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Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules

Project funded by the Child Care and Head Start Bureaus in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

What Works Brief Training Kit #3

www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/

December 2007

The What Works Brief Training Kits were developed to help in-service and pre-service providers conduct staff development activities. Each Kit is based on one What Work Brief and contains the following items: presenter’s PowerPoint note pages, participant handouts, activity ideas, pre-training survey, demographic form, training evaluation, and training certificate. The What Works Brief Training Kits are grounded in the Pyramid model depicted below which provides a framework for describing the four interrelated levels of practice that address the social and emotional development of all children. The Pyramid is designed to guide practitioners in understanding the importance of children’s social emotional competence in terms of school readiness and the prevention of challenging behavior. This What Works Brief Training Kit relates to the “High Quality Environments” level of the Pyramid.

We welcome your feedback as you provide professional development activities with these materials. Special thanks to the Meginnis Endowment at UIUC for funding to help support this effort and to the following individuals who developed the What Works Brief Training Kits materials: Micki Ostrosky, Hedda Meadan, Greg Cheatham, Monique Mills, Sallee Beneke, Nancy Gaumer, Amy Hayden, Elenor Rentschler, and Angel Fettig.

• Welcome participants. if desired.g. Routines. . since some behaviors may be part of the child’s culture.edu/csefel/). handouts. length of time for session. • Consider using What Works Brief # 3 handout as a supplemental resource. etc. • As you present the workshop: Remind participants to take the culture and background of children into consideration and to work hand-in-hand with parents when they select target behaviors. Schedules. Section VII. and Transitions (available at http:// www.. break.vanderbilt.Presenter Notes WWB Training Kit #3 Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules Presenter PowerPoint Speaker Notes: • Presenter should be familiar with the content in What Works Brief #3 and • Module 1. • Take care of any logistics (e.) • Pass out pre-training survey for all participants to complete and turn in.

• Schedules represent the big picture—main activities to be completed daily. • Routines represent the steps done to complete the schedule. . • Schedules represent the big picture—the main activities to be completed daily. Speaker Notes: • The terms routines and schedules are often used interchangeably. Schedules • The terms routines and schedules are often used interchangeably. • Routines represent the steps done to complete the schedule.Routines vs.

etc. • Routines and schedules may vary. Schedules • Routines and schedules need to be taught directly.) Speaker Notes: • Rather than assuming that all children will pick up on center routines and schedules. etc. • Based on level of children’s interest • Should be inherently flexible (to allow for fire drills.Routines vs. field trips. assemblies. . service providers should teach students each activity in the schedule and all of the smaller steps needed to complete routines. • Sometimes schedules must be altered due to fire drills. field trips.

bathroom time includes both toileting and handwashing)..Routines • Activities and procedures that occur regularly • Often involve a series of responses • Preschool routines typically include • • • • • • • Arrival time Bathroom time Cleanup time Departure Nap time Snack time Story time Speaker Notes: • Define routines. This training session will focus on school routines. • A series of responses to a story time routine would involve • Gathering in a circle on a floor mat • Sitting like a pretzel • Listening to the teacher read • Looking at pictures in a storybook • Answering questions • There could be several series of responses within one routine (i. . • Routines occur at school and home.e.

Daily Schedule • Blocks of time for classroom activities • Sequence of classroom activities • Preschool schedules typically include • Group or circle time • Activity or center time • Snack time • Outdoor time • Story time Speaker Notes: • Define daily schedule. • Sample Daily Schedule: 8:40 9:00 9:20 10:10 10:25 10:50 11:10 Arrival Time Group Time Activity Time Story Time Outdoor Time Snack Time Dismissal . This training session will focus on classroom schedules. • Schedules occur at school and home.

• They help children feel secure. • Children who are familiar with classroom schedules and routines are more likely to be engaged. • They can result in higher rates of child engagement. . • They help children understand expectations. schedules and routines help children learn classroom activities. • They help reduce behavior problems. and learn new knowledge. attentive. • Children are able to predict what will happen next and this helps them feel secure and prepared. and social development. cognitive.Routines and Schedules Are Important Because: • They influence a child’s emotional. Speaker Notes: Why are schedules and routines important? • Because they are repetitive. • Classrooms with consistent schedules and routines facilitate children’s understanding of the learning environment expectations.

play time. Complete the chart. • Share thoughts with the larger group by having a few pairs share their ideas. and cleanup time. and the steps needed to complete them. • Pairs should think about the following 4 classroom routines: snack time. Discussion Questions • Why is it important to teach children classroom routines? • What are some ways to teach classroom routines? . restroom time.Activity 1 Pair-Think-Share • Pair with a partner • Think about all the steps involved in 4 classroom routines and write them in the partially completed chart • Share your routines and talk about what might happen if you completed the steps of each routine in a different order Speaker Notes: Activity 1 • Assign partners.

Use four different routines and write down their corresponding steps. .Steps in Daily Routines Speaker Notes: Here is a partially completed daily routine chart.

outdoor) • Number of activities available—variety so all children find something that peeks their interest.Things to Consider in Daily Schedule Planning: • • • • • • • Balance of activities Number of activities available Number of adults available Child’s attention span Child’s level of alertness Child’s cultural and linguistic background Longer play periods result in increased play behaviors Speaker Notes: Things to consider when planning the daily schedule: • Balance of activities—Have activities that differ in noise level. pace. person leading (child vs. and location (indoor vs. adult). but not so many that children play in isolation for long periods of time • Number of adults available—for supervision and facilitation of skill development • Child’s attention span—high-interest materials and activities • Child’s level of alertness—some children are more active and alert at certain times of the day • Child’s cultural and linguistic background—activities and materials that represent the children in your care • Longer play periods result in increased play behaviors—consider how long children have to truly become engaged in an activity .

http://www.environments.com Speaker Notes: Consider showing samples of free visual cues from the environment website.environments. .What Makes a Good Daily Schedule? • Balance of Activities • Active and Quiet • Large Group and Small Group • Indoor and Outdoor • Child-Directed and Teacher-Directed • Visual Cues • Use of daily picture schedule • www.com.

possible causes. nap time) • Think about what can go wrong during this activity. and ways to minimize or eliminate the problem • Share thoughts with the larger group .Activity 2 • Divide into small groups • Identify a different daily activity (center time. snack time. recess.

move recess time before nap time . create more centers • Too many children at one center—centers are not equally attractive.Activity 2 Speaker Notes: Here are some possible answers to the challenges above: • Restless children—not enough centers. change time of snack • Children do not pay attention during story time—story is boring. find out what children are interested in and provide centers that meet those interests • Children play with snack food—they are not hungry. choose more engaging stories • Children are restless during nap time—they have not been active before nap time.

• Distribute the certificate of attendance if appropriate.com to create and print free daily routine labels Speaker Notes: • Thank the participants for participating and have them complete the evaluation form.environments. . if appropriate.Additional Resources www.

3. . 2. what are two ways to promote socialemotional competence and prevent challenging behavior during center time? R What are the three most pressing issues you face as an early childhood professional? 1.Pre-training Survey WWBTK #3: Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules R In what ways can routines and schedules influence children’s behavior and social-emotional competence? CSEFEL R What are two considerations in planning routines and schedules? R Focusing on schedules and routines.

.Pre-training Survey WWBTK #3: Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules Demographic Information Describe yourself (check the boxes that best describe you): Your gender: □ Female □ Male CSEFEL Your age: □ under 30 □ 31 to 40 □ 41 to 50 □ 51-60 □61 and above Your ethnicity: □ European American □ Asian-Pacific □ Hispanic □ African-American □ American Indian □ Other (specify)_________ Check your current teaching certificates: □ Early Childhood Education □ Elementary Education □ Special Education □ Other (Specify)____________________ Check the one that best describes your education: □ High school or GED □ Some college □ Associate’s degree □ Bachelor’s degree □ Master’s degree □ Other (Specify)____________________ Your teaching experience: How many year(s) have you taught preschoolers?_____________ How many year(s) have you taught preschoolers with IEPs?_____________ Thank you for completing this survey.

________ represent the big picture. Schedules • • Routines and schedules need to be _______ directly. Routines and schedules may vary • • . Schedules • • • • The terms routines and schedules are often used interchangeably. Main activities to be completed daily.Participant Notes Notes WWB Training Kit #3 Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules Participant PowerPoint Routines vs. ________represent the steps done to complete the schedule. Routines vs.

They can result in higher rates of child ____________. They help reduce _______________.Routines • • • Are activities and procedures that ____________ Often involve a ________________________ Preschool routines typically include • • • • • • • Notes Daily Schedule • • • Blocks of time for classroom activities Sequence of classroom activities Preschool schedules typically include: • • • • Routines and schedules are important because: • • • • • • They __________ a child’s emotional. They help children feel _________. They help children understand _____. . cognitive and social development.

com to create and print free daily routine labels .com Additional Resources www.environments.environments.Things to Consider in Daily Schedule Planning: • • • • • • • Balance of activities Number of activities available Number of adults available Child’s attention span Child’s level of alertness Child’s cultural and linguistic background Longer play periods result in increased play behaviors Notes What Makes a Good Daily Schedule? • Balance of Activities • Active and Quiet • Large Group and Small Group • Indoor and Outdoor • Child-Directed and Teacher-Directed • Visual Cues • Use of daily picture schedule • www.

and jot down the steps needed to complete them on the chart. and cleanup). listen. bathroom. look at pictures. Talk about the following 4 classroom routines (snack. answer questions about story . playtime. CSEFEL Routine Story time Steps Sit in a circle. Share your thoughts with the larger group.Activity 1 Pair-Think-Share WWBTK #3: Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules R Directions: Pair with a partner.

nap time. and ways to minimize or eliminate the problem (i. solutions). snack time.Activity 2 Pair-Think-Share WWBTK #3: Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules R Directions: Think about what can go wrong during this activity. etc.). Be prepared to share your thoughts with larger group. Complete the chart. Identify a daily activity (center time. Challenges Children get restless and lose interest during circle time Too many children at one center Children play with their snack food Children do not pay attention during story time Children are restless during nap time Possible Causes Solutions . CSEFEL Divide into small groups. recess.e. possible causes.

2. The information covered was clear. 5. 4. 6. The amount of information covered was 3. Overall. this presentation was (Extremely Important) 4 3 2 1 (Not Important at All) (Just Right) (Very Clear) (Very) (Very) (Very Useful) 4 3 2 1 (Inadequate) 4 3 2 1 (Vague) 4 3 2 1 (Not at All) 4 3 2 1 (Not at All) 4 3 2 1 (Not Useful) R Things I liked about this presentation: R Things I would change about this presentation: R Additional information I would like on this topic: R New things I am going to try as a result of this workshop: R Additional comments: . The activities conducted were beneficial. This topic is important to me.CSEFEL Training Workshop Evaluation WWBTK #3: Helping Children Understand routines and Classroom Schedules Date: Topic: Speaker(s): Your position: Location: CSEFEL R Circle the number that best expresses your reaction to each of the following items: 1. The handouts provided were useful.

Cer tificate of Training Helping Children Understand Routines and Classroom Schedules This is to certify that successfully completed the above training Trainer Trainer Participant Date and Location Additional training resources are available at: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/csefel/ .