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Superior-subordinate communication

Superior-subordinate communication is an important influence on job satisfaction in the workplace. The way in which subordinates perceive a supervisor's behavior can positively or negatively influence job satisfaction. Communication behavior such as facial expression, eye contact, vocal expression, and body movement is crucial to the superior-subordinate relationship (Teven, p. 156). Nonverbal messages play a central role in interpersonal interactions with respect to impression formation, deception, attraction, social influence, and emotional.[20] Nonverbal immediacy from the supervisor helps to increase interpersonal involvement with their subordinates impacting job satisfaction. The manner in which supervisors communicate with their subordinates non-verbally may be more important than the verbal content (Teven, p. 156). Individuals who dislike and think negatively about their supervisor are less willing to communicate or have motivation to work whereas individuals who like and think positively of their supervisor are more likely to communicate and are satisfied with their job and work environment. A supervisor who uses nonverbal immediacy, friendliness, and open communication lines is more likely to receive positive feedback and high job satisfaction from a subordinate. Conversely, a supervisor who is antisocial, unfriendly, and unwilling to communicate will naturally receive negative feedback and create low job satisfaction in their subordinates in the workplace.
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Definition
At its most general level of conceptualization, job satisfaction is simply how content an individual is with his or her job. At the more specific levels of conceptualization used by academic researchers and human resources professionals, job satisfaction has varying definitions. Affective job satisfaction is usually defined as an unidimensional subjective construct representing an overall emotional feeling individuals have about their job as a whole.[1][2][3][4] Hence, affective job satisfaction for individuals reflects the degree of pleasure or happiness their job in general induces. Cognitive job satisfaction is usually defined as being a more objective and logical evaluation of various facets of a job. As such, cognitive job satisfaction can be unidimensional if it comprises evaluation of just one aspect of a job, such as pay or maternity leave, or multidimensional if two or more facets of a job are simultaneously evaluated. Cognitive job satisfaction does not assess the degree of pleasure or happiness that arises from specific job facets, but rather gauges the extent to which those job facets are judged by the job holder to be satisfactory in comparison with objectives they themselves set or with other jobs. While cognitive job satisfaction might help to bring about affective job satisfaction,

cognitive job satisfaction can be unidimensional if it comprises evaluation of just one aspect of a job. temporal stability. The majority of job satisfaction measures are self-reports and based on multi-item scales. They also vary in terms of the extent and rigour of their psychometric validation. Reported internal consistency reliabilities range between . The BIAJS differs from other job satisfaction measures in being comprehensively validated not just for internal consistency reliability. Cognitive job satisfaction does not assess the degree of pleasure or happiness that arises from specific job facets. As such.[1][2][3][4] Hence. although they vary in terms of how carefully and distinctively they are conceptualized with respect to affective or cognitive job satisfaction. but also for crosspopulation invariance by nationality.[2] [edit] Measuring job satisfaction How job satisfaction is measured depends on whether affective or cognitive job satisfaction is of interest. or multidimensional if two or more facets of a job are simultaneously evaluated. convergent and criterion-related validities.81 and . and job type. not necessarily directly related. Several measures have been developed over the years. job level. overtly affective as opposed to cognitive. While cognitive job satisfaction might help to bring about affective job satisfaction. such as pay or maternity leave. but rather gauges the extent to which those job facets are judged by the job holder to be satisfactory in comparison with objectives they themselves set or with other jobs. Cognitive job satisfaction is usually defined as being a more objective and logical evaluation of various facets of a job. job satisfaction has varying definitions.[1] . The Brief Index of Affective Job Satisfaction (BIAJS) is a 4-item. and have different antecedents and consequences. measure of overall affective job satisfaction. not necessarily directly related. At the more specific levels of conceptualization used by academic researchers and human resources professionals.[2] [edit] Definition At its most general level of conceptualization.the two constructs are distinct. affective job satisfaction for individuals reflects the degree of pleasure or happiness their job in general induces.87. Affective job satisfaction is usually defined as an unidimensional subjective construct representing an overall emotional feeling individuals have about their job as a whole. the two constructs are distinct. and have different antecedents and consequences. job satisfaction is simply how content an individual is with his or her job.

The JSS is a 36 item questionnaire that measures nine facets of job satisfaction. the Job Satisfaction Survey (JSS).[37] is a specifically cognitive job satisfaction measure. or someone at work. participants answer either yes. The MSQ measures job satisfaction in 20 facets and has a long form with 100 questions (five items from each facet) and a short form with 20 questions (one item from each facet). Other job satisfaction questionnaires include: the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire (MSQ).The Job Descriptive Index (JDI).. and the work itself. It measures one’s satisfaction in five facets: pay. and the Faces Scale. Finally. promotions and promotion opportunities. or can’t decide (indicated by ‘?’) in response to whether given statements accurately describe one’s job. the Faces Scale of job satisfaction. measured overall job satisfaction with just one item which participants respond to by choosing a face.         [edit] Are you reaching your full potential? Are you learning or improving skills that you could put on a resume? Are your skills valued within the company? Are your skills utilized? Is your voice heard? Do you have a mentor? Are you satisfied with your supervisor's leadership? Are you able to experiment and try new ideas? 12 Questions to Measure Employee Engagement has some good questions for general job satisfaction that may be useful:  Do you know what is expected of you at work? Do you have the materials and equipment you need to do your work right? At work. one of the first scales used widely. have you received recognition or praise for doing good work? Does your supervisor. coworkers. no. do you have the opportunity to do what you do best every day? In the last seven days. The scale is simple. do your opinions seem to count? Does the mission/purpose of your company make you feel your job is important? Are your associates (fellow employees) committed to doing quality work? Do you have a best friend at work?         10down voteaccepted  . seem to care about you as a person? Is there someone at work who encourages your development? At work. supervision.

has someone at work talked to you about your progress? In the last year.  In the last six months. have you had opportunities at work to learn and grow? The list is from Gallup's research and Marcus Buckingham if you want to dig deeper into th .