You are on page 1of 44

Minister’s foreword

2012

AUSTRALIAN JOBS
AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012

1

Contents
National, state and territory labour markets
Labour market overview National overview New South Wales Victoria Queensland South Australia Western Australia Tasmania Northern Territory Australian Capital Territory 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 12

INTRODUCTION
The Australian Jobs publication presents summary information for people exploring careers, and education and training options, as well as those currently looking for work or wanting assistance to enter or re-enter the labour market. The publication includes past and projected employment trends, by industry and occupation, as well as information about skills. Australian Jobs provides a snapshot of the Australian labour market and introduces readers to a range of information about the workforce, employment and training. The data may spark the interest of some readers to explore more detailed information about particular occupations, industries or local labour markets. If further information is required, a page of useful websites and links is included on the inside back cover of the publication. Clearly, a higher skilled workforce has benefits for the economy and for individuals. In recognition of the importance of skills and employment, the Australian Government has recently announced a number of initiatives to skill more Australians, and it also supports job seekers through Job Services Australia. Information about these initiatives is included on pages 32 and 33. The Australian labour market is continuously changing, as we move to a sustainable, low carbon economy. This year, the Australian Jobs publication includes information to help readers understand structural change and the skills and attributes that employers are looking for in 2012, covering employability skills and skills for sustainability (see page 28). Although information contained in Australian Jobs 2012 is as up-to-date as we can make it, the labour market can change quickly and the skills needed by employers vary across industries and geographic locations. Consequently, employment and training decisions need to be based on a range of information including expectations about pay, working conditions, skills and interests as well as training requirements and long term goals. Consider information from a wide range of sources. School careers advisers, Australian and state/territory government websites and employment service providers can all help (see page 43 for useful sites).

Industries
Industry overview Structural change Apprentices and trainees by industry Accommodation and Food Services Administrative and Support Services Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing Arts and Recreation Services Construction Education and Training Electricity, Gas, Water and Waste Services Financial and Insurance Services Health Care and Social Assistance Information Media and Telecommunications Manufacturing Mining Other Services Professional, Scientific and Technical Services Public Administration and Safety Rental, Hiring and Real Estate Services Retail Trade Transport, Postal and Warehousing Wholesale Trade 13 14 15 15 16 16 17 17 18 18 19 19 20 20 21 21 22 22 23 23 24 24

Occupations and skills
Occupational overview Skill level overview The next five years What do employers look for when recruiting? Which jobs have the best prospects? Education and employment Employment and education services 25 26 27 28 29 30 32

Inquiries about Australian Jobs should be directed to AustralianJobs@deewr.gov.au

Australian Jobs Matrix
Guide to the Australian Jobs Matrix Australian Jobs Matrix Australian Jobs 2012 data sources Useful websites and links 34 35 42 43

The contents of Australian Jobs 2012 are based on information available at the time of publication. Over time, the reliability of the data and analysis may diminish. The Commonwealth, its officers, employees and agents do not accept responsibility for any inaccuracies contained in the report or for any negligence in the compilation of the report and disclaim liability for any loss suffered by any person arising from the use of this report. Labour market information must be used cautiously as employment prospects can change over time and vary by region. It is important in making and assessing career choices to consider all factors, including interest and aptitudes, remuneration and expectations, and the requirements of occupations.

2

AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012

Minister’s foreword

The Australian economy is continuously adapting to change. We are currently in an important era of generational change driven by growing demand from Asian markets, new technologies, the shift to a low carbon economy and the challenges of an ageing workforce. There is a key role for government in managing the transformation process and maximising the opportunities for all Australians to participate in meaningful and productive work. Over the past year, the pace of employment growth in Australia has moderated. While Australia has not been immune from international economic conditions, we still have one of the strongest economies in the industrialised world with one of the lowest unemployment rates. Highlighting the resilience of our labour market is the fact that record numbers of Australians have a job. While some industries and regions are clearly doing it tough in a difficult economic climate, others are recording particularly strong jobs growth, providing many opportunities for Australian job seekers. The Australian Government understands the importance that having a job has for individuals and families and also the importance to the economy of a skilled and productive workforce. It continues to be committed to providing opportunities for all Australians to have rewarding employment through better access to training, higher standards of education, improved childcare and employment services and a strong economy. In addition, the Building Australia’s Future Workforce package is providing a significant investment in increasing participation among key groups who are at risk of falling behind. The Government is also investing a further $8.5 billion in employment services over the next four years to assist people back into employment. Supporting more Australians to gain skills, the Government has announced a wide array of initiatives. As part of its $1.75 billion offer to the states and territories to reform the training system, the Commonwealth is asking states and territories to introduce an entitlement to training for anyone of working age without a Certificate III or higher qualification. It has also made landmark reforms which have already enhanced access to university study, with the number of students enrolled at a record high. In addition, the establishment of the My University and the My Skills (to be released later in 2012) websites provides Australians with vital and comparable information to help them to choose the right training options. Australian Jobs 2012 also supports this aim by providing a wealth of information about the current and future labour market, including information about industries, occupations and states and territories. It also provides an insight into Australian Government services that can assist those interested in employment, education or training. I encourage you to consider the valuable analysis of the labour market which is included in Australian Jobs and to explore the other useful resources referenced in this publication.

Bill Shorten

AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012

3

National, state and territory labour markets

LABOUR MARKET OVERVIEW
The changing labour market
Technological change, greater labour market flexibility and economic reforms have helped to transform people’s working arrangements and have been associated with a significant improvement in labour market conditions between the end of the early 1990s recession and the onset of the global recession in September 2008. Indeed, over the 15 years to September 2008, employment growth was exceptionally strong, increasing by around 3.2 million (an annual average rate of 2.3%). Full-time employment rose by 1.9 million over the period (an annual average rate of 1.9%), while part-time employment increased by 1.3 million (an annual average rate of 3.5%), although the rise in part-time employment was off a much lower base.

Regional labour markets
Recently, Australia has seen the emergence of a ‘multispeed’ economy and labour market, with some states, regions and sectors performing strongly, while others struggle. For instance, the resource-rich states of Western Australia and Queensland continue to benefit from high commodity prices and the associated Mining boom, while the trade-exposed sectors in states such as Victoria and Tasmania, are feeling the effects of the high Australian dollar and weaker demand, resulting in softer labour market conditions. • Over the year to March 2012, employment increased significantly in Western Australia, up by 44 900 (or 3.7%), and the unemployment rate declined by 0.3 percentage points to 4.1%, well below the national figure of 5.2%. The State’s participation rate increased by 0.7 percentage points over the year to 68.9%, the highest of any state. • By contrast, labour market conditions in Victoria (with greater exposure to Manufacturing, which is hard hit by the high Australian dollar and competitive pressures) deteriorated over the year to March 2012. Employment fell by 22 800 (or 0.8%) over the year, and the unemployment rate rose by 1.4 percentage points to 5.8% in March 2012. Over the period, the participation rate fell by 0.4 percentage points to 65.3%. The ‘multispeed’ nature of the economy is also evident at the regional level. In March 2012, the disparity in regional unemployment rates (the highest and lowest) was at 8.5 percentage points, only just below the 9.9 percentage points recorded in August 2009, at the height of the global recession, and well above the 4.9 percentage points recorded in April 2008.

Recent developments in the labour market
Following the onset of the global recession in September 2008, the Australian labour market deteriorated, with employment growth stalling and the unemployment rate peaking at 5.9% in June 2009. Nevertheless, the Australian economy and labour market displayed remarkable resilience and fared much better than most other major advanced economies over 2010, with employment growing by a robust 3.3%, the unemployment rate falling to 4.9% in December 2010 and the participation rate1 reaching a near record high of 65.8%. Since then, however, financial market volatility and global uncertainty have resulted in a fall in business confidence and a hesitancy on the part of firms to hire new staff, while a strong Australian dollar together with cautious consumer sentiment have dampened economic and labour market activity in the non-mining sectors. As a consequence, the pace of trend employment growth has slowed, to an average of 6500 jobs per month in March 2012 (significantly below the recent peak of 38 000 jobs per month in August 2010), while the unemployment rate has edged up to 5.2% in March 2012. Despite the softening in labour market conditions over the year to March 2012, the Australian labour market remains one of the best performing in the advanced world, with an unemployment rate around half that of the Euro Area (10.8%) and well below the rate in the United States (8.2%) and United Kingdom (8.3%).

Regional Disparity, March 2008 to March 2012
14 12 10 Unemployment rate (%) 8 6 4.9 percentage points 4 2 0 9.9 percentage points 8.5 percentage points

Unemployment Rate and Annual Employment Growth, March 1992 to March 2012 (%)

12 10 Unemployment Rate (%) 8 6 4 2 0

8 Annual Employment Growth (%) 6 4 2 0 -2 -4

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey

Canterbury-Bankstown, in Sydney, provides an illustration of a poorly performing region. Employment declined by 6300 (or 4.3%) over the year to March 2012, and the unemployment rate stood at 7.7% in March 2012, well above the national average, and the participation rate stood at 56.5%, well below the national average of around 65%. By contrast, employment in Remainder-Balance WA (see page 10 for map) increased by a robust 7300 (or 5.1%) over the year to March 2012, strengthening from the increase recorded over the year to November 2011. The unemployment rate declined by 1.6 percentage points over the year to 2.4% in March 2012, the lowest of any region in Australia. The large decrease in the unemployment rate occurred in conjunction with a strong (0.8 percentage point) increase in the participation rate over the year to March 2012, to 70.3%, well above the comparable national average.

Source: ABS Labour Force Survey

1 The participation rate is the proportion of people aged 15 years or older who are either working or looking for work.

4

Ma r Ma -92 r Ma -93 r-9 Ma 4 r Ma -95 r Ma -96 r Ma -97 r Ma -98 r Ma -99 r Ma -00 r Ma -01 r Ma -02 r Ma -03 r Ma -04 r Ma -05 r Ma -06 r Ma -07 r Ma -08 r Ma -09 r Ma -10 r Ma -11 r-1 2

Unemployment Rate (%)

Annual Employment Growth (%)

AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012

Ma r-0 8 Ju n-0 8 Se p-0 8 De c-0 8 Ma r-0 9 Ju n-0 9 Se p-0 9 De c-0 9 Ma r-1 0 Ju n-1 0 Se p-1 0 De c-1 0 Ma r-1 1 Ju n-1 1 Se p-1 1 De c-1 1 Ma r-1 2
Lowest Unemployment Rate Highest Unemployment Rate

For more information see www.deewr.gov.au/lmip

4 7.2 234. ABS Survey of Education and Work.gov.8 0. and many do not have the skills needed for local vacancies (skill shortages are particularly evident in some regional areas).8 1.National. The largest numbers of new jobs created over the five years to November 2011 were in the three largest states of Victoria (up by 307 200 or 12.8 2.0 10.5 Working part-time % 28 33 29 33 27 30 33 32 30 25 35 34 30 31 28 34 29 35 18 25 30 47. Employment by Location Employment Employ’t change 1 year to Nov 2011 ‘000 % Employ’t change 5 years to Nov 2011 ‘000 190.2 6.4 6.3 15.4 -0.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 5 . Australia has an ageing workforce.9 13.0 53.4 million). Workers in regional areas are less likely to have studied after they have left school than those in the state capital cities. with almost two out of every five workers (38%) aged 45 years or older.1 6.0 14. For more information see www.6 million and almost 11.7 214.7 6.4 2.2 13.2 922.8 12.0 -0. The smallest employing state is Tasmania (237 600 workers).3 174.9 1264.1%). It shows that.4 % 8.1 1.5 0. 19 000 (or around 2% of new jobs nationally).5 20.3 14.1 0.6 40. Tertiary education is accessible to Australians across the country.7 12.6 125. The workforce is highly concentrated with more than three in four workers employed in the three most populous states. This suggests there will be strong demand for workers in these areas to replace those who retire over the next decade.2 2875.4 1. The table below compares key labour market data across state capital cities and regional areas.3 97.1 307.9 1.2 -0. some employers experience difficulty recruiting.7 8. followed by Victoria (almost 2.9 5.2 92.0 23.1 2.3 1256.9 6.0 -1.0 8.2 13.8 14. the workforce tends to be older in regional areas than in metropolitan areas.3 252.0 11. and Queensland (2.0 1.7 310.deewr. and clearly there are real advantages for workers in regional Australia to gain post-school qualifications to meet the skill needs of employers.1 32.6 4.4 30 46 38 37 27 29 37 Regional labour markets There are sound opportunities for employment outside Australia’s state capital cities. This highlights the increasing demand for workers in regional Australia. particularly for skilled occupations.0 151.7 19.1 13.7 47. Although the employment growth rate was strongest in the Northern Territory.9 10.6 Sources: ABS Labour Force Survey.4 736.6 1077. the small size of its workforce means there was a relatively small number of new jobs.0 820. Australia’s population is around 22.1 18. regional employment growth exceeded the capital city growth rate in all states except Tasmania.9 4.9 1238.8 -0.5 1.2 2.7 204.5 62.4 8.5 0.6 123.0%). 2006 Census.5 million Australians are employed.1 0.3 2143.1 135.2 1.5 0.3 31.6 million workers).9 133. New South Wales is the largest employing state (with 3.8 288. New South Wales (288 100 or 8.6 1.0 16. although the ACT and the Northern Territory have smaller workforces. generally speaking. More than one in every three of the nation’s workers (37% of the workforce or more than 4 million people) are employed in regional Australia. The labour market varies markedly across regions with a number of areas experiencing strong employment growth and low unemployment rates.9 28. It is also interesting to note that over the year to November 2011.0 1.7%) and Queensland (234 000 or 11. including in regional locations.8 3605.2 4.9 6.6 2351.4 Employment profile Aged younger Aged 45 than 25 years or Female years older % 45 45 45 45 46 46 47 44 45 42 49 46 45 45 46 46 44 47 47 48 46 % 16 16 17 16 19 17 18 15 18 15 17 17 16 17 18 17 17 17 16 17 17 % 36 43 36 43 35 40 39 46 37 42 42 44 39 38 38 41 38 43 37 36 38 Educational profile Employed persons without post-school qualifications % 36 43 39 46 43 49 44 52 42 50 43 49 35 36 39 41 41 41 43 29 37 Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 Cities and regions Sydney Regional NSW Melbourne Regional VIC Brisbane Regional QLD Adelaide Regional SA Perth Regional WA Hobart Regional Tasmania States and territories New South Wales Victoria Queensland South Australia Western Australia Tasmania Northern Territory Australian Capital Territory Australia 2346.3 15. Even in regions where unemployment is relatively high. up from 33% a decade ago. state and territory labour markets NATIONAL OVERVIEW Australia’s labour market Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) 11 456 500 10.3 6.7 237.3 10.0 1071.9 million).7 11.6 103.6 0.0 9.4 605.2 11 456.4 5.

6 million). state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) 6 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.5 1.deewr. state and territory labour markets NEW SOUTH WALES New South Wales is the largest employing state. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend.2 0.au/lmip .6%. with the largest fall being in the Hunter.5 7302. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average).3 3605. compared with national growth of 10. The strongest growth was in South Eastern (up by 8.2 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 16 15 16 18 13 17 20 13 17 7 16 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 36 47 46 36 51 39 45 51 44 38 39 % 29 15 14 17 11 19 16 17 14 12 29 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 26 31 29 33 34 33 34 30 29 27 30 Without postschool qual % 36 43 47 41 45 38 40 43 46 51 35 June 2011 Sydney Richmond-Tweed and Mid-North Coast Murray-Murrumbidgee Newcastle Hunter Wollongong Illawarra South Eastern Northern.8 0. North Western and Central West. The largest employing industries in regional New South Wales are Health Care and Social Assistance (155 000).gov. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change to June 2011 % 1.4 9. Accommodation and Food Services (41 500) and Professional. Retail Trade (384 100) and Professional.7 9. Scientific and Technical Services (40 300).1%).5 2. employment grew more strongly in regional New South Wales than it did in Sydney (2.5 6.4 1.5 1. It also has a slightly higher proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification than the national average (29% compared with 27%).3 241. with almost one in every three Australian workers (3.8 279. Regional New South Wales Slightly more than one third of workers in the state are employed in regional areas.2 0.8 3.8 0. most new jobs were in Accommodation and Food Services (13 100) and Professional.3 1. 2011.0 65. and RichmondTweed and Mid-North Coast.0 2.1 % 2.6 1.9 1.4 1.1 6. Northern.6 3.4%.9 -1.2%.5 145.7 -0.2 127.1 6.5 552.8 7.4 -2.3 5.5 49. Scientific and Technical Services (305 000). The workforce is relatively highly skilled with 64% of workers holding a post-school qualification.6 0.2 6. Retail Trade (139 600) and Manufacturing (109 000). employment increased by 0.6 271. which collectively account for about 30% of employment.1 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 47.5 -3.8 8.1 493. North Western and Central West Far West New South Wales ‘000 4627.3 238.National. Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011.7% or 288 100 over the five years to November 2011. Employment by Region.8 105.7 5.1 116.4 3. Over the year to November 2011.3 0. Over the year to November 2011.3 560. and 45% are female. Employment rose by 8.2 100.0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth.9 2. Around 70% of workers are employed full-time.2 Nov 2011 ‘000 2346. Regional areas have a lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (60% compared with 66% in Sydney).3 2. Around 60% of these people work in three of the nine regions: Newcastle.6% compared with 2. Scientific and Technical Services (9700).2 0. Over the year to November 2011. The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (416 200). Employment fell in two regions. The largest numbers of new jobs are in Health Care and Social Assistance (85 900). Employment is concentrated in Sydney which has almost two thirds of the state’s employment.0 3. compared with national growth of 0.8 293.8 137. Australia.5 22.9% or 9500).1 15.1 0.4 221. Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change.2 % of total % 65.5 1.0 -3.

8% or 4800).8% or 10 300) and Central Highlands-Wimmera (4.5% compared with national growth of 0. Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change.National. state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) For more information see www.9 million).4 401.gov.4 196.0 4.8 7. Retail Trade (317 200) and Manufacturing (302 700). The proportion of Victorian workers who are aged 45 years and older is the same as the national average (38%). The Victorian workforce is relatively highly skilled with 30% of workers holding a Bachelor degree or higher qualification compared with 27% nationally.7% and 6.2 1. The largest employing regions are Barwon-Western District (196 700) and Goulburn-OvensMurray (149 100).6 100.6 4. Scientific and Technical Services (39 400).9 2875.6 3. About 45% of workers are female and 31% of workers are employed part-time (compared with 46% and 30% respectively for Australia). 2011. which combined have around one third of state employment. with each having between 3. with the largest numbers of new jobs created in Health Care and Social Assistance (63 500).0 1. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change to June 2011 % 1. with a quarter of the nation’s employment (almost 2.5 5621. Over the year to November 2011.7 6. Construction (41 700) and Professional.1 5.8 6.3 316. Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011. Over the year to November 2011.5 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 40.6 1.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 7 . The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (336 700).7 143.3 5.6 4.8 1.5 % 1.2 141.6%.8 4.5 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 17 16 17 16 18 15 17 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 36 44 36 41 49 44 38 % 28 17 17 16 14 14 30 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 25 30 29 29 30 32 28 Without postschool qual % 39 45 46 47 48 46 36 June 2011 Melbourne Barwon-Western District Central Highlands-Wimmera Loddon-Mallee Goulburn-Ovens-Murray All Gippsland Victoria ‘000 4137. employment growth was strongest in Loddon-Mallee (up by 7.8 105. state and territory labour markets VICTORIA Victoria is the second largest employing state.0 5.4 0.8 10.6 211.0% (or 307 200) over the five years to November 2011. a slightly stronger growth rate than the national average of 10. employment is relatively evenly distributed across the five regions. Australia.4%. Outside the state capital.9 283.8% of the state’s workers.deewr.0 149.4 1. employment in Victoria increased by 0. Employment by Region. Employment increased by 12. The largest employing industries in regional Victoria are Health Care and Social Assistance (94 600).8 4. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend. Over the year to November 2011. Regional Victoria State employment is highly concentrated in Melbourne which accounts for almost three in four workers.0 13.2 Nov 2011 % of total ‘000 % 2143. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average).8%). Regional Victoria has a relatively low proportion of people participating in the workforce (64% compared with 67% in Melbourne). The largest fall in employment was in Manufacturing (down by 15 200 or 4.0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth. Employment rose in 17 of the 19 industries.5 270.9 0.3 0.6 1. the largest numbers of jobs created in regional Victoria were in Retail Trade (up by 12 800) and Health Care and Social Assistance (10 000). Retail Trade (93 700) and Manufacturing (79 800).4 74.

The largest numbers of new jobs were in Health Care and Social Assistance (71 900).6 5. stronger than the national growth rate of 0.8 39. which together account for almost one third of the state’s employment.6 -5.1 1.3 0.0 2351.4 3.5 272. Employment by Region.deewr. with 2.1 11. Over the year to November 2011. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend.9 6. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). Similar to the state as a whole.6%.4 -0. Scientific and Technical Services (24 500). Over the year to November 2011.9 13.9 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 19 16 12 17 18 19 18 18 16 18 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 35 43 47 45 34 41 38 36 41 38 % 23 15 9 11 12 14 15 14 15 23 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 26 32 27 29 29 26 28 30 30 31 Without postschool qual % 43 44 56 51 51 52 50 47 46 39 Nov 2011 % of total ‘000 % 1071.9 1. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change June to June 2011 2011 Brisbane Sunshine Coast West Moreton Wide Bay-Burnett Mackay-Fitzroy-Central West Darling Downs-South West Northern-North West Far North Gold Coast Queensland ‘000 2029.2 -0. Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change. state and territory labour markets QUEENSLAND Queensland is the third largest employing state.7 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 10.4%. Retail Trade (256 400) and Construction (235 400). The largest employing regions outside Brisbane are the Gold Coast (one in eight Queensland workers is employed in this region) and Mackay-FitzroyCentral West which accounts for almost one in ten (9.9 411. Regional Queensland Employment is regionally dispersed with 54% of employment outside Brisbane.5 0.9% compared with 1.9 45.2 9.8 5.7 1.5 2.1% (or 234 000) over the five years to November 2011.9 1.3 1.5 2.7 118.4 0. state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) 8 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. and the Gold Coast (3.3 278. Employment fell in Manufacturing (down by 8700 or 4.4 335. Over the year to November 2011. 2011. Regional areas have a lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (66% compared with 69% in Brisbane). Mining (25 300) and Professional. Health Care and Social Assistance (142 800) and Construction (139 400).4 134.gov. About 28% of workers are employed part-time (compared with 30% nationally).6 5.6 1. employment in Queensland rose by 0. the largest employing industries in regional Queensland are Retail Trade (151 000). Health Care and Social Assistance (9900) and Construction (7100).0 -4.6 6.7 20.0 4.9 3.1 596.1 220.National. It also has a lower proportion of workers who hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (23% compared with 27%).5 5. employment growth was strongest in Mackay-FitzroyCentral West (up by 5. Queensland has a slightly higher proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications than the national average (39% compared with 37%).7% or 10 900).2 1.9 149. Australia. The largest numbers of new jobs in regional areas over the year to November 2011 were in Mining (up by 11 500).0% in Brisbane). compared with national growth of 10.3 10.9%.5 0.9 1.5% or 11 500).3 0.3 % 1.0 4580.4 270.6%). The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (272 600).3 84.4 million workers.au/lmip .0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth. Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011.4 302. Employment increased by 11.3 1.4%).4 138.9 158.8 303. regional employment growth was stronger than metropolitan growth (1.8 1.0 100.3 1.

8 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 18 14 16 17 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 39 47 43 41 % 21 11 11 23 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 27 28 27 29 Without postschool qual % 44 52 53 41 Nov 2011 ‘000 605. Over the year to November 2011. Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work 2011.4%.9% (or 53 000) over the five years to November 2011. Southern and Eastern SA accounts for 16.9 1. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change June to June 2011 2011 ‘000 Adelaide Southern and Eastern SA Northern and Western SA South Australia 1213. Forestry and Fishing (31 400).8 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 5. state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) For more information see www.9 0. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average). with the largest numbers of new jobs being in Construction (17 200). Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change. Manufacturing (23 100) and Retail Trade (21 500).5 % 0. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend. South Australia’s workforce has a relatively old age profile. South Australia has a slightly lower proportion of workers who hold post-school qualifications than the national average (58% compared with 61%). a lower growth rate than the national average of 10.8 75.0 278.gov. state and territory labour markets SOUTH AUSTRALIA South Australia is the second smallest employing state.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 9 .8 164. Employment increased by 6. 2011.9% of state employment and Northern and Western SA. The largest employing industries in regional South Australia are Agriculture. Over the year to November 2011. The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (102 200).9 9. both regions recorded employment growth.National. these industries employ one in every three workers in the state.deewr.6%.5 1656.9 16. The proportion of female workers is the same as the national average (46%).9 0. Retail Trade (92 500) and Manufacturing (78 800). employment grew more strongly than the national rate. The participation rate in regional areas is much the same as that in Adelaide (63% compared with 64%).2 820. Accommodation and Food Services (12 500) and Professional. Regional South Australia Employment is highly concentrated in Adelaide which employs almost three in every four of the state’s workers.8% compared with 0. Australia.3 % 0.6 2. and a lower proportion holding a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (23% compared with 27%). They differ markedly in terms of both geographic area and employment size.7 138. accounts for 9.0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth.4% and Northern and Western SA by 3. Over the year to November 2011. Scientific and Technical Services (11 000).2%.9%.8 6.9 100. Employment by Region. Combined.7 0. with 7% of the nation’s employment (820 900).3 % of total % 73. with 41% of workers aged 45 years or older compared with 38% nationally. the largest numbers of new jobs in regional South Australia were in Accommodation and Food Services (up by 2400) and Administrative and Support Services (1900).4 3. which covers a much larger area.0 2. Employment rose in 12 of the 19 industries. It also has a slightly higher proportion of its workers employed part-time than the national average (34% compared with 30%). up by 0. Outside the state capital city there are two labour force regions.1 0. with Southern and Eastern SA up by 1.

with around one in ten Australian workers (1.5 2. to the national average in terms of full-time employment (71% of workers are employed full-time compared with 70% nationally).4 1.4 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 15. Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend. 2011.8 13. although these regions have markedly different geographic size. Regional areas have a slightly lower proportion of people participating in the workforce (67%) compared with Perth (69%).0 14. most new jobs in regional areas were created in Lower Western WA (up by 6400 or 4.Balance WA Western Australia ‘000 1738.9% (or 151 200) over the five years to November 2011. In regional Western Australia. Australia. The largest numbers of new jobs were in Mining (40 300).4%.6%. Retail Trade (129 100) and Health Care and Social Assistance (127 800). Health Care and Social Assistance (3800) and Retail Trade (3100).5 1.7 166. employment is spread fairly evenly across the two regions. Over the year to November 2011. Over the year to November 2011. though. The workforce profile is similar. 2011. A slightly lower proportion of the state’s workforce is female compared with the national average (44% compared with 46%). Regional Western Australia Employment is highly concentrated in Perth which accounts for three quarters of the state’s employment.National. the same as the national figure).7 4.3 % 2.0 6. Employment by Region.2 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 18 15 15 17 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 37 40 44 38 % 22 12 12 22 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 28 29 29 30 Without postschool qual % 42 49 50 41 Nov 2011 ‘000 922.gov.5 11.4 2. Employment increased by 13. The largest employing industries are Construction (130 800). slightly higher than the national average (37%). outstripping the national growth rate of 10. About 41% of workers in Western Australia do not hold post-school qualifications. Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change.7 1238. Health Care and Social Assistance (25 100) and Construction (20 000).8 340. employment increased by 1. Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work.0 1.8 2.3 270. The largest numbers of new jobs in regional areas over the year to November 2011 were in Mining (up by 5600).2 2349. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change June to June 2011 2011 Perth Lower Western WA Remainder .2% compared with national growth of 0.4 144. Together.au/lmip . Employment rose in 15 of the 19 industries. and the proportion of workers aged 45 years or older (38%.deewr. these industries account for 31% of the state’s jobs.2 million). state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) 10 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.0%). A lower proportion of workers in Western Australia hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification than the national average (22% compared with 27%).3 % of total % 74. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average).7 100.0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth.6 % 1. Lower Western WA and Remainder-Balance WA. state and territory labour markets WESTERN AUSTRALIA Western Australia is the fourth largest employing state.

The largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (30 600). with 2% of the nation’s employment (237 600). Twelve of the 19 industries increased their employment. the level of employment was unchanged.0 0. In regional Tasmania.8 112. Over the five years to November 2011.6 49.National.8 -4.8 0.1 % 1. capital city and regional figures are 12 month average).2 0.2 0.6 68.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 11 . Employment by Region. Regional employment is concentrated in Mersey-Lyell and Northern which combined account for half of the state’s workers. which together account for one third of the state’s employment. compared with growth of 0.3%.4%.9 510.8 20. state and territory labour markets TASMANIA Tasmania is the smallest employing state.7 38. Health Care and Social Assistance (3900) and Education and Training (3500).6 28.6% at the national level. It also has a higher proportion of its workers employed part-time than the national average (35% compared with 30%). the largest employing industries are Health Care and Social Assistance (17 100).9 -0.9 15.9 237.7 % of total % 43.5 % 1. but employment rose in Northern (up by 0.0 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth.3%) and Mersey-Lyell (0.0 Employment profile (% of region’s workforce) Aged younger than 25 years % 17 13 18 16 17 Aged 45 Bachelor years or degree or older higher qual % 42 57 41 42 43 % 22 12 15 11 22 Cert III/IV or higher VET qual % 27 28 28 30 31 Without postschool qual % 43 50 48 50 41 Nov 2011 ‘000 103. There is only a slight difference in the proportion of people participating in the workforce between regional areas of Tasmania (60%) and Hobart (62%). Educational attainment data for states are ABS Survey of Education and Work. Over the year to November 2011. Over the year to November 2011. The largest numbers of new regional jobs over the year to November 2011 were created in Construction (2200) and Accommodation and Food Services (1500).deewr.1 142. Nov 2011 (% of state total) Employment Change. state capital city and regional figures are from ABS 2006 Census (latest available) For more information see www.4 0. 2011.2 0. The Tasmanian workforce has a particularly old age profile.3 0.2%). Tasmania has a higher proportion of workers who do not hold post-school qualifications than the national average (41% compared with 37%) and a lower proportion of workers hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (22% compared with 27% nationally). with 43% of workers aged 45 years or older. Year to Nov 2011 (%) Population and Employment Population 1 year change June to June 2011 2011 Hobart Southern Northern Mersey-Lyell Tasmania ‘000 216.6 100.7 6. employment fell slightly in regional Tasmania.1 0. Regional Tasmania Tasmania has the most regionally diverse workforce in Australia with around 56% of employment located outside Hobart. Retail Trade (14 600) and Construction (13 300).1% (or 13 700) compared with national growth of 10.7 0.6 Employment 1 year change to Nov 2011 ‘000 1. down by 0. with the largest numbers of new jobs created in Construction (4800). Employment data are ABS LFS Nov 2011 (state data are trend.gov. Retail Trade (26 800) and Construction (21 100). the highest of any state or territory. 2011. Australia. Tasmania’s employment increased by 6.1 -0.

2011 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth.0% compared with national growth of 0. The largest gains were in Public Administration and Safety (up by 8300).4%. Construction (2900) and Health Care and Social Assistance (2700). Over the year to November 2011. The proportion of people participating in the workforce is higher in the ACT than the national average (73% compared with 66%). ABS Survey of Education and Work.4 123. with 1% of national employment (123 700). compared with national growth of 10. the largest numbers of new jobs were in Construction (up by 3900).2 1. Growth was relatively strong over the year to November 2011. The largest employing industries in the Northern Territory are Public Administration and Safety (18 300).6 1. Professional.4%. Australia. 2011 The Northern Territory has Australia’s smallest labour market. and equal to the Australian Capital Territory (73% compared with 66% nationally).4 0. About 43% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications compared with 37% nationally.7 1.2 -1. but a relatively small proportion hold Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualifications (22% compared with 29% nationally). Employment increased by 4.5% compared with national growth of 0. compared with national growth of 10. which together account for slightly more than one third of the Territory’s employment.5 17 36 44 22 29 Sources: ABS Regional Population Growth. employment fell by 0.National. ABS LFS Nov 2011. state and territory labour markets NORTHERN TERRITORY Population June 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to June 2011 (%) Employment November 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to Nov 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to Nov 2011 (%) Aged younger than 25 years (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Educational profile (% of NT workforce) Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) 230. A high proportion of workers hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (44% compared with the national average of 27%). Australia. 2011. A lower proportion of the workforce is employed part-time than the national average (25% compared with 30%) and a smaller proportion of workers are aged 45 years or older (36% compared with 38%). Education and Training and Public Administration and Safety (each up by 2700). This reflects the concentration of the ACT’s employment in industries which generally require university qualifications and the relatively small proportion in Manufacturing and Construction. The workforce has a relatively low skill profile.0 -0. Over the five years to November 2011.9% (or 9600) over the five years to November 2011.2% (or 19 000). rising by 1.6%.0 16 37 24 28 43 AUSTRALIAN CAPITAL TERRITORY Population June 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to June 2011 (%) Employment November 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to Nov 2011 (‘000) 1 year change to Nov 2011 (%) Aged younger than 25 years (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Educational profile (% of ACT workforce) Bachelor degree or higher qualification (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) 365. the proportion of people participating in the workforce is higher than in any state. 2011. up by 18. Scientific and Technical Services (19 000) and Health Care and Social Assistance (18 400). Employment Change.9 204.deewr. The workforce is highly skilled with 69% of workers holding a post-school qualification compared with 61% nationally. which collectively account for almost half of the workforce. ABS LFS Nov 2011. However. ABS Survey of Education and Work.au/lmip . Health Care and Social Assistance (13 200) and Construction (12 200). The largest employing industries are Public Administration and Safety (62 800). About 47% of workers are female and just 18% of Territory workers are employed part-time (compared with 30% nationally). Employment increased strongly over the five years to November 2011. trend. The Australian Capital Territory (ACT) accounts for slightly less than 2% of national employment (204 200). trend. Year to Nov 2011 (%) 12 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.gov.6%.

3 -9.1 2 102. such as Agriculture.5 241.7 3.1 7.3 11 34.8 3. Forestry and Fishing (25 400) Rental.3 7.2 31.0 7.9 2 -46.6 -85.0 4. it had only the fourth largest number of new jobs and accounts for 2% of national employment. Over the five years to November 2011.gov.4 1 48.2 6.Industries INDUSTRY OVERVIEW Which are the largest employing industries? There are 19 broad industries in Australia.2 4.7 Public Administration and Safety 738.6 Mining 239.5%).4 12.5 12. and Construction.3 19.6 2.3 % 4.1 Rental. in • • • • Manufacturing (down by 72 100) Information Media and Telecommunications (46 800) Agriculture.4 2 -2. Postal and Warehousing 580.6 103.7 Agriculture.7 Manufacturing 945.1 -7.4 42.6 -1. Forestry and Fishing 327. Which industries have the most jobs in regional locations? Although Agriculture. Water and Waste Services industries combined.1 Wholesale Trade 424.8 -18. Scientific and Technical Services (122 300) Education and Training (114 700) Mining (102 900) Construction (100 700). Hiring and Real Estate Services (2600). Forestry and Fishing .3 18.1 Health Care and Social Assistance 1343. the largest are Health Care and Social Assistance.1 Other Services 452.7 8 -72.7 Total (all industries) 11 456.4 Construction 1045.6 7.7 18.5 6 98.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 13 .2 Sources: ABS Labour Force Survey.4 4 15.4 4. followed by Mining (61%).8 9 100.5 Employment Nov 2011 5 year % of change workforce to Nov 2011 % ‘000 % 7 85. and Electricity.2 8 122.skillsinfo. Water and Waste Services 154.5 4.8 Retail Trade 1219.1 12.4 Administrative and Support Services 399.1 Transport.2 61.8 3 -25. Information Media and Telecommunications.3 17. The largest growth was in • • • • • Health Care and Social Assistance (up by 276 000) Professional. Manufacturing is also a large employer.5 4.0 25.6 4.3 9.9 17. Hiring and Real Estate Services 193. It is interesting that.0 43.5 Education and Training 859.4 45.4 -7. Scientific and Technical Services 865.8 4.2 2 35. DEEWR employment projections For more information see www. Where are the new jobs? Over the five years to November 2011.5 4 38. the largest numbers of jobs in regional Australia are in • Health Care and Social Assistance (almost half a million) • Retail Trade (more than 470 000) • Construction (around 407 000). but there are still more people employed in Manufacturing than there are in the Arts and Recreation Services.7 15. Gas. Which industries had declining employment? Employment declined in four industries over the five years to November 2011.3 16.9 75. The decline in Manufacturing is part of a long-term trend reflecting structural adjustment in the Australian economy (information about structural adjustment is provided on page 14).2 Electricity. Many industries.4 3 45. Gas.0 2. and Manufacturing create thousands of jobs in other industries. Forestry and Fishing has the highest proportion of its employment in regional areas (87%). These four industries combined.4 1. such as Transport.4 15. Scientific and Technical Services .7 Professional. with almost 950 000.4 108.7 7 114.1 Arts and Recreation Services 213.4 Outside state capital % 39 35 87 34 39 36 44 20 37 21 35 61 38 24 43 33 39 33 28 37 ‘000 30.7 50.4 Financial and Insurance Services 432. Postal and Warehousing . Hiring and Real Estate Services. Industry Employment Employment profile (% of industry’s workforce) Aged 45 Working years or part-time Female older % % % 57 56 22 40 52 41 27 30 56 44 47 33 14 11 33 38 69 49 9 25 43 18 53 31 43 79 47 19 42 31 14 26 41 3 16 34 29 41 37 22 43 36 17 47 45 26 50 39 48 56 28 19 22 48 16 33 42 30 46 38 Projected growth to 2016-17 Industry ‘000 Accommodation and Food Services 773. although the Mining industry experienced the largest percentage rise in employment over the five years to November 2011 (75.1 11.8 131.9 5 68.9 100 1077.5 7.7 10.5 12 276.9 18.7 4 30.7 5. Retail Trade and Construction which each employ more than 1 million workers. around 1. Mining.4 10. DEEWR trend and four quarter average data.2 3. Professional.4 13. employ two in every five Australian workers. employment fell in Manufacturing.0 829.7 12.1 million jobs were created.4 Information Media and Telecommunications 203.0 17. Rental. In employment terms.

Manufacturing. for example. increased participation of women and greater flexibility in working hours have all contributed to the labour market of 2012 looking very different to that of a hundred years ago. As Manufacturing’s share of employment has fallen. • Our ageing population. and business services. the share of the workforce involved in the provision of services has risen. Forestry and Fishing was the largest contributor to the Australian economy at the start of the 20th century and the largest employing industry. the economy has transitioned from one that was centred on agricultural produce and manufactured goods towards services. Since the 1980s. Over time. Because we can never predict what the global economy or new technology will deliver next. about • a million people change jobs. it is important for our workforce to be flexible to be able to adapt quickly to change. The lasting shifts in employment and economic activity are referred to as structural change. Media and Telecommunications. which will mean that Australia will have a lower proportion of the population working. • In 1910. such as Professional. • In the mid 1940s it employed 33% of Australian workers. and Information. • In 1910. Japan. such as Health Care and Social Assistance and Education and Training. as well as individuals. Service sector jobs are a very broad grouping of industries excluding Manufacturing . Over the last half century its share of Australian employment has fallen. China. In addition. energy. by the rise of Asian economies. What is likely to happen in the next century? No one can know what will happen over the next hundred years. The ageing of the workforce. this industry employed around 422 000 people. while a similar number close or change ownership. Each year. many interconnected. the Republic of Korea and India are our top four export markets. industries. Service industries have always been important. Water and Waste Services. While our Manufacturing sector continues to downsize. Construction . Manufacturing accounted for slightly more than 20% of total employment. 14 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. evolving trend.skillsinfo. What has happened over the last century? The industrial structure of the Australian economy has changed markedly over the last century. • Today. need to reduce pollution to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Information about recent changes in industry and occupational shares of employment can be found on pages 13 and 25 respectively. these industries represent 13% of the workforce. in part. Factors like the following are likely to contribute to changes. Mining and Manufacturing. Australia is well placed to access growing markets for food. Scientific and Technical Services .au . the fastest growing services have been social services. • The strong growth in Mining and the flow on effects. Forestry and Fishing. The structure of the industry in Australia changed around this time. Forestry and Fishing . this industry accounts for 3% of employment with 327 100 workers. facing strong competition from overseas in some sectors. tourism and other high value-added goods and services in Asia. Many factors contribute to change Changes in the structure of the Australian economy and labour market have been driven by a range of factors. Sometimes the drivers of change are sudden. education. Australia experienced strong employment growth over the ten years to November 2011. or 26% of Australia’s workers. • Changes in the international economic and geopolitical landscape as a result of the growing importance of Asia. until it reached its peak in the early 1960s. • For most of the first half of the 20th century. Our economy is more globalised.gov. • Manufacturing remains a large industry. The economy has continued to change over the last decade. but structural changes have resulted in significant growth in these sectors in recent decades. Agriculture. These changes bring both opportunities and challenges. The Australian economy is facing major. • Today. there are opportunities for Australian manufacturers to move into the production of world class. Agriculture. Global and domestic pressures are contributing to an acceleration in structural change. and Electricity. • The development and application of new technologies such as high speed broadband which will support businesses to drive productivity improvements. Australia’s high levels of technology and skills will assist manufacturers to find new products and markets in which Australia can become a world leader. Today. • A greater focus on environmental efficiency changing the way industries operate and the skills they need in their workforce. generational change driven. Forestry and Fishing . with rises in growth industries (mainly services) more than offsetting declines in industries such as Agriculture. but it now accounts for 8% of jobs. services industries employ over three quarters of Australian workers. Some of these factors include • economic reforms and changes to workplace relations • increasing labour force participation • changing consumer preferences • technological advances • international competition • international trade. with hundreds of thousands changing industries • around 300 000 businesses open. but most are part of a steady. new technologies and the shift to a green economy.Industries STRUCTURAL CHANGE The labour market is changing continuously The Australian labour market is always changing. with metals. Gas. Mining . • In 1910. The early decades of the 20th century saw Manufacturing expand. • Now. employing 945 600 workers. engineering and vehicles the largest employing area. Its share of the workforce has steadily declined for many decades and drought has had an impact on the number employed. less than 40% of the Australian workforce was employed in services industries. around half of Australia’s workers were employed in Agriculture. made clear when you look at the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Year Book Australia which was first published in 1908. Jobs are becoming more highly skilled and our workforce is more highly educated. sophisticated technologies. with textiles and clothing manufacturing the most significant activity.

including those in which trade occupations are the largest employers.0 16. Accommodation and Food Services is an important employer in regional Australia. This industry provides good entry-level opportunities to the labour market.4 5.Industries APPRENTICES AND TRAINEES BY INDUSTRY Apprenticeships and traineeships are available across all sectors of the economy and include training in traditional trades as well as a diverse range of other careers. Postal and Warehousing Public Administration and Safety Professional. In line with significantly differing occupational profiles across industries. Over the five years to November 2011.2 1.0 29.3 13. such as Health Care and Social Assistance and Education and Training have large numbers of professional workers and consequently high proportions of their workforces hold higher education qualifications at the Bachelor degree or higher level. Apprentices and Trainees In-Training by Industry (‘000) Construction Manufacturing Accommodation and Food Services Other Services Retail Trade Administrative and Support Services Health Care and Social Assistance Transport.8 10 16. employment rose by 85 500 (or 12. but this was partially offset by a fall in Accommodation (down by 7500).1 5.9 5. While there are training opportunities in all industries and across locations. This industry has the highest proportion of young workers (aged younger than 25 years) of any industry (45%) and a higher proportion of females than the average for all industries (56% compared with 46%).6 4. driven by continued growth in Food and Beverage Services.9 2. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Capital cities Source: NCVER Apprentices and Trainees Collection. Forestry and Fishing 0 8.2 6.4 10.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 15 . and some have large numbers of apprentices and trainees. ACCOMMODATION AND FOOD SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 773 400 11 456 500 12.6 2.7 22. Part-time employment is common and many people combine work in this sector with study.5 2. Scientific and Technical Services Wholesale Trade Education and Training Financial and Insurance Services Electricity.8 Accommodation and Food Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region 26. Accommodation and Food Services accounts for 7% of national employment. apprentices and trainees in Mining and Agriculture.2 5. there is marked variation in the number of apprentices and trainees by industry.gov.skillsinfo.5 6.4 57 30 56 46 22 38 39 37 11 22 61 27 29 37 Accommodation and Food Services employs 773 400 workers.7 6. but in some regions it accounts for a higher proportion of the workforce (up to 17%).0 5.7 4. which is valued by employers.7 19. Other industries. rely more heavily on the vocational education and training sector to develop their skilled workers.2 3. Water and Waste Services Information Media and Telecommunications Arts and Recreation Services Rental. They provide an attractive training option by combining practical work with structured training to give students a nationally recognised qualification with important industry experience.7 16.0 32.6 2.7 1.5 48.0 5. More information about Australian Apprenticeships is provided on page 33.4 1.1 20 30 40 50 60 Source: ABS Labour Force Survey.7 8. Hiring and Real Estate Services Mining Agriculture. More than three in every five workers do not hold post-school qualifications.4%).3 24.5 19.7 16. with more than 300 000 workers outside the state capital cities.9 31. The industries with the largest numbers of apprentices and trainees in-training are • Construction (79 300 in-training) • Manufacturing (56 500) • Accommodation and Food Services (46 700) • Other Services (42 700) • Retail Trade (38 000). September 2011 Regional locations For more information see www.0%).6 7.5 15. A large number of new jobs were created in Food and Beverage Services (up by 86 500). Forestry and Fishing are more likely to be employed in regional areas. Gas. employment in Accommodation and Food Services is expected to increase by 30 900 (or 4. reflecting the geographic profile of these industries. Some.2 7. Over the next five years.

up by 45 400 (or 12. Forestry and Fishing employment is expected to increase by 5500 (or 1.skillsinfo. were partially offset by rises in Dairy Cattle Farming (up by 7600). Industry bodies have. This is particularly the case in Far West New South Wales. Forestry and Fishing accounts for a relatively small proportion of Australia’s employment (3%).gov. Over the five years to November 2011. Employment losses in Fruit and Tree Nut Growing (down by 12 400) and Nursery and Floriculture Production (6600). Part-time employment is common with 40% of workers employed part-time compared with 30% for all industries.2 10.8%). suggesting on-the-job training and experience contribute significantly to skills. Pest Control and Other Support Services. noted the need for more formal training.7%). Over the next five years Agriculture.2%). Agriculture. which includes employment and travel services.4%) over the next five years with the largest number of new jobs likely to be in Building Cleaning. Forestry and Fishing as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Employment increased in both subdivisions. employment grew strongly. and in Southern and Eastern South Australia. More than half the workers do not hold post-school qualifications. workers in this industry are more likely to be female (52% compared with 46%) and aged 45 years or older (41% compared with 38% for all industries). While some regions rely slightly more on this industry for employment than others. Around 140 000 workers in regional Australia are employed in Administrative and Support Services. but in many regional areas it is a major employer. This industry’s workforce has a relatively low skill profile (about 45% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications).4 27 30 30 46 56 38 87 37 12 25 55 27 29 37 Administrative and Support Services employs 399 700 workers.au .Industries ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPPORT SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 399 700 11 456 500 12.5%). Over the five years to November 2011. though. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) 16 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. The Administrative and Support Services industry accounts for around 3% of national employment. Pest Control and Other Support Services. Fishing (1700) and Aquaculture (1300). there is relatively limited variation across regions. up by 29 500 (or 17. Compared with all industries. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. The industry has a relatively old age profile (many in the industry continue working beyond the usual retirement age) and females make up a relatively low proportion of employment (30% compared with 46% for all industries). but the largest number of new jobs are in Building Cleaning. The vast majority of jobs in this industry (around 285 000 or 87%) are outside the state capital cities. where 16% of workers are employed in the sector. Administrative and Support Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Agriculture. FORESTRY AND FISHING Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 327 100 11 456 500 -7.4 40 30 52 46 41 38 35 37 20 27 45 27 29 37 AGRICULTURE. employment fell by 25 400 (or 7.8 10. Forestry and Fishing is a relatively small employing industry with 327 100 workers. where one in five workers is directly employed in this industry (21%). Agriculture. Administrative and Support Services employment is expected to increase by 17 700 (or 4.

4 44 30 47 46 33 38 34 37 24 28 42 27 29 37 CONSTRUCTION Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 1 045 500 11 456 500 10. Construction employment is expected to rise by 131 200 (or 12. Some regions have a relatively high proportion of their workforce employed in this industry.4 14 30 11 46 33 38 39 37 8 46 38 27 29 37 The Arts and Recreation Services industry employs 213 400 workers (2% of national employment). Most new jobs are in Creative and Performing Arts Activities (up by 10 000) and Heritage Activities (9400). with more than one million workers (9% of national employment). employment is expected to increase by 7800 (or 3. Most employment in Arts and Recreation Services is based in the state capital cities. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) For more information see www. Over the five years to November 2011. It covers a diverse range of activities including the operation of museums. Arts and Recreation Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Construction as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. well above the average of 29% across all industries. For example. the Gold Coast has more than 14% of its workers in this industry. The vast majority of workers are males who are employed full-time.6%) over the next five years. with most new jobs expected to continue to be created in Construction Services.7 10.7%). with most having less than 3% of their workforce employed in this industry. This growth was mainly driven by Construction Services (up by 47 500) and Building Construction (21 700).Industries ARTS AND RECREATION SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 213 400 11 456 500 19. Many workers are employed part-time (44% compared with 30% for all industries). parks and gardens. driven by growth in Sports and Recreation Activities. Females have a low share of Construction industry employment (just 11% compared with 46% across all industries) and 14% of workers are employed part-time. creative and performing arts. A slightly higher proportion of workers in this industry do not hold post-school qualifications than the national average (42% compared with 37%).gov.skillsinfo. and there is little variation in employment share across regions outside the state capital cities.7% (or 100 700). Construction is the third largest employing industry in Australia.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 17 . employment rose by 35 300 (or 19. 39% of the industry’s employment. Over the next five years.8%). This industry’s workforce is relatively young with one third of workers aged 45 years or older (compared with 38% in all industries). Over the five years to November 2011. A relatively low proportion of the workforce holds higher education qualifications.8 10. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Around 407 000 workers in regional Australia are employed in Construction. employment increased by 10. and professional and recreational sports. Around 34% (around 72 000 workers) in the industry are employed in regional Australia. Consistent with the largest occupations in this industry being trades (four of the top five) 46% of workers hold vocational education and training qualifications at the Certificate III or higher level.

More than three in every five workers (64%) hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification. This is a highly skilled industry. Almost two in five workers hold a Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualification. Over the five years to November 2011. up by 45. Gas. Almost seven in ten workers are female and there are good opportunities for part-time work with 38% of workers employed on a part-time basis. The industry also has a slightly higher proportion of older workers compared with all industries (43% are aged 45 years or older compared with 38%). employment in Electricity. Queensland. Most new jobs are in Adult. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Around 44% of workers in the industry (more than 67 000) are employed in regional Australia. Electricity. Water and Waste Services is expected to increase by 17 900 (or 11. 36% of the industry’s workers. Reflecting the need for education and training services in every region. Over the next five years. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) 18 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. employment increased by 15. with almost half the new jobs expected to be in Preschool and School Education. Most new jobs are in Electricity Supply (up by 26 800) and Waste Collection.7 10. Water and Waste Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. This industry provides good job opportunities in regional areas.au .4 38 30 69 46 49 38 36 37 64 18 15 27 29 37 ELECTRICITY. Community and Other Education and Tertiary Education. the higher education sector is a key contributor of skills. just 15% of workers do not hold a post-school qualification. higher than the average for all industries (37%).1%). Water and Waste Services is the smallest employing industry with 154 400 workers (1% of national employment).Industries EDUCATION AND TRAINING Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 859 200 11 456 500 15. About 31% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications compared with 37% across all industries. There are limited differences in employment share from region to region. This industry is male dominated (three in four workers are male) and the majority of employment is full-time (91%). Gas.7% (or 48 400). the employment share does not vary much across Australian regions. The industry experienced strong employment growth over the five years to November 2011. mainly teachers. The lowest proportion is around 5% in the Illawarra in New South Wales and the highest is almost 10% in West Moreton. Reflecting the very large numbers of professionals employed in this industry. The industry is relatively highly skilled.5% of their workers in this industry.4 9 30 25 46 43 38 44 37 26 38 31 27 29 37 Education and Training has 859 200 workers. Education and Training employment is expected to increase by 61 300 (or 7. Over the next five years.6%). More than 305 000 people are employed in Education and Training in regional Australia.4% (or 114 700). Gas.skillsinfo. GAS. with around half the regions having less than 1.4 10. Education and Training as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Electricity. Treatment and Disposal Services (19 800).gov. The industry has a relatively older workforce with almost half the workers aged 45 years or older compared with 38% in all industries. WATER AND WASTE SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 154 400 11 456 500 45.

which covers services like pathology. More than half of the workforce is female (53%) which is higher than the all industries average (46%). About 47% of workers are aged 45 years or older compared with 38% for all industries. resulting in employment in this industry being highly concentrated in metropolitan areas. with growth in this subdivision and a smaller rise in Insurance and Superannuation Funds partially offset by a fall in employment in Finance.4 43 30 79 46 47 38 37 37 41 32 21 27 29 37 The Financial and Insurance Services industry is a relatively small employing industry. This industry employs slightly fewer than half a million people in regional Australia.skillsinfo. with 432 100 workers. Over the five years to November 2011.3 million workers (12% of national employment). providing more new jobs than any other industry.3%) over the next five years. Although the industry represents 12% of Australia’s workforce it has a higher proportion in some regions. The higher education sector plays an important role in the provision of skills. About 31% of workers are aged 45 years or older compared with 38% in all industries.4%).gov. Around a quarter of workers have Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualifications.4 18 30 53 46 31 38 20 37 41 23 31 27 29 37 HEALTH CARE AND SOCIAL ASSISTANCE Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 1 343 400 11 456 500 25.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 19 . Over the five years to November 2011. with many of the large employing occupations requiring tertiary qualifications. Financial and Insurance Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Health Care and Social Assistance as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Far West New South Wales has 17% of its jobs in this industry. the lowest proportion of any industry. Around 20% (more than 85 000 people) are employed in regional Australia. Employment growth was strong across all subdivisions but the largest number of new jobs was in Medical and Other Health Care Services (up by 108 700 or 36. The Health Care and Social Assistance industry has experienced strong growth over the past decade and is now Australia’s largest employing industry with more than 1. The workforce is female dominated (79%) and 43% of workers are employed part-time (compared with 30% across all industries). Relatively few people work part-time (18%) compared with all industries (30%).Industries FINANCIAL AND INSURANCE SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 432 100 11 456 500 7. employment increased by 276 000 (or 25.1%). November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. The majority of large finance and insurance companies operate from state capital cities. medical and dental practitioners and physiotherapy. Most new jobs are in Auxiliary Finance and Insurance Services (up by 31 100 or 28.0%).5 10.5%). For example. employment rose by 30 300 (or 7.9%). The Health Care and Social Assistance industry is highly skilled. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) For more information see www. employment in Health Care and Social Assistance is expected to increase by 241 800 (or 18. Employment is expected to increase by 18 500 (or 4. with more than two in every five workers holding a Bachelor degree or higher qualification.9 10. Over the next five years.

though. but the workforce has become more skilled with a higher proportion now in skilled occupations than a decade ago. but this industry employs around 43 000 workers in regional Australia. compared with 37% for all industries. radio and broadcasting. but are considerably more likely to have a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (40% compared with 27%) than the average for all industries.au . However. but is expected to rise in four subdivisions.1%). it still employs 945 600 workers or 8% of Australia’s workforce. Over the five years to November 2011.gov. Less than one third of workers do not hold post-school qualifications. Employment is concentrated in the state capital cities. The majority of workers are employed full-time (81%) and 42% of workers are female. in subdivisions such as Primary Metal and Metal Product Manufacturing (up by 12 900). employment fell by 72 100 (or 7.7%). Manufacturing was Australia’s largest employing industry. This industry accounts for around 8% of national employment. Over the next five years. It employs 203 700 workers. as a result. employment is expected to increase by 4600 (or 2. Information Media and Telecommunications as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Manufacturing as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. now it is fourth. There were some job gains. The decline was evident in ten of the 15 subdivisions.skillsinfo.4 14 30 26 46 41 38 35 37 14 36 42 27 29 37 Information Media and Telecommunications is a diverse industry including newspaper and Internet publishing. with the largest number of new jobs in Telecommunications Services. but in some regional areas it has a much higher proportion of the local workforce. including Transport Equipment Manufacturing (down by 24 600) and Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing (19 200). A smaller proportion of workers in this industry are aged 45 years or older (31%) compared with the average across all industries (38%).3%). employment fell by 46 800 (or 18. The largest occupations are engineering trades and.4 19 30 42 46 31 38 21 37 40 23 31 27 29 37 MANUFACTURING Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 945 600 11 456 500 -7. Workers are less likely to hold vocational education and training qualifications (23% compared with 29%).1 10. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) 20 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. A relatively high proportion of workers do not hold post-school qualifications (42% compared with 37% across all industries). down by 85 600 (or 9. Employment in Manufacturing is expected to fall over the next five years. including in Primary Metal and Metal Product Manufacturing. The workforce is dominated by males (74%) and most employment is full-time (86%). Although there is likely to be a slight rise overall. A slightly larger proportion of workers in this industry are aged 45 years or older (41%) compared with all industries (38%). slightly lower than the all industries average (46%).Industries INFORMATION MEDIA AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 203 700 11 456 500 -18. There are around one third of a million Manufacturing jobs in regional Australia. vocational education and training is a vital source of skills. Four of the seven are expected to increase employment. there is some disparity across subdivisions.0%). Over the five years to November 2011.7 10. Just over a decade ago.

and the lowest is Southern Tasmania (1. A slightly lower proportion of the workforce in this industry is female (41%) compared with all industries (46%).5 10. Other Services employs 4% of Australia’s workforce. The majority of workers are male (84%) and almost all are employed full-time (97%). around 18% of the workforce is employed in Mining. some regions are highly dependent on the industry for employment. which includes personal care. Most new jobs are in Metal Ore Mining (up by 37 900 or 79.5%). Three in every five Mining workers (around 140 000 people) are employed in regional Australia. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) For more information see www. with professionals such as engineers and geologists being vital to the industry. Other Services is a diverse industry which includes personal services and selected repair and maintenance activities. compared with 29% for all industries. funeral and religious services. Most new jobs are in the Personal and Other Services. Over the five years to November 2011.2% (or 38 300).1%).1%) and Coal Mining (21 100 or 75. Mining as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Other Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. the strongest growth rate of any industry.4% (or 103 700). About half the new jobs are expected to be in each of the Repair and Maintenance. Over the next five years.gov. The industry has 452 700 workers. The region with the highest proportion of its workers in this industry is Wollongong (where 6. the vocational education and training sector provides a significant contribution to skills in this industry.4 3 30 16 46 34 38 61 37 19 41 35 27 29 37 OTHER SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 452 700 11 456 500 9. employment grew by 9. While Mining directly accounts for 2% of employment in Australia. employment is expected to increase by 43.5% (or 102 900).Industries MINING Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 239 100 11 456 500 75. with large numbers of workers flying in and out of regional locations. with more than 172 000 people working in regional Australia (38% of industry employment). Employment rose strongly over the five years to November 2011. A smaller proportion of workers are aged 45 years or older (34%) compared with the average across all industries (38%).2 10. employment is projected to grow by 18 400 (or 4. and Personal and Other Services sectors.9%). Almost half of workers (47%) hold a Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualification.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 21 .4 29 30 41 46 37 38 38 37 13 47 32 27 29 37 Mining employs around 239 100 workers. up by 75. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. the highest of any region in Australia. (up by 20 500) and Repair and Maintenance (15 400) sectors. in the resource rich area of Remainder-Balance WA (which incorporates the vast majority of regional Western Australia). The higher education sector is also a key source of skilled workers. Over the next five years.6% of the region’s employment is in Other Services ). The vocational education and training sector is a major contributor of skills with more than two in five workers holding Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualifications.skillsinfo. For example. Consistent with technicians and trades workers being the largest employing occupations.

November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Around 29% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications. Over the five years to November 2011.4%). SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 865 700 11 456 500 16. In the ACT. veterinary services and computer system design. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) 22 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. and 17% of workers are employed part-time (compared with 30% for all industries). Professional.au . more than twice the average for all industries (27%).4 10. Scientific and Technical Services includes a diverse range of activities such as legal and accounting services. The proportion of workers who are aged 45 years or older is slightly lower in this industry than it is across all occupations (36% compared with 38%). Engineering and Technical Services. employment grew by 98 400 (or 15.4 17 30 47 46 45 38 43 37 36 28 29 27 29 37 Professional. About 56% of workers have a Bachelor degree or higher qualification.4 22 30 43 46 36 38 24 37 56 22 18 27 29 37 PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION AND SAFETY Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 738 100 11 456 500 15. The industry also has. this industry accounts for about 31% of the workforce. Females comprise 47% of the industry’s workforce (compared with 46% for all industries).gov. Scientific and Technical Services has 865 700 workers. though. Over the five years to November 2011. About 36% hold a Bachelor degree or higher qualification (compared with 27% for all industries) and the proportion holding a Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualification is similar to the average for all occupations. Scientific and Technical Services industry outside the state capital cities.5 10. with many new jobs in Computer System Design and Related Services and Architectural. The largest numbers of new jobs were in Public Administration (up by 79 900) and Public Order. Engineering and Technical Services is expected to also provide more than 40% of the projected 108 200 new jobs in Professional.2%).skillsinfo. There are slightly fewer than 210 000 workers employed in the Professional. A relatively low proportion of workers in this industry are employed part-time (22% compared with 30% for all industries). about 6% of the Australian workforce. employment rose by 122 300 (or 16. employment is expected to increase by 31 200 (or 4. Employment is concentrated in the state capital cities. Safety and Regulatory Services (16 300). Architectural.Industries PROFESSIONAL. a relatively high proportion of its workers employed in the ACT where it accounts for 9% of the workforce. In the next five years. Public Administration and Safety has a significantly higher proportion of its workforce (43% or more than 310 000 people) outside the state capital cities than the average across all industries (37%). well below the all industries average of 37%. Professional. Scientific and Technical Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Public Administration and Safety as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. almost a quarter of the industry’s workers. Public Administration and Safety has employment of 738 100. Scientific and Technical Services over the next five years.5%). which is home to the Australian Government’s administration. About 45% of workers are aged 45 years or older compared with the 38% across all industries.

The industry has about 11% of national employment. though. HIRING AND REAL ESTATE SERVICES Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 193 800 11 456 500 -1. but its share of local employment is as high as 15% in Wide-Bay Burnett in Queensland and 14% on the Sunshine Coast. Around 40% of workers in the industry do not hold post-school qualifications. This industry’s workforce also has a young age profile.3%). will be partially offset by a fall in Rental and Hiring Services (except Real Estate). accounting for 2% of national employment. This rise. employing around 470 000 workers. employment rose by 34 600 (or 2. Hiring and Real Estate Services as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Retail Trade as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 23 . higher than the all industries average of 46%. slightly higher than the all industries average (37%). The new jobs are anticipated to be in Property Operators and Real Estate Services (up by 7600). Half the workers in the industry are female. There are five major subdivisions in this industry. About 59% of workers do not hold post-school qualifications.skillsinfo. also in Queensland. making it a significant source of jobs in regional areas. which covers activities like motor vehicle and bloodstock leasing. though. compared with 37% for all industries.3 10. The industry’s share of local employment does not vary much across the regions.4 48 30 56 46 28 38 39 37 13 22 59 27 29 37 The Rental.2%). Employment is expected to increase by 6700 (or 3. with the small Non-Store Retailing and Retail Commission-Based Retailing sector showing the strongest growth (up by 147.9 10.5%) over the next five years. making Retail Trade an ideal entry point to the labour market.9%). November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. Over the five years to November 2011. but almost one in three holds a Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualification (compared with 29% for all industries).4 26 30 50 46 39 38 33 37 19 32 40 27 29 37 RETAIL TRADE Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 1 219 100 11 456 500 2. Almost two in every five Retail jobs are outside the state capital cities.1%) over the next five years.gov. with the highest share being around 3% in the Gold Coast.2 million workers. Retail Trade is Australia’s second largest employing industry. with more than 1. Over the five years to November 2011. and employment increased in three.1% or 9900). The largest number of new jobs. Hiring and Real Estate Services industry employs around 193 800 people. Around one third of jobs (more than 64 000) in the Rental. employment fell by 2600 (or 1. About 56% of workers are female and almost half of Retail Trade employment is part-time (48%).Industries RENTAL. Hiring and Real Estate Services industry are in regional Australia. Employment in Retail Trade is expected to increase by 50 400 (or 4. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) For more information see www. Rental. and a slightly lower proportion of employment is part-time (26% compared with 30%). was in Food Retailing (up by 22 200 or 6.

up by 13.au . Just 28% of workers (around 120 000) are employed in regional Australia. The majority of workers in the industry are male (78%) and the vast majority of employment is full-time (81%). Employment is concentrated in the state capital cities.2%). POSTAL AND WAREHOUSING Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 580 100 11 456 500 13. employment is expected to increase by 42 000 (or 7.skillsinfo.9% (or 15 800). Outside the state capital cities some regions. with 30% of workers holding Certificate III or higher vocational education and training qualifications. Postal and Warehousing employs around 580 100 workers. This workforce has a relatively low skill profile. The Wholesale Trade industry employs 424 700 workers. with the largest increase being in Machinery and Equipment Wholesaling (up by 28 000).gov.4 19 30 22 46 48 38 33 37 14 30 47 27 29 37 WHOLESALE TRADE Employment November 2011 (number) 5 year change to November 2011 (%) Working part-time (%) Female (%) Aged 45 years or older (%) Employment outside state capital cities (%) Educational profile With a Bachelor degree or higher (%) With VET qualifications at Cert III or higher (%) Without post-school qualifications (%) This industry All industries 424 700 11 456 500 3. This is slightly lower than the average for all industries (37%).9 10. The industry employs 5% of the Australian workforce. Rises were partially offset by falls in Basic Material Wholesaling and Motor Vehicle and Motor Vehicle Parts Wholesaling. The majority of workers are employed full-time (84%) and 42% are aged 45 years or older.5% in some regions and less than 1% in Far West in New South Wales. Almost half the workers in this industry (47%) do not hold post-school qualifications. it employs up to 7. Almost half the workers in this industry do not hold post-school qualifications. Most new jobs are in Rail Transport (up by 20 200) and Transport Support Services (18 000). compared with 37% for all industries.0%) over the next five years. The industry’s workforce is relatively old (48% of workers are aged 45 years or older compared with 38% across all industries).Industries TRANSPORT. with the largest employment gains expected in Machinery and Equipment Wholesaling. Transport. Over the five years to November 2011. Employment rose in most subdivisions. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. employment grew strongly.4% (or 68 400). Over the five years to November 2011. Postal and Warehousing as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Wholesale Trade as a % of Total Employment in Each Region Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. A relatively high proportion of workers are male (67%) compared with all industries (54%). Postal and Warehousing employs more than 190 000 people in regional Australia (one in three of its workers is employed outside the state capital cities). The vocational education and training sector is an important contributor of skills. November 2011 (regional titles are available in the States and territories section from page 6) 24 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. accounting for 5% of the national workforce. and Grocery. North Western and Central West in New South Wales have a relatively high proportion of their workforces in the industry (around 4%). West Moreton in Queensland and Northern.4 10. Over the next five years. Liquor and Tobacco Product Wholesaling. suggesting that there are good opportunities for entry-level positions. higher than the average for all industries (38%). Employment is expected to rise by 17 000 (or 4. Transport. such as Southern and Eastern SA. however. employment increased by 3.4 16 30 33 46 42 38 28 37 21 24 47 27 29 37 Transport. well below the average for all industries (37%).

At the specific occupation level.Occupations and skills OCCUPATIONAL OVERVIEW In which occupations do Australians work? About one in three Australian workers is a Manager or Professional.0 1077. The five largest employing occupations in Australia are • • • • • Sales Assistants. Aged and Disabled (32 300).8 6. Professionals accounted for more than one third of these.8 6.6 17. fell by 11 600. Females also make up a larger proportion of these workforces than the national workforce average (more than 60% compared with 46% across all occupations).3 37. This suggests these occupations offer good opportunities for people seeking shorter work hours to balance employment with study or caring responsibilities. Registered (49 000) Managers. General (up by 64 700) Nurses. Advertising and Sales (34 900) Sales Assistants.4 1689. Occupations in regional locations The occupational groups with the highest proportion of their employment in regional areas are Labourers (47%) and Machinery Operators and Drivers (44%). AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 25 .6 1731.4 368.7 12. with more than 2. Age profile An important element behind the changing nature of the Australian labour market has been the ageing workforce. Professional jobs generally require completion of a Bachelor degree or higher qualification. the largest numbers of new jobs over the five years to November 2011 were for • • • • • Clerks.4 10. Another 30% of Australians are employed as Technicians and Trades Workers or Clerical and Administrative Workers. permanent and casual. Occupations with a high proportion of workers aged 45 years or older are likely to provide additional opportunities for job seekers as workers retire over the next decade. In 2011. More than half of those employed as Sales Workers and Community and Personal Service Workers are employed part-time.6 -1. Entry to occupations in these groups differs.8 108. health and engineering are also evident in a number of regional locations.5 118. part-time.9 799.4 3. employment growth was strongest for Community and Personal Service Workers. meaning that this proportion is projected to increase. Registered (228 000) Clerks. There are 25 occupations (of the more than 350 included in the Australian Jobs Matrix which begins on page 35) which employ more than 100 000 people. Machinery Operators and Drivers and Clerical and Administrative Workers also have relatively older age profiles (47% and 42% are aged 45 years or older. In percentage terms. Hours of work Employment in Australia is a mix of jobs that are full-time.9 5. respectively).3 43.3 % 6. Employment in the lowest skilled group. General (32 600) Carers. DEEWR employment projections.4 Outside state capitals % 40 28 41 39 33 36 44 47 37 Employment profile (% of occupational group) Working part-time Female % % 12 35 23 52 14 13 53 68 36 76 56 62 14 9 43 34 30 46 Aged 45 years or older % 50 39 33 33 42 25 47 37 38 Projected growth to 2016-17 Managers Professionals Technicians and Trades Workers Community and Personal Service Workers Clerical and Administrative Workers Sales Workers Machinery Operators and Drivers Labourers Total (all occupations) ‘000 1483.0 51.4 8.8 15. General (187 200) Truck Drivers (184 800).9 196.2 254.2 Source: ABS Labour Force Survey. There is quite a marked variation in hours of work across the major occupational groups.4 million workers.2 7.1 -11. Retail (240 900) Nurses. but generally requires vocational education and training or equivalent experience. Occupational Employment Employment Nov 2011 % of workforce % 13 21 15 10 15 9 7 10 100 5 year change ‘000 % 163. and the workforce is ageing.4 10. so employment prospects for people with relevant qualifications and experience are good. The increasing need for highly skilled workers is shown in the relative employment change across occupational groups over the five years to November 2011. with half of these workers aged 45 years or older reflecting.1 11 456.9 97.6 2. This blend of job opportunities responds to both the needs of employers and workers. The Managers group has the oldest age profile.0 1088.2 7.7 10. General (499 000) Managers. the many years of experience generally required for these jobs. The largest numbers of new jobs were for • Professionals (up by 368 600) • Community and Personal Service Workers which generally require a vocational education and training qualification or equivalent (196 000). Shortages of Professionals in fields such as agriculture.0 829. it is a large group and there are around 700 000 jobs in regional Australia. Although Professionals has a low proportion of its workforce employed outside the state capital cities.0 22.0 117. Which occupations have grown? More than 1 million new jobs were created in Australia in the five years to November 2011. in part. The largest occupational group in employment terms is Professionals.5 ‘000 94.8 1150. 38% of Australian workers were aged 45 years or older.7 29.3 2438.7 146. Labourers.3 104.5 1048.6 4.

5 11. including some in each of Community and Personal Service Workers. the skill requirements of many jobs are predicted to change dramatically in response to new systems and technologies. General (20 500) • Clerks. In the future. Projected Employment Growth to 2016–17. Accounting (18 600).4% (or 45 000). The value of studying to gain skills is not only highlighted by the growth in employment in skilled occupations.7% Skill Level 4. job opportunities are expected across all skill levels. In some industries.8 121. The next highest skill levels.2% Skill Level 3. and for many occupations.2 million workers are employed in an occupation assessed at skill level 1 (equivalent to a Bachelor Degree or higher qualification). the strongest employment growth was recorded at skill level 1 (up by 15.2% Most new jobs will be in skilled occupations More than half the projected growth in jobs over the next five years is expected to be in the highly skilled occupations. The rise in employment in skilled occupations has not only occurred over the recent past.0 3.Occupations and skills SKILL LEVEL OVERVIEW The previous page examined the labour market by occupation.4 Qualification equivalence Bachelor Degree or higher qualification AQF Associate Degree.8 1697. it is useful to also examine employment trends by skill level.9 million people.9 ‘000 322.1 2. Since 1990.3 15. The range of occupations in this category is very broad. Clerical and Administrative Workers. 38.9 129. too. DEEWR employment projections 26 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 . Employment by skill level Projected Growth to 2016-17 Employment Nov 2011 Skill Level 1 2 3 4 5 % of workforce % 28 11 15 26 17 5 year change ‘000 % 446. The five occupations expected to provide the largest number of new jobs over the next five years are • Nurses. 14. which includes Managers and Professionals. Page 30 provides information on the relationship between education and employment.9 Sources: ABS Labour Force Survey.7 1958. Skill Level (% share) Skill Level 1. 27.7 13. and the importance of acquiring skills.4 45. Machinery Operators and Drivers and Labourers.8 224.8 1288. that this trend will continue with the majority of occupations expected to experience jobs growth over the next five years requiring a high level of skill. More than 3.2 60. Skill levels are indicative. Registered (46 800) • Carers. 7. employment growth for jobs that generally require a qualification at the Diploma level or higher (or extensive on-the-job experience) has outstripped the growth in low skilled jobs (employment growth of 78% for occupations at skill levels 1 and 2 over this period compared with 17% growth for skill level 5 occupations).0% Source: DEEWR employment projections However. which includes those at skill levels 1 and 2. previous experience and on-the-job training is required to competently perform in an occupation. the higher the skill level the greater the amount of formal education or training.9% Skill Level 2. Sales Workers. Advanced Diploma or Diploma AQF Certificate III or Certificate IV (including at least two years of on-the job-training) AQF Certificate II or Certificate III AQF Certificate I or compulsory secondary education ‘000 3259.9 2981. highlighting the importance of developing skills and undertaking further education and training to increase your employment opportunities. Skill Level 5. It is evident.9% or 446 300 jobs) with employment in relatively low skilled occupations (skill level 5) increasing by only 2.2 59. a Certificate III is emerging as the minimum qualification needed for entry level jobs. Aged and Disabled (23 900) • Electricians (23 800) • Clerks. 12.0 344. some years of relevant experience can substitute for formal qualifications. but also in relative unemployment rates and starting salaries for graduates. Over the five years to November 2011. To understand changes in the level of skill of the Australian workforce. Generally. 2 and 3 (which are equivalent to vocational education and training at the Certificate III or higher level) combined account for more than 2.5 100.

4% of new jobs) is expected to be in Health Care and Social Assistance. Postal & Warehousing. 30.9 18. highlighting the importance of undertaking post-school education and training to improve your job and career prospects.2 103.4% Transport. Education and Training (61 300) and Retail Trade (50 400).9 97. Source: DEEWR employment projections Projected Employment Growth to 2016–17. 14. For more information see www.5% Machinery Operators and Drivers. Scientific and Technical Services Mining Education and Training Retail Trade Transport. with Construction and Professional.5% Community and Personal Service Workers. Occupation Group (% share) Technicians and Trades Workers. Top 10 Industries (‘000) Health Care and Social Assistance Construction Professional.deewr. 14. with around 31% of new jobs being in this group. Occupation Group (‘000) Professionals Technicians and Trades Workers Community and Personal Service Workers Clerical and Administrative Workers 146. the top ten sectors providing the most new jobs are expected to be • • • • • • • • • • Hospitals (up by 63 100) Cafés.gov. 3.8% Other Industries.3 50.6% Source: DEEWR employment projections Education & Training. the largest jobs growth is expected to be for Professionals (up by 254 700) followed by Technicians and Trades Workers (146 500) and Community and Personal Service Workers (118 900). Projected Employment Growth to 2016–17. though. Restaurants and Takeaway Food Services (53 000) Architectural.7 94.4% At the more disaggregated level. There are also expected to be large numbers of new jobs for Clerical and Administrative Workers (97 700) and Managers (94 200). 4.2 51. 6.4% Construction.8% Source: DEEWR employment projections Managers. 3.Occupations and skills THE NEXT FIVE YEARS Which industries will have the most new jobs over the next five years? All industries are projected to increase their employment over the next five years except Manufacturing.7 61. 11. The pie chart below shows that one in four new jobs (241 800 or 26. 17.9% Mining. Postal and Warehousing Public Administration and Safety Accommodation and Food Services Financial and Insurance Services 0 Source: DEEWR employment projections 241.3% Managers Public Administration & Safety.5 50 100 150 200 250 300 The graph below highlights the strong role that Professionals will play in contributing to overall employment growth over the next five years.3% Projected Employment Growth to 2016–17. Over the five years to 2016–17. 11. more than half of the new jobs in Australia are expected to be provided by just three of the 19 industries.5% Machinery Operators and Drivers Labourers Sales Workers Other industries which are expected to provide large numbers of new jobs include Mining (up by 103 700). 6.2% Clerical and Administrative Workers.2 30. Scientific & Technical Services.7% Sales Workers.8 131.5 118. 5.3 37. 26.3% Labourers. Over the five years to 2016–17.0 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 254.2 108. Labourers and Machinery Operators and Drivers.0 31.0 29. Projected Employment Growth to 2016–17 Industry (% share) Health Care & Social Assistance. Engineering and Technical Services (46 400) Residential Care Services (39 000) Building Installation Services (37 600) Metal Ore Mining (36 800) Other Social Assistance Services (34 500) Computer System Design and Related Services (32 700) Allied Health Services (31 100) Building Completion Services (29 400). Which occupations will have the most new jobs over the next five years? While all eight major occupational groups are expected to have larger employment in five years time.7% Retail Trade. 11. there are projected to be smaller employment gains for the lower skilled occupational groups of Sales Workers. More information about employment change by skill level is included on page 26. 11.7% Professionals. 15.4 42. where employment is expected to decline (continuing a long-term trend).7 Professional.au/lmip AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 27 . Scientific and Technical Services together also creating more than a quarter of new jobs (up by 131 200 and 108 200 respectively). 4.

However. enthusiasm. Page 29 provides information about the factors which influence job prospects. it is likely that a host of existing jobs will be made greener. Learning skills and Technology skills. but they are not the only attributes you need. A job in an industry like Retail Trade or Accommodation and Food Services may be available for you to work after school. which include links to useful sites. motivation and adaptability. Employers often reject applicants who are suitable in many other respects. positive self-esteem. reliability. honesty and integrity. is breaking into the labour market with little or no workplace experience. are the professional and vocational skills. or skills for sustainability. A Diploma provides some $10 000 a year of income over a school leaver.Occupations and skills WHAT DO EMPLOYERS LOOK FOR WHEN RECRUITING? Employers are interested in a range of skills and attributes when they recruit and it is important to understand that technical skills and high levels of qualification can significantly enhance your prospects of gaining a job. or more than $400 000 across a 40 year working life. core. An entry-level job can provide you with the workplace skills and experience that will be the critical first stepping stone to success in the labour market.gov. Employers also value a range of personal attributes including: loyalty. The Australian Government is committed to ensuring that the education and training system is capable of providing a workforce that has the skills required to face the challenges of the future and the transition to a sustainable. Are employers just looking for workers in occupations in shortage? Sometimes a great deal of attention is given to skill shortages. life. Initiative and enterprise skills. Higher levels of education and skills also generally lead to higher levels of workforce participation and productivity. employability skills are transferable between jobs. • More information about post-school education and training is included on pages 30 and 31. unemployment is relatively low and your chances of getting a job are good. essential or soft skills. but there is no guarantee that those shortages will be evident in the future or that they are apparent in every location. Do I need workplace experience? One of the most difficult challenges. with school leavers earning around 42% less than a university graduate. that even the most highly educated person can face. though. What are employability skills? Employability skills are non-technical or generic skills which contribute to your ability to gain and keep a job. • There are opportunities for good candidates in every occupation. Further information about initiatives providing opportunities for Australians to learn new skills for sustainability and enhance existing skills.au/Skills/Programs/WorkDevelop/ ClimateChangeSustainability. No matter what the skill level of the position you want.deewr. that no matter in which region. Workers across a range of occupations will need new skills to increase efficiency. that completing post-school education or training at the Certificate III or higher level means you are less likely to be unemployed and you are highly likely to earn more than someone who has not done further study.gov. at weekends or school holidays and this can help you gain valuable workplace skills as well as possibly providing you with a good reference for future job applications. Shortages can result from a number of factors including low levels of training. Look at the median earnings in the Australian Jobs Matrix which begins on page 35. reduce waste. you are likely to find it hard to gain employment if you do not have ‘employability’ skills. Self-management skills. These skills can be developed in entry-level jobs or pre-vocational courses and extracurricular activities. The eight identified employability skills are: • Communication skills. Unlike many technical skills. Others will need to respond to the demand for sustainable design. What is the value of post-school education and training? In Australia’s sound labour market. There is no doubt that new green jobs will be created as we move to a greener economy. high levels of wastage (workers no longer in occupations that use their qualifications). increasing demand for new skills within an occupation and locational mismatch (where workers who have the skills are not in close proximity to the employers seeking those skills).au. that is. even if you finished studying at Year 12. commitment.skills. The skills and attributes employers need and the technical or job-specific skills they value vary depending on the position they are looking to fill. The existence of shortages mean there may currently be good opportunities for people with specialised skills or experience in these occupations. Planning and organising skills. even those who hold relevant qualifications. Skilled workers commonly earn more. as well as the generic skills (such as sustainable approaches. • Unemployment is also lower for people who have higher levels of qualification (see page 30). Entry-level positions can be a great place for you to develop employability skills and you don’t have to wait until you have completed school or study.gov. It is also true. What about the demand for green skills? Green skills. The occupations which have the highest earnings are generally those which require high levels of skill. as businesses and entire industries across the economy move to more sustainable ways of working. Green skills are important to all industries and sectors. knowledge and practices can be found at www. innovation and problem solving) required for the new green jobs and the greening of existing jobs across all industry sectors as a response to climate change and sustainability imperatives. Team work skills. low carbon economy. • Information about opportunities to undertake training to ‘up-skill’ or ‘re-skill’ and obtain formal qualifications is available at www. It is now a requirement of nationally recognised vocational education and training packages to embed employability skills into course content. changes in technology. 28 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 . It is clear.au click on schooling then careers and transitions. green products and green skills from clients and customers. industry or occupation you want to work employers place very strong value on employability skills. ability to deal with pressure. particular jobs may require some more than others. though. common sense. While employers consider all eight to be important. personal presentation. To find out more about employability skills go to www. those non-technical skills required to work effectively. conserve water and develop and implement new technologies and practices for a more sustainable world.deewr. Problem-solving skills. It is better to look for training and employment in an occupation in which you are interested and have aptitude than to base decisions on the existence of shortages. because they do not have the required employability skills. They are sometimes referred to as key. This includes occupations in clean energy production and jobs in the manufacturing and production of clean and green consumer items.

• The workforce is relatively old and staff turnover is slightly higher than average.com. • Entry to training is competitive. you are pretty close to being guaranteed a job. Carers. success in the UMAT test which some universities use in the selection of students. creating more than 9000 jobs. with 7900 new jobs.au has useful information about industry dispersion. more than 12 000 new jobs are likely. This employment can provide great work experience. • There are shortages of Geologists. generally requiring a very high Australian Tertiary Admission Rank and often. • Although it may be relatively easy to gain employment as a Sales Assistant. Turnover creates opportunities in all occupations when workers need to be replaced. with additional jobs generally offered over the busy Christmas period. • Earnings are very high and unemployment is low. in addition. Employment is almost entirely in the Construction industry (more than 90%). What other data can help you find out about job prospects? • Industry profile Some occupations are engaged across a range of industries. These include • Number employed In simple terms. so there are likely to be opportunities even in occupations in which employment is falling. Strong employment growth over the past five years (32 300 new jobs) and further strong growth expected as the Australian population ages. • Employment growth Historical employment growth tells you how many new jobs have been created and projected growth gives you an insight into how many additional jobs there will be in the future. • High earnings reflect the level of skill. but there are also opportunities in jobs that generally do not require post-school education or training. Training is through a formal apprenticeship. but strong growth is expected. Vacancies arise in all occupations as people move jobs. There are good prospects in many skilled occupations. • There are good prospects of working part-time. though. there were just 1700 new jobs in the two fields.Occupations and skills WHICH JOBS HAVE THE BEST PROSPECTS? Are there opportunities in all occupations? Jobs with good prospects exist across many occupational groups and all industries. Medical Practitioners. Employment is expected to continue to grow relatively strongly. remote location of jobs and shortages. It may be easier to transfer to a new job if an occupation is spread across industries. though. meaning there are likely to be many vacancies as workers retire or leave the occupation. • Opportunities to work in this field without qualifications are shrinking as many employers seek applicants who hold relevant qualifications at the Certificate III or higher level.joboutlook. General • This is quite a large occupation. • Graduate outcomes It is useful to look at the employment outcomes for graduates (but bear in mind that outcomes change). the more likely there are to be jobs in every location. • Staff turnover is high which means many vacancies are created as people leave their Sales Assistant positions to work in other occupations or retire.4% across all occupations) but the large size of the occupation means a large number of jobs were created (32 600). Employment increased at an average rate over the past five years. • Most employment is part-time (70%). with ABS Labour Force Survey data showing almost two in five Plumbers are working for themselves. are for highly experienced or specialist workers and new graduates may find it difficult to gain initial employment. Over the next five years. About a million people change jobs every year – and hundreds of thousands switch industries – showing that the labour market is continuously providing openings. Shortages vary by location and change over time. • Earnings are about average but working conditions can be muddy and difficult as some work is in sewerage systems. Sales Assistants. the larger an occupation.au/Research/GradJobsDollars. • Plumber is a large occupation with employment of 81 100. Geologists • This profession requires a minimum of a Bachelor degree for entry and graduate outcomes are good. and they may offer good job prospects.gov. 52 300 employed. • You may to have to move to undertake training and be willing to work in a regional location. • Opportunities are also available for people wanting work for a short period.0% compared with 10. especially in the trades and professions. but earnings are low. others are concentrated in a single industry. but there are still many jobs available to replace workers who retire or leave the trade. Some shortages. Information is at www. but there are very few opportunities outside those remote and regional areas where Mining is concentrated. Employment growth has been very strong over the past five years and further strong growth is expected over the next five years. General • This is the largest employing occupation in Australia (almost 500 000 jobs) with opportunities in almost every location across the country. pay is low and work may involve weekends and evenings. www. but if you have the skills and are flexible in your work location. • About 90% of Geologists and Geophysicists are employed in the Mining and Professional. retirement or unemployment. There are opportunities for self-employment. • Job turnover Job turnover is the annual percentage of workers who move out of the occupation into other occupations. • If you have registration as a Medical Practitioner. What factors affect an occupation’s prospects? Many factors affect the number of job opportunities available in an occupation. providing opportunities for workers with the right skills. Plumbers • A minimum of a Certificate III is required and licensing is needed for most work. • Unemployment is below average and there are shortages of Plumbers. your prospects of gaining a job in this occupation are good. • Few Sales Assistants hold post-school qualifications. • Small employment (11 100 workers in Geologist and Geophysicist combined) so although employment growth over the past five years has been strong. AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 29 . The following examples show the kind of issues that affect your chances of getting a job in particular occupations. • Shortages Occupations in which there are shortages mean there are currently good opportunities for people with those skills and experience.graduatecareers. • Staff turnover is relatively low. • Employment growth has been below average over the past five years (up by 7. Aged and Disabled • A large occupation with 116 800 workers across the country. Scientific and Technical Services industries.

• DEEWR projections (see page 27) show that employment growth over the next five years is expected to be strongest for skilled workers.2 Unemployment Rate by Qualification.8 31.4 4.6 76.8 19. by Remoteness Area.7 0 2011 2 2010 4 6 8 10 8.7 27.6 Remote Australia 0 5 10 10.7 34. The higher your qualification. the less likely you are to be unemployed and data on page 28 also show higher qualifications generally mean higher pay.9 Year 12 Certificate III/IV Bachelor Degree There is regional disparity in educational attainment There are significant differences in the qualification profile of the workforce in state capital cities compared with regional areas. Highest Level of Educational Attainment. 2009 to 2011 Bachelor degree graduates Employed full-time four months following graduation 2011 2010 2009 76.1 3.8 % with a university qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Work % with a VET Certificate III/IV or higher Source: Gradstats and NCVER Student Outcomes 30 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 .0% for people who completed a Bachelor degree. where Agriculture. Construction. Manufacturing and Mining can represent relatively high shares of local employment. Forestry and Fishing. this reflects the industry base of many regional locations. In 2011. Around half of those employed in 2002 had studied after leaving school but this has now risen to around 63%. Source: ABS Survey of Education and Work Employment outcomes for university and vocational education and training graduates are good For Bachelor degree graduates.5 2. While this figure also includes people employed on a part-time basis.8 3. May 2011 (% of total employed) 31.6 3. while in regional Australia.2 79. May 2010 and May 2011 (%) Year 10 or below 5. Accommodation and Food Services.5% for people who completed Year 12.3 9.6%.4 76.1% for those with Certificate III/IV qualifications and 3. 4. Educational Profile (% of total employed). There has been a marked increase in the proportion of Australian workers who hold post-school qualifications.4 2. the National Centre for Vocational Education Research’s (NCVER) survey of VET students for 2010 found that 77% of surveyed graduates found work within six months of graduating. and many professions and trade occupations have particularly strong employment growth (see the Australian Jobs Matrix which begins on page 35). people are more likely to hold vocational education and training qualifications.0 2.5 6. Looking at the industries in which employment growth is very strong.9 15 20 25 30 35 40 Bachelor Degree and Vocational Education and Training Graduates Employed After Graduation. This means that you are at an increasing disadvantage when looking for work if you have a low level of education. Higher qualifications increase your chance of getting a job There is plenty of evidence to suggest your level of education has a significant effect on your chance of getting a job.9 37. May 2011 Highest level of post-school qualification Postgraduate Degree Graduate Diploma/Certificate Bachelor Degree Advanced Diploma/Diploma Certificate III/IV Certificate I/II Certificate not further defined and level not determined No post-school qualification Source: ABS Survey of Education and Work % 5.4 19. these results are similar to the outcomes for Bachelor degree students.Occupations and skills EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT The Australian workforce is becoming more skilled The Australian workforce is becoming more educated and more highly skilled. like Health Care and Social Assistance where more than three-quarters of workers hold post-school qualifications. people are much more likely to have a university qualification. or have not completed post-school study. Graduate Careers Australia’s (GCA) 2011 graduate survey shows that 77% of surveyed 2010 graduates had found full-time work four months after finishing their degrees.2 Vocational education and training graduates Employed (full-time or part-time) at end May following graduation 77. In state capital cities.2 Major cities of Australia Regional Australia 16. The May 2011 ABS Survey of Education and Work shows that those with a Certificate III or higher qualification had a lower unemployment rate than workers who do not hold post-school qualifications. the unemployment rate for workers with Year 10 or below as their highest qualification was 8. In part. Retail Trade.6 9. compared with 5.3 77. For VET graduates. it is apparent that most of the new jobs of the future will require post-school qualifications to meet employers’ demand for skilled workers.

0 90. The information shown below is employment outcomes for Bachelor degree graduates. In 2011.5 83. 2011 Average annual income for full-time Employed at end May employed graduates following graduation Major cities Inner and outer regional Remote and very remote Source: NCVER Student Outcomes Creative Arts Information Technology Source: NCVER Student Outcomes $52 800 $52 700 $64 600 75.3 Outcomes for Vocational Education and Training Graduates by Location. Vocational education and training graduates in regional and remote Australia are more likely to find employment after graduation than those in major cities. but the entry qualification for some occupations is commonly a Master’s degree.5% 79.3 85.5% Starting salaries for graduates In 2011.graduatecareers. Hospitality & Personal Services Natural & Physical Sciences 62. up from $49 000 in 2010. GCA figures show that in Architecture.gov. Bachelor Degree Students who Graduated in 2010 (% of those seeking full-time employment who were working full-time four months after graduation) Mining Engineering Medicine Dentistry Civil Engineering Rehabilitation Law Building Accounting Chemistry Visual/ Performing Arts 0 10 20 30 40 50 Source: Graduate Careers Australia.au – more about studying at university.au – information about higher education graduates.edu. www.ncver.9 86.edu. Medical Practitioner).au – graduate careers in the Australian Government and State agencies – Click on ‘Career Information’ then select Graduates. Environmental & Related Studies Society and Culture Management and Commerce Food. % Employed at May 2011 Education Architecture and Building Engineering & Related Technologies Health Agriculture.3 82. www.3 60 70 80 90 100 63. click on explore our research. www.6 84.3 73. GCA figures show the median annual starting salary for all Bachelor degree graduates aged less than 25 years and in their first full-time job in Australia was $50 000.1 56. This is particularly the case for graduates in remote areas (84% were employed after graduating compared with 76% in major cities) and they are also more likely to command a higher income once they have found employment (average annual income of $64 600 compared with $52 800 in major cities). Detailed information is at www.com.com. Gradstats 52.gov. for example.3% 83. www.6 Useful links www.8 78.au – the Australian Government’s new website which provides a broad range of information about Australian universities. The five highest starting salaries were for • • • • • Dentistry ($80 000) Optometry ($70 000) Earth Sciences ($65 000) Engineering ($60 000) Medicine ($58 500). there is a mandatory internship/registration year before a graduate is admitted to the occupation (for example.6 81. 2010 Vocational Education and Training Graduates. and www.myuniversity.ncver. For some other occupations. NCVER data show the average annual salary for graduates with a qualification through vocational education and training who were in full-time work six months after completing their training was • Diploma or higher ($60 800) • Certificate III/IV ($53 200) • Certificate I/II ($48 000).au/Research. more than 42% of 2010 Bachelor degree graduates were in further study four months after graduation.graduatecareers.5 87. Employment outcomes by field of study Graduate employment outcomes by field of study are useful to see which graduates do best in the labour market but they need to be examined in the context of other information.2 98. for graduates with a qualification through vocational education and training who were in full-time work six months after completing their training.Occupations and skills EDUCATION AND EMPLOYMENT Graduate demand is strong in regional areas NCVER data also show that vocational education and training qualifications are particularly sought after in regional and remote areas of Australia. In 2011. so a high proportion of these graduates are in full-time work.gov.2 60.au – information on vocational education and training graduate outcomes and research.au/statistic/21065.1 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 89.8 77. AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 31 .6 89. the highest average salaries were in the fields of • Education ($70 400) • Engineering and Related Technologies ($57 600) • Health ($57 500) • Natural and Physical Sciences ($53 900) • Management and Commerce ($52 400).studyassist.6 76.jobsearch.0 98.

you may have additional responsibilities and needs that affect your ability to secure employment. Based on your needs this can include work experience opportunities by placing you with an employer. A Job Bonus is available to employers who recruit an eligible mature age job seeker from 1 July 2012. For further assistance call 13 17 64. which are summarised below. The Experience+ website contains information for mature age job seekers and mature age workers. EMPLOYMENT Help if you are looking for work If you’re looking for work. Centrelink and your Job Services Australia provider will provide interpreter services when required. all Job Services Australia providers can deliver specific services to meet your needs. including information for specialist services. cities and rural sites across Australia. Youth For youth services visit www. including Local Employment Coordinators and Jobs and Skills Expos.deewr. In addition.au is the place to start. Job Services Australia providers work with local employers. including younger secondary students (from Year 7) to stay in school. Local Employment Coordinators Local Employment Coordinators (LECs) work in 20 vulnerable areas across Australia. to continue activities that support these vulnerable areas. the services and training you receive will be 32 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 . The Indigenous Youth Careers Pathways program (IYCP) is available for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in Years 11 and 12 (and in limited cases Year 10 students) to start and successfully complete a school-based traineeship. If you would like further information. The Government has extended the Priority Employment Area initiative. LECs identify opportunities and drive strategic responses to local needs by facilitating linkages across business. Employment and Workplace Relations’ (DEEWR) website www. provider organisations and all levels of government to help people into jobs and meet demands for skills and labour. Job Services Australia Job Services Australia is the Australian Government’s national employment services system. Details about Job Services Australia. Go to www. the Department of Education. is available at www. If you are an eligible job seeker.au. Parents and carers As a parent or carer. community. It is a one stop shop for employment assistance that has providers located in more than 2000 towns. registered training organisations. you may be given the choice of attending a CALD specialist Job Services Australia provider.gov. Literacy and Numeracy program may also help improve English language skills. based on your individual circumstances. Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP).gov. state. Working one-on-one with your local Job Services Australia provider. The following information is a summary with links provided to help you get the full details about policies and programs available to assist you.deewr. Assistance could include support to access suitable child care. and includes free career advice and a résumé appraisal service.org. including a $20 million Flexible Funding Pool. People from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds If you are a job seeker from a culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) background. You can contact Centrelink’s multilingual call service on 13 12 02. contact Centrelink at www. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples If you are an Indigenous job seeker and experiencing barriers to getting a job.au/PEA for information on the 20 areas identified as requiring additional assistance to help address local labour market issues. Parents who are not on income support can also access employment services.au/employment/programs/expplus. The helpful staff there can then assist you to get in touch with an employment service provider. find a job or move into further study.au/llnp for program details. you may be able to register directly with a Job Services Australia provider to get immediate help.au/jsa. who are not in full-time study or full-time work. regardless of whether they receive income support. based on your individual circumstances and caring responsibilities. Principal carer parents on income support are eligible to access Job Services Australia services for help to gain new skills or update existing skills. Indigenous Employment Program (IEP) providers.gov. developing their career or owning and operating their own business. This maps out the services and training that will help you to find and keep a job. You may also be given the choice of attending an Indigenous specialist Job Service Australia provider.deewr. who operate in many locations across Australia. until 2013.youth. and the location of Job Services Australia providers. They will be able to provide flexible assistance and support to help you overcome barriers. gain skills through training and understand your rights in the workplace. You may want to explore www.humanservices.gov.au or phone 13 25 80. call DEEWR on 13 17 64. Further information is available at www. Your local Job Services Australia provider will be able to discuss this with you in more detail. staying employed. For further assistance call the job seeker hotline on 13 62 68. if you have significant issues preventing you from getting a job. undertake a school-based traineeship. you can register to receive help from Job Services Australia.gov.deewr. See www.au/Indigenous or by contacting a Job Services Australia provider. To find out where Jobs and Skills Expos are being held.2 million has been allocated over two years.gov. Mature age employment If you are aged 50 or older and looking for work. Job Services Australia is available to all young people aged between 15 and 21. you will be linked to a provider of your choosing who will work with you to develop an Employment Pathway Plan that is tailored to your individual needs. If you do not have access to the Internet. A total of $45.fiftythousandjobs. Providers of the IEP work with Job Services Australia providers to assist Indigenous job seekers with getting a job.Occupations and skills EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION SERVICES There is a wide range of Government assistance available to help you find the right job. You can also look at www. access to training and skill development or assistance to relocate to a place with more work opportunities. Assistance is also available for other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.deewr. go to the PEA website and click on Jobs and Skills Expos. community and health services. The Language. territory and local government and other organisations to develop opportunities.gov.au.gov.deewr.

gov. Austudy or ABSTUDY may be eligible to receive an annual Student Start-Up Scholarship for each year they are studying. re-entering the workforce or simply wishing to change careers. rights and obligations and investigates complaints or suspected contraventions of workplace laws. visit the Australian Government’s Study Assist website at www. General Employee Entitlements and Redundancy Scheme The General Employee Entitlements and Redundancy Scheme (GEERS) may also be able to assist you if you lose your employment. or to enter employment or further education or training.jobaccess. For more information see www. EDUCATION AND TRAINING Skills for All Australians There are a number of new initiatives in education and training including a commitment between the Australian Government and the state and territory governments to provide training to anyone of working age without a Certificate III or higher qualification. For more information.studyassist. The Australian Apprenticeships Access Program provides vulnerable job seekers who experience barriers to entering skilled employment with pre-vocational training.gov.au. depending on your personal circumstances. including minimum wages.gov. The Australian Government has a number of initiatives to help ease the financial difficulties of Australian Apprentices.gov. Australia’s workplace relations system.au or call 1300 799 675.au for information about all the initiatives.gov. If you are considering setting up your own business. Visit www. annual and long service leave. GEERS is a payment scheme established to assist employees who are owed entitlements after they lose their employment due to the liquidation or bankruptcy of their employer.deewr. which has programs and services available to quickly reconnect you with job opportunities. You can be a school-leaver. In some circumstances.fwa.au. educates people working in Australia about fair work practices.au/AAAP. you will have access to Job Services Australia. University students in receipt of Youth Allowance. NEIS can provide you with accredited small business training. visit JobAccess at www. in both the Higher Education and VET sectors.deewr. If you are a student receiving Youth Allowance or ABSTUDY and you need to move away from home to study you may also be eligible for a Relocation Scholarship. facilitating good faith bargaining and the making of enterprise agreements.gov. valued at $2050 in 2012 (two payments of $1025). Here you will find information about student loans available under the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP). GEERS covers capped unpaid wages. For more information see www. Visit www.au or call 13 13 94. capped payment in lieu of notice and capped redundancy pay. business advice and mentoring. Each has different functions within that system.au.deewr.australianapprenticeships. Higher Education If you are planning to study at university or other approved higher education provider have a look at the new Australian Government website MyUniversity. Help available after you have a job The Fair Work Ombudsman (FWO) and Fair Work Australia (FWA) are the two key organisations in Australia’s workplace relations system.au. and do not require any entry qualifications.au for more information on eligibility for these scholarships.gov. For more information see www. The program includes pre-vocational training linked to an Australian Apprenticeship pathway and assists participants to find and keep an Australian Apprenticeship. Disability Employment Services providers are organisations contracted by the Australian Government in more than 1900 sites across Australia. in awards. Australian Apprenticeships Australian Apprenticeships are available to you if you are of working age.gov.gov.fairwork. productive and cooperative workplace relations and ensuring compliance with Commonwealth workplace laws. Harvest work is generally available throughout the year where there are not enough local workers to harvest fruit and vegetable crops or assist wool growers. Workers from eligible companies in the automotive manufacturing and the textile. JobAccess advisers can also be contacted on 1800 464 800. job seekers and service providers for the employment of people with disability.gov.au/NEIS.gov. mediation and in some cases arbitration. regulating the taking of industrial action and resolving a range of collective and individual workplace disputes through conciliation. The FWO offers people a single point of contact to obtain accurate and timely information about AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 33 . It is an independent body with power to carry out a range of functions including providing a safety net of minimum conditions. New Enterprise Incentive Scheme Starting a new business is another employment option available to you as a job seeker. Harvest Labour Services Harvest Labour Services providers can help you find work as a harvest labourer in rural and regional areas across Australia. Visit www. Visit www.innovation. The National Harvest Labour Information Service can also help you find information about fruit and vegetable harvest jobs across Australia.myuniversity.humanservices.Occupations and skills EMPLOYMENT AND EDUCATION SERVICES Disability Employment Services Disability Employment Services provide specialist help for job seekers with disability. as well as information about Student Income Support and Australian Scholarships and Awards. as well as ongoing income support for up to 52 weeks. there is likely to be an Australian Apprenticeship to meet your needs. The FWO is an independent statutory office whose functions include promoting harmonious. Help if you have lost your job If you’ve recently been made redundant. the Government is able to provide labour adjustment packages to assist employees in areas where large scale closures may impact on the local labour market. They provide a wide range of services and support to help you find and maintain sustainable employment. employees. You may even be able to start an Australian Apprenticeship while you are still at school. This is a one-stop information shop providing help for employers. See www. support and assistance.au/geers. Visit www.harvesttrail.gov. clothing and footwear industry have immediate access to intensive assistance through Job Services Australia. awards and agreements. For more information see www. FWA is the national workplace relations tribunal.au Should you require help to finance your tertiary studies. you may be eligible for the New Enterprise Incentive Scheme (NEIS). No matter in which industry or field of work you are interested. granting remedies for unfair dismissal. injury or health conditions.

so they are indicative only and cannot be used to determine what a worker will actually earn in a particular job. An occupation may have high unemployment but also be experiencing shortages for particular skills.≥ -1. Job Openings estimates are indicative only and are included to provide a guide to the number of opportunities likely to be available over the next five years. It is vital to note that these estimates do not provide any guidance about how many people are looking for opportunities in each occupation. Skilled occupations generally attract better pay and conditions Titles in the Matrix are arranged in alphabetical order and some are duplicated to make them easier to find. and does not include first job seekers or those who have not worked in the past two years. 34 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www. half the workers in the occupation are younger and half are older. but this may be to compensate for difficult working conditions or unsociable hours.0 > 5.0 . but may also be a result of the skills held by unemployed people not matching those required by employers. Occupational Unemployment Rates do not reflect underutilised skills (such as an Accountant working as a Clerk. That is.0 Unemployment Rate The Unemployment Rate is the number of unemployed persons as a percentage of the labour force (employed plus unemployed). above average and high. for example Electrical Engineer will be listed under Engineer. They are based on median weekly earnings and are arranged in five categories. Information about job prospects is included on page 29. Lifestyle factors may influence your choice. For example. Similar occupations may also be clustered together with their titles reversed. and the information in the Matrix can also help you identify key issues. The links on page 43 can help you explore these factors. pay and conditions. Earnings Data on weekly earnings are before tax earnings for full-time employees.Australian Jobs Matrix GUIDE TO THE AUSTRALIAN JOBS MATRIX How do I use the Matrix? After you have considered your interests and aptitudes. Median Weekly Earnings—ranges $ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ ≤ $800 $801-950 $951-1150 $1151-1400 ≥ $1401 Future Employment Change DEEWR’s employment growth projections are based on: occupational employment forecasts by the Centre of Policy Studies. 6310. The information is based on the ABS definition of full-time.0 to 5. It relates to total employment so it includes both full-time and part-time workers.5 > 8. females comprise 46% of employment in Australia. This can occur when there is a geographic mismatch between workers with skills and employers who are seeking skills. recent employment growth. may wish to work as an Accountant). while not unemployed. which is workers who usually work 35 hours or more per week. Employment Change shows the change in the number of people employed as well as the percentage change in employment over the five years to November 2011. Job Openings Job Openings counts both the number of new jobs expected to be created over the next five years and the number of openings likely due to job turnover (workers leaving their occupation group for other employment or leaving the workforce). Full-time Employment Share Information provided shows the proportion of workers in the occupation who work full-time.gov.joboutlook. future jobs growth and skill level. future and actual industry employment growth and. The categories are based on the occupation’s average unemployment rate over 2011 relative to the average across ‘all occupations’.au . Descriptions of the data in each column of the Matrix are provided below. Monash University.0) 2010. 5 years to 2016–17      < -1.5 to 11. Gender This column shows the proportion of those employed in the occupation who are female. and small occupations where there are inadequate numbers of qualified people may offer better prospects for suitably skilled applicants. and have thought about how to boost your own prospects you may want to look in more detail at factors which might help with your decisions about which particular occupation or career to pursue. 5 years to 2016–17 q qq qqq qqqq qqqqq < 5000 5000 to <10 000 10 000 to <25 000 25 000 to <50 000 ≥50 000 Median Age Data presented on age are the median age in years for workers in each occupation. and decisions about future career choices should be based primarily on your own skills. no. Turnover rates vary over time and are estimated from aggregated data (and some data have been imputed). Job Openings (‘000). how hard it is to get into relevant training. interests and expectations. The information provided in the Australian Jobs Matrix is a guide. qualitative information on occupational developments. Employment and Employment Change The Employment column provides information about the number of people employed in Australia in November 2011 for each occupation. Some relatively low skilled occupations may have relatively high pay. below average. Overall. Electrical so it is adjacent to other Engineers to help you compare similar occupations. These can include the availability of work in your local area. Future Employment Change (%). Although there may be large numbers of Job Openings.0 > 11. Unemployment is presented in five categories: low. Accounting who. The median earnings ranges are for all ages and levels of experience. there may be even larger numbers of job applicants.0 to 8. Benefits and Trade Union Membership (Cat. average. data for Carpenters and Joiners appear also as Joiners and Carpenters. and are obtained from the ABS publication Employee Earnings.

3 -12.1 5.7 -1.0 32.3 32.8 115.6 1.4 13.5 8.7 116. Other Clerical and Office Support Workers.4 129.1 -0. Dancers and Other Entertainers Actuaries.5 -2.8 -12.4 37. Domestic Cleaners.0 15.0 3. and Food and Wine Scientists Chiropractors and Osteopaths Cleaners.4 13.5 147.7 0.1 27.4 16.1 3.2 17.4 -1. Personal and Nursing Support Care Workers. Forestry & Horticultural Operators Agricultural Technicians Airconditioning and Refrigeration Mechanics Aircraft Maintenance Engineers Air Transport Professionals Ambulance Officers and Paramedics Anaesthetists Animal Attendants and Trainers Aquaculture Workers Architects and Landscape Architects Architectural.1 3.2 46.7 10.8 1.3 76.2 24.4 1.3 3. Child Caretakers Carpenters and Joiners Cartographers and Surveyors Checkout Operators and Office Cashiers Chefs Chemists.0 9.9 4.4 53.6 13.9 2.4 33.8 38. Aged and Disabled Carers. Building & Surveying Technicians Archivists.2 -3.6 -8.2 -1.7 2.9 21. Betting Clerks.7 -3.9 -1.8 -8.4 13.7 12.4 26.1 0.2 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % below avg high low avg high low avg low low low low below avg high below avg avg below avg low low avg below avg avg above avg avg high low avg avg below avg below avg above avg avg avg high high low high avg high avg avg low avg below avg above avg above avg below avg low high avg avg high below avg avg above avg 49 50 40 59 5 17 1 7 7 31 33 68 0 27 8 68 8 91 41 74 26 76 55 18 97 19 93 1 3 1 81 71 27 11 79 86 80 96 8 1 14 77 19 26 27 58 79 13 56 82 64 68 37 28 35 34 39 45 30 40 39 40 45 38 36 38 42 45 43 37 38 48 28 37 37 24 53 31 47 33 45 37 38 33 28 31 47 36 44 36 47 31 53 31 38 20 33 43 35 47 47 47 44 42 45 35 84 37 84 84 87 74 93 97 84 92 93 61 81 83 92 76 76 64 93 45 91 79 69 35 85 61 75 98 28 92 92 93 28 71 74 71 44 53 36 45 64 94 90 20 78 93 79 37 16 68 58 64 41 59 $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $ $$$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$ $ $$ $ $$$$ $ $ $$$ $$ $$ $$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$$ $ $$ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $$ $$                                                       qqqqq qq q qqqq qqq q qqq qq qqq qqq q qq q qqq qqqq q q q qqq q q qqq qqq qqqqq q qqq q q qqqqq qqq qqq q qqqq qqqq q qqq qqqqq q qqqqq qqqqq q qqqqq qq qqqqq qqqqq q q qqqqq qqq q qqq qqqqq q qq A Accountants Actors. Finishers and Screen Printers Boat Builders and Shipwrights Bookkeepers Bricklayers and Stonemasons Butchers and Smallgoods Makers C Cabinetmakers Cafe Workers Call or Contact Centre Workers Canvas and Leather Goods Makers Car Detailers Care Workers.8 17.5 -0.0 34.5 20.4 50. Special Carers.1 18.6 1. Court and Legal For the key to symbols see page 34 For more information see www.2 161.2 6.2 18. Other Clerks.2 18.9 4.5 -1.0 6. Curators and Records Managers Auctioneers and Stock and Station Agents Audiologists and Speech Pathologists Auditors and Company Secretaries Authors.0 1.1 36.7 27.0 15.2 4.8 30.1 9.3 2.6 57.2 6.1 -46.8 7.1 0.6 17.1 6.5 27.3 -1.3 11.6 31.5 5.1 -10.5 4.7 2.2 18. Accounting Clerks.1 0.7 -64.1 6.8 18.3 2.5 -0.5 -2.1 7.3 91. Commercial Cleaners.joboutlook.5 117.3 -74.4 -16.4 -0.gov.9 0.2 103.3 75.4 9.4 2.9 -30.4 16.3 -38.7 6.7 18.8 Occupation Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 158.9 14.1 1.3 30.7 23.3 7.7 -16.1 0.3 4.1 55.9 5.1 0.2 -26.0 52.1 12.4 8.0 18.0 13.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 35 .3 18.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 10.6 22.6 6.0 -1.2 16.1 4. Mathematicians and Statisticians Advertising and Marketing Professionals Agricultural.8 7.6 0.2 -3.4 82.5 31.2 6.9 41.0 3.6 32.8 -28.3 23.0 1.3 11.9 1.5 -0.6 3.3 3.0 36.8 -28.7 136. and Book and Script Editors Automotive Electricians B Bakers and Pastrycooks Bank Workers Bar Attendants and Baristas Barristers Beauty Therapists Binders.8 17.6 32.1 4.

2 -40.4 -23.8 12.7 26.9 49.7 0.0 Occupation Clerks.2 37. Mechanical Engineering Production Systems Workers Engineering Professionals.4 7.0 -22.6 -5.9 139.8 36.1 13. Truck Driving Instructors E Economists Economists. Money Market and Statistical Clerks.2 34.4 40.1 60.6 13.3 13. Inquiry Clerks.3 52.5 -11.0 7.au .2 1.4 7.7 4.6 10. Delivery Drivers.4 25.6 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % above avg avg low high below avg low avg avg below avg low below avg avg above avg above avg below avg above avg high high avg below avg avg high below avg high avg avg low low above avg avg low avg below avg avg above avg high low avg low low low low avg low below avg avg avg low below avg low low avg below avg avg above avg 80 84 77 70 66 86 43 39 82 0 74 7 72 55 75 66 80 20 2 50 50 61 9 99 53 37 100 45 25 89 3 7 18 10 3 6 2 21 25 17 70 92 1 5 14 12 14 0 10 4 10 14 17 36 42 40 37 37 41 39 40 48 48 44 37 34 33 41 31 39 47 47 43 36 28 34 48 34 36 42 32 39 38 49 38 47 54 40 39 48 46 47 36 46 47 46 43 32 38 41 42 44 38 48 41 39 43 38 59 62 77 73 82 67 87 89 52 100 38 93 88 79 85 69 54 65 75 95 88 37 74 83 45 72 80 79 67 84 41 99 67 68 57 92 99 93 40 80 83 74 20 98 94 86 97 90 91 95 94 95 94 82 96 $$ $$ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$$$ $ $$$$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$$$ $$ $ $$$ $$ $$$$ $$$ $$ $$$$$ $ $$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $ $$$$$ $ $$$$ $$ $$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$ $ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$                                                        qqq qqqqq qq qqqqq qqq qqq qqqqq qqqq q q q qqq qqqq qqq qqqqq qq qqqq qq qqqq qq qq qq qq qq qqq q qq q qq q q qqqqq qqq qqq qqqq qqqq qq qqqqq q q qq qq qqqqq qq qqqqq qqq qqq qq qq q q qq qqq q q D Dancers.1 1.2 47.7 24.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 0.6 5.0 70.6 3.8 -6.7 -3. Telecommunications For the key to symbols see page 34 36 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.8 7. Television.0 60.1 8. General Clerks.1 2.9 7. Automobile Drivers.1 11.6 32. Human Resource Clerks.1 -0.7 19.0 5.4 -1.6 4.6 23.1 23.9 51.9 5.4 5. Bus and Coach Drivers. Train and Tram Drivers.4 -6.0 -0.5 16.7 -1.7 -39.3 5.8 4.0 1.6 -9.2 9.4 38.0 26. Radio and Stage) Diversional Therapists Drillers.6 3. Filing and Registry Clerks.2 27. Civil Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians.4 7.0 -1.9 20.3 4.6 37.9 184.joboutlook.1 52.2 11.1 8. Other Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians.8 21.8 7.1 -0.0 30. Program and Project Administrators Conveyancers and Legal Executives Cooks Counsellors Couriers and Postal Deliverers Crane.6 25. and Media Producers & Presenters Directors (Film.8 16. Miners and Shot Firers Drivers.6 2.8 2.5 80.9 63.4 -0.0 -4.9 21. Forklift Drivers.8 38. Payroll Clerks.8 0.9 0.6 1.2 2.7 7.2 55.7 9. Electrical Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians.3 41.5 6.0 10.7 87.5 -27. Insurance.3 6.0 -3.4 21.0 21.2 -7.9 3.7 4.5 2.6 9.8 1.8 46.4 8. Artistic.5 3. Electronic Engineering Draftspersons and Technicians.9 13.1 15.3 64.9 43.3 62. Transport and Despatch Clothing Trades Workers Commissioned Officers (Management) Complementary Health Therapists Computer Network Professionals Concreters Conference and Event Organisers Contract.2 27.0 3.8 19.4 -6.5 9.9 47.7 2.6 -1.4 24.7 4.1 187.8 4.4 -6.6 24.4 -1. Hoist and Lift Operators Credit and Loans Officers Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 20.2 11.5 7.4 -20.6 8.4 32.6 29. Civil Engineering Professionals.6 1. Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks.5 33.6 12.3 -0.7 -1.8 32.4 25. Land and Valuers Education Advisers and Reviewers Education Aides Electrical Distribution Trades Workers Electricians Electronics Trades Workers Engineering and Building Technicians.7 4.3 56.3 -20.1 59.1 -1.gov.0 0.3 8. Actors and Other Entertainers Debt Collectors Deck and Fishing Hands Dental Assistants Dental Hygienists.9 0. Other Engineering Professionals.0 2.1 31.9 6.2 101.4 -0.9 11.8 18.9 2. Technicians and Therapists Dental Practitioners Dietitians Directors.2 -2.

3 8. Livestock Farmers.3 4.6 5.1 -26. Industrial.7 2.3 -12.8 2.3 -2.6 12. ICT Support and Test Engineers.2 1.0 83.2 9.1 high 25.8 6.3 below avg 15.6 -41.9 -12.7 -0. Plastics and Rubber Farm.2 25.4 4.8 -9.7 -6. Electrical Engineers.7 61.0 0.8 2.3 avg 60.4 3.1 7.2 -5.0 15. Gallery.2 24.8 30.5 -1. Mixed Crop and Livestock Fashion.2 low I ICT Business and Systems Analysts ICT Sales Professionals ICT Security and Database & Systems Administrators ICT Support and Test Engineers For the key to symbols see page 34 For more information see www.7 28.8 2.9 48.3 27.1 2.7 -2.8 37. Electronics Engineers.2 45.9 45.4 -0.8 -0.6 8.0 2.2 below avg 20. Museum and Tour Guides. Library and Museum Technicians Gaming Workers Gardeners Geologists and Geophysicists Glaziers Graphic and Web Designers. Crop Farm Workers.7 13.2 -35.4 below avg -15.5 3.1 -1.0 2.8 55.1 -10.3 below avg 15.2 44.2 20.5 -37.2 32.0 -1.3 2.7 -12.0 4.6 13.1 0.4 -10. Outdoor Adventure H Hairdressers Handypersons Health Diagnostic and Promotion Professionals.2 30.8 19.0 -1.4 low 67.4 16.5 low 46.4 27.9 16.2 -0. Livestock Farm Workers.0 5.1 5.2 low 45.2 6.3 37.9 -6.5 6. Chemical and Materials Engineers.5 -5.9 -1.5 above avg -4.6 below avg 50.1 11.joboutlook.1 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % 17 1 14 2 5 35 72 30 21 22 8 34 32 15 0 19 30 21 58 38 2 38 20 27 6 54 96 58 2 36 85 39 10 19 47 31 50 33 85 5 79 67 88 67 24 27 23 14 34 43 41 36 39 40 44 33 40 41 37 41 42 32 28 46 50 54 53 33 18 41 44 38 42 43 31 35 44 26 35 33 47 50 33 39 38 35 33 41 44 41 36 32 50 44 35 42 34 39 37 40 36 98 97 87 94 93 93 90 79 74 85 87 84 56 62 73 90 81 79 82 80 17 82 88 86 85 97 31 81 35 42 98 72 86 57 77 72 90 93 77 88 79 44 85 60 67 73 80 36 88 92 94 91 94 $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$ $ $$ $ $$ $ $ $ $$ $$ $ $$$$ $ $ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$$$$ $$ $$$ $$$ $$ $ $$$$$ $ $$ $$$$$ $$ $ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$$                                                      q qq q q qqq q qqq qqq qq qqq q qqq qqq qqqq q q q qq q qq qqqq qqq qqq qq qqq q qqq qq qq qq q qqq q q qq qqqqq q qq qqqq q qqq q q qqqqq qqqq qq qq qqq qqqq qqq qqq qqq q 75.5 6.8 1.6 9.9 8.4 11.1 -9.7 37.1 13.5 31.7 low 37.0 4.9 below avg 10.4 3.0 6.7 -1.2 3.3 5.6 -9. Other Factory Workers. Mechanical and Production Engineers.6 1. Forestry and Garden Workers.0 -46.4 avg 41.9 3.7 -0.2 4.4 58.3 1. Mining Environmental & Occupational Health Professionals Event and Conference Organisers Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 7.0 -29.2 -3.1 15.6 3.9 high high high avg high high avg low low low low below avg high high below avg below avg below avg below avg below avg low high above avg high above avg avg low above avg below avg low above avg avg high avg below avg below avg F Factory Process Workers. Other Farm Workers. Crop Farmers.4 21. Food and Drink Factory Workers.4 60. Aquaculture Farmers.4 1.8 27.5 25.6 -1.7 26.7 low 30.0 3.gov.0 avg 50.2 -51.1 5.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 37 . Industrial and Jewellery Designers Fast Food Cooks Fencers Financial Brokers Financial Dealers Financial Investment Advisers and Managers Fire and Emergency Workers Fitness Instructors Floor Finishers Florists Food Trades Assistants Forestry and Logging Workers Freight and Furniture Handlers Funeral Workers G Gallery.0 Occupation Engineers.0 19.9 27.0 10.8 -3.6 12.0 1.4 9.2 21.8 3. and Illustrators Graphic Pre-press Trades Workers Greenkeepers Guides. Other Hotel Service Managers Housekeepers Human Resource Professionals -3.5 25.1 10.1 32.7 23.3 11.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 3.6 -20.2 2.1 below avg 3.0 -0.5 2.6 15. Mixed Crop and Livestock Farmers.0 2.7 18.7 6.

7 -4.2 high -16.5 2.6 1.7 6.3 9. Licensed Club Managers.2 1.6 -16.3 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % avg low below avg low avg low below avg high high below avg below avg low low 19 56 19 60 0 57 44 1 47 35 65 67 43 32 1 48 84 59 2 20 6 27 75 27 75 84 91 7 37 11 40 51 38 34 40 55 37 47 92 5 61 4 43 28 74 43 56 21 43 89 34 40 48 50 37 41 41 40 35 37 35 36 45 48 31 39 40 24 32 40 31 37 38 48 47 31 51 44 40 43 44 39 38 47 43 40 37 42 41 60 37 43 45 46 44 47 47 42 41 41 43 49 92 68 82 58 96 80 86 83 82 87 84 75 87 67 94 75 55 22 84 57 98 97 83 55 74 69 66 32 89 77 98 97 84 65 83 92 77 79 92 86 74 93 87 97 88 93 87 94 93 95 77 73 $$$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$$ $ $$$ $$ $$$$ $ $$ $$$ $ $ $$ $$ $$$ $$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$                                                     qqqq q qq q q qqq qqqq qqq qqq q qqq qq q q qqqqq qqq qqqq qqqqq qqqqq qqq qqq qq qqq qq q qq qq q q q q q q qq qqqq qqqqq q qqqq qqqq q qq qqqq q qq qqqq qqq qqq qq qqqq qqqq qq q J Jewellers Joiners and Carpenters Journalists and Other Writers 24.7 2. Health and Welfare Services Managers.3 -2. Paper and Wood Processing Machine Operators.3 76.4 6.1 -0.3 below avg -42.8 18.4 -14.7 0. Human Resource Managers.9 7.1 55.7 36. Contact Centre and Customer Service Managers. Textile and Footwear Production Mail Sorters Management and Organisation Analysts Managers.9 34.2 6.9 above avg -21.2 84.4 18.4 high -17.6 47.gov.6 13.9 low 16.3 17.2 17.3 34.7 -10.2 129.9 -1. Amusement.1 low -11.3 38.6 16.4 -24.2 29.8 high above avg below avg above avg high high above avg below avg below avg avg below avg high low low low below avg low below avg below avg avg avg below avg low low M Machine Operators.9 13.5 -7.0 above avg -20. Other Construction and Mining Labourers.1 12.9 80. Plastics and Rubber Production Machine Operators.8 135.8 -1. Clay Concrete.0 25.joboutlook.1 -2. Child Care Centre Managers.4 51.0 8. Hotel and Motel Managers.4 14.3 16. ICT Managers.3 124.9 116.9 11.4 75.5 -0.3 -4.2 18.0 27.8 -0.2 -13.0 9.0 8.0 avg high K Keyboard Operators Kitchenhands L Labourers.1 -0.2 8.8 12.0 -4.8 2.7 -20.5 0.1 -0.1 2.au .9 3.5 11.9 -1.7 8.6 6. Paving and Surfacing Landscape Architects and Architects Laundry Workers Leather and Canvass Goods Makers Legal Executives and Conveyancers Librarians Library Assistants -8.2 3.1 -38.7 1. Corporate Services Managers.5 10. Café and Restaurant Managers.7 16.8 -3.6 below avg 4.5 -1.2 -25.3 1.1 10.2 18.8 -20.0 -1.5 15.5 2. Other Inspectors and Regulatory Officers Insulation and Home Improvement Installers Insurance Agents Insurance Investigators and Loss Adjusters Intelligence and Policy Analysts Interior Designers Internal Medicine Specialists Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 58.4 44.5 13.8 -3.3 8.4 20. Advertising and Sales Managers.5 -2.8 11.2 8. Call.2 17. Garden and Nursery Labourers.2 -1.9 -2. Nursing For the key to symbols see page 34 38 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.6 25.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 12.6 -0.9 -42.4 -1.9 -13.6 -1.6 4. General Managers.3 37.6 49.8 9.3 high 32.3 60. Engineering Managers.3 -0.1 7.7 31.6 2.6 4.3 5. Glass & Stone Machine Operators.8 high 27. Building and Plumbing Labourers. Fitness and Sports Centre Managers.7 41.4 2.6 -14. Construction Managers.8 4.6 22.0 35.4 21.6 avg -20. Caravan Park and Camping Ground Managers.3 2.8 13.7 6.8 avg -8.7 9.8 -12.4 4.9 2.7 -2. Exporters and Wholesalers Indigenous Health Workers Industrial Spraypainters Information and Organisation Professionals.9 74. Other Machine Operators.6 40.1 Occupation ICT Support Technicians ICT Trainers Importers. Finance Managers.8 2.4 1.3 89.0 avg -7.1 3.0 6.9 0.

9 19.0 29.3 27.1 2.5 228.2 2.5 0.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 0.1 11.3 17. Policy and Planning Managers.9 5.5 15.8 4.3 11.0 -0.2 18. Statisticians and Actuaries Meat Boners and Slicers.2 6.1 8. and Slaughterers Media Producers & Presenters.0 2.6 30.1 -1.7 below avg 27.9 -2.9 18.7 4.5 -1.5 8.2 62.0 -0.0 4.9 3.9 7.3 4.4 8.4 11.6 64.9 35.joboutlook.0 52.8 low -2.4 16.1 low -9. Registered Nurserypersons Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers 122.7 39.6 3.2 0.8 3.4 58.8 0.0 -59.2 above avg -8.1 11.8 0.1 -33.5 8. Other Hospitality.2 below avg 80.0 28.4 44.6 -34.3 44.5 21.9 14.5 3.2 10.9 low 186.0 9. Precision Midwives Miners.9 20.7 47. Practice Managers.3 -2.0 10.7 6.1 24. Office Managers. Other Specialist Managers.0 6.3 59.7 low -3.6 7. Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses.0 -38.2 4.6 25.7 5. Transport Services Managing Directors and Chief Executives Manufacturers Marine Transport Professionals Massage Therapists Mathematicians.1 82.1 35. General Medical Practitioners.2 avg 67.3 below avg 58.2 0.8 12.1 14.7 83.5 9.1 7. and Artistic Directors Medical Imaging Professionals Medical Practitioners.4 -5.4 22.8 15.0 9.1 21.3 6.5 82. Retail and Service Managers.0 15.4 0. Other Accommodation and Hospitality Managers. Supply and Distribution Managers.2 56.9 Occupation Managers.7 65.3 9.0 -2.5 11.3 high -0. Production Managers. Retail Managers.2 5.6 low O Occupational & Environmental Health Professionals Occupational Therapists Optometrists and Orthoptists Osteopaths and Chiropractors P Packers Painting Trades Workers Panelbeaters Paramedics and Ambulance Officers Pastrycooks and Bakers Performing Arts Technicians Personal Assistants Personal Care Consultants Personal Service Workers.1 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % below avg avg avg below avg below avg low low below avg low below avg avg below avg low low high low low avg above avg low low below avg below avg low avg low low avg below avg below avg below avg avg avg avg 83 53 67 37 34 54 90 15 31 46 16 15 18 19 6 72 40 10 45 67 43 47 77 0 9 100 3 27 85 1 11 32 76 89 96 91 31 79 35 93 50 27 55 2 31 26 29 98 76 64 58 45 50 48 44 44 45 44 44 45 40 44 48 51 50 45 43 35 32 39 33 42 39 42 44 39 37 44 38 53 45 35 34 31 40 45 49 47 44 39 44 44 32 37 35 35 39 38 40 37 37 38 53 41 31 67 64 88 88 94 89 64 98 89 87 97 89 90 83 82 42 84 91 67 76 81 88 60 82 96 91 53 99 74 24 93 93 88 42 73 73 47 55 68 44 90 69 84 79 64 88 94 92 79 60 78 28 46 71 $$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $ $$ $ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$$$ $$$$ $ $ $ $$$$$ $ $$ $$$ $$ $$$$                                                       qqqqq q q qqqq qqqq qqq qqq qqq q qqqqq qqq qqq qqqq qq qq qqq q qq qq qqq qqqq qq qqq q qqqqq q qq qqqqq q q qqqq qqq q qq q q qqq qqqqq q qqqqq qqq qq q q qqqqq qqqq q qqq qqq qq qqqq qq qqq qqq N Nurse Educators and Researchers Nurse Managers Nurses.0 -0. Forging & Finishing Trades Metal Fitters and Machinists Metal Trades Workers.8 11.2 132.9 -2.4 7. Drillers and Shot Firers Ministers of Religion Models and Sales Demonstrators Motor Mechanics Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters Multimedia Specialists and Web Developers Music Professionals Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 155.7 12.4 47.3 -22. Research and Development Managers.0 5.2 23.7 low -17.0 -3.7 avg 50.2 -5.7 42.4 95.2 -21.gov.3 -1. Other Education Managers.8 13.0 10.4 1.4 1.5 low 33.8 91. Other Medical Technicians Metal Casting.3 53. Other Pharmacists For the key to symbols see page 34 For more information see www.1 -6.6 240.8 49.1 8.1 1.4 low 13.2 113.3 -4.6 5.0 35.8 7.7 -6.1 avg -15.4 avg 30.0 13.3 16.1 high -9.7 -2.2 30.5 9.7 low -14.1 -1.2 23.9 21.7 6.4 low -33.9 2.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 39 .8 5.0 30.8 4.9 0.

4 9. Technical Sales Support Workers.7 -0.6 -20. Medical Laboratory Screen Printers and Binders & Finishers Secretaries For the key to symbols see page 34 40 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.3 4.0 -39.3 17.7 -1.9 -0. ICT Sales Assistants.8 16.3 17.2 -19.6 5.9 31.1 54.1 2.1 10.3 25.2 48.6 13.9 25. Chemical.5 0.au .8 33.1 2. Other Natural and Physical Science Technicians Scientists.0 38.6 62.6 47.0 13.8 3.7 34.9 -1.3 2.6 15.9 2.2 12.5 35.6 -26.8 20.3 -2. Environmental Scientists.5 36.3 -18.5 10.1 9.0 7.1 49.2 16.9 9.8 89.0 Occupation Photographers Photographic Developers and Printers Physiotherapists Planners.5 9.9 2. Urban and Regional Plant Operators.7 10. Other Stationary Plasterers Plumbers Podiatrists Police Policy and Intelligence Analysts Postal Deliverers and Couriers Primary Products Inspectors Printers Printers and Photographic Developers Printing Assistants and Table Workers Prison Officers Process Workers.9 -1. Agricultural and Forestry Scientists.5 -4.2 19.2 4. ICT Sales Representatives Sales Representatives.4 -45.5 -2.2 42.3 499. Earthmoving Plant Operators. Petroleum and Power Plant Operators.9 3.1 -12.7 -3.6 20.1 14.gov.8 19.0 -7.5 -31.6 19.2 8.8 0.1 5.1 11.9 81. and Chemists Scientists. Other Salespersons. Other Mobile Plant Operators.2 8.8 -3.7 1.8 -1.3 1.0 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % high low below avg low avg avg avg above avg above avg below avg low low below avg avg low avg low high low high high high high high low below avg avg high avg avg low low avg low high above avg above avg avg below avg avg low low avg high avg low low avg low below avg below avg low below avg avg below avg 37 70 76 39 2 8 7 2 0 75 24 65 20 38 8 70 46 18 24 5 10 32 39 40 76 70 4 43 95 0 50 57 12 68 34 40 92 27 39 30 50 16 56 71 55 30 44 19 39 26 44 70 19 97 38 25 37 36 43 45 43 45 33 33 31 38 35 47 43 40 25 50 46 31 43 35 40 45 55 43 36 41 43 38 49 34 31 51 24 38 28 24 37 40 40 40 37 49 31 50 45 38 44 38 43 38 36 47 46 70 46 66 89 98 93 90 97 88 94 66 97 84 75 85 89 46 65 97 83 93 89 88 89 57 61 76 96 83 51 69 82 74 95 30 57 76 29 94 86 93 53 89 43 47 99 85 72 84 84 93 86 81 75 50 $$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$ $$$ $$ $ $$$$ $ $ $ $ $$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$ $ $ $$$$ $$ $$$$ $ $$ $$ $ $$$$ $$$ $$$$ $ $$ $$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $ $$                                                        qq q qq qq qq qqqq qq qqq qqq qqqq q qq qqq qqqq q qq q q qqq qqq qqq qq qqq qq q qqq qqq qq qqqq qqqqq q qq qqqq q qqqqq qqq qqq qqqq qqq qqqqq qqqq q qqqq qq qqq qqq q qqq q qq q q qq q qqqq R Railway Track Workers Real Estate Sales Agents Receptionists Recycling and Rubbish Collectors Retail and Wool Buyers Retail Supervisors S Safety Inspectors Sales Assistants (General) Sales Assistants and Salespersons.1 5.0 -3.6 -4. Food and Wine.2 1.2 16.3 101.9 -1.3 -32.0 80.8 23.1 21.5 3.7 6.7 16.8 6.4 -28.3 28.0 11. Timber and Wood Product Assemblers Product Quality Controllers Psychiatrists Psychologists Public Relations Professionals Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 10.8 1.3 26.3 4.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % -0.6 2.3 9.3 36.0 6. Street Vendors and Related Salespersons. Ticket School Principals Science Professionals.6 13. Other Sales Assistants.1 -3.5 11.3 3.1 8.3 -1.5 32.9 7.1 -10.joboutlook.2 2.2 1.2 -5.8 16.8 -31.5 23.0 0.0 181.7 2.1 1.4 20.3 3. Motor Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Salespersons. Meat.3 19. Poultry and Seafood Process Workers.9 5.9 76.1 11.0 23.2 -37.8 7.1 -29. Pharmacy Sales Professionals.3 3.3 4.0 -8.3 6.8 -30.1 172.3 2.6 84.8 60.9 3.1 -3.9 0. Metal Engineering Process Workers.1 10. Life Scientists. Gas.9 -13.4 39.5 3.2 14.4 -43.9 -1.0 -9.1 5.2 3.0 74.2 1.7 -43.7 1.6 6.5 6.1 0.0 25.3 -3.

1 -70.3 -41.3 4.5 0.4 8.6 2. Private 20.2 -1.5 30.2 1.5 2.3 31.6 13.7 2.7 29.1 10. Electrical Engineering Technicians and Draftspersons.6 low low low low avg low avg avg avg low high high high high avg low low high low 30.0 above avg 9.7 9.2 -2. Other Building and Engineering Technicians.9 5. Primary School Teachers.1 above avg 55.1 below avg 7.5 23.4 1.8 16.4 -6. Air Transport Professionals. ICT Training and Development Professionals Transport Professionals.5 30.4 high avg high low avg low 13.2 below avg 16. Science Telecommunications Technical Specialists Telecommunications Trades Workers Telemarketers Tilers.9 5.joboutlook.1 10.7 52.4 58.8 -0.3 117.6 20.4 0.2 24.8 2.0 27.7 -7.6 1.4 0.5 36.7 -3.0 9.2 2.0 2.8 40.0 9.8 22.2 above avg 6.2 -0.6 4.7 0.0 -23.7 32.4 -4.4 0.1 8.5 3.4 below avg 33.5 53.9 47.9 16.0 5.7 53.3 54.7 below avg 103.0 -39.8 -9.9 -6.6 -32.6 5.7 13.7 12.1 16.7 -1.2 3.1 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % avg high avg low low high avg 14 26 88 0 42 14 63 79 15 47 91 48 18 1 20 2 1 26 50 14 84 39 28 47 45 37 24 33 47 41 36 38 37 25 22 37 38 37 35 39 41 38 45 71 32 72 90 97 24 92 50 61 93 85 64 28 48 92 81 96 94 79 20 90 57 $$$ $ $ $$$ $$$ $ $$ $$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $                                                      qqqq qqq q q q qqqqq q qq qqq qqqq qqq q qqqq qq qqq qqqqq qqqq qqqq q q qq q qq q q qqqqq qqqq qq qqq q qq qq q q qqqq q qqqq qqq qqq qqq qq qq qqq qq qq q qqq q qqqq qqq qq qq qqq -39. Special Education Teachers.0 0.7 2.8 11.9 -4.2 52.6 0.4 125.4 5.4 32.7 11.0 below avg 107. Gallery. Civil Engineering Technicians and Draftspersons.7 6.2 9.6 -1.3 7. Agricultural Technicians and Draftspersons.2 -22.5 8.1 -3. Wall and Floor Toolmakers and Engineering Patternmakers Tourism and Travel Advisers Trainers.7 below avg 23.3 below avg T Teachers.8 below avg -74.5 13.3 22.9 146.3 31.6 19.0 0.4 2.8 below avg For the key to symbols see page 34 For more information see www.2 41.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 4. Secondary School Teachers.2 below avg 24.5 8. Vocational Education Technicians.4 17.7 13.0 -22.5 9.6 2.1 31.6 Occupation Security Officers and Guards Service Station Attendants Sewing Machinists Shearers Sheetmetal Trades Workers Shelf Fillers Signwriters Social Professionals Social Workers Software and Applications Programmers Solicitors Speech Professionals and Audiologists Sports Coaches.1 8. Marine Travel Attendants Tutors and Teachers.3 7.gov.7 3. Instructors and Officials Sportspersons Stonemasons and Bricklayers Storepersons Structural Steel and Welding Trades Workers Structural Steel Construction Workers Surgeons Survey Interviewers Surveyors and Cartographers Switchboard Operators Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 55.1 3.7 7.2 -0.6 4. Roof Tilers.0 -35.1 3.3 2.4 3.9 66.6 -0.3 79. Library and Museum Technicians. Middle School Teachers.0 28.1 below avg 11.2 85.2 7.9 5.8 -35.2 0.2 1. Architectural.8 below avg 39. Medical Technicians.6 49. ICT Support Technicians.7 7. Early Childhood (Pre-primary School) Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages Teachers.0 10.2 6.1 21.9 23.2 4.8 3.2 11.7 -22. Electronic Engineering Technicians and Draftspersons.au AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 41 . Mechanical Engineering Technicians.1 4.5 2.8 56.7 low high low low 96 73 50 85 59 87 49 17 12 14 0 10 8 85 19 77 14 44 13 2 63 0 1 6 76 56 58 7 6 72 74 42 44 43 41 43 45 49 45 42 44 38 48 42 50 34 42 41 38 46 43 29 26 35 47 33 40 42 39 45 38 36 63 52 93 68 79 56 64 74 90 91 95 94 92 57 92 60 97 72 97 91 55 90 87 95 82 68 79 84 82 55 20 $$ $$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$ $$$$ $$ $$$$$ $$$$ $$$$ $$$ $ $$ $ $$$ $$ $$$ $$$$ $$$$$ $$$$$ $$$ $$$$$ -7.7 low avg 27.5 7. Building and Surveying Technicians.

6291. Educational attainment data refer only to persons aged 15-64. 3218.1 4.0) • Survey of Education and Work (Cat. and current and prospective industry developments.0) • Labour Force. data from the 2006 Census are the latest available source of educational attainment profiles. 6310. Although trend data are used for employment estimates. no.3 10. Australia. 1216.4 4.8 6. ‘non-metropolitan’ and ‘outside the state capital cities’ have been used interchangeably throughout the publication. no. no.7 -0.4 Occupation Employ’t Nov 2011 ‘000 45. Specific regions are ABS Labour Force Regions and boundaries are based on the 2006 Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) (Cat. 6202.2 -0.1 -60.Electronic Delivery (Cat. educational attainment figures are not comparable between states and regions. Research and Tertiary Education • Higher Education Statistics Graduate Careers Australia • GradStats. employment data at the regional level are in original.55.0) • Regional Population Growth. Detailed . standard errors are large relative to the size of the employment estimates. no. For regional areas. Detailed.4 79. employment data at the national and state level have been presented in trend terms (where possible). Department of Education. Australia (Cat. Australia (Cat. Australia (Cat.6 2. Employment and Workplace Relations • Employment projections.0) • Labour Mobility. no. employment and employment change figures are not comparable between states and regions.joboutlook.6 avg -10. 6227. For consistency. employment growth trends are variable for small occupations and should be used with caution. 2006 For many small occupations. no.au . Accordingly.3 avg 19.Australian Jobs Matrix Employ’t Change 5 Years to Nov 2011 ‘000 % 6. 1301. no.0 -1.6 8.0 F-T Future Future Unemp Gender Median Share of Median Employ’t Job 2011 Females Age Employ’t Earnings Change Openings % years % avg avg 48 18 17 5 2 58 60 98 54 88 77 11 2 81 76 29 47 49 46 39 33 38 38 28 52 38 22 31 37 42 42 43 74 71 83 95 92 66 77 52 52 44 26 88 96 77 68 75 $$$$$ $$$ $$$ $$ $$$$$ $ $ $ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$$ $$                 qqq q qq q q qq q qq q q qqqqq q qqqq qqq qqqq q U University Lecturers and Tutors Upholsterers V Valuers and Land Economists Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers Vehicle Painters Vending Machine Attendants Veterinarians Veterinary Nurses Visual Arts and Crafts Professionals Visual Merchandiser -27. The terms ‘regional’.1 below avg W Waiters Web Developers and Multimedia Specialists Welding Trades and Structural Steel Workers Welfare.0). 6291. the Balance of Queensland.003) • Employee Earnings.8 low -52.3 7. Quarterly (Cat.1 -7. Recreation and Community Arts Workers Welfare Support Workers Wood Machinists and Other Wood Trades Workers For the key to symbols see page 34 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 .2 13.5 1.0 -0.5 -0. various issues • Grad Careers & Dollars National Centre for Vocational Education Research • Student Outcomes • Apprentices and Trainees Collection • Miscellaneous VOCSTATS from NCVER website 42 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 For more information see www.9 26. the Balance of South Australia. the Balance of Tasmania.0 low 90.55.5 avg 31. Department of Industry.0. Educational attainment data from the 2011 Survey of Education and Work are only available at the state and national level.001) • Labour Force.9 4.0) • Census of Population and Housing.4 below avg -19.7 -3. 2001 (Cat. Australia.6 16. These are based on actual employment trends.DATA SOURCES Australian Bureau of Statistics • Year Book Australia.gov.2 low -1. the Balance of Victoria.5 high 132. Innovation. no. economic models.3 5. throughout the publication.9 7.3 avg -9.0) • Labour Force. 6209. no.2 avg -0.7 high 16.2 4.2 5. the Balance of Western Australia.1 avg 22. Science. However.1 -5. economic trends and prospects.3 -3.4 9. Accordingly.1 6. This is comprised of the Balance of New South Wales.0 56.5 16. the Northern Territory and the Australian Capital Territory.0.9 below avg -38. including Access Economics and the Centre of Policy Studies at Monash University.6 113. 12 month or 4 quarter average terms. Benefits and Trade Union Membership (Cat.

deewr. Careers Information Australian Government website http://australia. Job seekers can search for current employment vacancies. and the links between education and the labour market more generally. analyses. MySkills www.USEFUL WEBSITES AND LINKS Employment and Labour Market Information Industry Skills Councils www. It also gives useful information about careers based on personal interests and abilities.gov. manages.gov.au/lmip The DEEWR Labour Market Information Portal (LMIP) provides detailed.myskills.skillsinfo. articles and links to thousands of resources to assist with career development and planning.deewr. job seekers and employers with a broad range of Australian Apprenticeships information and resources including sample job and training descriptions. Job Guide www. careers advisers.au The National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) collects.au Graduate Careers Australia (GCA) provides a range of graduate-related publications and research that informs students.humanservices. qualifications.au My Future provides current career information.graduatecareers.deewr.gov. training outcomes and fees.ncver. AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 43 . My Future www. courses. and links to employment assistance and information for all job seekers.gov.gov.gov. Career Information Centres www. including free registration for all Australians seeking work. Skill Shortages www.au This DEEWR site provides more detailed statistical information for each of the occupations included in the Australian Jobs Matrix in this publication.au Provides information about student loans available from the Australian Government under the Higher Education Loan Program (HELP) in both the higher education and the vocational education and training sectors. National Centre for Vocational Education Research www.studyassist. Australian Apprenticeships Pathways www. Training www.joboutlook.edu. Job Outlook www.com. courses.gov.gov.au To be launched late in 2012. units of competency and Registered Training Organisations (RTOs). evaluates and communicates research and statistics about vocational education and training.com.au Provides comprehensive data on industry employment trends and projections. JobSearch has a range of features.training. and their education and training pathways. including information about training providers. MyUniversity www.gov. graduate employment opportunities and career development.australianapprenticeships.au Information on training packages. Centrelink’s Career Information Centres are ‘one-stop-shops’ providing a comprehensive free service to all Australians.myfuture.gov.jobsearch. Education and Training Australian Apprenticeships www.au/topics/employment-and-workplace/ career-information An Australian Government initiative which includes links to careers and employment information. Study Assist www.aajobpathways.au The Australian Apprenticeships Pathways (AAP) website provides students.gov.myuniversity.isc. Skills Info www.au Australian Apprenticeships provides information on all apprenticeships and traineeships.edu. Labour Market Information Portal www. up-to-date labour market information based on local areas.au The recently released Australian Government website helps you make an informed decision about your higher education studies.au JobSearch is Australia’s largest free online jobs website. including helpful links and general information.au/jobguide Provides an in-depth look at a range of occupations.au click on careers or use the search function. and industry based job pathway charts and practice aptitude quizzes.gov.gov.org.au/SkillShortages DEEWR monitors the labour market for a range of skilled occupations to identify and report on shortages.au Industry Skills Councils (ISCs) are recognised and funded by the Australian Government and they provide information about industries. this site will provide an on-line database to inform students and employers about their training options. Graduate Careers Australia www. employers and careers practitioners about industry and salary trends. JobSearch www.

Contents ISSN 1832-7230 44 AUSTRALIAN JOBS 2012 .