

Activity Relaxing in the park Visiting Historic Sites Walking for pleasure Gardening Swimming

(6)
(7) (8)

Boating
Bicycling

Percent Participating 1 73.7% 61.9% H 57.0% 38.7% 25.5% 22.5% 20.5%

(9) (10)

Bird Watching Fishing Camping

20.2% 13.4% 14.5%

Source: Genera/ Public Recreation Sun-el; 2004

Trends, Issues and Needs

Table 3.13 - Camping Facilities by State Park Region


Rep* Nuielara
Allegany Plates with 0 of Cannea les Plat es with , of cab., si , Na rs wan

(est.)
100 161 3J7. 60% 6,583 8,639 59% 7.8%

Cabins
ID 1.20.

' - ''
16 557 1.9% 15.7%

Gimp Camps
31 27 4.0%

17 9 21
40 1110

3.7% 1.9% 43%


86% 11.6%

3.5% 4,7% 87%


1116% 11.3%

Genesee rimer lakes


339311a1 t west Pgr.eree

123 235
348 414

4,6% 8.8%
13,0% 15.8%

8344 19.902
15,141 11316)

75% 17.9%
13.1% 163%

119 1135
453 1532

3,4% 5.2%
1.1 .871. 41.1%

36 67
81 1113

Tamtir Palisades long isgarei 18a:sand

140 308 129

5.7% 13.8% 4.8%

2,801 9200
1,846 19.824

2.5% 8.3%
1/

6 47 7 161 45
0 464

1.1% 101%
1,5% 34.1%

III 112 1 291 113


0 3547

3.1% 12% 0. 2% 8,2% 3.2%


0.0% 10130%.

77 199 34 62 55
41 773

10.0% 25.7%

4.4%
3.0% 1.1%
417% 1016%

islands
Sarakep. Caudal DrAnt1 Now Yak (110
Total

39/
151
0 2676

14.8%
9.4%
41(1% 10047%

9,1% 8.6%
II 0% 1000%

9,555
I)

9.2%
0.1144. 1060.4

111,105

Figure 3.8 - Need for Camping Facilities

.35

B10 PREFERRED ACTIVITIES FOR OLDER POPULATION and CAMPING NEEDS (Source: Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan, 2004)


Clark's Beach Proposal as part of Bay to Sound Trail System
katalfglied3nateM Existing Trails Conceptual New Link Traits

tall Pala PIWAM Lin*


Village Bike/Walking Route Seaview Trails Bike Route Clark's Beach Site Proposed Clark's Beach Trails IC Proposed Wind Turbine

Tan a Sowne. Fob., it WM no.,...ps. $tsful s COPVSKINT X , I Cs....N


NY

B11 BAY TO SOUND TRAIL SYSTEM (Source: Town of Southold)

AREAL VIEW FROM WEST

ENTRY VIEW FROM THE STREET

VISITOR CENTER UNDER THE ELEVATED SOLAR PANELS

VISITOR CENTER APPROACH, SEEING TWO WINGS AND RAMPED GARDEN BETWEEN

VISITOR CENTER VIEWS, SPACE CORRESPONDS TO EARTH SURFACE

VISITOR CENTER FRONT, VIEWING NORTH

FIELD VIEWED FROM SOUTH

PROGRESSIVE VIEW TOWARD NORTH, THE ROCK IS ON THE RIGHT, WIND TURBINE IS BEYOND

WATER TREATMENT MARSH ON THE RIGHT

APPROACH TO THE SOUND. "DEW-DROP" RAIN GARDENS ARE ON THE RIGHT

P"`

LONG ISLAND SOUND VIEW BEYOND THE JETTY LOOKOUT AT THE NORTH END

Studio a/b architects