FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014 EXECUTIVE BUDGET RECOMMENDATION

VIRG BERNERO MAYOR

(This page intentionally left blank)

LANSING CITY GOVERNMENT
Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014

MAYOR Virg Bernero CITY COUNCIL Carol Wood, Council President, At Large A'Lynne Boles Robinson, Council Vice President, 3rd Ward Kathy Dunbar, At Large Derrick Quinney, At Large Brian Jeffries, At Large Jody Washington, 1st Ward Tina Houghton, 2nd Ward Jessica Yorko, 4th Ward CLERK Chris Swope DISTRICT COURT JUDGES Frank J. DeLuca, Chief Judge Patrick F. Cherry Charles F. Filice Hugh B. Clarke, Jr. Louise Alderson

OFFICERS Chief of Staff……..……………….…….….....………...………..…………Randy Hannan Chief Operating Officer/Public Service Director..….…....…………….Chad A. Gamble City Attorney……..….………………………………………………..…Janene McIntyre City Assessor…....…….….……….………………...….……...……….………..Bill Fowler City Treasurer….….…….……………………………………............….….Antonia Kraus Interim Finance Director…..…...…………….....………..…………….…Angela Bennett Police Chief…..………………………………..……………….……….Teresa Szymnaski Fire Chief……..……........……………….……..….….….……….……….Randy Talifarro Planning & Neighborhood Development Director….………….………….Bob Johnson Parks & Recreation Director……..…………….…….……..…………..Brett Kaschinske Court Administrator…….……………………………………....………….Anethia Brewer Human Relations & Community Service Director…………..…Joan Jackson Johnson Human Resources Director…..…….….…..……………………...…….…….Terri Taylor Internal Auditor…..……………….………………………..…………………Arnold Yerxa

(This page intentionally left blank)

TABLE OF CONTENTS Budget Overview Budget Overview …..………..…………………………………...………………………1 Staffing Chart……………………………………………………………………………...5 City-Wide Budget Summary.……………………………………………………….….…7 Fund Summaries General Fund Revenues by Category……………………………………..……………..11 General Fund Expenditures by Department………………………………………….......13 Major Streets Fund……………………………………………………………………….14 Local Streets Fund………………………………………………..……………………...15 Drug Law Enforcement Fund……………………………………………………………16 Drug Law Enforcement Fund – Tri County Metro………………………………………17 Building Safety Fund…………………………………………………………………….18 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME, and ESG Grants Funds…......19 Stadium Fund…………………………………………………………………………….20 Municipal Parking System Fund…………………………………………………………21 Sewage Disposal System Fund…………………………………………………………..22 Refuse Disposal System Fund…………………………………………………………...23 Municipal Recycling System Fund………………………………………………………24 Municipal Cemeteries Fund………..…………………………………………………….25 Municipal Golf Courses Fund…..………………………………………………………..26 Department Summaries City Council……………………………………………………………………………...28 Internal Audit…………………………………………………………………………….30 Mayor’s Office…………………………………………………………………………...32 Office of Community Media….……………………………………………………….…34 City Clerk………………………………………………………………………………...36 Courts………………………………………………………………………………….…38 Planning & Neighborhood Development……………………………………………..…41 Information Technology………………………………………………………………....50 Finance…………………………………………………………………………………..52 Human Resources………………………………………………………………………..54 City Attorney………………………………………………………………………….…54 Police……………………………………………………………………………………..58 Fire……………………………………………………………………………………….64 Public Service…………………………………………………………………………....66 Human Relations & Community Service………………………………………………..79 Parks & Recreation………………………………………………………………………83 General Fund Non-Departmental Expenditures……………………………………….....89 Lansing Center…………………………………………………………………...………92 Cooley Law School Stadium…………………………………………………………….93 Lansing City Market…………………………………………………………………….94

TABLE OF CONTENTS Lansing Economic Development Corporation (LEDC)..……………………………..…95 Lansing Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (LBRA).………………………….…....96 Tax Increment Financing District (TIFA)…………………………………………….….99 Downtown Lansing, Incorporated……………………………………………………...100 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) Capital Improvement Program……….……………………………………...…….…....102 Proposed Budget Resolution & Fee Changes………………………………………..103

Fiscal Year 2014 Proposed Budget Overview  The FY 2014 budget is proposed in another year of financial challenges.  Cities across the state continue  to struggle to maintain services for residents.  Simply stated, the funding model for Michigan cities is  broken.  Cities are limited in their ability to raise revenues, the theory being that revenue sharing from  the state would offset that need.  Yet over the past decade, revenue sharing for municipalities has been  reduced drastically.  Lansing is currently receiving $8 million less annually than it did in 2001, when  revenue sharing cuts began.   Over the past decade, that has amounted to a cumulative loss of over $62  million for the city.    The onset of the Great Recession impacted the City in several ways.   First, the 2008 stock market crash  added significantly to the City’s pension costs.  It has impacted all three of the City’s major General Fund  revenues sources: income taxes, state revenue sharing, and property taxes.  Over the past four years,  the city has seen an $8 million decline in non‐dedicated property tax revenues.  Thanks to the voter‐ approved dedicated millage passage in November, 2011 for police, fire, and roads, the city has been able  to mitigate some of this challenge.  The millage proposal and passage was not requested lightly.  The city has reduced its budget by over $60  million over the past several years (see page 5 for a list of those measures).  However, the millage and  these measures are not enough.  As evidenced by fiscal challenges faced by cities across the state, we  need to continue to restructure and change the way we do business in order to not only survive, but to  thrive.  For this reason, last fall Mayor Bernero appointed a Financial Health Team composed of area business  and community leaders to assess the city’s financial challenges and to make recommendations, both in  the near and long‐term.  Last week, the Financial Health Team issued its report and recommendations.   The report is available on the City’s website at www.lansingmi.gov.  Fiscal Year 2014  The FY 2014, citywide proposed budget is $191.5 million, a 1.6% increase over the City’s FY 2013 budget.   The reason for that increase is strategic investments in road infrastructure, beyond the voter‐approved  millage.  The City’s FY 2014 General Fund budget is $112.0 million, a mere $100,000 more than FY 2014.  In order to arrive at this budget proposal, more tough choices needed to be made.   The FY 2014 budget  includes further internal reorganizations and employee healthcare concessions.  This budget also proposes to have fire hydrant rentals and street lighting, previously funded by the City’s  general fund, paid through surcharges on Board of Water and Light customer bills.  In combination, the  surcharge for the average homeowner should amount to about $46 per year ‐‐ less than one dollar a  week.  This method of funding these vital services will allow the City to make strategic investments and  offset a portion of the historic loss of revenue sharing and property tax revenues.  The increase in BWL  charges will also be offset by an anticipated reduction in property taxes of $45 next year for a home with  a market value of $100,000. 

1

Road funding in Michigan is woefully inadequate, and these measures also enable the city to invest $1.3  million in critical road repairs it would not have otherwise been able to fund.  In combination with $1.8  million in revenues from the police, fire and roads millage, $3.1 million will be used to improve our road  infrastructure.   This past winter has been very tough on our roads, as evidenced by the number and  severity of potholes.  This necessary but costly investment benefits the city not just today, but tomorrow  in terms of slowing road deterioration.    Other highlights of the budget include:  Internal Reorganizations:   To provide enhanced efficiencies, parking enforcement will be moved from the Parking Services  Office to the Police Department.  The City’s code enforcement activities will be merged in the Fire Department Fire Marshall’s  Office. This move will allowed for greater enforcement capabilities.  The creation of a Department of Information Technology and internal service fund, with the  addition of a Cabinet‐level Chief Information Officer (CIO).  This change in organization and  funding mechanism recognizes the importance of information technology in virtually every  aspect of city government, both in terms of internal functions and service delivery to residents.  The City and the Board of Water and Light will work toward a joint purchasing agreement.  This  measure will enhance the City’s purchasing function, affected by staffing downsizing, and will  enhance efficiencies for a function both organizations provide.  The City’s pension administrative functions are proposed to be charged to the City’s pension  funds, rather than the City’s general fund.  Rather than adding a burden to the pension systems,  the proposal is to fund pension administrative support using a funding mechanism outside of  the pension system’s main assets.   

Recommendations Affecting Employees  The City has been working with its employees during these difficult times, and their contributions over  the past several years have been significant and important.  We continue, however, to face challenges in  both healthcare and pensions.  As affirmed by the Financial Health Team report, the City, like most other  communities, has significant long‐term liabilities for pensions and healthcare.    This next fiscal year, the majority of employees will fall within the state‐mandated “hard cap” that limits  the amount the city can contribute to healthcare.  The City, employees, and unions have been working  toward a consolidated healthcare plan that falls below the hard cap requirements and helps address the  City’s health care challenges.  The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP), the International Association of Fire  Fighters (IAFF) and the United Auto Workers (UAW) do not yet fall under the hard cap requirement.   However, as we continue to face challenges in those areas, changes to healthcare are needed.  Next  year, a grant that pays for eleven police officers will end.  Concessions in healthcare are needed so that 

2

funds set aside from this year’s police millage allocation can be used for officer funding when that grant  ends.  For the past few years, non‐emergency personnel have been subject to reduced work hours, or  “furloughs.”   The FY 2014 budget recommends the elimination of furloughs, returning our workforce to  a full‐time schedule in order to provide the highest level of public services possible with current staffing  levels.    Incorporation of Financial Health Team (FHT) Recommendations  The Mayor’s FY 2014 budget recommendation incorporates a number of the Financial Health Team’s  recommendations.  The budget, first and foremost, is a continuation of structural measures to address  the challenges we face.  To the extent that measures were not incorporated into the budget, they will be  assessed for the future.  The Financial Health Team strongly recommends increasing our investment in the prefunding of retiree  health care and in building the City’s general fund reserves.  These are also the goals of the  Administration.  Next year, the City will need to provide a $1.4 million subsidy to the City’s Tax  Increment Finance Authority (TIFA), due to declines in property values and the removal of several state  office buildings from the tax rolls.  The City is working to refinance the underlying debt to the TIFA;  however, doing so requires state legislative action.  If the refinancing is approved, it is the  Administration’s intent that the $1.4M will be split evenly between building up the City’s rainy day fund  and prefunding retiree healthcare.  The Financial Health Team recommended reductions in City funding for human services and parks and  recreation activities.  These measures need to be more fully assessed, as they have the potential to  impact some of the most basic and necessary needs in our community.  Granted, human services is a  function not normally provided at the municipal level; however, during these challenging economic  times, funding of human services by other entities, especially the state, have been curtailed.    This budget recommendation, while requesting concessions and organizational changes within Police  and Fire, does not reduce Police or Fire staffing, as recommended by the FHT.  The Financial Health Team also recommended a number of measures that will require further  assessment, study, and regional partnerships.  While important, they extend beyond the City’s ability to  address the FY 2014 budgetary challenges.  Outlook  Recent news in terms of improved property tax projections and healthcare are positive.  Barring another  major economic downturn, the City’s property values are stabilizing.  This is very good news; however, it  does not preclude the need for continued reforms and restructuring in the way government services are  provided.  Revenues are projected to stabilize; however, due to state limitations on property tax growth,  revenues are projected to grow at a slow pace, and will not keep pace with expenditure growth.  In  addition, the City needs to make continued investments in its long‐term liabilities and infrastructure  needs.  This makes regional partnerships and new models of doing business all the more important  going forward. 

3

Service-Level Changes/Revenue Enhancements Enacted In Response to Declining Revenues
In response to the challenges presented by declining General Fund revenues and increasing costs of pension and healthcare, Mayor Bernero has, since coming into office in 2006, proposed and implemented many different changes in City programs, staffing, and organization, including:                        Reducing the City’s workforce by 378 (31%) since FY 2006, from 1,220 to 843 Reducing hours of work for all non-emergency personnel Reducing city health insurance costs by negotiating increases in employee health insurance premium sharing, healthcare plan changes, and pension contributions Reducing city health insurance costs for Medicare-eligible retirees Reducing/postponing/eliminating capital projects, including roads and streets Reducing minimum staffing requirements for firefighters Reducing police overtime by reorganizing work schedules Closing 3 fire stations and eliminating associated costs Closing Waverly and Red Cedar Golf courses Closing Miller Road Senior Community Center Closing Washington Ice Dome and Scott House Consolidating functions within the City (grounds maintenance, engineering, fleet maintenance) Consolidating functions with other governments (911, dive team) Entering into cooperative agreements with other governments (police and fire training, purchasing, economic development) Expanding mutual aid agreements and shared services studies with adjoining municipalities Transferring management of Sycamore Driving Range and Fenner Nature Center to non-profits Eliminating leased space by consolidating police Patrol and Investigations Divisions Increasing fees Implementing new technology to improve efficiency (including cash receipting, code compliance, financial system upgrades, payroll system, computerized traffic ticket system, E-filing for income taxes) Increasing income tax compliance efforts (over $3M in additional uncollected revenue since February, 2007) Implementing energy efficiency measures in city buildings Implementing new restrictions on overtime, travel and hiring Instituting a voter-approved 4.0 mill property tax increase to mitigate further reductions to police, fire and road services

During this time, the City has maintained its focus on preserving and improving its economic base. The Mayor’s economic team has worked tirelessly to retain and expand jobs, bringing income tax and property tax revenue into the City.
4

Summary of Projected Full-Time Positions by Department (Includes Elected Officials)

City-Wide Staffing Levels FY 2008 - FY 2014
1,500

1,163
1,000

1,147

1,109

1,041 888 843 852

500

0 FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014

FY 2008 City Council Internal Audit Mayor Staff Office of Community Media Clerk Staff Court/Probation Staff Planning & Neighborhood Development Finance Information Technology Human Resources City Attorney Police Fire Public Service Human Relations & Community Services Parks & Recreation
(1)

FY 2009 11 2 5 2 7 53 90 101 17 14 12 343 235 181 8 66 1,147

FY 2010 11 2 5 2 7 53 87 92 15 12 12 344 235 171 5 56 1,109

FY 2011 11 2 5 2 6 48 64 86 14 11 11 328 225 201 5 22 1,041

FY 2012 10 1 5 2 5 48 63 79 10 9 10 260 179 183 5 19 888

FY 2013 10 1 5 2 5 43 62 30 10 9 10 229 180 226 5 16 843

FY 2014 10 1 5 2 5 43 45 30 11 10 10 234 202 222 6 16 852
(1) (2)

11 2 5 2 7 53 18 90 101 17 14 12 342 235 181 8 65 1,163

(1),(3) (1) (1),(2),(5)

(4),(5)

Fourteen (14) postions are transferred from PND to Fire; four (4) to Police, and one (1) to Public Service for FY 2014.

Forty-five (45) postions were transferred from Finance to Public Service for Property Management and Fleet Maintenance operations in FY 2013. The reduction in Police staffing in FY 2013 is due to the transfer of 53 positions to the 9-1-1 Dispatch Center to Ingham County. Police staffing for FY 2013 increased by 11 officers and one Crime Analyst due to grants. Nine (9) addtional officers will be added in FY 2013.
(4) (5) (3)

(2)

Eighteen (18) Parks Zoo positions were transferred to Ingham County in FY 2008. Thirty-one (31) postions were transferred from Parks & Recreation to Public Service in FY 2011.

FY 2008 Number of employees per 1,000 residents 10.2

FY 2009 10.1

FY 2010 9.7

FY 2011 9.1

FY 2012 7.8

FY 2013 7.4

FY 2013 7.5

5

Fiscal Year 2013/2014 City-Wide Budget
$191,494,000

Finance/Human Resources Finance/ 3% Human Resources 7% Public Services 38%
6

Executive/ Legislative 2% Courts 3%

Police 19%

Human Services/Agency Suppport 32% Parking 6%

Fire 17% Parks & Recreation 6% Planning & Neighborhood Development 3%

FY 2013/2014 City-Wide Budget by Department/Service Type
Percent of Total Budget

Department General Government City Council Internal Auditor Mayor's Office Office of Community Media City Attorney's Office City Clerk Courts Finance Human Resources Capital Improvements Library Building Rental Debt Service Subtotal - General Government Public Safety Police Fire Subtotal - Public Safety Recreation & Culture Parks & Recreation - General Fund Parks Capital Improvements Parks - Golf Parks - Cemeteries LEPFA/Stadium Subtotal - Recreation & Culture Community Development Planning & Neighborhood Development Economic Development Corporation Downtown Lansing Incorporated Human Relations & Community Services Dept. Human Services City Supported Agencies Tax Increment Financing District Subtotal - Community Development Public Services Public Services Public Services - Roads Public Services - Sewer Public Services - Refuse Public Services - Recycling Public Services - Fleet Subtotal - Public Services Parking System Vacancy Factor

General Fund 628,900 184,460 792,470 334,250 1,452,640 880,400 5,608,490 4,895,100 1,612,670 1,100,000 155,000 1,392,220 19,036,600

Other Funds 244,975 244,975

Total 628,900 184,460 792,470 334,250 1,452,640 880,400 5,608,490 4,895,100 1,612,670 1,100,000 155,000 1,637,255 19,281,635

10.07%

35,648,150 31,704,800 67,352,950

1,135,220 1,135,220

36,783,370 31,704,800 68,488,170

35.77%

7,048,750 300,000 521,000 451,400 1,618,780 9,939,930

300,000 411,400 262,400 390,000 1,363,800

7,048,750 600,000 932,400 713,800 2,008,780 11,303,730

5.90%

989,450 50,000 60,470 869,910 1,395,000 331,400 1,400,000 5,096,230

4,526,435 623,710 5,150,145

5,515,885 50,000 684,180 869,910 1,395,000 331,400 8,846,375 4.62%

5,742,090 3,812,200 1,620,000 11,174,290 (600,000) 112,000,000

14,796,700 43,055,700 1,667,400 3,957,000 63,476,800 11,143,000 82,513,940

5,742,090 18,608,900 43,055,700 1,667,400 3,957,000 73,031,090 11,143,000 (600,000) 191,494,000 38.14% 5.82%

Note: Transfers from other funds are netted out from expenditures so as not to overstate total funding.

-

7

(This page intentionally left blank)

8

Fund Summaries

9

Where the Money Comes From
FY 2013/2014 General Fund Budgeted Revenues $112,000,000

Property Taxes 34%
10

Income Taxes 26%

Other Revenue 16% Interest and Rents 1%

Fines and Forfeitures 2%

Charges for Services 8%

State Shared Revenues 12% Licenses and Permits 1%

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 General Fund Revenue (excluding use of reserves) FY 2013 Adopted Budget 28,473,352 2,865,200 2,865,200 1,910,000 1,910,000 38,023,752 29,050,000 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed -1.3% -1.5% -1.5% -1.5% -1.5% -1.3% 0.3%

FY 2012 Actual Property Taxes Non-Dedicated Dedicated - Police Dedicated - Fire Dedicated - Roads Dedicated - Parks 31,264,329 2,289,043 33,553,373 27,943,070

FY 2013 Projected 27,861,037 4,365,000 2,910,000 1,940,000 1,940,000 39,016,037 28,835,000

FY 2014 Proposed 28,117,000 2,822,250 2,822,250 1,881,500 1,881,500 37,524,500 29,130,000

Income Taxes State Revenues State Revenue Sharing Fire Reimbursement Grants Liquor License Fee

12,710,114 1,436,113 69,611 14,215,838

12,752,048 1,050,000 80,000 13,882,048

13,097,208 900,000 83,000 14,080,208

13,438,300 1,050,000 80,000 14,568,300

4.9%

Licenses & Permits Business Licenses Building Licenses & Permits Non-Business Licenses Cable Franchise Fees

84,131 36,535 109,239 1,318,694 1,548,599

79,200 40,125 95,265 1,300,000 1,514,590

82,500 34,600 96,600 1,350,000 1,563,700

82,500 35,600 96,600 1,350,000 1,564,700

3.3%

Charges for Services Reimbursements Appeals & Petitions Code Compliance Public Safety Subscriptions and Information Work for Others Central Stores Recreation Fees

2,950,381 58,737 1,644,302 3,303,166 1,562 (87,313) 495 576,723 8,448,053 2,291,108

2,562,500 57,655 2,147,590 3,900,900 1,300 130,500 700 528,845 9,329,990 2,485,520

2,546,500 47,200 1,930,200 3,588,037 1,300 (35,240) 600 599,879 8,678,476 2,384,855

2,270,000 48,700 2,050,200 4,027,800 1,500 (14,600) 700 616,700 9,001,000 2,595,400

-3.5% 4.4%

Fines & Forfeitures Interest & Rents Interest Income Rental Income

48,606 48,606

90,000 18,000 108,000

50,000 50,000

60,000 60,000

-44.4%

Return on Equity Board of Water and Light Sewer Fund

12,169,097 300,000 12,469,097

17,000,000 300,000 17,300,000

16,600,000 300,000 16,900,000

17,000,000 300,000 17,300,000

0.0%

Other Revenues Sale of Fixed Assets Donations & Contributions Miscellaneous

1,298,205 190,636 144,372 1,633,214

10,000 34,000 127,100 171,100

8,000 42,000 110,324 160,324

8,000 31,000 132,100 171,100

0.0%

Total General Fund Revenues before Capital Fund Transfers Transfers from Capital Funds Total General Fund Revenues

102,150,958 48,000 102,198,958

111,865,000 65,000 111,930,000

111,668,600 65,000 111,733,600

111,915,000 85,000 112,000,000

0.0% 30.8% 0.1%

11

How the Money Is Spent
FY 2013/2014 General Fund Budget $112,000,000
Public Services 10% Human Services & Agency Support 2% Planning & Neighborhood Development 2% Parks & Recreation 9% Police 32% Fire 29% Finance/ Capital Improvements Human Resources 2% 6% Executive/Legislative 4% Courts 5%

12

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 General Fund Summary FY 2013 Adopted Budget 554,179 4,818,020 5,372,199 111,930,000 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning General Fund Balance Beginning Budget Stab. Fund Balance Total General Fund Reserves Revenues (detail on previous page) Expenditures: Council Internal Audit District Court Circuit Court Building Rental Mayor's Office Office of Community Media City Clerk's Office Planning & Neighborhood Development Finance Human Resources City Attorney's Office Police Fire Public Service Human Relations & Community Services Parks & Recreation Human Services Non-Departmental Expenditures: Library Building Rental Operating Subsidies to Other Funds City Supported Agencies Capital Improvements Debt Service Vacancy Factor Total Expenditures Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Total Ending Reserves General Fund Reserves as a Percent of Revenues 512,467 4,818,020 5,330,487 102,198,958

FY 2013 Projected 554,179 4,818,020 5,372,199 111,733,600

FY 2014 Proposed 817,679 4,818,020 5,635,699 112,000,000

535,462 146,946 4,664,526 31,811 633,988 244,620 807,223 2,236,260 6,588,633 1,186,216 1,253,205 30,626,897 28,069,367 9,031,880 693,869 6,996,074 1,275,485 161,030 3,536,860 328,243 1,294,956 1,813,696 102,157,247 41,712 5,372,199

592,050 161,692 5,496,424 143,335 713,433 300,858 906,125 2,550,051 7,294,841 1,437,274 1,422,589 33,513,551 30,923,190 9,195,779 799,648 6,673,801 1,350,000 165,000 3,164,397 331,400 4,113,798 1,480,764 (800,000) 111,930,000 5,372,199

510,092 168,066 5,387,642 143,335 707,170 298,574 880,911 2,546,575 7,093,690 1,411,086 1,325,266 33,460,329 30,633,700 9,117,333 756,991 6,734,357 1,350,000 150,000 3,149,397 328,925 4,113,798 1,202,862 111,470,100 263,500 5,635,699

628,900 184,460 5,474,740 133,750 792,470 334,250 880,400 845,050 4,895,100 1,612,670 1,452,640 35,498,150 31,704,800 5,742,090 869,910 7,048,750 1,395,000 155,000 4,396,050 331,400 6,832,200 1,392,220 (600,000) 112,000,000 5,635,699

(1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (2) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1),(2) (1) (1) (1) (1)

6.2% 14.1% -0.4% -6.7% 11.1% 11.1% -2.8% -66.9% -32.9% 12.2% 2.1% 5.9% 2.5% -37.6% 8.8% 5.6% 3.3% -6.1% 38.9% 0.0% 66.1% -6.0% -25.0% 0.1%

4.9%

5.3%

4.8%

5.0%

5.0%

Information regarding the budget for each of the departments listed above is contained in the Department Summary section of this document.
(1) FY 2014 Departmental Increases are mainly the result of the allocation of information technology costs to departments, previously aggregated in the Finance Department. (2)

Beginning FY 2014, code compliance activities, formerly reported in the Planning & Neighborhood Development department, are combined with the Fire Marshall's office in the Fire Department.

13

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Major Streets Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 4,596,685 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Gas & Weight Tax Receipts Utility Permit Fees (Metro Act) State Trunkline & Utility Cut Reimbursements Interest Income Miscellaneous Revenue Use of Existing Bond Proceeds Transfer from General Fund Total Revenues Expenditures Capital Major Maintenance Debt Service Subtotal - Capital Operating Administration & Engineering Routine Road Maintenance Bridge Maintenance Winter Maint. - Snow Removal Trunkline Maintenance Traffic Administration Traffic Maintenance Subtotal - Operating Transfer to Local Streets Fund Total Expenditures 5,049,045

FY 2013 Projected 4,596,685

FY 2014 Proposed 2,910,252

6,254,782 489,360 1,133,814 666 148,473 1,221,924 9,249,019

6,320,000 398,000 972,200 90,000 100,000 7,880,200

6,317,330 398,000 916,568 62,539 753,829 100,000 8,548,266

6,379,880 398,000 1,056,240 46,000 991,540 200,000 9,071,660

0.95% 0.00% 8.64% 0.00% -48.89% 100.00% 15.12%

1,309,201 608,979 1,918,180

1,130,994 609,803 1,740,797

3,265,076 609,803 3,874,879

2,022,760 609,216 2,631,976

78.8% -0.1% 51.2%

1,312,207 1,853,785 39,116 649,382 347,935 24,813 592,802 4,820,040 2,963,159 9,701,379

1,419,469 2,189,851 58,420 1,077,119 581,600 30,000 637,500 5,993,959 637,648 8,372,404

1,389,512 2,077,096 55,272 948,930 485,718 30,000 790,617 5,777,145 582,675 10,234,699

1,589,419 2,261,054 77,547 1,068,704 580,600 40,000 637,500 6,254,824 1,791,000 10,677,800

12.0% 3.3% 32.7% -0.8% -0.2% 33.3% 0.0% 4.4% 180.9% 27.5%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease Ending Fund Balance Amount Designated for Projects Less: Amounts Held for Inventories Available Fund Balance Available Fund Balance as a Percent of Operational Revenues

(452,360) 4,596,685 (3,189,761) (1,050,623) 356,301

(492,204) 4,104,481

(1,686,433) 2,910,252

(1,606,140) 1,304,112 -68.2%

(1,050,623) 253,489

3.9%

14.7%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Major Street (main artery road) operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Major Street Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Public Service Department.

14

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Local Streets Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 495,821 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Gas & Weight Tax Receipts Utility Cut Reimbursements Interest Income Miscellaneous Revenue Transfer from General Fund Transfer from General Fund - Millag Transfer from Major Streets Fund Use of Existing Bond Proceeds Total Revenues Expenditures Capital Major Maintenance Debt Service Subtotal - Capital Operating Administration & Engineering Surface Maintenance Winter Maintenance Traffic Administration Traffic Maintenance Subtotal - Operating Total Expenditures 317,039

FY 2013 Projected 495,821

FY 2014 Proposed 315,084

1,827,483 542,910 (502) 100,000 2,963,159 92,253 5,525,303

1,834,608 348,054 580,000 417,680 1,910,000 637,648 179,136 5,907,126

1,852,954 472,996 580,000 417,680 1,910,000 582,675 254,786 6,071,091

1,900,580 365,000 1,730,700 1,881,500 1,791,000 7,668,780

3.6% 4.9% 0.0% -100.0% 314.4% -1.5% 180.9% -100.0% 29.8%

110,253 1,354,598 1,464,851

355,586 1,357,208 1,712,794

500,113 1,357,208 1,857,321

1,600,000 1,355,349 2,955,349

350.0% -0.1%

807,843 2,716,846 279,180 9,999 67,802 3,881,670 5,346,521

1,003,135 2,793,541 668,160 10,000 114,500 4,589,336 6,302,130

973,791 2,828,639 471,761 10,000 110,316 4,394,507 6,251,828

1,119,094 2,943,638 685,519 20,000 117,000 4,885,251 7,840,600

11.6% 5.4% 2.6% 100.0% 2.2% 6.4% 24.4%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance Amount Designated for Projects Available Fund Balance Available Fund Balance as a Percent of Operational Revenues

178,782 495,821 (893,475) (397,654)

(395,004) 100,817

(180,737) 315,084

(171,820) 143,264 42.1%

-7.2%

1.9%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Local (local access) Street operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Local Street Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Public Service Department.

15

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Drug Law Enforcement Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget (74,748) % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Drug Forfeiture Revenues Interest Income Total Revenues Expenditures Operations Total Expenditures 193,186

FY 2013 Projected (74,748)

FY 2014 Proposed 263,491

454,742 51 454,793

1,149,500 1,000 1,150,500

1,176,440 1,000 1,177,440

340,000 1,000 341,000

-70.4% 0.0% -70.4%

722,727 722,727

839,201 839,201

839,201 839,201

275,500 275,500

-67.2% -67.2%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance

(267,934) (74,748)

311,299 236,551

338,239 263,491

65,500 328,991 39.1%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Drug Enforcement operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Drug Law Enforcement Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Police Department.

16

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Drug Law Enforcement - Tri-County Metro Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 708,797 % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed 716,227

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Drug Forfeiture Revenues Contributions from Local Units Grant Revenue Interest Income Operating Transfers Total Revenues Expenditures Ingham-Eaton-Clinton Task Force Total Expenditures 442,919

FY 2013 Projected 708,797

138,477 871,310 377,493 43 46,499 1,433,822

200,000 231,750 250 432,000

200,000 231,750 271,778 250 703,778

435,000 424,720 859,720

117.5% 83.3% -100.0% 99.0%

1,167,944 1,167,944

432,000 432,000

696,348 696,348

859,720 859,720

99.0% 99.0%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance

265,878 708,797

708,797

7,430 716,227

716,227 1.0%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Drug Enforcement operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Drug Law Enforcement - Tri-County Metro Special Revenue Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Police Department.

17

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Building Safety Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed 104,111

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Licenses & Permits Charges for Services Miscellaneous Transfer from General Fund Total Revenues Expenditures -

FY 2013 Projected -

1,410,617 3,550 75 534,866 1,949,108 1,949,108

1,916,543 4,600 200 193,157 2,114,500 2,114,500

2,018,865 2,995 300 193,157 2,215,317 2,111,206

2,179,650 2,400 250 144,400 2,326,700 2,326,700

13.7% -47.8% -25.2% 10.0% 10.0%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance

-

-

104,111 104,111

104,111

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Building Safety operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Building Safety Fund in the Department Summary section, under Planning and Neighborhood Development.

18

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Federal Entitlement Grant Special Revenue Funds FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Projected

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) Revenues Federal Grants 1,853,232 1,819,874 Program Income 27,644 Total CDBG Revenues 1,880,876 1,819,874 Expenditures General Administration Single Family Rehab Program Property Acquisition Public Improvements Neighborhood Community Services Economic Development Weatherization Total CDBG Expenditures HOME GRANT Revenues Federal Grants Program Income Total HOME Grant Revenues Expenditures General Administration Single Family Building Rehab HOME Rehab. LISC & HRC Total HOME Expenditures

1,809,744 10,130 1,819,874

1,637,887 1,637,887

-10.0% -10.0%

381,216 940,262 80,489 336,571 114,212 28,125 1,880,875

242,392 1,163,482 1,000 1,000 272,000 100,000 40,000 1,819,874

242,392 1,163,482 1,000 1,000 272,000 100,000 40,000 1,819,874

391,726 877,061 900 278,200 90,000 1,637,887

61.6% -24.6% -10.0% -100.0% 2.3% -10.0% -100.0% -10.0%

369,218 22,381 391,599

591,466 591,466

569,883 21,583 591,466

531,535 531,535

-10.1% -10.1%

95,075 152,788 143,732 391,595

178,719 305,150 107,597 591,466

178,719 305,150 107,597 591,466

202,764 135,000 193,771 531,535

13.5% -55.8% 80.1% -10.1%

EMERGENCY SHELTER GRANT (ESG) Revenues Federal Grants 197,391 Total ESG Revenues 197,391 Expenditures Emergency Shelter Operations Total ESG Expenditures

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

0.0% 0.0%

197,391 197,391

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

0.0% 0.0%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for the City's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME, and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to Planning and Neighborhood Development in the Department Summary section.

19

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Cooley Law School Stadium Special Revenue Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Operating Revenues Olds Park Stadium Naming Rights Interest Income Transfer from General Fund Total Revenues Expenditures Debt Service Total Expenditures -

FY 2013 Projected -

FY 2014 Proposed -

365,460 119,947 (62) 410,455 895,800

250,000 125,000 472,700 847,700

270,000 120,000 457,700 847,700

270,000 120,000 410,000 800,000

8.0% -4.0%

-5.6%

895,800 895,800

847,700 847,700

847,700 847,700

800,000 800,000

-5.6% -5.6%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance Fund Balance as a Percent of Operational Revenues

-

-

-

0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for City support of Olds Park stadium operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Stadium Fund in the Department Summary section.

20

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Municipal Parking System Enterprise Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 11,370,599 % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed 8,331,976

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Parking Revenue Baseball Revenue Parking Fines Interest Capital Lease Payment Other Revenue Total Revenues Expenditures Administration Operations Maintenance South Grand Avenue Ramp South Capital Avenue Ramp North Grand Avenue Ramp North Capital Avenue Ramp Townsend Street Ramp Baseball Operations Debt Service Total Expenditures 13,253,682

FY 2013 Projected 11,370,599

6,195,214 16,250 550,174 8,355 2,995,000 148,302 9,913,295

5,846,500 53,000 550,000 10,000 2,870,000 9,329,500

6,027,467 49,370 538,224 547 2,870,000 396 9,486,004

6,166,465 50,357 548,988 10,000 2,740,000 9,515,810

5.5% -5.0% -0.2% 0.0% -4.5% 2.0%

1,819,071 867,776 915,550 82,006 485,933 276,173 1,048,761 469,638 60,850 5,770,620 11,796,378

2,688,441 947,474 1,602,100 518,000 346,000 581,000 358,000 5,913,591 12,954,606

1,775,528 671,744 1,473,569 18,238 968,814 197,294 1,053,839 406,904 49,370 5,909,327 12,524,627

1,915,200 1,284,943 721,500 171,000 705,000 343,000 152,000 50,357 5,800,000 11,143,000

-28.8% 35.6% -55.0% N/A -67.0% 103.8% -41.0% -57.5% #DIV/0! -1.9% -14.0%

Working Capital Increase/(Decrease) Ending Working Capital

(1,883,083) 11,370,599

(3,625,106) 7,745,493

(3,038,623) 8,331,976

(1,627,190) 6,704,786 -13.4%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for Parking operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Parking Fund in the Department Summary section, under Planning and Neighborhood Development.

21

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Sewage Disposal System Enterprise Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 21,425,685 % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed 16,384,629

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Sewer Charges Interest Income Low Income Credit Miscellaneous Income Existing Bond Proceeds Total Revenues Expenditures Administration & General Sewer Maintenance Pumping Stations Industrial Laboratory Return on Equity - General Fund Total Expenses Debt Service Capital Projects Total Budgeted Uses 21,957,809

FY 2013 Projected 21,425,685

29,916,399 239,150 (600) 247,849 318,931 30,721,729

31,010,819 10,000 (2,000) 25,000 31,043,819

30,606,242 32,058,234 2,305 (2,600) (2,000) 60,778 1,127,135 7,567,630 31,793,860 39,623,864

3.4% -100.0% 0.0% -100.0% 27.6%

9,771,674 1,581,027 1,252,345 202,150 300,000 13,107,196 17,622,182 524,475 31,253,853

11,119,095 2,293,331 1,402,718 232,033 300,000 15,347,177 18,330,023 2,628,000 36,305,200

10,495,641 2,192,003 1,381,677 185,928 300,000 14,555,249 18,330,023 3,949,644 36,834,916

11,585,156 2,424,230 1,534,538 252,566 300,000 16,096,490 18,682,210 8,277,000 43,055,700

4.2% 9.4% 8.8% 0.0% 4.9% 1.9% 215.0% 18.6%

Working Capital Increase/(Decrease) Ending Working Capital

(532,124) 21,425,685

(5,261,381) 16,164,304

(5,041,056) 16,384,629

(3,431,836) 12,952,793

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations of the City's sanitary sewer operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Sewer Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Public Service Department.

22

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Refuse Disposal System Enterprise Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 242,604 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Operating Income Interest Income Total Revenues Expenditures Bag Refuse Disposal Total Expenditures 341,527

FY 2013 Projected 242,604

FY 2014 Proposed 118,275

1,457,996 1,081 1,459,077

1,611,753 5,850 1,617,603

1,522,571 1,280 1,523,851

1,596,200 7,750 1,603,950

-1.0% -0.8%

1,558,000 1,558,000

1,665,709 1,665,709

1,648,180 1,648,180

1,667,400 1,667,400

0.1% 0.1%

Working Capital Increase/(Decrease Ending Working Capital

(98,923) 242,604

(48,106) 194,498

(124,329) 118,275

(63,450) 54,825

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations of the City's garbage collection operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Garbage and Refuse Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Public Service Department.

23

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Municipal Recycling Enterprise Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget 807,192 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Operating Income Sale of Recycled Materials Interest Income Transfers Total Revenues Expenditures Reycling Operations Composting Promotion, Education, & Marketing Capital Total Expenditures 1,007,607

FY 2013 Projected 807,192

FY 2014 Proposed 424,397

2,724,026 94,338 (248) 2,818,116

3,434,035 130,000 3,564,035

3,423,994 52,000 3,475,994

3,640,650 80,000 3,720,650

6.02% -38.46% #DIV/0! 4.39%

1,610,239 1,109,330 298,962 3,018,531

2,362,455 1,222,294 337,611 3,922,360

2,292,527 1,241,499 324,763 3,858,789

2,592,802 1,364,198 3,957,000

9.75% 11.61% -100.00% 0.88%

Working Capital Increase/(Decreas Ending Working Capital

(200,415) 807,192

(358,325) 448,867

(382,795) 424,397

(236,350) 188,047 -58.11%

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations of the City's recycling operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Recycling Fund in the Department Summary section, under the Public Service Department.

24

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Municipal Cemeteries Enterprise Fund FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Cemetery Service Revenue Sale of Lots Other Transfer from Perpetual Care Transfer from Parks Millage Fund Transfer from General Fund Total Revenues Expenditures Administration Cemetery Paid Services Cemetery Ground Maintenance Transfer to Perpetual Care Fund Total Expenditures 18,408

FY 2013 Projected -

FY 2014 Proposed -

155,814 84,580 6,446 301,420 73,058 621,318

174,845 84,200 5,400 414,469 678,914

174,890 84,200 1,000 416,538 676,628

176,400 85,000 1,000 451,400 713,800

0.9% 1.0% -81.5% #DIV/0!

5.1%

216,023 139,128 267,659 16,916 639,726

223,100 139,782 299,232 16,800 678,914

215,349 141,560 302,919 16,800 676,628

223,574 473,426 16,800 713,800

0.2% -100.0% 58.2% 0.0% 5.1%

Working Capital Increase/(Decrease) Ending Working Capital

(18,408) -

-

-

-

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for the operations of the City's Evergreen, Mt. Hope, and North Cemetery operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Cemetery Fund in the Department Summary section, under Parks and Recreation.

25

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Municipal Golf Courses Enterprise Fund

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Working Capital Revenues Greens Fees Equipment Rentals Concessions Other Revenue Transfers In - General Fund Transfers In - Parks Millage Total Revenues Expenditures Groesbeck Golf Course Red Cedar Golf Course Sycamore Golf Course Total Expenditures 13,627

FY 2013 Adopted Budget 7,064

FY 2013 Projected 7,064

% Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed 7,064

267,331 110,469 11,620 714 100,000 300,000 790,134

298,000 109,000 39,000 20,000 356,096 822,096

298,000 109,000 39,000 19,955 348,641 814,596

287,000 109,400 15,000 521,000 932,400

-3.7% 0.4% -61.5% -100.0% 0.0% 46.3% 13.4%

712,963 2,981 80,753 796,697

770,396 51,700 822,096

773,519 41,077 814,596

867,400 65,000 932,400

12.6% 0.0% 25.7% 13.4%

Working Capital Increase/(Decrease) Ending Working Capital

(6,563) 7,064

7,064

7,064

7,064

This page is a presentation of the projected results of operations for the operations of the City's Groesbeck and Sycamore golf course operations. For narrative information of operations and a more detailed view of expenditures, please refer to the Golf Fund in the Department Summary section, under Parks and Recreation.

26

Department Summaries

27

City Council
Mission and Role As the City’s legislative branch, the City Council is responsible for the adoption and amendment of ordinances in accordance with the City Charter and State law. The City Council is also vested with oversight and investigative powers and is charged with creating City policy through the adoption of resolutions. At Council Committee of the Whole and regularly scheduled Committee meetings, Council reviews proposals from the Administration and offers citizens an opportunity to make suggestions for the improvement of the City and City operations. The City Council, as required by Charter, adopts an annual City budget, designating appropriations and the amount to be raised by taxation for general purposes and payment of principal and interest on its indebtedness. The Council also works directly with other governmental, business, and community groups to resolve regional and neighborhood issues.

28

CITY COUNCIL
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 438,004 97,458 535,462 535,462 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

473,638 118,412 592,050 592,050

404,222 105,870 510,092 510,092

452,039 118,311 570,350 58,550 628,900

-4.6% -0.1% -3.7%

6.2%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions for staff. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

29

INTERNAL AUDIT
Mission and Role The Internal Auditor is established by City Charter to review the City's financial compliance in accordance with Council policy. The Internal Auditor works under the direction of the City Council in reviewing external audits of financial transactions and procedures. The Internal Auditor also performs routine audits of other City business. The Internal Auditor is appointed by and is responsible to the City Council.

30

INTERNAL AUDIT
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 145,075 1,871 146,946 146,946 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

159,402 2,290 161,692 161,692

166,343 1,723 168,066 168,066

176,565 2,575 179,140 5,320 184,460

10.8% 12.4% 10.8%

14.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

31

Mayor's Office
Mission Statement As Lansing's Chief Executive Officer, the Mayor's mission is to exercise supervision and coordination over the various Departments of City government, and provide that the laws, ordinances and regulations of the City are enforced. The Mayor is also empowered under the City Charter to suppress disorder and enforce the laws of the State, and is charged with the duty to make proposals to the Council for meeting the needs and addressing the problems of the City. Other duties, subject to delegation, include the development and preparation of the budget, response to audit reports, management of real property, reducing discrimination and promoting mutual understanding, annually reporting on affirmative action status, and citizen complaint investigation and response. Mayor's Office staff work with Council committees to respond to informational needs and concerns, respond to citizen inquiries and complaints, and work with residents and citizen groups for City improvement and to implement City initiatives. The Mayor’s Office coordinates the implementation of the LansingStat management evaluation program to promote the efficient and cost-effective provision of essential City services. The Mayor’s Office supports the activities of the Greater Lansing Go Green! Initiative to promote local and regional efforts to conserve energy, reduce carbon emissions and increase the use of renewable energy. The Mayor’s Office also supports the activities of the Office of Community and Faith-Based Initiatives, the Office of Financial Empowerment, the Mayor’s Commission on Celebrating Diversity, the Mayor’s Neighborhood Advisory Council, the Lansing Regional Sister Cities Commission, and a variety of community-based task forces.

32

MAYOR'S OFFICE
FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 557,590 76,398 633,988 633,988

FY 2013 Projected

634,636 78,797 713,433 713,433

628,870 78,300 707,170 707,170

680,413 85,447 765,860 26,610 792,470

7.2% 8.4% 7.3%

11.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

33

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY MEDIA
Mission Statement The Office of Community Media (OCM) administers the City's Public, Educational and Government (PEG) digital media network, including management of day-to-day operations of City TV and Lansing's Public Access Channel (PAC). The OCM is also responsible for developing and implementing strategies to build community capacity in the production of local origination programming; creating and managing partnerships that leverage the PEG network to foster educational and career opportunities for Lansing residents in digital media, broadcasting and related fields; and leading efforts to collaborate with regional partners toward the establishment of a regional Community Media Center.

34

OFFICE OF COMMUNITY MEDIA
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 242,783 1,837 244,620 244,620 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

283,537 17,321 300,858 300,858

280,253 18,321 298,574 298,574

305,999 17,611 323,610 10,640 334,250

7.9% 1.7% 7.6%

11.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: The Community Media Center is expected to open later this year. Additional Public Education Grant resources will fund additional contractual positons, to support the expanded staffing requirements for the center. Other changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the Presidential election in FY 2013, the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

35

CITY CLERK
Mission Statement: The Office of the City Clerk is responsible for the orderly conduct of all elections in the City of Lansing and for the processing of all voter registration records of its citizens.  The City Clerk oversees the proper maintenance of records for the City, and prepares Agendas and printed Proceedings for the Lansing City Council. A number of business licenses are processed through the Office of the City Clerk, including the regulation of Peddlers & Transient Merchants, Vehicles for Hire, and Cabarets. The City Clerk serves as the recording secretary to the Board of Ethics, and administers all oaths required for municipal purposes by law.

36

CITY CLERK'S OFFICE
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 623,872 183,351 807,223 807,223 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

727,023 179,102 906,125 906,125

709,035 171,876 880,911 880,911

705,668 142,802 848,470 31,930 880,400

-2.9% -20.3% -6.4%

-2.8%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the Presidential election in FY 2013, the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

37

54-A DISTRICT COURT
Mission and Role The mission of the 54-A District Court is to provide access to trial court services for all persons as needed, employing available resources and working in partnership with the community to afford efficient and courteous service. This mission is carried out through efficient case flow management from pre-adjudication to post-adjudication; conducting arraignments, preliminary felony exams, trials, sentencing, and probation; including operating full service divisions (Traffic, Civil, Criminal, and Probation). The District Court handles four types of cases: (1) Criminal (misdemeanors and felonies reduced to misdemeanors); (2) Civil (small claims jurisdiction up to $5,000, general civil jurisdiction up to $25,000, and landlord-tenant disputes); (3) traffic violations (formal and informal hearings); and (4) City Ordinance violations. For the majority of its cases, the District Court works with the Ingham County Prosecutor’s Office, the Office of the City Attorney, and the Lansing Police Department. Additional support services provided by City of Lansing staff include finance, budgeting, personnel, information technology, operational services, and building maintenance. The District Court fund and budget are self-contained operations. The District Court budget expenditure and the Court-related revenue are accounted for in a separate fund during the fiscal year, and then both expenditures and revenues are returned to the General Fund at June 30. This accounting convention effectively makes the Court a General Fund agency, with special budget considerations attached to its status as the judicial branch of government.

38

COURTS 54-A District Court & Probation
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 4,138,582 525,944 4,664,526 4,664,526 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

4,909,592 586,832 5,496,424 5,496,424

4,836,651 550,991 5,387,642 5,387,642

4,664,980 564,930 5,229,910 244,830 5,474,740

-5.0% -3.7% -4.8%

-0.4%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

39

COURTS Circuit Court Building Rental
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Total 31,811 31,811 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

143,335 143,335

143,335 143,335

133,750 133,750

-6.7% -6.7%

Summary of Significant Changes: By State law, the City is obligated to provide a facility for the Circuit Court, which is operated by Ingham County. The budget for the Circuit Court is for facility rent only.

40

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT
Mission and Roles
The primary objective of the Planning and Neighborhood Development Department has been to stabilize the City’s economic base, and, through continued planned and directed development, “grow” that base to a level capable of providing continuous support for the City’s services and infrastructure. The direct service missions of the Department include Zoning, Planning, Building Safety (building, plumbing, electrical, mechanical, and plan review and inspections), Homeownership Assistance, Homeless Assistance. Housing and neighborhood improvement activities and coordination are primarily handled under the City's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and various federal and state housing assistance programs. Planning functions include comprehensive planning and a newly-launched form-based code initiative, site plan review, flood plain review, zoning review, historic preservation, public improvement and economic development projects and activities. The Department has worked very closely with the Ingham County Land Bank Fast Track Authority (“ICLBFTA”) on the opportunity to bring non-contributing property back to a productive use. Finally, the Department supports the Planning Board, Zoning Board of Appeals, Historic District Commission, and the Plumbing, Mechanical and Electrical Boards, the Building Board of Appeals, as well as numerous neighborhood organizations and nonprofit housing corporations. The Department also assists the Mayor and Council in policy-making roles.

Organization
The Planning and Neighborhood Development Department consists of five separate divisions: Administration, Building Safety, Planning, Parking Services Office (PSO), and Development. Divisions that are primarily “non-General Fund” are Building Safety, Development, and Parking Services. Building Safety is operated as a Special Revenue Fund, per State Law. The traditional allocation of Community Development Block Grant Program, HOME, and the Emergency Shelter Grant Program are federally funded programs, administered by the Development Division. In addition to these programs, the Development Division also administers the Neighborhood Stabilization Program, Lead Based Paint Abatement, and the Floodplain Abatement FEMA programs. The Parking Services Office encompasses the operation of the parking system. Parking Services Office provides economical parking options for downtown workers and visitors. The PSO will provide administrative support to the Lansing Police Department relative to its enforcement of the parking regulations, which provides safety and turnover parking. The Parking Services Office also assists in the economic growth of downtown Lansing by securing properties initially used for parking and that have been used for future development.

41

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT SUMMARY
Department Appropriation FY 2012 Actual Planning & Neighborhood Development - General Fund Building Safety Fund CDBG Fund HOME Grant Fund Emergency Shelter Grant Parking Fund Total P&ND FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

2,236,260 1,949,108 1,880,875 391,598 197,391 5,770,620 12,425,852

2,550,051 2,114,500 1,819,874 591,466 174,713 5,913,591 13,164,195

2,546,575 2,111,206 1,819,874 591,466 174,713 5,909,327 13,153,161

845,050 2,255,910 1,637,887 531,535 174,713 5,800,000 11,245,095

-66.9% 6.7% -10.0% -10.1% 0.0% -1.9% -14.6%

Summary of Significant Changes: Services provided by the Planning and Neighborhood Development Department are incorporated in the City’s General Fund, Building Safety, Parking, and federally-funded Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME, and Emergency Shelter Grant Funds. Information for the Planning and Neighborhood Development Department's funds is provided in the following pages.

42

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT General Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 1,987,777 248,483 2,236,260 2,236,260 2,293,590 256,461 2,550,051 2,550,051 2,294,199 252,376 2,546,575 2,546,575 613,810 155,400 769,210 75,840 845,050 -73.2% -39.4% -69.8% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

-66.9%

Summary of Significant Changes: The FY 2014 proposed budget includes the transfer of the City's Code Compliance operations from the Planning and Neighborhood Development Department to the Fire Marshall's division. This consolidation is anticipated to faciliate enhanced enforcement capabilities. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

43

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT Building Safety Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Total Information Technology Allocation 1,531,949 417,159 1,949,108 1,949,108 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

1,731,309 380,191 3,000 2,114,500 2,114,500

1,728,036 380,170 3,000 2,111,206 2,111,206

1,894,090 358,820 3,000 2,255,910 70,790 2,326,700

9.4% -5.6% 0.0% 6.7%

10.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

44

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total 616,126 1,264,749 1,880,875 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

642,422 1,177,452 1,819,874

642,422 1,177,452 1,819,874

998,918 638,969 1,637,887

55.5% -45.7% -10.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: Detailed proposals for CDBG, HOME, and Emergency Shelter grants for FY 2014 are available in the Consolidated Action plan, available on the City’s website.

45

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT HOME Grant Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total 56,495 335,103 391,598 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

58,389 533,077 591,466

58,389 533,077 591,466

96,457 435,078 531,535

65.2% -18.4% -10.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: Detailed proposals for CDBG, HOME, and Emergency Shelter grants for FY 2014 are available in the Consolidated Action plan, available on the City’s website.

46

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT Emergency Shelter Grant Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Transfers Total 197,391 197,391 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713

0.0%

0.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: Detailed proposals for CDBG, HOME, and Emergency Shelter grants for FY 2014 are available in the Consolidated Action plan, available on the City’s website.

47

PLANNING & NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT Parking Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total Information Technology Allocation 1,947,486 2,262,819 1,815,453 5,770,620 11,796,378 11,796,378 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

2,074,113 2,562,402 2,404,500 5,913,591 12,954,606 12,954,606

1,856,920 1,492,127 3,266,253 5,909,327 12,524,627 12,524,627

1,896,225 2,195,695 1,155,000 5,800,000 11,046,920 96,080 11,143,000

-8.6% -14.3% -52.0% -1.9% -14.7%

-14.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund, will be accounted for in an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

48

(This page intentionally left blank)

49

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Mission and Roles
The Information Technology Department is responsible for the maintenance of the City's various computer systems, and technology infrastructure, as well as implemention of new technology initiatives. The department oversees the City's data centers, e-mail system, and telephone system, computer workstations, cellular communication devices and converged voice, video and data communications network and interconnects with Ingham County and the State of Michigan. This department was formerly a part of the Finance Department.

50

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Internal Service Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Debt Service Total 1,349,789 1,029,745 2,379,534 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

1,370,935 1,121,641 2,492,576

1,304,517 1,121,255 2,425,772

1,556,390 1,123,610 400,000 3,080,000

13.5% 0.2% 100.0% 100.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: In recognition of the importance of technology to City employees, operations, and residents, Information Technology, formerly a division within the Finance Department, Information Technology will become its own department with the appointment of a Cabinet-level Chief Information Officer. Where costs were previously accounted for completely in the City's General Fund, an internal service fund will be used, meaning that costs will be aggregated in the fund and charged to the City's various departments and funds. This allows for better recognition of technology costs in the Citys' various funds, but more importantly, it provides a funding mechanism for future upgrades and technology software and infrastructure replacement. A $2 million technology bond is proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs include the addition of a Chief Operating Officer position, as well as the combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

51

FINANCE
Mission and Roles
The Finance Department consists of three divisions: Operations, Assessor and Treasury. Operations includes Accounting, Budget and Purchasing while Treasury includes Property Tax and Income Tax. The Finance Department's mission is to develop and control the financial management functions of the City. As outlined in Section 4.302 of the City Charter, this includes accounting, assessment, income tax, and treasury functions. The Department maintains multiple financial management systems which are used for the assessment and collection of property tax, receipt and record revenue, collection of income tax, monitor and meet financial reporting requirements in order to ensure fiscal stability and proper utilization of public monies. Investment and management of City funds are also a major policy and operational activity through which the Finance Department maximizes City resources by maintaining the City's portfolios in the most advantageous positions. This includes ongoing analysis of both individual investments and general trends that impact the returns on investments, including analysis of City disbursement and collection activities to ensure sound and prudent fiscal management. Financial management responsibilities include risk management and management of Retirement System's assets, as well as the assets of the General Fund and enterprise or special revenue funds. Budget responsibilities include the preparation of policy recommendations and coordination of budget development and budget monitoring to assure conformance with the state Uniform Budget and Accounting Act, and Article Seven of the City Charter. This process includes revenue and expenditure analysis, development of policy and budgetary alternatives, and coordination between the Mayor and departments on budget development and financial and operational issues. Budget staff also assist in union contract negotiations, and provide cost benefit analyses on proposed projects for Mayoral review. The Department is directly responsible to the public to maintain an efficient collection system for income and property taxes, as well as a process for equity in assessment of real and personal property. Interdepartmental support activities include providing accounting services, payroll, financial planning, deposit control, purchasing, and accounts payable functions. Additional support to the Mayor and Council comes from the Finance Department in the preparation of revenue and debt service requirements, as well as analyses of economic trends and business activity that may impact City fiscal resources and/or operational concerns.

52

FINANCE DEPARTMENT
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 4,987,797 1,600,836 6,588,633 6,588,633 5,470,865 1,823,976 7,294,841 7,294,841 5,331,936 1,761,754 7,093,690 7,093,690 4,019,717 683,773 4,703,490 191,610 4,895,100 -26.5% -62.5% -35.5% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

-32.9%

Summary of Significant Changes: Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

53

DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES
Human Resources Mission The Department of Human Resources’ mission is to provide a wide range of Personnel, Employee and Labor Relations services to City departments, employees, retirees, City unions and the Community. The Department of Human Resources advises the Mayor on policy-related items concerning labor relations, equal employment opportunities, hiring practices, benefits and payroll, compensation and classification of positions, training and health and safety issues. The Department develops and updates policies and procedures for the Department and provides a wide range of activities and customer support services to the residents of the City of Lansing, all City Departments, including Lansing City Council, 54A-District Court, Economic Development Corporation, Downtown Lansing, Inc., Lansing Police and Lansing Fire Departments respectively. Employee Services Division Hiring and Classification Section The Hiring and Classification Section (HCS) is responsible for recruitment, selections, hiring, retention, compensation, various trainings and classification of all City positions. The Hiring Group provides ongoing training to the department managers and supervisors in areas of hiring and selection.

Health and Wellness Section The Health and Wellness Section administers the City's workers' compensation program and develops safety rules, policies, and safety training citywide, and administers and ensures compliance with federal workplace regulations. Payroll and Benefits Division The Payroll and Benefits Section provides services to City employees and retirees, including orientation for new employees. Employee and Labor Relations and Training Division The Employee & Labor Relations and Training Division is charged with facilitating positive working relationships with the City's eight (8) bargaining units by resolving bargaining issues, the administration of the grievance procedure and matters of contract interpretation or changing circumstances in the mutual interest of the City and its employees.

Training Section The training section works diligently to meet the ongoing training needs of City employees and works directly with the Health and Wellness Section. The department is currently working on implementing computerized training system to offer employees the option of self-driven training programs. It is the continued goal and vision of the Training Section to computerize all trainings for each employee to ensure that they have all the necessary tools to safely and efficiently provide services to the City of Lansing residents and neighboring Communities.

54

HUMAN RESOURCES
FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY 2014 FY13 Adopted Proposed FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel 1,034,826 Operating 451,390 Total 1,486,216 Information Technology Allocation 1,486,216

FY 2013 Projected

997,195 500,079 1,497,274 1,497,274

983,850 487,236 1,471,086 1,471,086

1,045,316 519,454 1,564,770 47,900 1,612,670

4.8% 3.9% 4.5%

7.7%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund, will be accounted for in an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

55

OFFICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY
Mission Statement The Office of the City Attorney (OCA) is dedicated to providing the highest quality legal service to the City of Lansing. Our mission is to provide professional, knowledgeable, courteous, and dependable service to the City's elected, appointed, and administrative officials and its committees and boards. Our goal is to equal or exceed the legal abilities of any respected private law firm in the State and to be the best possible "law firm" to the City. Under the Charter, the City Attorney is the attorney for Lansing as a Michigan municipal corporation and is responsible to both the Mayor and the City Council. The OCA provides legal services and advice at the request of the Mayor, City Council, City Departments and Boards; represents the City in all courts, tribunals and administrative agencies in all cases in which the City is a party or has an interest; and prosecutes all City ordinance violations. As the prosecutor for the City, the OCA is involved in remedying matters that directly impact citizens, neighborhood safety and quality of life, including enforcement of the housing code, drug laws, and alcohol-related offenses. We staff and provide legal advice at meetings, draft ordinances and issue written legal opinions to elected, appointed, and administrative officials. We also draft contracts, review and approve all contracts, bonds and legal instruments, Council resolutions, and grants. We are actively involved in the negotiation, purchase, sale, development and redevelopment of property in the City. We also serve as the designated Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) coordinator for the City.

56

OFFICE OF THE CITY ATTORNEY
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel 1,173,294 Operating 79,911 Total 1,253,205 Information Technology Allocation 1,253,205 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

1,348,741 73,848 1,422,589 1,422,589

1,248,329 76,937 1,325,266 1,325,266

1,321,228 78,192 1,399,420 53,220 1,452,640

-2.0% 5.9% -1.6%

2.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

57

POLICE DEPARTMENT
Mission Statement The mission of the Lansing Police Department is to minimize crime, maximize public safety, maintain order, and enforce the law. The Department pledges to maintain the trust and confidence of our citizens by partnering with them to: solve community problems, provide safety education, and enhance Lansing’s quality of life, making it a great place to live, work and visit. Department Goals ● Reduce crime, reduce repeat calls for service and increase citizen satisfaction by delivering quality police service in a lawful, sensitive, safe and professional manner in order to protect life, property and maintain public peace. ● Prevent crime and maintain order through police action; targeting specific problems. ● Enhance organizational excellence through education, training and technology. ● Identify and analyze problems, explore alternative solutions, and encourage regional cooperation. ● Create and maintain open lines of communication to promote partnerships with our community. ● Encourage and support citizen involvement and leadership to improve the quality of life at the neighborhood level. ● Employ personnel that meet standards of professional excellence and represent the diversity of our community. ● Promote job satisfaction, open communication, and team building through employee participation in decision making. ● Maximize the use of available resources. Police Department operations involve logistical support from three Divisions, the Patrol Division, the Investigations Division and Central Headquarters. The Special Operations Section falls under the command of the Investigations Division Captain as does the Detention Unit and the Property and Supply Unit. The Patrol Division Captain is responsible for all uniformed officers including Team Policing, School Resource Officers, the Canine Team and Community Policing Officers. Within Central Headquarters, the Staff Services Lieutenant oversees the Electronic Equipment Maintenance Unit, all Training and Technical Services, as well as Records and Identification. The Internal Affairs Section, Accounting Services Section and Legal Advisor report directly to the Chief of Police.
(continued)

58

Forfeiture Fund (drug law fund) consists of monies and other assets seized and forfeited in the process of enforcement of anti-drug laws. The Special Operations Section confronts the difficult issues involved in narcotic trafficking, vice, organized crime, and criminal gangs. The Special Operations Section works with our law enforcement partners at both the state and federal levels. These partnerships include the United States Attorney’s Office, the Ingham County Prosecutor’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms, the Federal Drug Enforcement Agency, the Internal Revenue Service, the Federal Bureau of Investigations, the United States Department of Agriculture, Health and Human Services, the Michigan State police, and local law enforcement agencies. The activities of the Ingham-Eaton-Clinton Counties Co-operative Enforcement Team (Tri-County Metro Narcotics, a multi-agency task force) generate revenues credited to a second drug law fund (aka Forfeiture Fund). The three counties in the IEC Cooperative (Ingham, Eaton, and Clinton) appropriate their respective shares of the total drug law enforcement task force budget (census population weighted) and, at year’s end, are reimbursed to the extent that drug forfeitures were sufficient to pick up the costs. Forfeitures in excess of IEC Cooperative expenditures are returned first to the counties (first tier) and then to all the participating agencies (second tier, including Lansing Police and Michigan State Police). Any IEC Co-Op funds turned back to Lansing Police must be used for drug law enforcement purposes. By definition of the IEC Co-Op funding agreement, any extra monies for LPD become bonus dividends to the SOS (LPD) drug law enforcement program. The Lansing Police Department and the City of Lansing shoulder fiduciary responsibility for the IEC Co-op. The activities of the Ingham-Eaton-Clinton Counties Co-operative Enforcement Team (Tri-County Metro Narcotics, a multi-agency task force) generate revenues credited to a second drug law fund (aka Forfeiture Fund). The three counties in the IEC Cooperative (Ingham, Eaton, and Clinton) appropriate their respective shares of the total drug law enforcement task force budget (census population weighted) and, at year’s end, are reimbursed to the extent that drug forfeitures were sufficient to pick up the costs. Forfeitures in excess of IEC Cooperative expenditures are returned first to the counties (first tier) and then to all the participating agencies (second tier, including Lansing Police and Michigan State Police). Any IEC Co-Op funds turned back to Lansing Police must be used for drug law enforcement purposes. By definition of the IEC Co-Op funding agreement, any extra monies for LPD become bonus dividends to the SOS (LPD) drug law enforcement program. The Lansing Police Department and the City of Lansing shoulder fiduciary responsibility for the IEC Co-op.

59

POLICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY

Department Appropriation FY 2012 Actual Police General Fund 911 Dispatch Center Drug Law Enforcement Drug Enforcement Tri-County Metro Total Police 30,626,897 5,621,605 722,727 1,167,944 38,139,173 FY 2013 Adopted Budget 33,513,551 839,201 432,000 34,784,752 FY 2013 Projected 33,460,329 839,201 696,348 34,995,878 FY 2014 Proposed 35,498,150 275,500 859,720 36,633,370 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed 5.9% -67.2% 99.0% 5.3%

$2.8 million of the Lansing Police Department is funded by a voter-approved 1.5 mill property tax millage.

Summary of Significant Changes Operations of the 9-1-1 dispatch center transfered to Ingham County at the end of FY 2012. Information for the Lansing Police Department's funds is provided in the following pages.

60

POLICE DEPARTMENT General Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 27,647,644 2,979,253 30,626,897 30,626,897 30,246,579 3,266,972 33,513,551 33,513,551 30,319,576 3,140,754 33,460,329 33,460,329 31,340,320 3,364,830 34,705,150 793,000 35,498,150 3.6% 3.0% 3.6% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

5.9%

$2.8 million of the Lansing Police Department is funded by a voter-approved ,1.5 mill dedicated property tax millage.

Summary of Significant Changes: A new "cold case" investigator position is proposed for FY 2014 to enhance the department's ability to resolve unsolved investigations. The large increase in personnel costs is largely due to costs previously funded through drug forfeiture receipts being funded by the General Fund. In light of the City's ongoing budgetary challenges, the FY 2014 proposed budget anticipates health care changes for employees. The City will work with the Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) to maximize funding within the department through health care changes. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

61

POLICE DEPARTMENT Drug Law Enforcement Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Grant Match Total 540,682 131,686 14,999 35,360 722,727 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

711,875 119,326 8,000 839,201

711,875 119,326 8,000 839,201

122,100 153,400 275,500

-100.0% 2.3% 1817.5% 100.0% 100.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: The decrease in funding for the FY 2014 budget is due to anticipated lower drug forfeiture receipts. Drug forfeiture revenues vary widely from year-to-year, subject to the timing of State and Federal case settlement and awards.

62

POLICE DEPARTMENT Drug Law Enforcement - Tri-County Metro Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Transfers Total 134,376 1,022,429 11,139 1,167,944 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

75,225 344,775 12,000 432,000

128,389 555,959 12,000 696,348

69,930 777,790 12,000 859,720

-7.0% 125.6% 0.0% 99.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: There are no significant changes for FY 2014.

63

FIRE DEPARTMENT
Mission Statement The Lansing Fire Department, under the direction of its Fire Chief, is committed to serving the Lansing community with the highest levels of life and property protection. This is achieved by providing excellent, compassionate service in an atmosphere that encourages innovation, professional development, and diversity. The Lansing Fire Department also has a Board of Fire Commissioners with eight members that represent all wards within the City of Lansing including two at-large positions. The Fire Commissioners have a wide range of authority including department budget approval, citizen complaints and department polices. The Department performs its mission through six organizational divisions, providing a wide range of services including fire prevention, emergency management and disaster preparation activities, Fire Safety, Housing and Premise Code enforcement, rental registration, plan review, public education, special events planning, arson investigation, employee education and certification, as well as emergency response for fire and medical, hazardous materials, and technical rescues.

64

FIRE DEPARTMENT
FY 2013 Adopted Budget % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 24,492,049 3,577,318 28,069,367 28,069,367

FY 2013 Projected

FY 2014 Proposed

27,208,881 3,714,309 30,923,190 30,923,190

26,878,448 3,755,252 30,633,700 30,633,700

28,523,064 2,698,466 31,221,530 483,270 31,704,800

4.8% -27.3% 1.0%

2.5%

$2.8 million of the Lansing Fire Department is funded by a voter-approved ,1.5 mill dedicated

Summary of Significant Changes: The FY 2014 proposed budget includes the transfer of the City's Code Compliance operations from Restructuring of Fire Department command staff is expected to result in $200,000 in cost reductions Maintenance of fire hydrants has been funded by the City's General Fund and accounted for in the

65

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT
GENERAL FUND ACT 51 MAJOR & LOCAL STREETS SEWAGE REFUSE & RECYCLING ENGINEERING Missions and Roles: The Public Service Department is organized into four distinct divisions (Engineering, Business and Permits, Operations and Maintenance, and the Waste Water Treatment Plant) that are responsible for engineering, transportation, construction, right-of-way permitting, and the operation and maintenance of roads, bridges, sidewalks, and storm and sanitary sewers within the City of Lansing, including the Waste Water Treatment Plant and pump stations . The Operations and Maintenance Division also operates the City's Capital Area Recycling and Trash (CART) program. The Engineering Division also provides general engineering support and oversight for other City departments.

Activities of the Department are primarily supported through: General Fund, Act 51 Fund (Major and Local Streets Special Revenue Fund - Gas Tax), Sewage Disposal System Enterprise Fund (sewer bills), trash collection fees, and recycling fees. Additional funding may be utilized, as available, from bond proceeds and interest on existing bond issues, Federal E.P.A. and Transportation Funds, Michigan Department of Transportation and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality Grants, State Revolving Loan Funds, the Lansing Building Authority, Tax Increment Finance Authority, Special Assessments, and the City's Community Development Block Grant.

Engineering (Major supporting funds: General Fund, Act 51, Sewage Disposal System Enterprise Fund): This Division is responsible for the oversight of all infrastructure design and construction contracts in the City necessary to maintain, upgrade, expand and install new storm sewers, sanitary sewers, combined sewers, roads, bridges, sidewalks, traffic and parking signs, pavement markings, and traffic and pedestrian signals. This Division reviews and approves site plans for development projects. This Division administers several programs regulated by the State of Michigan such as: Biennial Bridge Inspections, Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Program, Street Rating (PASER), and ACT51 Reporting and Environmental Clean-up Projects. The City’s largest infrastructure and environmental program, the Wet Weather Program (comprised of the CSO, SSO, and Storm water Phase II permit programs) is managed out of this Division. The Transportation and Non-Motorized Unit of the Engineering Division guides the operational design of reconstructed streets using the Complete Streets model and oversees implementation of the City’s nonmotorized plan and sidewalk gap closure and repair program. This Unit also develops the traffic sign program for the City and manages all City traffic signals and school zone flashers, evaluates intersection traffic control, speed limits, parking regulations, and roadway lane configurations, develops traffic control plans for special events, and prepares school operational and safety studies and a wide variety of other traffic operations evaluations and reports. The Transportation and Non-Motorized is also responsible for CAD and GIS within the Public Service Department.

66

Business and Permits (Major supporting funds: General Fund, Act 51, Sewage Disposal System The Business and Permits Division combines the Public Service budget coordination, permitting, soil erosion enforcement, snow on sidewalk program, accounts payable, accounts receivable, administrative support and department wide technology efforts, into one workgroup. The right-of-way (ROW) is managed by this division by its issuance of all ROW permits to private contractors and utility companies that need to perform work in the right of way. This Division also provides permitting and inspection for the Soil Erosion and Sedimentation and Control Program, sidewalk and drive approaches, sewers, and special transportation. This group has a focus on improving our communication with our customers and general advancements of technology and its use and deployment throughout the department. Some examples under development are an internal work order/asset management system, increased development and use of the GIS platform, and goals to reduce the dependency and utilization of paper and move to electronic data storage department wide.

Operations and Maintenance (O & M) (Major supporting funds: General Fund, Act 51, Sewage Disposal System Enterprise Fund, trash fees, and recycling fees): The O & M Division is generally considered to be the backbone of the City. It is divided into six work sections that provide the basic and necessary functions that allow for the continued public health of the Lansing metropolitan area. These sections are: Surface, CART (Capital Area Recycling and Trash), Streets, Sewer, Administrative, and Grounds. The State of Michigan contracts with the City to maintain 44 miles of state trunklines and provides funding within the Major Streets Fund for: maintenance and repairs to roadways, winter maintenance, right of way mowing, and traffic control systems on state trunklines. Surface The Surface Section is responsible for maintaining city surface infrastructure, alleys, and parking areas. Funding sources include the Parking Fund, Major and Local Street Funds, and the General Fund. Funded activities include operating the O&M yards and facilities, maintaining surface infrastructure (e.g. guard rails, signs), graffiti abatement, compost facility operations, internal city department refuse service, ROW trash violation abatement, street sweeping, gravel street maintenance, alley maintenance, sign shop field operations, special event traffic control and barricading, placing radar speed trailers and message boards, portions of parking maintenance, fall leaf removal from the streets, and winter maintenance activities.

The Surface Section is the one stop source for traffic control and barrier placement, providing routine and emergency support to the Transportation Unit, the Lansing Fire Department and the Lansing Police Department. The Section also maintains city parking ramps and surface lots, performs basic maintenance, and provides coordinated winter maintenance support to downtown street parking locations. Capital Area Recycling and Trash (CART) The Recycling Fund supports weekly curbside collection of a range of recyclable materials and organic yard waste for compost, serving residences with four or less units. Under ordinance, larger residential complexes, and commercial and industrial operations are required to recycle and the Department is charged with oversight of this activity. The City’s recent transition to a single recycling stream collection method, where all recyclables are collected in one container in the collection truck, has proven to be an enormous success. This budget indicates the extension of this program with the roll out of residential recycling carts and a cart based commercial recycling service.

67

The Trash Fund supports the Operations and Maintenance Division’s weekly trash collection throughout the City. Included is funding for collection of bulk refuse items which ensures that City residents have ready access to proper disposal of large refuse items. Also included is funding for weekly refuse pick-up utilizing City imprinted trash bags ("Blue Bags") which are sold through local merchants, or refuse carts (“Trash Cart Program”) which are billed on a quarterly basis and are available by calling the Department. The City’s Blue Trash Bag program, a hallmark of the system that competes in the private market, provides for volume based collection. The bags complement recycling efforts by making refuse disposal less expensive for residents who make regular use of the City's recycling program. The City’s Blue Trash Bag program (“Pay as you throw program”) has proven to be a cost effective option for those taking advantage of the new single stream recycling program. Revenue is derived from bag sales and from quarterly billing for container services. Streets The Street Section maintains city streets and sidewalks using the Major and Local Street Funds for street repairs, and utility cut fees and the General Fund for sidewalk maintenance. Funded activities include skin patching, AMZ-asphalt spray patching, potholing, crack sealing, utility cut repairs, concrete curb repair, sidewalk repairs and winter maintenance. Maintenance work is coordinated and prioritized by working closely with the Engineering Division. Sewer The Sewer Section maintains the city sanitary and storm sewer collection system using sewer funds for sanitary sewer maintenance and the General Fund for storm sewer maintenance. Funded activities include sewer cleaning and repair, structure repair, catch basin cleaning, bypass pumping, flood control, sewer televising, emergency response, inspection and winter maintenance. Administraative The Administrative Section is responsible for customer service, accounting functions and performance tracking of all activities within the Division. The section coordinates the administrative needs of other sections and provides a direct link between the public and the services performed by the Operations and Maintenance Division. On an annual basis this section handles over 22,000 phone calls from the public, serves over 2,000 citizens in person, dispatches field staff to more than 3,500 locations to address citizen concerns and responds to more than 3,900 requests for special services from the CART section. They manage payroll and personnel issues for full time Teamster and UAW employees and UAW seasonal employees. They also service over 5,900 Trash Cart customers. Through meticulous data management procedures they ensure that the activities of the Division are properly recorded, reported, and where applicable, reimbursed by other departments, agencies or individuals. Grounds The Grounds Section maintains city green spaces, cemeteries, trees, right of ways, and park infrastructure. Funding sources include the General Fund, Major and Local Street Funds, and the Parking Fund. Funded activities include mowing (for all City jurisdictional properties: ROWs, parks, cemeteries, and parking lots), cemetery operations, ornamental area planting, support to leisure services, parks infrastructure maintenance, forestry operations (hazard tree removal, hazard mitigation, planting and nursery operations) and winter maintenance. We will continue to enhance the efficient, streamlined, and cost effective approach to the maintenance of all City maintained properties. This will include primary maintenance activities such as mowing, forestry operations, snow removal from City parking facilities and sidewalks, and minor maintenance of the park land, cemeteries, ornamental areas, and right of way vegetation management.

68

Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP) (Major supporting funds: Sewage Disposal System Enterprise Fund): The City’s Activated Sludge Wastewater Treatment Plant is the fifth largest in the State of Michigan. It is a hightech facility with a comprehensive computerized control system. This system can remotely control many functions of outlying pump stations, process controls, and other on-campus functions. This process has allowed the WWTP to optimize staff size and focus attention on maintaining the plant appurtenances necessary to serve our customers. Currently the plant processes an average daily flow of 16 million gallons of sewage.

The WWTP laboratory is responsible for daily testing of influent flows, evaluating the plant’s in-process removal of pollutants, and confirming plant effluent compliance with the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) limits. The WWTP staff is also responsible for operating and maintaining 28 sanitary sewer pump stations ranging in capacity from less than 100,000 gallons per day to over to 66,000,000 gallons per day. Other programs that are

Fleet Maintenance and Building Management The Property Management and Fleet Services Division of the Finance Department will be re-organized under an executive order to the Public Service Department. This will allow for sharing of resources noting the location of the new central garage facility adjacent to the Operations and Maintenance Division at South Street. These units will each form a new Division within the Public Service Department.

69

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY
Department Appropriation FY 2012 Actual Public Services - General Fund Major Streets Fund Local Streets Fund Sanitary Sewer Fund Garbage & Rubbish Fund Recycling Fund Engineering Internal Service Fund Fleet Maintenance Fund Total Public Services 9,031,880 9,701,379 5,346,521 17,922,182 1,558,000 3,018,531 2,379,534 6,734,966 55,692,993 FY 2013 Adopted Budget 9,195,779 8,372,404 6,302,130 18,630,023 1,665,709 3,922,360 2,492,576 6,936,052 57,517,033 FY 2013 Projected 9,117,333 10,234,699 6,251,828 18,630,023 1,648,180 3,858,789 2,425,772 7,341,713 59,508,337 FY 2014 Proposed 5,742,090 10,677,800 7,840,600 18,982,210 1,667,400 3,957,000 3,080,000 8,424,970 60,372,070 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed -37.6% 27.5% 24.4% 1.9% 0.1% 0.9% 23.6% 21.5% 5.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: Information for the Public Service Department's various funds is provided in the following pages.

70

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT General Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 2,814,466 6,217,414 9,031,880 9,031,880 2,804,792 6,390,987 9,195,779 9,195,779 2,744,509 6,372,824 9,117,333 9,117,333 2,924,027 2,722,263 5,646,290 95,800 5,742,090 4.3% -57.4% -38.6% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

-37.6%

Summary of Significant Changes: Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased pension contributions. Streetlighting has been funded by the City's General Fund and accounted for in the Public Service Department. The FY 2014 budget proposes that those costs be funded by a surcharge by the Board of Water and Light. This $4 million cost reduction to the City is anticipated to cost the average homeowner $1.75 per month, or $21.00 per year. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

71

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Major Streets Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Transfer to Local Streets Total 2,073,765 2,635,104 1,420,372 608,979 2,963,159 9,701,379 2,785,516 3,095,943 1,243,494 609,803 637,648 8,372,404 2,524,234 2,885,057 3,632,930 609,803 582,675 10,234,699 2,753,852 3,388,472 2,135,260 609,216 1,791,000 10,677,800 -1.1% 9.4% 71.7% -0.1% 180.9% 27.5% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

Summary of Significant Changes: The FY 2014 proposed budget includes a $100,000 appropriation, funded by a transfer from the City's General fund, for new sidewalk construction for areas where sidewalks do not currently exist. This funding supplements $100,000 in sidewalk repair monies funded out of the City's Capital Improvement Fund. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

72

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Local Streets Special Revenue Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total 2,283,336 1,596,411 112,176 1,354,598 5,346,521 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

2,716,618 1,860,218 368,086 1,357,208 6,302,130

2,621,248 1,735,559 537,813 1,357,208 6,251,828

2,775,215 2,095,036 1,615,000 1,355,349 7,840,600

2.2% 12.6% 338.8% -0.1% 24.4%

$1.8 million in neighborhood street funding is funded by a voter-approved 1.0 mill property tax millage.

Summary of Significant Changes: In addition to the voter-approved millage levy for local roads, a $1.3 million transfer from the City's General Fund will allow for much-needed repairs to City streets.

73

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Sanitary Sewer (Wastewater) Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Transfers Total Information Technology Allocation 5,939,356 6,867,840 524,475 17,622,182 300,000 17,922,182 17,922,182 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

7,321,035 7,725,142 2,629,000 18,330,023 300,000 18,630,023 18,630,023

6,859,253 7,395,496 3,950,144 18,330,023 300,000 18,630,023 18,630,023

7,661,282 7,959,638 8,278,000 18,682,210 300,000 18,982,210 174,570 19,156,780

4.6% 3.0% 214.9% 1.9% 0.0% 1.9%

2.8%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund, will be accounted for in an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

74

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Garbage & Refuse Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total 845,848 712,152 1,558,000 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

862,950 802,759 1,665,709

855,421 792,759 1,648,180

862,487 804,913 1,667,400

-0.1% 0.3% 0.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

75

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Recycling Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Debt Service Total 1,915,798 1,102,733 3,018,531 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

2,084,279 1,313,081 525,000 3,922,360

2,042,690 1,291,099 525,000 3,858,789

2,018,059 1,413,941 525,000 3,957,000

-3.2% 7.7% 0.0% 0.9%

Summary of Significant Changes: Single-stream recycling is anticipated to be launched this summer. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

76

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Engineering Internal Service Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total Information Technology Allocation 2,626,436 280,885 82,156 188,639 3,178,116 3,178,116 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

2,809,908 349,286 35,000 192,635 3,386,829 3,386,829

2,741,059 341,986 88,082 184,814 3,355,941 3,355,941

2,860,554 410,906 166,160 3,437,620 356,580 3,794,200

1.8% 17.6% -100.0% -13.7% 1.5%

12.0%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

77

PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENT Fleet Maintenance Internal Service Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Debt Service Capital Total 2,911,641 3,041,963 113,586 667,776 6,734,966 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

3,225,606 2,820,424 243,922 646,100 6,936,052

3,102,886 2,804,802 243,922 1,190,103 7,341,713

3,437,035 2,863,783 243,922 1,880,230 8,424,970

6.6% 1.5% 0.0% 191.0% 21.5%

Summary of Significant Changes: The City's newly renovated consolidated garage will become operational later this year. This facility will house the operations of three former City-owned garage locations. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

78

HUMAN RELATIONS & COMMUNITY SERVICES
HRCS Mission The Human Relations and Community Services (HRCS) Department pursues City Charter and Ordinance mandates to address basic human services needs and help cultivate a community climate of diversity, equity and nondiscrimination. The Department strives to improve the quality of life for all Lansing citizens by providing leadership to address urgent community issues such as the resolution of homelessness, food security, health care for the uninsured, affordable housing, infant mortality prevention, youth programs to prevent juvenile delinquency and drug abuse, and refugee resettlement.

HRCS Responsibilities The Department’s Human Services’ focus works in partnership with community coalitions to evaluate community needs, develop grant proposals or programming, and oversee contracts to distribute City funding to support nonprofit service provision. Staff has the capacity to monitor and distribute Federal HUD Supportive Housing and Emergency Services Grants to local agencies and provide technical assistance where needed. The Human Relations focus provides mediation to address community disputes and complaints, and monitors City compliance with laws and ordinances that ensure social Leveraging Funds - the Department administers Human Services Funding as outlined in the City Charter and ensures the funds are disbursed in a coordinated and efficient manner. HRCS assists other City departments and local agencies in identifying resources, completing grant applications and leveraging funding from multiple sources to address community needs. HRCS brings divergent groups together as partners to pool scarce resources to address unmet needs. Priority needs are defined by City Charter as: Basic Needs: Food, shelter, clothing, transportation, child care, housing assistance and legal help for indigent persons. Life Skills: Mentoring, academic enhancement, social competency, literacy, conflict resolution, parenting skills development, structured recreation, and self sufficiency for people with disabilities.

Employability Development: Job readiness and retention, job seeking skills, vocational training, job site development and placement activities. Health/Mental Health: Health care access, crisis intervention, dental care, prescription medications, health promotion, counseling, substance abuse prevention, safety promotion, hospice and respite care.

Assessing Needs -The Department assesses human services needs within the community, develops priorities, and assures the use of City funds is appropriate and consistent with identified priorities. The Human Relations and Community Services Advisory Board, made up of Lansing residents, provides a citizen’s perspective to the Department, fostering mutual understanding and respect among all groups in the city while helping to identify community needs and resources. The HRCS Department promotes an agency clustering model, whereby agencies providing similar services are encouraged to partner on mutual projects, thus reducing cost inefficiencies and duplicative efforts. (continued)

79

HRCS Coordinates Services to Address Gaps Addressing Food Security The HRCS Department supports a monthly Mobile Food Pantry , staffed by volunteers, through a contract with the Greater Lansing Food Bank, providing more than 450,000 pounds of food in 2012

Children and Youth are assisted through the HRCS “Spring Break Feeding Program,” that distributed more than 5,000 healthy lunches to Lansing children and 500 food boxes to identified families in 2012, families who would otherwise go without during the school district’s spring break.

Due to cuts in food stamps, the HRCS Department identified the need to supplement family meals through creation of weekend survival kits, distributed monthly to Children in need, in cooperation with the Lansing School District. Addressing Affordable Housing Shortage The One Church One Family Project developed 12 houses and eight families moved in through this partnership with local churches, Ingham Co. Land Bank, the MSHDA Homeless Families Initiative and the City Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) grant. Six more houses are under development. The partnership with local churches capitalizes on volunteers who provide mentorship, case management and other support services to families. Addressing Elder Abuse and Financial Exploitation Given the increasing elder population, the HRCS Department was awarded a 3-year grant to create a systemic response to abuse in partnership with the Lansing Police Department, Prosecutor’s Office, End Violent Encounters, Inc., the Tri-County Office on Aging and Adult Protective Services. HRCS coordinates the grant that provides training for law enforcement and victim service providers, facilitates a Coordinated Community Response Team, and will provide victim services and outreach in the final 18 months of the grant. Sponsoring Events to serve People in Need HRCS coordinates and organizes the following annual events Spartans Giving Back - Taking it to the Streets is a one-day event providing more than 40,000 hours of community services to homeless shelters, community centers, the South Lansing office complex, cemeteries, public housing, and a number of other sites. Southside World Day is organized to foster better relationships and “teach tolerance” in the Southwest corridor of the City of Lansing. A diverse group of 500 citizens came together to enjoy an afternoon of games, food, fun and giveaways. Lansing Community Connect (Formerly Project Homeless Connect) connected more than 1,700 low-income citizens with 70 nonprofits and local businesses, to receive benefits applications, medical screenings, eye exams and eyeglasses and employment or job-training services. An excellent example of community collaboration, 350 MSU volunteers and business sponsors from the community provide free food, personal needs items, haircuts and more. Citizen Assistance – HRCS is the City of Lansing’s focal point for citizens seeking help with all types of human services needs providing information, referral and direct assistance as needed. Staff are trained as mediators who may assist residents in resolving neighborhood conflicts or disputes prior to seeking legal action or contact with the courts.

80

Upholding Principles of Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity - The Department is charged with the enforcement of Charter and Ordinance Human Relations mandates which prohibit discrimination on the basis of protected characteristics against persons seeking employment, housing, and the use of public facilities. These include labor standards such as the federal Davis Bacon Prevailing Wage Act for City construction projects, as well as Fair Housing enforcement, and the Human Rights Ordinance. The Department is mandated to ensure City compliance with, and handle complaints related to, the Equal Employment Opportunity Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Section 504, and Child Labor Law. Complaint Investigation – HRCS houses the Police Commission Investigator who conducts independent intake and review of citizen complaints against the Lansing Police Department that may allege inappropriate and/or discourteous actions by police personnel. Community Supported Agencies and Events –Through HRCS, the City contracts with a variety of community agencies to support other essential programs such as diversion for first time offenders, economic development, educational enhancement, recreation and the Arts, which enhances the quality of life for Lansing citizens.

81

HUMAN RELATIONS & COMMUNITY SERVICES

FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 625,663 68,206 693,869 693,869

FY 2013 Adopted Budget

FY 2013 Projected

FY 2014 Proposed

% Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

747,743 51,905 799,648 799,648

704,497 52,494 756,991 756,991

760,056 72,594 832,650 37,260 869,910

1.6% 39.9% 4.1%

8.8%

Human Services 1,275,485 1,350,000 (1.25% of of General Fund Revenues)

1,350,000

1,395,000

3.3%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

82

PARKS & RECREATION
Mission and Roles The Department of Parks and Recreation creates community through people, parks and programs. The mission of the Parks and Recreation Department is to enhance lifestyle opportunities for the citizens of Lansing through the provision of leisure time activities, and the preservation and maintenance of park lands and special recreation facilities. The Department accomplishes this mission in the following ways: •         organization of youth, adult, and senior citizen recreational programming in parks, community centers, schools, swimming pools, nature center, and historic home; •         regular maintenance of all parks and natural areas owned by the City of Lansing, including maintenance of Lansing’s urban forest areas through regular cycles of tree planting, fertilization, and trimming; •         providing burial services and cemetery maintenance at the City’s three municipal cemeteries; •         providing public golfing opportunities at Groesbeck Golf Course which support recreational and league play in the area; •         supporting youth through the teaching of life-skills through The First Tee of Mid-Michigan program at Sycamore Creek Golf Academy •         provision of special recreation facilities such as Ranney Skate Park, Soldan Dog Park, Gier Park BMX Bicycle Track, Cooley Gardens, Frances Park Rose Garden and the Lansing River Trail linear park. •         sustaining working partnerships with the Lansing School District, Ingham County Parks and Recreation, Michigan Department of Natural Resources, Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund, Michigan Department of Transportation, Lansing Community College, Capital Region Community Foundation, Michigan State University and various community banking organizations. The Department receives advisory support from the citizens of Lansing by encouraging their involvement in the following citizen groups: City of Lansing Parks Board, Friends of TurnerDodge, Fenner Conservancy, the individual Community Center advisory boards and their youth advisory boards, the Baseball and Softball advisory boards and over 38 neighborhood park “Friends” groups. The Department provides support in policy decisions regarding recreational options and facilities to the Mayor and City Council. Organization The Parks and Recreation Department consists of four separate divisions: •         Administration The Administration Division includes Management and Business Administration, Park Design, Planning and Research, and the staff support for park and pavilion rentals, event planning and support services for both the General Fund and the Enterprise Fund programs. The Management and Business Administration section is responsible for the salary, hourly, Temporary Employment Agreements, and seasonal payroll and time cards. This section also processes procurement card reconciliations, accounts payable and receivable, and processes paperwork for yearly employee evaluations and step increases. (continued)

83

•         Field Services Funding for Field Services which includes; Forestry, Grounds and Landscape Maintenance, and Athletic Field and Pool Maintenance, is located in this part of the budget. Staffing for these activities now resides in the Public Service Department. Below is a description of these services. The Forestry Section of the Field Services Division is responsible for maintenance of safe and healthy trees in City parks and on City streets. Care includes trimming and removal of dead, damaged or diseased trees and limbs from these areas. They also maintain and stock a city nursery, which provides trees for residential streets, parks, cemeteries, and golf course plantings as needed. Grounds & Landscape Maintenance Section is responsible for care and maintenance of turf, shrubs, ornamental trees and flowers, as well as planting new growth for the next season. They also handle repair of tables, benches, signs and playground equipment, as well as ice and snow removal on trails, parking areas, and park sidewalks during the winter season. Athletic Fields and Pool Maintenance is responsible for the maintenance of City athletic fields and the public outdoor pools at Hunter and Moores Parks, as well as Cemetery burials and grounds maintenance (see Cemetery Fund). •         Leisure Services The Leisure Services Division operates recreation programs at four Community Centers (Gier, Foster, Letts, Schmidt), Special Recreation Services (Hunter and Moores Swimming Pools, Kids Camp and Therapeutic Recreation) and Lifetime Sports. The division also operates specialized facilities such as the Turner-Dodge House (historic home) and the Fenner Nature Center. Programming at the Fenner Nature Center is conducted by the Fenner Conservancy. •         Golf Operations The department operates Groesbeck Golf Course which is an 18 hole golf course located at 1600 Ormond. The Sycamore Driving Range and Practice Facility is operated by The First Tee of MidMichigan, and is located at 1526 E. Mount Hope Avenue. This program provides quality instruction on the game of golf for youth and adults. The First Tee of Mid-Michigan operates the driving range, which is open to the public for practice. Facilities Programmed recreation sites are Letts, Gier, Schmidt and Foster Community Centers; Groesbeck golf course; Sycamore Golf Academy and Driving Range; Lansing River Trail; Moore’s Park and Hunter Park swimming pools; Fenner Nature Center; the Turner-Dodge House; Davis, Gier, Ranney, Sycamore, Davis and Kircher Park ball fields. We have several neighborhood parks and athletic fields throughout the city where recreation programming occurs throughout the year. We also provide several facilities for rental which includes Frances Park Rose Garden and overlook, and Cooley Gardens.

84

PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT SUMMARY
Department Appropriation FY 2012 Actual Parks & Recreation General Fund Cemeteries Fund Golf Fund Parks Capital Improvements FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

6,996,074 639,726 796,697 150,000 1,586,423 8,582,497

6,673,801 678,914 822,096 215,000 1,716,010 8,389,811

6,734,357 676,628 814,596 215,000 1,706,224 8,440,581

7,048,750 713,800 932,400 300,000 1,946,200 8,994,950

5.6% 5.1% 13.4% 39.5% 1 7.2%

Total Parks & Recreation

Summary of Significant Changes: Information for the Parks and Recreation Department's various funds is provided in the following pages.

85

PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT General Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Total Information Technology Allocation 4,669,188 2,326,886 6,996,074 6,996,074 4,343,812 2,329,989 6,673,801 6,673,801 4,369,423 2,364,934 6,734,357 6,734,357 4,435,853 2,485,157 6,921,010 127,740 7,048,750 2.1% 6.7% 3.7% FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

5.6%

$1.8 million in park maintenance and infrastructure funding is funded by a voter-approved 1.0 mill property tax millage.

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions. Beginning in FY 2014, technology costs previously funded completely by the General Fund will be accounted for through an internal service fund (see explanation in Information Technology Department summary) and allocated to the City's various departments and funds.

86

PARKS AND RECREATION Municipal Cemeteries Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Transfers Total 468,069 154,741 16,916 639,726 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

374,017 288,097 16,800 678,914

375,153 284,675 16,800 676,628

389,853 307,147 16,800 713,800

4.2% 6.6% 0.0% 5.1%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

87

PARKS AND RECREATION Municipal Golf Courses Enterprise Fund
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total 401,179 287,131 108,387 796,697 FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

426,896 281,200 5,000 109,000 822,096

427,973 272,103 5,000 109,520 814,596

518,780 304,000 109,620 932,400

21.5% 8.1% -100.0% 0.6% 13.4%

Summary of Significant Changes: No significant operational changes are proposed for FY 2014. Changes in personnel costs result from a combination of factors, including the elimination of furloughs for FY 2014, a State-mandated capping of City contributions toward employee heath care costs, new healthcare plans, and increased City pension contributions.

88

GENERAL FUND NON-DEPARTMENTAL EXPENDITURES & TRANSFERS
FY 2012 Actual Department Appropriation Operating Subsidies to Other Funds/Related Entities Cemeteries Fund (Parks Millage) 301,420 Golf Fund (Parks Millage) 300,000 Police Millage Fund (Police Millage) 911 Dispatch Center 142,770 Stadium Fund 410,455 Building Safety Fund 534,866 Emergency Shelter Grant Match 97,326 State & Federal Grant Matches 149,125 Downtown Lansing Inc. 39,180 Cemeteries Fund 73,058 Golf Fund 100,000 Lansing Economic Dev. Corp. (LEDC) 245,252 LEPFA 1,143,408 Tax Increment Financing Authority 3,536,860 Transfers to Other Funds for Capital Improvements: Capital Improvements Fund 1,044,956 Parks Millage Fund (Parks Millage) 150,000 Police Millage Fund (Police Millage) Fire Millage Fund (Fire Millage) e Road Millage (Road Millage) Roads/Sidewalks (non-millage) 100,000 Fleet Fund 1,294,956 City-Supported Agencies Sister City Gr Lansing Safety Council Capital Area Rail Council Arts And Culture Grants Silver Bells Administration Community Corrections Advisor LEAP Support Common Ground Support FY 2013 Adopted Budget FY 2013 Projected FY 2014 Proposed % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

414,469 356,096 436,000 472,700 193,157 100,000 39,180 50,000 1,102,795 3,164,397

414,469 356,096 436,000 457,700 193,157 100,000 39,180 50,000 1,102,795 3,149,397

451,400 521,000 410,000 144,400 150,000 60,470 50,000 1,208,780 1,400,000 4,396,050

8.9% 46.3% -100.0% 0.0% -13.3% -25.2% 0.0% 50.0% 54.3% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 9.6% 100.0% 38.9%

1,216,200 254,239 75,479 140,200 1,910,000 517,680 4,113,798

1,216,200 254,239 75,479 140,200 1,910,000 517,680 4,113,798

1,100,000 300,000 1,881,500 1,930,700 1,620,000 6,832,200

-9.6% 18.0% -100.0% -100.0% -1.5% 273.0% 100.0% 66.1%

20,000 12,000 3,900 130,000 8,000 12,343 15,000 127,000 328,243

20,000 12,000 3,900 130,000 8,000 12,500 15,000 130,000 331,400

20,000 12,000 3,900 130,000 8,000 12,500 15,000 127,525 328,925

20,000 12,000 3,900 130,000 8,000 12,500 15,000 130,000 331,400

0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0%

Debt Service General Fund Debt Service Transfers to Other Funds For Debt Service: Debt Service Funds

1,622,801 190,895 1,813,696 161,030 7,134,785

1,193,964 286,800 1,480,764 165,000 9,255,359

916,062 286,800 1,202,862 150,000 8,944,982

1,106,620 285,600 1,392,220 155,000 13,106,870

-7.3% -0.4% -6.0% -6.1% 41.6%

Library Lease Total Non-Departmental

89

(This page intentionally left blank)

90

Other Budgets
Lansing Entertainment & Public Facilities Authority (LEPFA) ● Lansing Center ● Cooley Law School Stadium ● City Market Economic Development Corporation (LEDC) Lansing Brownfield Redevelopment Authority (LBRA) Tax Increment Financing Authority (TIFA) Downtown Lansing, Incoporated (DLI)

91

Lansing Center
2013-2014 Budget

REVENUES
Building Rental Food Services Food Services-Merch Food Services-Vend Equipment Rental Utilities Signage/Promotions Sponsorships Security Box Office Pay Phone Receipts Labor/Service Parking Message Center Miscellaneous
Total Operating Revenues

916,000 2,775,000 1,000 14,000 532,167 161,000 32,000 52,001 17,967 199,000 8,000 16,583 4,724,718

EXPENSES
Salaries/Wages Full-time Events Allocation to Olds Park Subtotal Fringes/Related Costs Communications Leases Professional Services Utilities Marketing Repairs/Maintenance Supplies/Materials Events Security Insurance/Bonding Depreciation F/B Expense Vending Miscellaneous Total Operating Expense Income/(Loss) Interest of Bank Accts Sales/Marketing Reimbur

1,917,741 599,999 21,194 44,000 275,708 770,000 65,001 83,137 92,000 66,556 44,386 74,184 34,800 1,668,887 627 68,706 5,826,927 (1,102,209) 4,504 245,656 (1,097,705)

Income/(Loss) City Contribution

(852,049) 852,049

92

Cooley Law School Stadium
Proposed 2013-2014 Budget

REVENUES
Misc Total Operating Revenue 5,000 5,000

EXPENSES
Salaries/Wages Allocation Total Fringes/Related Costs Allocation Total Communications Professional Services Utilities Marketing Repairs/Maintenance Supplies/Materials Concessions/Catering Insurance/Bonding Depreciation Miscellaneous Total Operating Expense Less Depreciation 53,182

22,426

1,600 2,500 120,280 4,250 57,001 4,458 24,444 972 20,970 312,082 0 307,082

Income/(Loss)
Interest Income

Income/(Loss) City Contribution

(302,082) (302,082)

93

Lansing City Market
Proposed 2013- 2014 Budget

REVENUES
Building Rental Equipment Rental Labor/Service Parking/Miscellaneous Total Operating Revenues 127,905

5,095 133,000

EXPENSES
Salaries/Wages Fringes/Related Costs Communications Rents/Leases Professional Services Utilities Printing/Reproduction Marketing Repairs/Maintenance Supplies/Materials Insurance/Bonding Depreciation Miscellaneous Total Operating Expense Income/(Loss) City Contribution 63,534 20,295 1,800 2,000 63,279 9,000 5,750 5,371 1,900 9,180 542 182,651 (49,651) 49,651

94

LANSING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FY 2014 BUDGET
FY 2013 Adopted Budget 1,200 82,380 50,000 130,000 3,000 5,000 25,340 140,815 50 35,818 152,457 626,060

FY 2012 Actual Revenues FEDERAL GRANT (Dept. of Energy) STATE GRANT (Business Incubator) PARKING SYSTEM REVENUE APPLICATION FEES BROWNFIELD APPLICATION FEES CONTRACT SERV LBRA CONT SERV CITY ARTS & CULTURE CONTRACT ENERGY EFFICIENCY LOAN ADMIN BANNER PROGRAM RADDISON ANNUAL PAYMENT INTEREST INCOME LOAN INTEREST FROM FUND BALANCE (includes $70,000 loss on sale of property) MISCELLANEOUS REVENUE ANNUAL ISSUER'S FEES OP TRFR TIFA 230,000 46,012 20,158 6,830 5,000 72,401 245,252 130,000 5,515 28,511 206 35,819 229,966 1,055,670

FY 2013 Projected 1,200 250 73,894 50,000 130,000 23,000 100,000 5,000 25,000 34 33,681 149,936 591,995

FY 2014 Proposed 73,900 50,000 130,000 100,000 3,000 22,000 50 30,000 139,936 548,886

Expenditures SALARIES FRINGE BENEFITS CHANGE IN ACCRUED COMPENSATED ABSENCES MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING BUSINESS INCUBATOR PROMOTION DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS CONTRACTUAL SERVICES FAÇADE/SIGN GRANT ARTS & CULTURE GRANTS BANNER PROGRAM UTILITIES BUILDING RENTAL TRAINING INSURANCE & BONDS EB-5 REGIONAL CENTER STATE GRANT (Business Incubator) LOSS ON SALE OF PROPERTY DEPRECIATAION

284,645 127,726 (29,187) 12,530 1,257 13,215 1,330 72,284 18,500 130,000 11,147 21,475 250 2,324 1,585 46,011 70,000 7,598 792,690 3,361,032 262,980 3,624,012 (752,678) (280,000) (68,377) 2,522,957

1,727 15,700 372,800 5,000 130,000 3,000 8,160 21,900 2,600 70,000 7,598 638,485 3,624,012 (153,240) 3,470,772 (839,402) (60,779) 2,570,591

1,727 15,700 372,800 1,500 130,000 1,005 7,721 1,800 1,898 7,598 541,749 3,624,012 50,246 3,674,258 (839,402) (60,779) 2,774,077

2,000 401,763 3,500 130,000 1,800 2,225 7,598 548,886 3,674,258 3,674,258 (730,311) (53,181) 2,890,766

Beginning Fund Balance Surplus/(Deficit) Ending Fund Balance Less: EDC Loans Receivable Less: Land Less: Equipment Available Fund Balance

95

LANSING BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY FY 2014 BUDGET
FY 2013 Adopted Budget 183,784 302,484 261,126 792 16,263 9,643 6,773 64,532 38,902 6,881 8,255 10,790 82,380 10,057 142,996 7,084 32,283 9,299 137,621 6,584 930,853 970,292 44,338 74,248 200,000 200,000 173,604 3,931,864

Description Revenues TAX REVENUE FOR BROWNFIELD RLF PLAN 2 MOTOR WHEEL PLAN 5 BTS PLAN 9 SCHAFER BAKERY PLAN 10 NEOGEN PLAN 11 NEOPHASE PLAN 12 PERCY BEAN PLAN 14 PRUDDEN PLAN 16 METRO FORD PLAN 17 BUILDERS PLUMBING PLAN 19 STYLELINE PLAN 20 LORANN OILS PLAN 21 WOLHERT LBRA ADMIN PLAN 30 BROWNFIELD DEV SPEC PLAN 23 STADIUM DISTRICT PARTNERS PLAN 37 CEDAR ST SCHOOL PLAN 40 POINT NORTH PLAN 42 NU UNION PLAN 8b JNL PLAN 49a MARSHALL STREET ARMORY PLAN 53 MICH AVE INVESTORS FEDERAL GRANTS (EPA BCRLF) STATE GRANT(CMI) STATE GRANT (CMI Waterfront) HAZ SUB-BROWNFIELD EPA (2010) PETRO-BROWNFIELD EPA (2010) EPA ADMIN HAZ SUB-BROWNFIELD EPA (2012) PETRO-BROWNFIELD EPA (2012) INTEREST INCOME CITY LOAN

FY 2012 Actual 157,705 277,454 212,895 358 14,852 9,192 5,538 48,363 8,162 34,444 7,391 3,269 35,447 72,401 8,863 126,870 7,655 29,889 10,418 130,960 69,147 58,506 29,708 121,587 65,248 -

FY 2013 Projected 198,277 295,232 283,450 774 5,269 5,907 51,619 12,130 7,318 8,123 25,067 73,894 9,133 96,003 7,039 32,007 9,382 135,550 586 600,000 730,000 44,338 74,248 5,000 47,500 22,500 1,700 151,280 2,933,324

FY 2014 Proposed 216,371 295,232 283,453 774 5,907 51,619 7,318 8,124 25,067 73,900 9,132 96,003 7,039 32,007 9,382 135,550 384 330,853 240,292 10,000 145,000 170,000 1,000 2,154,407 (continued)

2,093 230,870 1,779,283

96

LANSING BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY FY 2014 BUDGET
FY 2013 Adopted Budget 930,853 7,040 2,960 20,292 940,000 82,380 44,338 74,248 200,000 200,000 183,784 302,484 792 16,263 9,643 6,773 64,532 38,902 6,881 8,255 10,790 142,996 10,057 7,084 32,283 9,299 137,621 6,584 434,730 3,931,864 625,700 625,700 (621,663) 4,037

Description Expenditures CAPITAL OUTLAY/CONSTRUCTION (EPA BCR SALARIES (CMI Marketplace) FRINGE BENEFITS (CMI Marketplace) CONTRACTUAL SERVICES CONTRACTUAL SERVICES (CMI Marketplace) CAPITAL OUTLAY/CONSTRUCTION (CMI Mar ADMINISTRATION EXPENSES TO EDC EPA ADMIN EXP HAZ-SUB BROWNFIELD EPA (2010) PETRO - BROWNFIELD EPA (2010) HAZ-SUB BROWNFIELD EPA (2012) PETRO - BROWNFIELD EPA (2012) BROWNFIELD REVOLVING LOAN FUND PROJ COSTS PLAN 2 MOTOR WHEEL PROJ COSTS PLAN 9 SCHAFER BAKE PROJ COSTS PLAN 10 NEOGEN PROJ COSTS PLAN 11 NEOPHASE PROJ COSTS PLAN 12 PERCY BEAN PROJ COSTS PLAN 14 PRUDDEN PROJ COSTS PLAN 16 METRO FORD PROJ COSTS PLAN 17 BUILDERS PL PROJ COSTS PLAN 19 STYLELINE PROJ COSTS PLAN 20 LORANN OILS PROJ COSTS PLAN 21 WOLHERT PROJ COSTS PLAN 23 STADIUM PTR PROJ COSTS PLAN 30 BRWNFLD DEV PLAN 37 CEDAR ST SCHOOL PLAN 40 POINT NORTH PLAN 42 NU UNION PROJ COSTS PLAN 8b JNL PROJ COSTS PLAN 49A MARSHALL ST ARMO DEBT SERVICE BROWNFIELD BTS CITY LOAN REPAYMENT

FY 2012 Actual 69,147 58,506 29,708 72,401 119,827 65,248

FY 2013 Projected 600,000 10,000 20,292 699,708 73,894 5,000 44,338 74,248 47,500 22,500 125,168 295,232 774 5,269 5,907 51,619 12,130 7,318 8,123 25,067 96,003 9,133 7,039 32,007 9,382 135,550 434,730 2,857,930 625,700 75,395 701,095 (694,772) 6,322

FY 2014 Proposed 330,853 5,000 235,292 73,900 10,000 145,000 170,000 216,370 295,232 774 5,907 51,619 7,318 8,124 25,067 96,003 9,132 7,039 32,007 9,382 135,550 283,453 2,153,022 701,095 1,385 702,480 (694,773) 7,707 (continued)

150,800 277,454 358 14,852 9,192 5,538 48,363 8,162 34,444 7,391 3,269 35,447 126,870 8,863 7,655 29,889 10,418 130,960 443,765 1,768,525 614,942 10,758 625,700 (621,663) 4,037

Beginning Fund Balance Surplus/(Deficit) Ending Fund Balance Less: Ending Restricted Fund Balance Ending Unrestricted Fund Balance

97

LANSING BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY FY 2014 BUDGET
FY 2013 Adopted Budget -

Description RLFA Revenues TAX REVENUE FOR REVOLVING ASSESSME RLFA Expenditures Eligible Expenditures Beginning RLFA Restricted Fund Balance Ending RLFA Restricted Fund Balance RLF Revenues TAX REVENUE FOR RLF RLF Expenditures ELIGIBLE EXPENDITURES Beginning RLF Restricted Fund Balance Ending RLF Restricted Fund Balance

FY 2012 Actual

FY 2013 Projected -

FY 2014 Proposed -

123,875 123,875

123,875 123,875

123,875 123,875

123,875 123,875

157,705

183,784

198,277

216,371

150,800 490,883 497,788

183,784 497,788 497,788

125,168 497,788 570,897

216,370 570,897 570,898

98

TAX INCREMENT FINANCE AUTHORITY (TIFA) FY 2014 BUDGET
FY 2013 Adopted Budget 3,049,154 100 1,628,689 4,677,943

FY 2012 Actual Revenues PROPERTY TAX LEVY PROPERTY TAX LEVY-SCHOOL PROPERTY TAX PENALTY AND INTER INTEREST INCOME FROM FUND BALANCE TRANSFER FROM CITY 4,592,560 5,423 2,543 8,377 4,608,903

FY 2013 Projected 2,998,722 313 4,900 3,003,935

FY 2014 Proposed 2,798,722 100 462,731 1,400,000 4,661,553

Expenditures MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING LEASES DEBT SERVICE-TIFA COURTS DEBT SERVICE-TIFA CONV CNTR

229,966 2,995,000 574,075 956,370 4,755,411 3,484,781 (146,508) 3,338,273 (1,442,509) 1,895,764

152,457 2,870,000 574,116 1,081,370 4,677,943 3,338,272 (1,628,689) 1,709,583 (1,442,509) 267,074

149,936 2,870,000 574,116 1,081,370 4,675,422 3,338,272 (1,671,487) 1,666,785 (1,173,739) 493,046

139,936 2,740,000 575,247 1,206,370 4,661,553 1,666,785 (462,731) 1,204,054 (903,869) 300,185

Beginning Fund Balance: Surplus/(Deficit) Ending Fund Balance Less: Ending Restricted Fund Balance Ending Unrestricted Fund Balance Restricted Revenues INTEREST INCOME - RESTRICTED Expenditures DEBT SERVICE-TIFA CONV CNTR Beginning Fund Balance Reserved for Debt Service Surplus/(Deficit) Ending Fund Balance Reserved for Debt Service

4,171

2,600

2,600

1,500

271,370 1,709,708 (267,199) 1,442,509

271,370 1,442,509 1,442,509

271,370 1,442,509 (268,770) 1,173,739

271,370 1,173,739 (269,870) 903,869

99

City of Lansing Fiscal Year July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Downtown Lansing Incorporated Special Revenue Fund (fomerly Principal Shopping District) FY 2013 Adopted Budget 21,267 % Change FY13 Adopted FY14 Proposed

FY 2012 Actual Beginning Fund Balance Revenues Special Assessments Grants Miscellaneous Transfer from General Fund Total Revenues Expenditures 49,167

FY 2013 Projected 21,267

FY 2014 Proposed 10,909

416,290 10,000 156,136 39,180 621,606 649,506

395,000 10,000 202,855 39,180 647,035 668,218

416,000 10,000 175,528 39,180 640,708 651,066

416,000 10,000 210,390 60,470 696,860 684,180

5.3% 0.0% 3.7% 54.3% 7.7% 2.4%

Fund Balance Increase/(Decrease) Ending Fund Balance

(27,900) 21,267

(21,183) 84

(10,358) 10,909

12,680 23,589 90.0%

100

Fiscal Year 2014 Capital Improvement Plan

101

FY 2014 City-Wide Capital Improvement Program
Project Facilities Cooley Stadium Improvements Court Renovations Facility Capital Improvements Subtotal Technology Technology Improvements/Computer Replacements Public Education & Gov't (PEG)Television Capital Improvmts Subtotal Parking Fund Parking Lot Construction Ramp Repairs - South Capitol Ramp Ramp Repairs - North Grand Ramp Ramp Repairs - North Capitol Ramp Ramp Repairs - North Townsend Ramp Subtotal Planning & Neighborhood Development Form-Based Code Project FY 2014 Appropriation General Fund Road Millage Parks Millage Fleet Fund

Funding Sources Parking Fund Street Funds Sewer Fund Grants/ Trusts Bonds/ Loans

120,000 85,000 725,000 930,000

120,000 85,000 725,000 930,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,000,000 300,000 2,300,000

2,000,000 300,000 300,000 2,000,000

275,000 50,000 500,000 150,000 30,000 1,005,000

-

-

-

-

275,000 50,000 500,000 150,000 30,000 1,005,000

-

-

-

-

70,000 70,000

70,000 70,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

102

Parks & Recreation Crego Park Improvements Citywide Repair and Maintenance

200,000 100,000 100,000

-

200,000 100,000 100,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

Public Services/Transportation Sidewalk Repairs and New Sidewalk Construction Local Street Road Maintenance and Construction Surface Transportation Program (STP) Federal Aid Project City Share of Sanitary Sewers City Share of Delta and Delhi Township Sewers Central Interceptor Rehabilitation Wet Weather Program Sewer Regulator Abandonment Wastewater Treatment Plant Aeration Basins Subtotal

200,000 3,181,500 1,807,760 500,000 10,000 2,300,000 5,102,000 65,000 300,000 13,466,260

100,000 1,881,500

100,000 1,300,000 1,807,760 500,000 10,000 830,000 65,000 300,000 1,705,000 2,300,000 4,272,000 6,572,000

100,000

1,881,500

-

-

-

3,207,760

-

Fleet Services Vehicle & Equipment Purchases Fire Trucks

950,000 900,000 1,850,000 19,721,260

500,000 900,000 1,400,000 2,500,000

450,000 1,881,500 100,000 450,000 450,000 1,005,000 3,207,760 1,705,000 300,000 8,572,000

Total Capital Projects - FY 2013/2014

BY COMMITTEE OF THE WHOLE RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LANSING WHEREAS, in conformance with Article 7, Section 7-101 of the City Charter, on March 25, 2013, the Mayor submitted a proposed budget for the 2013/2014 fiscal year, which spans from July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014; and WHEREAS, the City Council held a series of televised public hearings to review Mayor’s budget recommendations; and WHEREAS, the City Council held special Committee of the Whole meetings during evening hours at the Alfreda Schmidt Community Center on Aprial 23, 2013 and at the Foster Community Center on May 7, 2013, and as part of the Council meeting to provide opportunities for citizens to comment on the proposed City budget; and WHEREAS, in accordance with City Charter and the State Uniform Budgeting and Accounting Act, notice was published and a public hearing was held on May, 6, 2013, for the fiscal year 2013/2014 budget and capital improvements program; and WHEREAS, Public Act 2 of 1968 of the State of Michigan, as amended, provides that the budget resolution of the City shall set forth the total number of mills to be levied under the General Property Tax Act, the estimated revenues, by source, and amounts appropriated to defray expenditures and meet the liabilities of the City for the ensuing fiscal year; and WHEREAS, the City Council desires to establish certain budget policies for the fiscal year 2013/2014, NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that 19.70 mills be levied under the General Property Tax Act for fiscal year 2013/2014 as follows: City Operating: 19.44 City Debt: .26 BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City's sewage rate shall be increased by 4.5% for FY 2014; BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the following changes to the City's fee and charges be adopted: From Current FY 2013 City Attorney Diversion Program Fire Department Ambulance Treatment/No Support Basic Life Support Advanced Life Support I Advanced Life Support II Fire Inspection Services: Inspections Plan Review/Suppression Plan Review/Alarm Parking Tickets - Fire Lanes Motor Vehicle Assistance Assistance Hazmat Extrication To Adopted FY 2014

$

150.00

$

300.00

$ $ $ $

663.75 663.75 796.25 893.00

$ $ $ $

675.00 675.00 825.00 900.00

$ $ $

100.00 100.00 30.00

$ $ $

125.00 125.00 60.00

new fee new fee new fee

$ $ $

200.00 400.00 500.00

Vehicle Fires Confined Space Standby Rescue Training Ambulance Call - oxygen administration Downed Wire Standby (charge utility co.) Fire Inspection Fees - Internation Prop. Fire Code Parks & Recreation Department Showmobile Rental Basic Resident Basic Non-Resident Extensions Resident Extensions Non-Resident Weddings Cooley Gardens Cooley Sunken Gardens Sports & Leisure Rec League Team Fee 12 games Team Fee 12 games Team Fee 16 games Team Fee 20 games Team Fee 12 games Team Fee Tournaments Team Entry Kids Camp Non-Resident Local Excellance Training-Summer Non-Resident Local Excellance Training-Fall/Winter Non-Resident National Junior Tennis-Non Resident National Junior Tennis-Fall/Winter Non Resident Volunteen-Non Resident After School Program Rivertrail Use Fee Per Field Ranney; Gier; Davis Muni Gate Fee/Adults & 16 & Under Free Teen Drop In A Very Fairy Party Kids Tr Triathlon Sensory Science Social Club Tr Tr Day Program-Individual Tr Day Program-2 - 5 People Tr Day Program-6 - 10 People Golf 9 Holes 18 Holes Cart - 9 Holes $ $ $

new fee $ 250.00 new fee $ 350.00 new fee $ 150.00 new fee $ 50.00 new fee $ 200.00 new fee $75.00 - $100.00

$ $ $ $

350.00 650.00 750.00 1,550.00

$ $ $ $

375.00 675.00 775.00 1,575.00

$

50.00 new fee

$ $

100.00 100.00

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

226.00 260.00 308.00 375.00 226.00 280.00 75.00 199.00 35.00 35.00 45.00 30.00 45.00 35.00 10.00 75.00 new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee new fee

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

240.00 264.00 325.00 395.00 246.00 300.00 100.00 210.00 55.00 70.00 70.00 65.00 60.00 55.00 20.00 100.00 10.00 25.00 40.00 3.00 2.00 8.00 15.00 15.00 8.00 15.00 35.00 55.00

11.00 17.00 7.00

$ $ $

12.00 18.00 8.00

Cemetery Markers & Monuments-Monument Foundation Gov't Marker-Marker Foundation Marker-Registration & Cuts Interment Adult O/C Child 3.5' to 5.0' O/C Child 2.5' to 3.5' O/C Cremated Remains Columbarium After Hours - Weekday after 3:00 PM After Hours - Saturday before 1:00 PM After Hours - Saturday after 1:00 PM After Hours - Sunday and City Holiday before 1 Burial Spaces Single Grave / Resident Single Grave / Non Resident Monument - 2 Grave / Resident Monument - 2 Grave / Non Resident Monument - 3 Grave / Resident Monument - 3 Grave / Non Resident Child Infant Burial Spaces - Monument - 4 Grave / Resident Burial Spaces - Monument - 4 Grave / Non-Res Columbarium Niche Resident Non-Resident Disenterment & Re-interment in the same cemetery Adult Child & Infant Cremated Remains Planning & Neighborhood Development Department Building Safety Building Permits Electrical Permits Mechanical Permits Plumbing Permits Sign Permits-Technology Fee Demolition Permits-Technology Fee Planning Historic Designation Fee Parking Parking Fines - Early Pay Option Police Overnight Parking (2 - 5 am)

0.30 / sq. in. $ 66.00 $ 45.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 750.00 400.00 200.00 350.00 125.00 300.00 300.00 400.00 400.00 800.00 1,200.00 2,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 4,500.00 300.00 150.00 new fee new fee

0.50 / sq. in. $ 70.00 $ 50.00 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 800.00 425.00 225.00 400.00 150.00 350.00 350.00 500.00 650.00 900.00 1,350.00 2,200.00 3,300.00 3,300.00 4,950.00 325.00 200.00 4,400.00 6,600.00

$ $ $ $ $

550.00 825.00 700.00 255.00 225.00

$ $ $ $ $

650.00 975.00 1,000.00 350.00 325.00

$ $ $ $

60.00 70.00 70.00 70.00 new fee new fee

$ $ $ $ $ $

70.00 80.00 80.00 80.00 5.00 5.00

$100 - $1500 $ 7.00 $

no fee 10.00

$

9.00

$

20.00

Public Service Department General Fund Prints/Aerials/sheet Utility Research (per half hour) Late Payment Fee

$

20.00 new fee new fee

$

5.00

Noise Ordinance waiver application Noise Ordinance waiver mailing
Major/Local Streets Funds Overhead Banner Sunday Premium Traffic Control Plan (City Provided) Traffic Control Plan (Applicant Provided) Type II Barricade/Barrel (furnish) Traffic Cones 18" or 28" (furnish) Traffic Cones 42" (furnish) Pedestal Mounted Sign (furnish) Arrow/Message board (furnish) Water wall (furnish) Traffic cones 42" (furnish) Pedestal mounted sign (furnish) HMA utility cut, with 4 revisits HMA utility cut, with 4 revisits Winter seasonal cut, with 1 revisit Saw cut and excavate utility cut, prepare for fill Sidewalk replacement HMA utility cut, with 2 revisits HMA utility cut, with 2 revisits Winter seasonal cut, with 1 revisit Saw cut and excavate utility cut, prepare for fill Sidewalk replacement Recycling Fund Recycling Fee Recycling Cart - 2 or more Special Event Recycling Bins Commercial Recycing Late Fee Residential Recycling Cart Switch Refuse Fund Special Event Dumpster (20 YD) Special Event Trash Cart Special Event Trash ($120 for first 4 carts) $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$                  30.00 $                    0.15 new fee $                100.00 new fee $1/ parcel
100.00 0.15 95.00 35.00 5.75 2.75 5.00 10.00 50.00 190.00 3.75 7.50 75.75 25.25 10.00 5.00 11.33 39.00 13.00 10.00 5.00 11.33 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 120.00 0.20 100.00 50.00 6.00 3.00 6.00 15.00 100.00 50.00 4.00 10.00 81.00 27.00 12.00 6.00 12.00 45.00 15.00 12.00 6.00 12.00 92.50 25.00 10.00 5.00 25.00 615.00 20.00 120.00

89.75 42.00 7.50 new fee new fee 585.00 15.00 new fee

$ $

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the following appropriations and revenue projections are adopted as the City's budget for the FY 2013/2014 fiscal year: II. GENERAL FUND FY 2014 Proposed Estimated Revenues Property Taxes Income Taxes State Shared Revenues Licenses and Permits Charges for Services Fines and Forfeitures Interest and Rents Other Revenue Transfers Total Revenue 37,524,500 29,130,000 14,568,300 1,564,700 9,001,000 2,595,400 60,000 17,471,100 85,000 112,000,000 Council Changes FY 2014 Adopted 37,524,500 29,130,000 14,568,300 1,564,700 9,001,000 2,595,400 60,000 17,471,100 85,000 112,000,000

-

FY 2014 Proposed Appropriations City Council Personnel Operating Total Internal Audit Personnel Operating Total Courts Personnel Operating Total Mayor's Office Personnel Operating Total Office of Community Media Personnel Operating Total City Clerk' Office Personnel Operating Total Planning & Neighborhood Development Personnel Operating Total Finance Personnel Operating Total Human Resources Personnel Operating Total City Attorney Personnel Operating Total Police Personnel Operating Total

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

452,039 176,861 628,900

-

452,039 176,861 628,900

176,565 7,895 184,460

-

176,565 7,895 184,460

4,664,980 943,510 5,608,490

-

4,664,980 943,510 5,608,490

680,413 112,057 792,470

-

680,413 112,057 792,470

305,999 28,251 334,250

-

305,999 28,251 334,250

705,668 174,732 880,400

-

705,668 174,732 880,400

613,810 231,240 845,050

-

613,810 231,240 845,050

4,019,717 875,383 4,895,100

-

4,019,717 875,383 4,895,100

1,045,316 567,354 1,612,670

-

1,045,316 567,354 1,612,670

1,321,228 131,412 1,452,640

-

1,321,228 131,412 1,452,640

31,340,320 4,157,830 35,498,150

-

31,340,320 4,157,830 35,498,150

FY 2014 Proposed Fire Personnel Operating Total Public Service Personnel Operating Total Human Relations & Community Service Personnel Operating Total Parks & Recreation Personnel Operating Total Human Services Operating Total City-Supported Agencies Operating Total Non-Departmental Vacancy Factor Library Lease Debt Service Transfers Total Total Appropriations II. SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS MAJOR STREETS FUND Estimated Revenues Gas & Weight Tax Receipts Utility Permit Fees (Metro Act) Reimbursements Miscellaneous Revenue Transfer from General Fund Use of Existing Bond Proceeds Use of Fund Balance Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Transfers Total Appropriations 28,523,064 3,181,736 31,704,800

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted 28,523,064 3,181,736 31,704,800

-

2,924,027 2,818,063 5,742,090

-

2,924,027 2,818,063 5,742,090

760,056 109,854 869,910

-

760,056 109,854 869,910

4,435,853 2,612,897 7,048,750

-

4,435,853 2,612,897 7,048,750

1,395,000 1,395,000

-

1,395,000 1,395,000

331,400 331,400

-

331,400 331,400

(600,000) 155,000 1,392,220 11,228,250 12,175,470 112,000,000

-

(600,000) 155,000 1,392,220 11,228,250 12,175,470 112,000,000

6,379,880 398,000 1,056,240 46,000 200,000 991,540 1,606,140 10,677,800

-

6,379,880 398,000 1,056,240 46,000 200,000 991,540 1,606,140 10,677,800

2,753,852 3,388,472 2,135,260 609,216 1,791,000 10,677,800

-

2,753,852 3,388,472 2,135,260 609,216 1,791,000 10,677,800

FY 2014 Proposed LOCAL STREETS FUND Estimated Revenues Gas & Weight Tax Receipts Reimbursements Transfers Use of Fund Balance Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total Appropriations STADIUM FUND Estimated Revenues Operating Revenues Olds Park Stadium Naming Rights Transfer from General Fund Total Revenue Appropriations Debt Service Total Appropriations

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

1,900,580 365,000 5,403,200 171,820 7,840,600

-

1,900,580 365,000 5,403,200 171,820 7,840,600

2,775,215 2,095,036 1,615,000 1,355,349 7,840,600

-

2,775,215 2,095,036 1,615,000 1,355,349 7,840,600

270,000 120,000 410,000 800,000

-

270,000 120,000 410,000 800,000

800,000 800,000 BUILDING DEPARTMENT FUND

-

800,000 800,000

Estimated Revenues Licenses & Permits Charges for Services Miscellaneous Transfer from General Fund Use of Fund Balance Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Total Appropriations CDBG FUND Estimated Revenues Federal Grants Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Total Appropriations

2,179,650 2,400 250 144,400 2,326,700

-

2,179,650 2,400 250 144,400 2,326,700

1,894,090 429,610 3,000 2,326,700

-

1,894,090 429,610 3,000 2,326,700

1,637,887 1,637,887

-

1,637,887 1,637,887

998,918 638,969 1,637,887

-

998,918 638,969 1,637,887

FY 2014 Proposed HOME GRANT FUND Estimated Revenues Federal Grants Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Total Appropriations

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

531,535 531,535

-

531,535 531,535

96,457 435,078 531,535 EMERGENCY SHELTER GRANT FUND

-

96,457 435,078 531,535

Estimated Revenues Federal Grants Total Revenue Appropriations Operating Total Appropriations

174,713 174,713

-

174,713 174,713

174,713 174,713 DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT FUND

-

174,713 174,713

Estimated Revenues Drug Forfeiture Revenues Interest Income Use of / (Deposit To) Fund Balance Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Total Appropriations

340,000 1,000 (65,500) 275,500

-

340,000 1,000 (65,500) 275,500

122,100 153,400 275,500 DRUG LAW ENFORCEMENT FUND - TRI-COUNTY METRO

-

122,100 153,400 275,500

Estimated Revenues Drug Forfeiture Revenues Contributions from Local Units Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Transfers Total Appropriations

435,000 424,720 859,720

-

435,000 424,720 859,720

69,930 777,790 12,000 859,720

-

69,930 777,790 12,000 859,720

FY 2014 Proposed DOWNTOWN LANSING, INC. Estimated Revenues Special Assessments Grants Miscellaneous Transfer from General Fund Use of / (Deposit To) Fund Balance Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Total Appropriations III. ENTERPRISE FUNDS CEMETERIES FUND Estimated Revenues Cemetery Service Revenue Sale of Lots Other Transfer from Parks Millage Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Transfers Total Appropriations GOLF FUND Estimated Revenues Greens Fees Equipment Rentals Concessions Transfers In - Parks Millage Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Debt Service Total Appropriations

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

416,000 10,000 210,390 60,470 (12,680) 684,180

-

416,000 10,000 210,390 60,470 (12,680) 684,180

171,080 513,100 684,180

-

171,080 513,100 684,180

176,400 85,000 1,000 451,400 713,800

-

176,400 85,000 1,000 451,400 713,800

389,853 307,147 16,800 713,800

-

389,853 307,147 16,800 713,800

287,000 109,400 15,000 521,000 932,400

-

287,000 109,400 15,000 521,000 932,400

518,780 304,000 109,620 932,400

-

518,780 304,000 109,620 932,400

FY 2014 Proposed PARKING FUND Estimated Revenues Parking Revenue Baseball Revenue Parking Fines Interest Capital Lease Payment Use of Fund Equity Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Total Appropriations

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

6,166,465 50,357 548,988 10,000 2,740,000 1,627,190 11,143,000

-

6,166,465 50,357 548,988 10,000 2,740,000 1,627,190 11,143,000

1,896,225 2,291,775 1,155,000 5,800,000 11,143,000 WASTEWATER FUND

-

1,896,225 2,291,775 1,155,000 5,800,000 11,143,000

Estimated Revenues Sewer Charges Low Income Credit Existing Bond Proceeds Use of Fund Equity Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Capital Debt Service Transfers Total Appropriations REFUSE FUND Estimated Revenues Operating Income Interest Income Use of Fund Equity Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Total Appropriations

32,058,234 (2,000) 7,567,630 3,431,836 43,055,700

-

32,058,234 (2,000) 7,567,630 3,431,836 43,055,700

7,661,282 8,134,208 8,278,000 18,682,210 300,000 43,055,700

-

7,661,282 8,134,208 8,278,000 18,682,210 300,000 43,055,700

1,596,200 7,750 63,450 1,667,400

-

1,596,200 7,750 63,450 1,667,400

862,487 804,913 1,667,400

-

862,487 804,913 1,667,400

FY 2014 Proposed RECYCLING FUND Estimated Revenues Operating Income Sale of Recycled Materials Interest Income Use of Fund Equity Total Revenue Appropriations Personnel Operating Debt Service Total Appropriations IV. CAPITAL PROJECT FUNDS CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT (CIP) FUND Estimated Revenues Transfer from the General Fund PEG (Cable Capital) Revenues Total Revenue Appropriations Facilities PEG (Cable Capital) Expenditures Planning Public Service Total Appropriations 1,100,000 300,000 1,400,000

Council Changes

FY 2014 Adopted

3,640,650 80,000 236,350 3,957,000

-

3,640,650 80,000 236,350 3,957,000

2,018,059 1,413,941 525,000 3,957,000

-

2,018,059 1,413,941 525,000 3,957,000

-

1,100,000 300,000 1,400,000

930,000 300,000 70,000 100,000 1,400,000

930,000 300,000 100,000 1,330,000

-

PARKS MILLAGE FUND Estimated Revenues Transfer from the General Fund Total Revenue Appropriations Citywide Maintenance & Repair Crego Park Improvements Transfer to Cemeteries Fund Transfer to Golf Fund Total Appropriations

1,272,400 1,272,400

-

1,272,400 1,272,400

100,000 200,000 451,400 521,000 1,272,400

-

100,000 200,000 451,400 521,000 1,272,400

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that in the event that the outstanding debt in the Tax Increment Financing District can be refinanced, thereby reducing the City's General Fund subsidy, the resulting cost savings will be split equaly between building the General Fund reserve level and prefunding of the City's retiree healthcare obligation; and

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that the following policies are hereby established for the 2013/2014 fiscal year: [Insert Budget Polices] Approved for placement on the City Council agenda:

____________________________ Janene McIntyre, City Attorney

__________________ Date

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful