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VOL. 20 ISSUE 20 MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2013 • THEWEEKENDER.COM
NEPA’S No. 1 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT FREE WEEKLY
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SCRANTON
TELLSWEST SIDE
STORIES, P. 24
‘RIDING IN CARS’
AUTHOR AT
MARYWOOD, P. 46
VOL. 20 ISSUE 20 MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2013 • VOL. 20 ISSUE 20 MARCH 27 - APRIL 2,, 2013 • THEWEEKENDER.COM THEWEEKENDER.COM
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DON’T
PANIC!
OUR GUIDE WILL HELP YOU
PLAN THE PERFECT WEDDING
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staff
Contributors
Ralphie Aversa, Justin Brown, Kait Burrier, Caeriel Crestin, Pete Croatto, Nick Delorenzo, Tim Hlivia, Melissa Highes,
Michael Irwin, Amy Longsdorf, Matt Morgis, Ryan O’Malley, Kacy Muir, Jason Riedmiller, Erin Rovin, Ned Russin,
Chuck Shepherd, Jen Stevens, Alan K. Stout, Mike Sullivan, Bill Thomas, Mark Uricheck, Robbie Vanderveken, Noelle Vetrosky,
Bobby Walsh, Derek Warren
Interns
Karyn Montigney, Lisa Petz, Bill Rigotti
Address 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703
Fax 570.831.7375
E-mail Weekender@theweekender.com
Online theweekender.com • facebook.com/theweekender • follow us on Twitter: @wkdr
Circulation
The Weekender is available at more than 1,000 locations throughout Northeastern Pennsylvania.
For distribution problems call 570.829.5000 • To suggest a new location call 570.831.7349 • To place a classifed ad call 570.829.7130
Editorial policy
The Weekender is published weekly from offces at 90 E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18703.
The opinions of independent contributors of the Weekender do not necessarily refect those of the editor or staff.
Rating system
WWWWW = superb WWWW = excellent WWW = good WW = average W = listenable/watchable
* Scarborough Research
John Popko
General Manager • 570.831.7349
jpopko@theweekender.com
“As a guy, do I really have a
choice in the matter?”
Kieran Inglis
Media Consultant • 570.831.7321
kinglis@theweekender.com
“An endless one.”
Amanda Dittmar
Graphic Designer • 570.970.7401
adittmar@theweekender.com
“Well, in the state of Penn., I can’t
get married, so I’d just throw a
rager with lots of bass drops.”
Mike Golubiewski
Production Editor • 570.829.7209
mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
“I’m thinking royal wedding, only
bigger...and it would involve Yankee
Stadium and Pope Francis.”
Rich Howells
Editor • 570.831.7322
rhowells@theweekender.com
“An exact recreation of the
wedding of Reed Richards and
Sue Storm in Fantastic Four
Annual No. 3.”
Sara Pokorny
Staff Writer • 570.829.7132
spokorny@theweekender.com
“I would do it up Jay Gatsby style
- orchestras, booze, buffets, ‘20s
garb, and a kick-ass yellow car.”
If you had an unlimited
budget, what kind of wedding
would you have?
Tell @wkdr what
kind of wedding
you would have
if you had an
unlimited budget.
Paul Shaw
Digital Specialist • 570.829.7204
pshaw@theweekender.com
“Intimate with close friends and
family and the love of my life.
Save the money.”
social
Mark Duplass @MarkDuplass
Online comment
of the week.
I kinda miss walking
around the video store
in a state of utter
confusion.
The Weekender has 11,692
Facebook fans. Find us now at
Facebook.com/theweekender
letter from the editor
I’m not afraid of commit-
ment – I’m afraid of what comes
after.
Spending the rest of your
life with someone sounds great,
but getting there is always more
than you bargain for. Popping
the question is the biggest
responsibility I feel I have; after
that, many guys, like myself,
take a hands-off approach.
We aren’t the ones who were
dreaming of white dresses and
pretty fowers since childhood,
so we just hope to step back and
let our ladies do their thing.
That’s not the way
relationships work, however.
It’s a team effort every day, so
be prepared to take on every
single step of the wedding
process together. Thankfully,
we’ve made it a bit easier for
both of you with our three-page
wedding guide (pages 36-37,
40), sharing stories, tips, and
checklists to make your big day
go smoothly.
So don’t be afraid of
forgetting anything - be afraid
of tripping down the aisle and
other things beyond our control.
-Rich Howells, Weekender
Editor
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index
March 27-April 2, 2013
COVER STORY
Wedding guide ... 36-37, 40
LISTINGS
THe W ... 7
SPeAK & See ... 10
COnCeRTS ... 20
AgendA ... 28, 34
THeATeR ... 31
MUSIC
AWOlnATiOn … 12
AlBuM ReVieWS ... 14
CHARTS ... 14
BAd ReligiOn … 16, 45
THe luddiTeS … 18
CiRCA SuRViVe ... 50
STAGE & SCREEN
MOVie ReVieW ... 25
THe HOST ... 26
RAlPHie RePORT ... 39
inFiniTe iMPROBABiliTY … 41
STARSTRuCK ... 50
ARTS
STORY SlAM … 24
King’S COllege THeATRe ... 24
nOVel APPROACH ... 31
WRiTeRS SHOWCASe ... 44
BeVeRlY dOnOFRiO ... 46
LIFESTYLE
SHOW uS SOMe SKin … 46
JuST FOR THe HeAlTH OF iT ... 48
nOT YOuR MAMA’S KiTCHen ... 50
MAKeuP RuleS … 53
MAn … 69
MOdel … 70
HUMOR & FUN
i’d TAP THAT … 47
PeT OF THe WeeK … 50
neWS OF THe WeiRd ... 53
SORRY MOM & dAd … 55
Sign lAnguAge … 57
GAMES &TECH
TeCH TAlK … 16
geT YOuR gAMe On … 47
MOTORHeAd … 55
ONTHE COVER
deSign BY AMAndA diTTMAR, PHOTO BY KnOT
JuST AnY dAY PHOTOgRAPHY
VOluMe 20 iSSue 20
18
PUNK OR DIE
The Luddites go from the
basement to the stage
26
THE PERFECT ‘HOST’
Saoirse Ronan brings Stephenie Meyer’s
new love story to life
O
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i
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only at www.theweekender.com
READ ADDITIONAL ARTICLES IN OUR WEDDING GUIDE.
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FRIDAY
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….can you get the chance to “Come on down!”?
On May 30, the F.M. Kirby Center (71 Public Square, Wilkes-Barre) will play host to
“The Price is Right Live!”
The show is an interactive one that gives contestants, pulled right from the
audience, the chance to have an authentic experience with the game show.
“This is the real thing,” said Will Beekman, Kirby’s Director of Programming. “You
get Plinko, Cliffhangers, and of course, the big wheel. Heck, you even get the
models.”
A celebrity host will be announced soon.
Tickets go on sale March 28 at 10 a.m. and are available at the F.M. Kirby Center
Box Office, by phone at 570.826.1100, online at kirbycenter.org, and through all
Ticketmaster outlets.
Tickets are $35.50, $45.50, $55.50, and $78.50 for limited VIP.
….are so many Scrantonions dreading May? That’s when the hit NBC show based
in the Electric City, “The Office,” will finally come to an end.
The locals won’t let it go quietly, of course, so WBRE Eyewitness News is
organizing a mass lip dub video to give the show a proper send-off.
The first part of the process is to have local bands write a goodbye song and record
it, and a winner will be chosen from the submissions. This song will be used as the
basis for the lip dub video, which will be filmed May 5 in Scranton.
Any bands wishing to submit songs can do so via e-mail
by contacting coneal@pahomepage.com.
For more information on the event,
go online and check out
theofficescranton.eventbrite.com.
….can you do to lend a hand in kicking cancer’s ass? Help out the Center for
Cancer Wellness, Candy’s Place, by signing up to participate in its Rainbow Walk.
Now in its 16th year, the Rainbow Walk was created in memory of Candice Vincent-
Mamary, a social worker who died after a seven-month battle with lung cancer. Her
sister, Penny Cunningham, used the funds raised from the first Rainbow Walk to
create Candy’s Place in honor of Vincent-Mamary.
The walk will be held May 11 at Kirby Park, and the cost is $25. For more
information, call 570.714.8800 or visitcancerwellnessnepa.org.
When
Why
What
“You get Plinko, Cliffhangers, and of course, the big
wheel. Heck, you even get the models.”
- Will Beekman, F.M. Kirby’s Director of Programming
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THE VINTAGE THEATER AND TWENTYFIVEEIGHT STUDIOS PRESENTS:
Farley
SCAN TO BUY TICKETS NOW!
$10 IN ADVANCE
SPECIAL GUESTS:
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(DOORS OPEN AT 7PM)
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ALL AGES!
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speak and see
POETIC
Dietrich Theater
(60 E. Tioga ST., Tunkhannock:
570.996.1500)
• Creative CharaCters from PaPer to
PuPPets: ages 5-12. aPril 9, 16, 23, 30,
may 7, 4-5 P.m.
Everhart Museum
(1901 mulberry st., sCranton, Pa,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum.
org)
• everhart reads book Club: marCh
21, “bloodwork: a tale of mediCine
& murder inthe sCientifiC revolu-
tion;” aPril 18, “draCula;” may 16,
“the giaour;” June 20, vamPires in
the lemon grove. to register Call
570.346.7186.
King’s College
(133 north river st., wilkes-barre,
570.208.5957 or kings.edu)
• CamPion literary soCiety oPen read-
ing: aPril 10, 7 P.m., regina Court. info:
570.208.5900, ext. 5487.
Pittston Memorial Library
(47 broad st., 570.654.9565, Pitmemlib@
ComCast.net)
• friends meeting: marCh 28, 6:30 P.m.
Wilkes University events:
• reading by beverly donofrio, best-
selling author of ‘riding in Cars with
boys:’ aPril 3, 7 P.m., barnes and noble
College bookstore (wilkes-barre).
VISUAL
AFA Gallery
(514 laCkawanna ave., sCranton:
570.969.1040 or artistsforart.org)
gallery hours thurs.-sat., 12-5 P.m.
• keystone College senior exhibition:
aPril 4-27. oPening reCePtionaPril 4,
6-9 P.m.
• time and landsCaPe by kathe frantz:
aPril 4-27. oPening reCePtionaPril 5,
6-9 P.m.
ArtWorks Gallery
(502 laCkawanna ave., sCranton.
570.207.1815, artworksnePa.Com)
gallery hours: tues.-fri., 11 a.m.-5
P.m., sat., noon-3 P.m., or by aPPoint-
ment.
• keystone College senior exhibition:
aPril 4-27. oPening reCePtionaPril 4,
6-9 P.m.
The Butternut Gallery
& Second Story Books
(204 ChurCh st, montrose,
570.278.4011, butternutgallery.Com).
gallery hours: wed.-sat., 11a.m.-5 P.m.,
sun., 12 P.m.-4 P.m.
• ameriCan kotz family exhibit
Converge Gallery
(140 w. fourth st., williamsPort,
570.435.7080, Convergegallery.Com)
• “susPended intime,” featuring
traditional, landsCaPe and CitysCaPe
Paintings with a twist: through aPril
27.
Everhart Museum
(1901 mulberry st., sCranton, Pa,
570.346.7186, www.everhart-museum.
org)
admission $5 adults; $3 students/se-
niors; $2 Children 6-12; members free.
• vamPires at the afa gallery, showing
of the film‘vamPyr:’ marCh 27, 6-8 P.m.
ages 18 and uP.
The Linder Gallery at Keystone
College
(570.945.8335, keystone.edu/lindergal-
lery)
• “kellesimone waits: antithesis:”
through aPril 28.
Marquis Art & Frame
(122 s. main st., wilkes-barre,
570.823.0518)
• “three artists: three years later,”
featuring the works of ryan hnay,
marguerite i. fuller, and skiP sens-
baCh: through aPril 27.
• “the tv show:” aPril 5-may 1. oPening
reCePtionaPril 5, 6-8:30 P.m.
NewVisions Studio & Gallery
(201 vine st., sCranton, www.newvi-
sionstudio.Com, 570.878.3970)
gallery hours: tues.-sun., noon-6 P.m.
and by aPPointment.
• “under the sea:” aPril 5-26. oPening
reCePtionaPril 5, 6-10 P.m.
Pauly Friedman Art Gallery
(miseriCordia university, 570.674.6250,
miseriCordia.edu/art)
gallery hours: mon. Closed, tue.-
thurs. 10 a.m.-8 P.m., fri. 10 a.m.-5 P.m.,
sat.-sun. 1-5 P.m.
• “reCent landsCaPes,” a thomas
staPleton exhibit: oPening reCePtion
aPril 6, 5-8 P.m. runs aPril 6 to June 7.
• “Pennsylvania fromabove,” aerial
PhotograPhy: oPening reCePtionaPril
6, 5-8 P.m. runs aPril 6 to June 2.
Schulman Gallery
(2nd floor of lCCC CamPus Center,
1333 s. ProsPeCt st., nantiCoke,
www.luzerne.edu/sChulmangallery,
570.740.0727)
gallery hours: mon.-fri., 9 a.m.-5 P.m.
• annual rossetti exhibit: through
marCh 27.
• a ColleCtion of two masters, Pho-
tograPhy by miChael molnar and sam
Cramer: aPril 5-may 2.
The Vintage Theater
(326 sPruCe st., sCranton, info@
sCrantonsvintagetheater.Com)
• “Penmen, artists and eduCators: 125
years of thezaner-bloser PenmanshiP
ComPany:” through aPril 14.
Widmann Gallery
(loCated in king’s College’s sheehy-
farmer CamPus Center between
north franklinand north main
streets, wilkes-barre, 570.208.5900,
ext. 5328)
gallery hours: mon. through fri. 9
a.m. to 4:30 P.m., sat. and sun. as ar-
ranged. free and oPentothe PubliC.
• “a Closer look,” lawrenCe lang’s
PhotograPhiC works of marCos and
landsCaPes: through aPril 5. meet the
artist reCePtion, marCh 15, 6-8 P.m.
• 25th annual king’s student exhibi-
tion: aPril 15-may 4. oPening reCePtion
aPril 17, 6-8 P.m.
ExPANDED LISTINGS AT
ThEWEEKENDEr.COM. W
Send your listings to WB-
Wnews@civitasmedia.com, 90
E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa.,
18703, or fax to 570.831.7375.
Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m.
Print listings occur up until
three weeks from publication
date.
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LOOKWHATYOU MISSED
Awolnation, Blondfire, and Mother Mother
@ ShermanTheater • 03.22.13
Photos by Lisa Petz • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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weekender
Readers’ Choice
2013
SCAN TO VOTE NOW!
or go to theweekender.com
Vote for your favorite people and places!
(voting ends April 12 at 5pm)
Awards Ceremony:
Wednesday, April 24, Breaker’s Bar
inside the Mohegan Sun Casino
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With the weather (hopefully)
getting warmer, everyone normally
starts to resort to their favorite
summer throwback songs. But
what may be overlooked is the fact
some of these artists may have new
material out that can compete with
the old – Cartel, best known for
their hit “Honestly,” is back with a
new album that may perk the ears
of fans.
“Collider” starts off with a track
called “Second Chances,” offer-
ing listeners a catchy pop anthem
driven by scores of enthusiasm and
energy. However, it’s diffcult to
shake the feeling that you’ve heard
it before. “Take Me with You”
impresses with high-quality produc-
tion that is consistent throughout
and is a nice surprise, given that the
album is self-released. Neverthe-
less, the song lets us down, as it
lacks the vigor apparent in “Second
Chances.”
“First Thing’s First” arrives at
just the right time, picking up the
album with a dash of diversity that
possesses a more distinctive pop
punk sound to it, proving that Cartel
defnitely has the potential to push
its sound further and rid of the boy
band clichés that cling to most of
their songs. Indeed, with “Best
Intentions,” the album seems to be
turning around with bouncy guitar
riffs and energetic percussion that
provides the band with an endearing
relatability. However, the unremark-
able tune “Thin Air” that suggests
Cartel are resting on their laurels
and failing to maintain that sincere
pop punk amiability that shone
through in earlier tracks.
Relying primarily on hooks,
“Sympathy” and “Mosaic” echo
bands like There For Tomorrow and
Every Avenue that are entirely en-
joyable to listen to, provided you’re
OK with the feeling of gluttony
that results. However, Collider’s
last offering fnishes the album on a
note that is refreshingly different to
songs heard before and reminds the
listener vaguely of old 30 Seconds
to Mars. Cartel have clearly found
their niche; it’s just a shame that it
took until the end of the album to
do so. It’s nothing spectacular, but
for fans of more pop than punk, it
will do the trick just fne.
-Matt Morgis, Weekender
Correspondent
W
Cartel
‘Collider’
album reviews
Cartel collides
good with the bad
charts
In their 30-year career, Danish rockers
Pretty Maids have never managed to crack
the household name status like many of their
contemporaries. They’ve made some blips
on the radar, like with their 1987 second
major label album, “Future World,” guided
by legendary Jimi Hendrix producer Eddie
Kramer – that album’s title track is still turning
up periodically on ‘80s rock compilation
discs. Pretty Maids began life as a somewhat
sweetened take on the Paul DiAnno-fronted
Iron Maiden, tastefully blending keys and
synths into hardened, rhythmically dangerous
metal. On “Motherland,” the band has taken
this formula to aggressive new heights that
beg to be noticed.
Think Bullet For My Valentine’s infectious
metal-encrusted hooks meets the grand, dark
beauty of Opeth and you’ve pinpointed Pretty
Maids’ 2013 sound fairly well. The topical,
politically acrimonious opener “Mother of
All Lies,” with incensed lyrical protest like,
“Can’t you see, they’re twisting our reality,
never practicing what they preach,” and
heavy-handed riffng blows the lid off of
any preconceptions that this band is mired in
commercial hard rock complacency. Similarly,
the ambient, mid-tempo keyboard barrage of
“To Fool a Nation” packages empathy for the
“sitting ducks” of undisclosed democracies
into easily digestible, melodic, Beatle-esque
metal.
Prime cuts like “The Iceman” are as
thrill ride pummeling as any power metal
Helloween has recorded, tempered with
the funhouse-mirrored keyboards Morten
Sandager crafts into diabolic landscapes – on
par with Stratovarius pianist Jens Johansson.
The haunting vortex of “Why So Serious?”
is typical of vocalist Ronnie Atkins’ breathy
snarl, adding emotional depth to the band’s
uniquely European symphonic metal-meets-
classic hard rock sound.
Infernal and heavy, dark and infectious
arena-ready metal, Pretty Maids remain
contemporarily dynamic in a genre flled with
endless retreads.
-Mark Uricheck, Weekender Correspondent
W
The more Blake Shelton rises in stat-
ure, the more he parades his swagger-
ing, mischievous personality. His high-
profle role as a judge on NBC’s “The
Voice” has provided a platform for the
entertainingly outspoken side of this
tall, drawling country boy from Okla-
homa. Now Shelton is creating music
as brash as he is, fully integrating his
colorful character into his songs.
Before a career resurgence that
included landing as a coach on “The
Voice,” Shelton spent years struggling
to establish a consistent presence on
the country music charts, never creat-
ing a recognizable style of his own.
“Based on a True Story” reveals how
much has changed.
The album opens with a hip-hop
treatment of the word “redneck,”
traversing Shelton’s cross-interests in
the rural and the urban before blasting
into the guitar-driven “Boys ‘Round
Here,” about back-country folk who
rock out in the cabs of their pickups.
The tune sets the tone for Shelton’s
focus on boisterous country rock and
emotional ballads that show off his
expressive vocals as the Country Music
Association entertainer of the year rises
to his newfound superstar status with
a lighthearted but rollicking album
that pushes boundaries in all the right
places.
-Michael McCall, AP
W
Maids more
metal than ever
Shelton
shows off his
own ‘Voice’
8. Ke$ha: ‘C’Mon’
7. The Lumineers: ‘Ho Hey’
6. Imagine Dragons: ‘It’s Time’
5. Taylor Swift: ‘I Knew You Were
Trouble’
4. Calvin Harris/Florence Welch:
‘Sweet Nothing’
3. Justin Timberlake/Jay-Z: ‘Suit
& Tie’
2. Bruno Mars: ‘When I Was Your
Man’
1. Maroon 5: ‘Daylight’
1. Clutch: ‘Earth Rocker’
2. Justin Timberlake: ‘20/20
Experience’
3: Anthrax: ‘Anthems’
4. David Bowie: ‘Next Day’
5. Bon Jovi: ‘What About Now’
6. Jimi Hendrix: ‘People. Hell &
Angels’
7. Eric Clapton: ‘Old Sock’
8. P!nk: ‘Truth About Love’
9. Various: ‘Love For Levon’
10. Bruno Mars: ‘Unorthodox
Jukebox’
Top 8 at 8 with Ralphie Aversa Top 10 Albums at Gallery of Sound
Rating
W W W V
Pretty Maid
‘Motherland’
Rating W W W W
Blake Shelton
‘Based on a True Story’
Rating W W W W
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Music
Any band with over three de-
cades of history will automatically
receive the “legendary” label, but
Bad Religion has earned it.
What other punk band has
not only survived this long, but
also stayed as active and prolifc
as these Los Angeles natives?
Touring in support of their 16th
studio record, “True North,” the
fve-piece (not counting non-
touring member Brett Gurewitz)
group proved just how well their
new material blends with the old
at the Electric Factory (421 N. 7th
St., Philadelphia) on March 24.
Openers Polar Bear Club of
upstate New York showed off their
youthful energy with a simple,
yet rousing set of post-hardcore
tunes that live up to song titles
like “Killin’ It;” skinny, spectacled
frontman Jimmy Stadt easily
engaged the all-ages crowd. The
Bronx, however, did not appear as
genuine overall.
Filling in for Against Me!
when they dropped off the tour
weeks ago, the Los Angeles
hardcore punks sounded great
musically, embracing a surpris-
ingly classic rock sound and
head-bobbing beat, but vocalist
Matt Caughthran’s stage presence,
which felt more gangster rapper
than hardened punker amongst his
constant swearing and shout-outs
to various locations and random
musicians, detracted from an
otherwise exciting performance.
He did make up for this, though,
by jumping into the pit for The
Bronx’s last two songs to stir up
the already lively crowd, much to
the chagrin of security guards who
were forced to hold his micro-
phone cord over their heads the
entire time.
Bad Religion did not need to
rely on such stunts to whip up
a frenzy, bursting onstage with
“Past Is Dead,” a new song with
a title that’s ironic when followed
by “We’re Only Gonna Die,” a
set staple since their 1982 debut
album “How Could Hell Be Any
Worse?” “New Dark Ages” and
“True North” were next, but they
dug right back into the catalog
for “Anesthesia,” “Generator,”
“I Want to Conquer the World,”
and “21st Century (Digital Boy),”
all sounding as crisp as the days
they were recorded in the ‘80s and
‘90s.
One thing that has only
bolstered BR’s staying power is
this dedication to clear, quality
sound. Every one of singer Greg
Graffn’s words is annunciated and
understood over the memorable
hooks and three-part harmonies
perfectly, a stark contrast to
modern punk and hardcore’s
reliance on raspy, screeching
vocals and guttural growls. These
words are biting enough.
The mix of old and new
continued throughout the evening,
jumping from their latest single,
“F—k You,” to “Recipe for Hate”
and “Suffer” and back again for
“Robin Hood in Reverse.” Graffn
commented that “F—k You” was
a song “we should have written 30
years ago,” but the ease through
which they navigated their past
and present showed just how
timeless their work is – their
rebellious social commentary is
just as relevant now as it was then.
What that says about the state of
our country is a discussion for
another time.
The group took several pauses
to crack jokes and talk to the audi-
ence, keeping things light despite
the heaviness behind many of the
songs’ messages, yet they still
managed to play 30 tunes, which
felt like sing-a-longs due to the
sheer number of fans who knew
every lyric. Faces in the crowd
lit up again and again as BR
blustered through “Sanity,” “You,”
“Do What You Want,” “Dearly
Beloved,” “Epiphany,” “Against
the Grain,” “Them and Us,” “A
Walk,” and “American Jesus,”
among others, with Graffn only
pausing to point out the audience’s
fondness for nostalgia.
“Sorrow,” from 2002’s “The
Process of Belief,” likely sparked
that feeling for many, as the radio
hit brought it many new fans at the
time, though the four-song encore
of “F—k Armageddon… This Is
Hell,” “Vanity,” “Infected,” and
“Dept. of False Hope” made it
clear that they could still play, and
end on, more songs from their
new album than from any other
and still please fans of all ages and
expectations.
Not many 34-year-old bands
can say that, if any at all.
W
Bad Religion not reliant on its past
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
R EV I EW
Voyager I has provided invaluable information to scientists
over the pas three decades, but it’s just made its final exit.
Bon voyage to Voyager 1:
At 30, its journey continues
In the late ‘70s, NASA
launched the Voyager 1
spacecraft on an epic mission
of exploration through the outer
solar system.
But, despite massively
increasing our understanding of
our solar system, the Voyager 1
spacecraft’s journey isn’t over
just yet.
That intrepid traveler is still
beaming back information from
the outer reaches of the solar
system…or it was, until recently.
No, it hasn’t stopped working.
It’s fnally left the solar system.
Clipping along at nearly 11
miles per second, Voyager 1
has been measuring solar wind
(charged particles that the sun
routinely spews out in all direc-
tions) for years. Despite being
more than 30 years old, scientists
are still making use of new data
beamed back from the spacecraft.
In this case, we’ve discovered
that there is, in fact, a detectable
boundary between interstellar
space and the solar system. The
environmental infuence of the
sun – detectable as hydrogen
and helium – drops dramatically
and suddenly, and the prevailing
“currents” of particles are more
in line with what we’d expect in
deep space.
Scientists have been waiting
for this for a while.
Last year, Voyager 1 entered
the heliopause, which is general-
ly considered to be the boundary
zone between interstellar space
and the solar system, but they
weren’t exactly sure how long
the transition would take.
This is the frst time that any
manmade object has left the
solar system – Voyager 1 is also
moving at a higher velocity than
any other manmade object. And
just to give you an idea of the
distance travelled here: Moving
at a speed of 38,610 mph, it took
30 years to reach the edge of the
solar system, 11 billion miles
away.
It takes light from the sun 17
hours to travel that far. To make
you feel even smaller, it will take
another 40,000 years moving at
that speed to reach a nearby star.
Voyager 2, the twin of the
Voyager 1 spacecraft, is still
alive and well and is also headed
out of the solar system – it’s
somewhat closer to the sun
than Voyager 1, despite being
launched frst. Voyager 1 is
traveling more quickly due to
“slingshot” maneuvers it under-
took near Saturn.
Unfortunately, Voyager 1’s
nuclear power supply will run
down around 2020, bringing its
mission to an end – but we’ve
certainly gotten our money’s
worth.
Until then, Voyager 1 will
continue to return data, and
both Voyager 1 and its sister
spacecraft, Voyager 2, maintain
active Twitter accounts for
anyone interested in following
their missions. Voyager 1’s
Twitter account can be found
@NASAVoyager, and Voyager
2’s Tweets can be seen @
NASAVoyager2.
-Nick DeLorenzo is director
of interactive and new media for
The Times Leader. E-mail him at
ndelorenzo@timesleader.com.
W
tech talk
GadGets, Gizmos, & more
Nick delorenzo | Special to the Weekender
Photos by Rich Howells
Bad Religion played an energetic set at the Electric Factory
in Philadelphia on Sunday.
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Emerging from basement jam
sessions in Scranton, The Luddites
are fnally starting to make more
musical appearances.
The self-described melodic pop
punk rockers got their start in 2008
without any serious intentions, just
to play music with some friends.
After a long start, and many ex-
tended breaks, the band is fnally
starting to get their name out there.
“We’ve been around since ‘08,
and for some reason we’ve had a
tough time getting shows,” Nelson
Negron, drummer of the band,
explained. “Now, all of a sudden,
we’re starting to get a little bit of
recognition, and it’s great. This
is going to be our frst headlining
show, so I’m pretty excited about
it.”
The three-piece consists of broth-
ers Nathan and Nelson Negron
and good friend Jonathon Renaldi,
playing mostly original music
while throwing in a few covers here
and there. Renaldi writes a majority
of the lyrics, keeping a rock ‘n’ roll
attitude. Women are one of many
subjects that inspire his writing.
“I was always surrounded by
amazing writers, and I was inspired
to write well,” Renaldi said. “I
write what I see. I write about
things I hate and things I love. With
writing, I see more honesty in how
I accept myself. It’s different when
you’re surrounded by a wall of mu-
sic. It’s easier to write about things
and actually talk things through
with people.”
The band has over an hour’s
worth of original music to play.
When forming music together with
Renaldi’s lyrics, the trio works as a
team, adding in what they think fts
just right.
“John will come up with an idea,
and when we get together, that’s
when we start throwing little things
in there,” said Nathan.
After playing in many previous
bands, even one including Eric
Keen, mostly known for his work
in The Menzingers, Nelson is not
new to the music scene. However,
it is a different story for his brother
Nathan. Never touching a guitar
in his life before March of 2008,
Nathan was more or less forced
into the band.
“I made Nathan play the bass,”
said Nelson. “I didn’t give him a
choice. I was like, ‘Learn how to
play the bass guitar because you’re
playing bass for us. ‘”
Along with Nathan, Renaldi
was also mistakenly pulled into
the music world by a friend of his.
After being asked to join a friend’s
band but having no musical skills
or interest, Renaldi quickly picked
up a guitar and jumped at the op-
portunity to play in a band.
The band has two shows com-
ing up at New Visions Studio &
Gallery (201 Vine St. Scranton);
one titled “Punk-or-Die” on March
29 featuring local bands D-Grade
Monsters, Warning Level, and
Crock Pot Abduction, and another
show in May, but that is just the
start; they have discussed going on
a short tour over the summer.
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Renaldi states, “I think the whole
goal in bands is to tour, promote
yourself, make records, meet dif-
ferent people, and network across
states.”
While waiting for that much-
needed tour route to come into
place, The Luddites continue to do
what they do best: rocking out un-
derground while playing the music
that they love.
“We’re always going to be in a
basement somewhere playing mu-
sic,” said Nelson. “It’s just going to
be that way.”
W
Courtesy Photos
Melodic pop punk rock trio The Luddites are taking a heavier
step out into the local music scene by booking more shows.
Luddites rise from the basement
By Karyn Montigney
Weekender Intern
Punk-or-Die with The Luddites,
D-Grade Monsters, Warning Level,
and Crock Pot Abduction: March
29, 8 p.m., New Visions Studio &
Gallery (201 Vine St. Scranton). $7.
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FRIDAY
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ALICE C. WILTSIE
PERFORMING ARTS CENTER
(700 N. WyomiNg St., HazletoN)
570.861.0510, WiltSieceNter.org
• Fiddler on the rooF: April 17, 7 p.m.,
$27-$52
The Cooperage Project
(1030 mAin St., honeSdAle. 570.253.2020,
thecooperAgeproject.org.)
donAtionS Accepted And AppreciAted
At the door At All eventS.
open mic night: mArch 27, 7-10 p.m.
• the greAt pArty: mArch 29, 7:30 p.m.
• libertotrio: April 6, 7 p.m.
• electric open jAm: April 10, 7-10 p.m.
• hiroyA tSukAmoto: April 13, 7 p.m.
• Amy SpeAce: April 14, 5 p.m. $15,
AdvAnce; $18 At the door.
DOWNTOWN ARTS
(47 n. FrAnklin St., WilkeS-bArre)
• mykki blAnco, WiccA phASe SpringS
eternAl: mArch 29, 9 p.m., $10.
F.M. KIRBY CENTER
(71 public SquAre, WilkeS-bArre)
570.826.1100, kirbycenter.org
• bill coSby: April 5, 8 p.m., $37-$75
• romeo And juliet: April 9, 10 A.m., $7
• ron White: April 11, 7:30 p.m., $41-$51
• nepA philhArmonic: “Anne hAmpton
cAllAWAy SingS the StreiSAnd Song-
book:” April 12, 7 p.m., $34-$65
• Scotty mccreery: April 20, 8 p.m.,
$49-$99
• nepA philhArmonic: “Symphonie FAn-
tAStique:” April 26, 8 p.m., $34-$65
MAUCH CHUNK OPERA HOUSE
(14 W. broAdWAy, jim thorpe)
570.325.0249, mAuchchunkoperAhouSe.
com
• Willy porter: April 19, 8:30 p.m., $23
• pAulA cole bAnd: April 20, 8 p.m., $32
• kAlob griFFin bAnd: April 26, 8:30
p.m., $18
• kAShmir: the ultimAte led Zeppelin
ShoW: April 27, 8 p.m., $23
MOHEGAN SUN ARENA
(255 highlAnd pArk blvd., WilkeS-
bArre)
800.745.3000, mohegAnSunArenApA.com
• gAbriel igleSiAS: April 12, 8 p.m.,
$34-55
• ringling broS. And bArnum & bAiley:
April 26-28, timeS vAry, $33-93
MOUNT AIRY CASINO RESORT
(44 WoodlAnd rd., mount pocono)
877.682.4791, mountAirycASino.com
• WAr: April 20, 8 p.m., $30-40
NEW VISIONS
STUDIO & GALLERY
(201 vine St., ScrAnton)
570.878.3970, neWviSionSStudio.com
• the ludditeS / d-grAde monSterS
/ WArning level / teAm!: mArch 29, 8
p.m. $7.
• bAdtoWn rude / the queeFtoneS / the
red bAronS / the WhAt noWS?!: April
13, 8 p.m., $7.
PENN’S PEAK
(325 mAury rd., jim thorpe)
866.605.7325, pennSpeAk.com
• gAry AllAn: mAr. 27, 8 p.m., $40-$45
• SAtiSFAction: April 5, 8 p.m., $20
• SouthSide johnny & the ASbury
jukeS: April 19, 8 p.m., $22
• rAgdoll: tribute to FrAnkie vAlli And
the Four SeASonS: April 24-25, 1 p.m.
• jAmey johnSon: April 26, 8 p.m.,
$30-$35
RIVER STREET JAZZ CAFE
(667 n. river St., plAinS)
570.822.2992, riverStreetjAZZcAFe.
com5
• AlexiS p. Suter bAnd / eddie rAn-
dAZZo: April 13, 10 p.m., $10
• ol’ cAbbAge: “An evening oF phiSh”:
April 19, 10 p.m., $5
• bernie Worrell orcheStrA: April 20,
10 p.m., $8
• StArt mAking SenSe: tAlking heAdS
tribute: April 27, 10 p.m., $8
SCRANTON COMMUNITY
CONCERTS
(melloW theAter, 501 vine St., ScrAn-
toN)
570.955.1455, lAckAWAnnA.edu, etix.
com
priceS vAry, Student And group rAteS
AvAilAble
• the Four FreShmen: April 20, 8 p.m.,
$25-$30, $15 StudentS
SCRANTON CULTURAL
CENTER
(420 n. WAShington Ave., ScrAnton)
888.669.8966, ScrAntonculturAlcen-
ter.org
• “peter pAn”: April 5-7, timeS vAry,
$37-$57
• Air Force bAnd And Singing Ser-
geAntS: April 9, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
• nepA philhArmonic: “StreiSAnd Song-
book:” April 13, 8 p.m., $34-$65
• up & coming comedy SerieS: April 13,
8 p.m., $16
• nepA philhArmonic: “peter And the
WolF:” April 14, 2 p.m., $9
• “hAir:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.m., $32.50-
$52.50
• “the vieW” With A ScrAnton Attitude:
April 26, 7 p.m., $6
SHERMAN THEATER
(524 mAin St., StroudSburg)
570.420.2808, ShermAntheAter.com
• three dAyS grAce / pop evil: April 19,
8 p.m., $25
• chriS young: April 20, 8 p.m., $25-$35
• Steel pAnther: April 26, 8 p.m., $20
• opeth / kAtAtoniA: April 27, 7 p.m., $23
VINTAGE THEATER
(326 Spruce St., ScrAnton)
570.589.0271, ScrAntonSvintAgeth-
eater.com
• grAph rAbbit, the AtomiquS, dAyS in
trAnSit And more: mArch 29, doorS 7
p.m., ShoW At 8. $7.
PHILADELPHIA
ELECTRIC FACTORY
(3421 WilloW St., philAdelphiA)
215.love.222, electricFActory.inFo
• the blAck croWeS: April 12, 9 p.m.
• mindleSS SelF indulgence: April 14,
8 p.m.
• SevenduSt / coAl chAmber: April 18,
7 p.m.
• All time loW / pierce the veil: April
21-22, 6:30 p.m.
THE FILLMORE AT THE TLA
(334 South St., philAdelphiA)
215.922.1011, tlAphilly.com
• the revivAl tour: mArch 27, 8 p.m.
• george WAtSky: mArch 28, 9 p.m.
• veterAn FreShmAn preSentS driicky
grAhAm: mArch 29, 9 p.m.
• they might be giAntS: April 5, 7 p.m.
• c2c: April 6, 9 p.m.
• AndreW mcmAhon: April 10, 7:30 p.m.
• pArkWAy drive: April 12, 7:30 p.m.
• Steel pAnther: April 16, 8 p.m.
• collie buddZ “light it up” tour: April
19, 9 p.m.
• keller WilliAmS With more thAn A
little: April 20, 8 p.m.
• gogo morroW: April 24, 8 p.m.
KESWICK THEATRE
(291 north keSWick Ave., glenSide)
215.572.7650, keSWicktheAtre.com
• jeSuS chriSt SuperStAr: mAr. 28-30,
timeS vAry
• living colour: April 4, 8 p.m.
• dAve mASon (AcouStic duo): April 6,
8 p.m.
• bill coSby: April 7: 3 p.m.
• the mAverickS: April 10, 7:30 p.m.
• 1964: the tribute: April 12, 8 p.m.
• ron White: April 13, 7 And 10 p.m.
• b.b. king: April 17, 7:30 p.m.
• greAt big SeA: April 18, 7:30 p.m.
• Steve WilSon oF porcupine tree:
April 19, 8 p.m.
• billy brAgg: April 20, 8 p.m.
• jAke ShimAbukuro / leo kottke: April
21, 7:30 p.m.
• boney jAmeS: April 24, 8 p.m.
• toWer oF poWer / AverAge White
bAnd: April 26, 8 p.m.
• motoWn meetS rock & roll: April
28, 3 p.m.
TROCADERO THEATRE
(1003 Arch St., philAdelphiA)
215.336.2000, tHetroc.com
• SenSeS FAil / Such gold / reAl
FriendS / mAjor leAgue: April 4, 7 p.m.
• tootS And the mAytAlS: April 10, 9
p.m.
• volbeAt / dAnko joneS / Spoken: April
11, 7:30 p.m.
• the legWArmerS: April 27, 9 p.m.
• johnny mArr: April 30, 8 p.m.
SUSQUEHANNA BANK CENTER
(1 hArbour blvd., cAmden, n.j.)
609.365.1300, livenAtion.com/ven-
ueS/14115
• jenniFer hudSon: April 8, 7 p.m.
• tim mcgrAW: mAy 17, 8 p.m.
• the killerS: mAy 19, 8 p.m.
WELLS FARGO CENTER
(3601 South broAd St., philAdelphiA)
215.336.3600, WellSFArgocenterphilly.
com
• mAroon 5 / neon treeS / oWn city:
April 4, 7:30 p.m.
• FleetWood mAc: April 6, 8 p.m.
• rod SteWArt / Steve WinWood: April
12, 7:30 p.m.
ELSEWHERE IN PA
BRYCE JORDAN CENTER
(127 univerSity dr., StAte college)
814.865.5500, bjc.pSu.edu
• kendrick lAmAr: April 22, 8 p.m.
CROCODILE ROCK
(520 WeSt HamiltoN St, alleNtoWN)
610.434.460, crocodilerockcAFe.com
• endleSS victory / liminAl: (elite
room) April 6, 7 p.m.
• reverSe order / crASh the pArty:
April 6, 7 p.m.
• SpoSe: April 17, 7 p.m.
• Silver dreSS pAntS: April 19, 7 p.m.
• gAnStAgrASS: April 26, 7 p.m.
• millionAireS / trAce cyruS / beneAth
the Sun / lAnciFer: April 28, 8 p.m.
GIANT CENTER
(950 herSheypArk dr., herShey)
717.534.3911, giAntcenter.com
• hArlem globetrotterS: mArch 15,
7 p.m.
• cArrie underWood: mArch 25, 7:30
p.m.
• mirAndA lAmbert / dierkS bentley:
April 19, 7 p.m.
SANDS BETHLEHEM
EVENT CENTER
(77 SAndS blvd., bethlehem)
610.2977414, SAndSeventcenter.com
• yeS: April 7, 7 p.m.
• bill engvAll: April 12, 8 p.m.
• WAyne neWton: April 20, 8 p.m.
SOVEREIGN CENTER
(700 penn St., reAding)
610.898.7299, Sovereigncenter.com
• diAne reeveS And the rSo jAZZ FeSt:
April 5, 7:30 p.m.
• incognito / mAySA: jAZZ FeSt: April
6, 7 p.m.
• Fiddler on the rooF: April 15, 6 p.m.
• bob Seger & the Silver bullet bAnd:
April 23, 7:30 p.m.
• joAn riverS: April 26, 8 p.m.
• tedeSchi truckS bAnd: April 28, 7:30
p.m.
SOVEREIGN PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER
(136 north 6th Street, reAding)
610.898.7469, Sovereigncenter.com
• diAnne reeveS And reAding Symphony
orcheStrA: April 5, 7:30 p.m.
• incognito FeAt. mAySA: April 6, 7 p.m.
• FourplAy: April 7, 7 p.m.
• brit Floyd: April 9, 8 p.m.
• Fiddler on the rooF: April 15, 7:30
p.m.
• joAn riverS: April 26, 8 p.m.
WHITAKER CENTER
(222 mArket St., hArriSburg)
717.214.ArtS, WhitAkercenter.org
• meliSSA mAncheSter: mArch 23, 8 p.m.
• 2celloS: April 4, 7:30 p.m.
• dAve mASon AcouStic duo: April 12,
8 p.m.
• b.b. king: April 19, 8 p.m.
NEW YORK / NEW JERSEY
BEACON THEATRE
(2124 broAdWAy, neW york, n.y.)
212.465.6500, beAcontheAtre.com
• emmylou hArriS & rodney croWell:
mAr. 27, 8 p.m.
• nick cAve & the bAd SeedS: mArch
28-29, 8 p.m.
• keyShiA cole: April 4, 8 p.m.
• yeS: April 9, 8 p.m.
• brit Floyd: April 10, 8 p.m.
• diAnA krAll: April 19, 8 p.m.
• An evening With gipSy kingS: April
20, 8 p.m.
• FAntASiA: April 27, 8 p.m.
• mike tySon: April 28, 8 p.m.
IRVING PLAZA
(17 irving plAce, neW york, n.y.)
212.777.6800, irvingplAZA.com
• Andy grAmmer: April 2, 7 p.m.
• c2c: April 4, 8 p.m.
• living colour: April 6, 7 p.m.
• r5- loud tour: April 11, 6:30 p.m.
• pArkWAy drive: April 13, 6:30 p.m.
• the preSidentS oF the united StAteS:
April 15, 7 p.m.
• mindleSS SelF indulgence: April 16,
7 p.m.
• FonSecA: April 18, 8 p.m.
• killing joke: April 19, 8 p.m.
• AnthrAx: April 20-21, 5 p.m.
• Steel pAnther: April 23, 7 p.m.
• iAmx: April 26, 8 p.m.
• jj grey / moFro: April 27, 7 p.m.
• yngWie mAlmSteen: April 30, 7 p.m.
IZOD CENTER
(50 StAte rt. 120, eASt rutherFord, n.j.)
201.935.3900, meAdoWlAndS.com
• muSe: April 19, 7:30 p.m.
• Styx / reo SpeedWAgon / ted nugent:
April 26, 7 p.m.
MADISON SQUARE GARDEN
(7th Ave., neW york, n.y.)
212.465.6741, thegArden.com
• Armin vAn buuren: mArch 30, 8 p.m.
• FleetWood mAc: April 8, 8 p.m.
• AliciA keyS: April 11, 7:30 p.m.
• eric clApton’S croSSroAdS guitAr
FeStivAl 2013: April 12-13, 7:30 p.m.
• muSe: April 15-16, 8 p.m.
• rod SteWArt: April 19, 7:30 p.m.
RADIO CITY MUSIC HALL
(1260 6th Ave., neW york, n.y.)
212.247.4777, rAdiocity.com
• gAbriel igleSiAS: April 5, 8 p.m.
ROSELAND BALLROOM
(239 52nd Street, neW york, n.y.)
212.247.0200, roSelAndbAllroom.com
• hot chip: April 9, 8 p.m.
• hoodie Allen: April 13, 8 p.m.
BORGATA HOTEL CASINO & SPA
(1 borgAtA WAy, AtlAntic city, n.j.)
609.317.1000, theborgAtA.com
• briAn regAn: April 6, 8 p.m.
• diAnA krAll: April 13, 8 p.m.
• kAthy griFFin: April 20, 8 p.m.
• SoundgArden: mAy 3, 8 p.m.
ExPANDED LISTINGS AT
THEWEEKENDER.COM.
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Rapper and poet George Watsky will take the stage at the
Fillmore at the TLA (334 South St., Philadelphia) March 28
at 9 p.m. For more information, call 215.922.1011 or visit
tlaphilly.com.
concerts
Send listings to WBWnews@civi-
tasmedia.com, 90 E. Market St.,
Wilkes-Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax to
570.831.7375. Deadline is Mon-
days at 2 p.m. With the exception
of concert listings, print listings
occur up until three weeks from
publication date.
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Metro: Dustin Switzer and Neil Nicastro 8-?
River Grille: DJ Hersh 1-5 p.m.
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Hops & Barleys: Aaron Bruch
Jim McCarthy’s: Karaoke
Brews Brothers, Luzerne: Open Mic w/ Paul Martin
Over Pour: Jam Night w/ Junior High
Tommy Boys: Open Mic
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Scranton is a town full of art,
culture, and diversity, so what
better way to bring the community
together than a storytelling fest?
Scranton StorySlam is the prod-
uct of Madeline Zoe McNichols,
who started the event as a high
school senior project. Inspired
by what she saw after attending a
storyslam in Brooklyn, N.Y., she
decided to bring the event home
and do it Scranton-style.
This event brings 10 of the
community’s fnest together, chal-
lenging them to publicly tell a true
story about anything, as long as it
fts into the theme.
“Storytellers can
take the audience in
any direction. They
might tell a scary
story, they might tell
a funny story. You
never know what
you’re going to get,”
said Pamela McNich-
ols, Zoe’s mother,
in a recent interview
with The Weekender.
Zoe and Pamela,
who helps out with
coordinating the
event, try to choose participants
who play an important role in so-
ciety. In the past, storytellers have
included school board members,
authors, professors, students,
comedians, actors, and more.
“We choose people who are ac-
tive in the community, people who
have been recommended as good
storytellers, people who have rich
and interesting lives – basically
people that have the courage to tell
a story,” McNichols explained.
“I fnd that writers are really
good storytellers because they
really know how to construct a
story, so I like to look in that com-
munity.”
Each slam has a different theme.
The frst Scranton StorySlam was
“Warning Signs” and took place
last March. Since then, there have
been two other themed slams:
“Dirty Laundry” which took place
last summer, and “Game Chang-
ers,” which was last fall.
This year, the theme will cover
each part of Scranton, including
North, South, West, and even the
Hill Section, capturing the tales of
each area.
“The main idea with this year’s
storyslams is to bring the com-
munity together,” McNichols said.
“Maybe parts of the community
that don’t know each other or that
don’t really hang out together can
kind of come together.”
The West Side StorySlam will
be the frst in this sequence. For
this slam, the contestants chosen
will tell a story that
they have about
growing up, living in,
or just a random ex-
perience that they’ve
had in Scranton’s
West Side. Displaying
the diversity of Scran-
ton’s community is
very important to the
organizers.
“For the West Side
one, we really were
trying to capture the
community, so we
wanted some Italians,
Irish, Lebanese, be-
cause they make up that commu-
nity,” McNichols listed.
Along with the chosen sto-
rytellers, there are two or three
participants randomly chosen from
the audience for each slam. These
people throw their names in a hat
and are picked to compete and tell
their story for the grand prize.
Since it is a competition sto-
rytelling contest, there is obvi-
ously a winner as well as judges to
choose the winner. Four judges are
selected prior to the event (this one
includes Tom Borthwick, Alicia
Grega, and Justine Johnson), and
an additional judge is chosen from
the audience on the day of the
event. Judging is based on whether
or not they thought it was a good
story and if the contestant stayed
within the time limit. Past winners
were Mike Manzano, Andrea
Talarico McGuigan, and Amye
Archer.
The winner of the night receives
the honorary “Slammy Award” as
well as a cash prize. McNichols
hopes to bring together all the
winners at the end of the year to
compete against each other in the
Grand Slam.
The StorySlam is a rapidly
growing event and the frst of its
kind in Northeast Penn.
“Scranton is our big city,”
McNichols said. “We are into the
arts scene there – the performing
arts, the digital arts. We really seek
growth, and we wanted to help it
grow and be a part of it.”
W
West Side has its stories
By Karyn Montigney
Weekender Intern
The planned growth of one of
King’s College’s academic pro-
grams could lead to the relocation
of another.
Discussions are ongoing be-
tween college administrators and
heads of the physician assistant
studies and theater arts programs.
One result may be the physician
assistant studies’ program expand-
ing into space now occupied by
the George P. Maffei II Theatre on
the frst foor of the administration
building.
If this moves forward, as early
as this fall, the campus’ Theatre
Arts Department and the theater
the students practice and perform
in will be relocated to the former
Memorial Presbyterian Church on
West North Street in Wilkes-Barre
that has gone mostly unused since
the school acquired it in 2011.
The brownstone building is as
much a local landmark at the top
of the West North Street hill as it
was when it opened its doors in
the 1870s.
College spokesman John McAn-
drew said nothing has been fnal-
ized and several options are on the
table, including having the physi-
cian assistant studies program
moving into the former church
building and keeping the theater
program in its current home.
McAndrew said none of the dis-
cussions would lead to the demise
of the theater arts program or the
elimination of a physical theater
on the King’s College campus.
“King’s College is in the fnal
stages of determining the feasibil-
ity of a plan to renovate the North
Street Church facility into the
college’s performing arts center. A
fnal decision is contingent upon
developing an adequate plan for
interim Theatre program opera-
tions while the project is under
construction.
“Administration and Theatre
department faculty will be work-
ing together on those plans over
the next few weeks. The outcome
of those discussions and plans will
determine the fnal action plan,”
according to a college statement
sent by McAndrew.
“If the renovation takes place,
the current theatre space will be
utilized to develop a state-of-the-
art lab and classroom facility al-
lowing for the integration of Phy-
sician Assistant program facilities
and expansion to meet the growing
demand for the program,” the
statement went on. “Alternative
plans are also available and ready
to be implemented to support the
expansion of the Physician Assis-
tant program and to re-purpose the
North Street Church facility.”
In an e-mail sent out Wednesday
by Sheileen Corbett, chairwoman
of the school’s theatre arts depart-
ment, to some department alumni,
she urged alumni to contact King’s
President Jack Ryan to voice
displeasure. Her message informs
alumni that this isn’t something
being discussed, but something
that has already been fnalized,
without her input.
“This is happening, begin-
ning May 13th. We just fnished
renovation (of the theatre) in
the amount of $750,000 from a
gift donation. The promise is a
renovated church, however, there
is no funding and no plans for the
project… Plans were set in stone
before I or anyone from the theatre
was ever consulted,” Corbett’s
email, which was obtained by The
Times Leader, stated.
Corbett, via an email to The
Times Leader, noted that “nothing
in that statement negates that fact
that we have a start date for re-
moval of equipment and construc-
tion on the existing theatre on May
13. There just are no plans in place
or theatre funding for the future of
the theatre.”
When asked further questions,
she declined comment, stating that
she “has been instructed” not to
talk to the media.
McAndrew said part of the
long-term plan of the college is
to focus on programs that have
growth potential and the Physi-
cian Assistant studies program
is among those targeted. While
student numbers in this major have
remained steady – up 20 students
to 209 this current year – it’s
because there’s no room to grow,
he added.
Any growth, he said, would
likely come in the ffth- and sixth-
year graduate program, not the
undergraduate program.
McAndrew said targeted growth
is expected to be about 30 students
over the next four years.
Dwane Engelhardt, a 1981
King’s graduate and a theatre
major, was one of several alumni
to e-mail or call The Times Leader
to express concern with the way
the situation has been handled.
He said he hopes the school will
do whatever it can to not only
relocate the theatre, but also spend
the money to do it right.
“Don’t just give them the build-
ing, a ramshackle place, and say,
‘It’s yours,’” said Engelhardt, of
Kingston.
He said workshops and a design
room need to be built and other
renovations have to occur to get
it to the level the current theater
areas are at. Though he stopped
short of accusing the school of
plotting to end the program, he
said art and music programs have
been eliminated previously.
“They slowly kind of phase
them out,” he said.
McAndrew adamantly denied
this was the case for the theater
program, which has 14 majors and
seven minors.
W
Photo by Pete G. Wilcox/Times Leader
Jonathan Vojtko of Wyoming watches Steph Burke of
Queens, N.Y., use a circular power saw to cut a piece of wood
as they work on the set of Shakespeare’s ‘King Richard III.’
King’s theater plans spark drama
By Andrew M. Seder
Special to the Weekender
The West Side Scranton
StorySlam features:
Kate Barrett
Mark Dennebaum
Cy Douaihy
Joe Fasula
Mike Foster
Rich Howells
Maureen Welby McNichols
Tony Bartocci as the Master of
Ceremonies
Find out more at scrantonstoryslam.com.
West Side Scranton StorySlam:
March 30, doors 6:30 p.m., show
7:30 p.m., Haggerty’s Tavern
(421 N. Main Ave., Scranton). $5.
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• Serving Wilkes-Barre & Surrounding Areas • Service To Area Airports
•Fast, Dependable, Courteous Service • Newer Model Taxi’s / Airconditioned Safe & Reliable
• OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY
OPEN 365 DAYS
A YEAR
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Ono’s Bar & Grill
236 Zerby Ave.
Kingston, PA 283-2511
Monday Special with “Liz”
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(9pm-11pm)
Rating: W W
The ‘90s are over. It died at
least 13 years ago. We’ve all
stopped wearing our Blossom
hats, humanely put down our
Tamagotchis, and moved on. But
some embarrassing elements from
that decade still remain etched
within our pop cultural landscape,
and try as we might, we simply
can’t escape them.
One of those more regrettable
elements is the sight of a cartoon
character who is so full of attitude
and so unlike your Daddy’s cartoon
character that it can’t help but snow-
board down a totally gnarls moun-
tain, brah! It’s amazing this concept
lives on because even in the ‘90s, it
was considered a desperate way to
appeal to children and young adults.
Nowadays the idea is so clichéd that
it doesn’t even work when it’s used
ironically.
Nonetheless, about 30 minutes
into “The Croods,” we get, not one,
but six cavemen shooting a mean
whipple down the foamy fip-fop
(Asniggering 14-year-old has
informed me that these are, in fact,
snowboarding terms). This fashy
yet clueless sequence sums up
everything that’s cynical and lazy
about “The Croods.” Consider this
movie to be the cinematic equivalent
to jiggling car keys in front of a
cooing, clapping infant.
But to be fair, “The Croods” does
boast a kinetic opening that fnds the
Croods – a family of not-quite-fully-
evolved Neanderthals – hunting
for food and eventually trapped in
the middle of an elaborate game
of keep-away as they try to evade
predatory rivals. But once that
dazzling sequence ends, the flm
slips into far more inert territories as
we’re introduced to Grug (Nicolas
Cage), the paranoid patriarch of
the Croods who keeps his family
holed up in a cave most of the time
because he’s convinced that new or
unfamiliar things will kill you.
Tired of living under the rules
of her fear-mongering father, the
adventurous Eep (Emma Stone)
sneaks out of the family cave one
night and encounters Guy (Ryan
Reynolds), a slightly more evolved
cavemen who shares Eep’s lust for
life.
Coincidentally, shortly after
Eep’s escape, the family cave is
destroyed by a violent earthquake.
With nowhere else to go, the Croods
reluctantly follow Guy to greener
pastures, even though his only
solution is to “ride away on the
sun.”
It’s unfortunate that “The Croods”
only seems to reinforce John Krica-
fulusi’s lie that writers have no place
in animation because throughout the
flm, the writers only seem to get
in the way of the surreal invention
of the animators. Taking place in
a bizarre pastel-colored version of
Pangea, the world of “The Croods”
takes place in an odd alternate
timeline in which whales walk on
land, humans are attacked by large
owl/bobcat hybrids, and piranhas
have wings.
There’s a fun absurdist streak
running throughout “The Croods,”
but it’s constantly undercut by the
achingly conventional storyline that
leans heavily on easy pop culture
references and creaky “Flintstones”
inspired anachronisms, and it just
generally feels like somebody
took the script from a late period
“Ice Age” sequel, swapped out the
prehistoric animals, and replaced
them with caveman.
“The Croods” also pays near
constant lip service to living life to
its fullest and enjoying its attendant
wonders and joys, which is very
diffcult to swallow. If life is so
great, why did I waste 91 minutes of
it watching “The Croods”?
W
Though a great piece of eye candy, ‘The Croods’ lacks in
other areas.
‘Croods’ as outdated
as its setting
movie review
By Mike Sullivan
Weekender Correspondent
In theaters this week:
• G.I. Joe: Retaliation
• The Host
• Room 237
DVDs released
March 26:
• Lincoln
• Killing Them
Softly
• Parental
Guidance
• The Collec-
tion
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Twihards, take note. If you
thought that Bella had a tough
time trying to make up her mind
between Edward and Jacob, wait
until you meet Melanie Stryder, a
teenager who fnds herself in one
of cinema’s most bizarre roman-
tic triangles.
Based on “Twilight” author
Stephenie Meyer’s sci-f best-
seller, “The Host” is all about
aliens who invade both earth and
the bodies of human beings.
Saoirse Ronan stars as Mela-
nie, one of the last human survi-
vors who is eventually co-opted
by a good-natured E.T. called
Wanderer, or Wanda for short.
Playing host to Wanda might not
be life-threatening for Melanie,
but it does wreck havoc on her
love life.
See, Melanie has the hots for
Jared (Max Irons), while Wanda
is smitten with Ian (Jake Abel).
Needless to say, it makes for a
unique kind of relationship.
“Playing Wanda, I suppose,
was a bit tricky because she’s in
love with Ian, but at the same
time, she has all of Melanie’s
memories and emotions, so
she’s attracted to Jared because
Melanie is in love with him,” said
Ronan, 18. “But Melanie doesn’t
want Wanda to go anywhere near
Jared because Jared is hers.
“It was very complicated, but
we mapped out everything when
it came to that sort of stuff.”
Directed by “Gattaca” helmer
Andrew Niccol, “The Host”
(which co-stars William Hurt,
Frances Fisher and Diane Kruger)
is certainly not the frst mash-up
of sci-f and love story, but just
as Meyer’s “Twilight” books
gave vampires a modern-day
makeover, “The Host” updates
the notion of invading aliens.
Nicknamed The Souls, the
E.T.s try, in their way, to make
the world a better place. They
are, in Niccol’s words, more
humane than humans. That said,
not all earthlings are willing to
get with the parasite program.
While the Souls usually
extinguish the minds of the
humans they’ve been implanted
into, Melanie is strong-willed
enough to co-exist with Wanda.
Being asked to play two
characters at once was something
of a dream come true for Ronan,
who developed different accents
and walks for each woman.
On the set, Ronan’s voiceovers
as Wanda were piped into her ear
via an earpiece so she could hear
Wanda’s running dialogue with
Melanie as she was performing
those scenes.
So, how did Ronan like acting
with herself?
“I was nervous because I
had never worked with Saoirse
before,” she says with a laugh.
“I’ve heard some stories. She’s
a bit of a diva, I gotta say, for an
Irish girl. No, it was fne. I really
enjoyed it, I did.
“I knew what [Wanda’s]
delivery was going to be every
time in my ear, so it gave me
the freedom to play around with
different things and try different
things out.”
When it came to “The Host’s”
action scenes, Ronan was on
frm footing. Three years ago,
she appeared in Joe Wright’s
“Hannah,” which required her
to perform wall-to-wall stunts.
There were times on the set
of “The Host” when Ronan
surprised the crew with her
willingness to get physical.
“For one scene, the second AD
brought me over to this balcony
and said, ‘How would you like
to jump off of here? We have a
harness so you’ll be completely
safe, but we understand if you
don’t want to do it.’
“I said, ‘I’ll do it. I want to do
it.’ I wanted them to be able to
get as many shots as they could
get. The whole crew and AD
team had a bet that I wouldn’t do
it because it was so high up, but
the second AD thought I would
do it, so she won 40 bucks. That
was fun.”
Past, present, and future
Ronan comes by her love of
acting naturally. The only child
of Irish actor Paul Ronan (“The
Devil’s Own”) and wife Monica,
Saoirse was born in the Bronx.
At the age of three, she returned
with her parents to their native
land.
While she’s worked all over
the world, she still considers
Dublin home. “I’ve found that
while I’ve been away, my accent
gets stronger and I become more
Irish,” she noted. “I become more
patriotic.”
Ronan was already a veteran
of British TV by the time she
snagged the life-changing part
of aspiring novelist Briony Tallis
in “Atonement.” The movie
earned Ronan rave reviews and
a Best Supporting Actress Oscar
nomination.
Since then, Ronan has turned
in a number of well-received
performances in “The Lovely
Bones,” “Hanna,” and “The
Way Back.” In those flms,
she portrayed a suburban
Philadelphia murder victim, a
teenage assassin, and a Polish
orphan, respectively.
If Ronan has regrets about
working through her childhood,
she’s not letting on. “The thing
is, I never take [stardom] for
granted, but at the same time,
it’s just one part of my life,” she
explained. “It doesn’t overwhelm
me too much. I’ve been dealing
with it since I was 10.”
It’s likely that Ronan will be
dealing with success for a little
while longer. At the moment, she
has a handful of flms in various
stages of production, including
May’s vampire thriller “Byzan-
tium” and the post-apocalyptic
romance “How I Live Now,”
which is due in September.
This summer, Ronan is
scheduled to begin shooting
“How To Catch AMonster,”
which marks her pal Ryan
Gosling’s directorial debut. “Mad
Men’s” Christina Hendricks stars
as single mom whose teenage
son uncovers a mysterious
underwater town.
At the moment, Ronan is fn-
ishing up “The Grand Budapest
Hotel” for one of her favorite
directors, “Moonrise Kingdom’s”
Wes Anderson. “Wes always has
amazing casts in his flms, and
he has a brilliant, brilliant cast
in this,” said Ronan of the 2014
flm about a hotel’s “perfectly
composed” concierge.
“We all have dinner together
every single night. I’m sitting
down at a table where Wes is
at the top, and there’s Harvey
Keitel and Willem Dafoe and
Ralph Fiennes and Bill Murray.
Amazing. There’s moments like
that when suddenly everything is
a bit too surreal.”
W
Saoirse Ronan finds herself wrapped up in a bizarre love triangle, as well as a bit of two-
faced turmoil of her own, in ‘The Host.’
Split personality
By Amy Longsdorf
Weekender Correspondent
Ronan plays dual role in ‘The Host’
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570.690.323B
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puzzles
ACROSS
1 Suitable
4 Young boxer?
7 Litigious sort
8 Middle Eastern
dish
10 Bethlehem’s
region
11 Ball game
segment
13 New Orleans
neighborhood
16 Barbie’s
companion
17 Hosiery shade
18 Shaft of light
19 “An Inconvenient
Truth” narrator
20 Enticement
21 Chris of tennis
lore
23 19th President
25 Leave out
26 Cartoonist
Goldberg
27 Help
28 Inscribed pillar
30 “Suburgatory”
airer
33 Ice cream favor
36 Evening affair
37 Sorrow
38 Slow critter
39 Ear-related
40 Spring mo.
41 A Bobbsey twin
DOWN
1 Poet W.H.
2 Hammerhead part
3 Farm vehicle
4 Piece of
cheesecake?
5 Arm bones
6 Twosome
7 Confdent
8 Sharp irritation
9 False
10 NYC airport
12 Toothed wheels
14 Rodgers partner
15 “Catcher in the -”
19 Obtain
20 Caustic solution
21 Eastern
potentates
22 “America’s
Funniest Home -”
23 Island dance
24 Desert
25 Lummox
26 Carouse
28 Discard
29 Alternative to
“his/her”
30 Texas Hold ‘em
declaration
31United nations
32 Automobile
34 1492 vessel
35 Tittle
last week
BENEFITS/CHARITY EVENTS
AmERICAN CANCER SoCIETY
RElAY FoR lIFE EVENTS mEETINgS:
ApRIl 1, 6 p.m., SAxToN pAVIlIoN,
EdwARdSVIllE.
SpRINg CRAFT FAIR TEAm FuNdRAISER:
ApRIl 6, 10 A.m.-3 p.m., CRESTwood
HIgH SCHool (281 S. mouNTAIN BlVd.,
mouNTAIN Top).
BluE CHIp FARmS ANImAl REFugE
(974 loCkVIllE Rd., dAllAS,
570.333.5265, www.BCFANImAlREF-
ugE.oRg)
• First annual motorcycle run:
mAY 12. REgISTRATIoN 11 A.m.-NooN,
BEgINS AT 12:15. BEgINS ANd ENdS AT
gETAwAY louNgE (RouTE 11, plYm-
ouTH)
uNICo NATIoNAl kEYSToNE CHApTER
(duNmoRE)
• charity Pig roast: aPril 13, 6-10
p.m., FIoREllI’S (pECkVIllE). $45 pER
pERSoN.
VICTImS RESouRCE CENTER
(71 NoRTH FRANklIN ST, 570.823.0765,
www.VRCNEpA.oRg)
• 28th annual geranium sale:
oRdERS muST BE plACEd BY ApRIl 26.
gERANIumS wIll BE AVAIlABlE FoR
pICk-up/dElIVERY THE wEEk oF mAY
7-10. pINk oR REd gERANIumS IN 4INCH
poTS, $3.50 EACH.
VoluNTEERS oF AmERICA
(25 N. RIVER ST., wIlkES-BARRE,
570.825.5261)
• 9th annual celebrity Dinner:
ApRIl 11, THE woodlANdS INN ANd
RESoRT (1073 HIgHwAY 315,wIlkES-
BARRE). $125 pER pERSoN. INFo: lIz,
570.825.5261, ExT. 8.
CAR & BIkE EVENTS
2013 NEpA moToRCYClE ANd powERS-
poRTS SHow:
ApRIl 14, NooN-5 p.m., moHEgAN SuN
ARENA AT CASEY plAzA (255 HIgHlANd
pARk BlVd, wIlkES-BARRE). pRoCEEdS
FRom THE SHow go To wYomINg VAl-
lEY CHIldREN’S ASSoCIATIoN. $7.50
pER BIkE, REgISTRATIoN dAY-oF FRom
9-11 A.m. moToRCYClES wITH moRE
THAN ½ TANk oF FuEl NoT pERmITTEd.
$7.50, AdmISSIoN; FREE, CHIldREN
uNdER 12.
guNNERS pA lAw
ENFoRCEmENT mC
(guNNERSpAlEmC@gmAIl.Com, $20/
RIdER, $10/pASSENgER uNlESS NoTEd
oTHERwISE)
2Nd ANNuAl pRojECT FAllEN RIdE:
mAY 5, 10 A.m., SuSquEHENNA BREwINg
Co. INFo: guNNERSpAlEmC.Com.
CHuRCHES
FIRST pRESBYTERIAN CHuRCH oF
ClARkS SummIT
(300 SCHool ST., ClARkS SummIT,
570.586.6306, www.FpCCS.oRg)
• Final concert oF the arts at First
pRESBYTERIAN CHuRCHFINAl CoNCERT:
ApRIl 7, 4 p.m. 300 SCHool STREET,
ClARkS SummIT
ST. FAuSTINA kowAlSkA’S CATHolIC
CHuRCH
• annual basket raFFle FunDraiser:
ApRIl 14, dooRS 10:30 A.m., dRAwINg
BEgINS AT 1 p.m, ST. STAN’S gYmNASI-
um (wEST CHuRCH STREET, NANTICokE).
TICkETS To BId oN THE BASkETS CoST
$5 A RAFFlE TICkET, wHICH CoNTAINS
25 INdIVIduAl TICkETS.
ST. mICHAEl’S CHuRCH
(CoRNER oF CHuRCH/wINTER STS., old
FoRgE, 570.457.2875)
• Pierogie sale: march 27, Pick-uP
FRom 2-5 p.m. oRdERS BY mARCH 21.
$6 pER dozEN. To plACE oRdERS CAll
SANdRA, 570.457.9280 oR THE CHuRCH
HAll, 570.457.2875.
uNITY oF NEpA:
A SpIRITuAl CENTER
(140 S. gRANT ST., wIlkES-BARRE)
guEST SpEAkER ANN mARIE ACACIo:
ApRIl 7, 10 A.m.
oNENESS BlESSINg wITH ERNIE pAppA:
ApRIl 8, 22, 7-9 p.m. $8.
dEVElopINg EFFECTIVE TEAmS: TRANS-
FoRmINg TEAmS INTo SACREd CIRClES
oF SERVICE wEBINAR: ApRIl 10, 7-9 p.m.
SpIRITuAl lIBERATIoN wITH mICHAEl
BECkwITH: ApRIl 13, 6:30-9 p.m.
THE BRIdgE ClASS: ApRIl 17, 6:30-9
p.m.
RE-NEw uNITY woRkSHop ANd
luNCHEoN: ApRIl 20, 9:30 A.m.-3:30
p.m. $30, BoTH woRkSHopS; $20, oNE
woRkSHop. lImITEd To 50 pARTIC-
pANTS; RESERVATIoNS REquIREd.
EVENTS
CHICoRY HouSE ANd FolkloRE SoCIETY
(www.FolkloRESoCIETY.oRg,
570.333.4007)
• new englanD contra Dance: aPril
6, 7 p.m., CHuRCH oF CHRIST uNITINg
(776 mARkET ST., kINgSToN). $9.
CHoRAl ARTS oF luzERNE CouNTY
(www.CHoRAlARTSlC.oRg)
• sPring concert/FiFth season
CElEBRATIoN: ApRIl 27, 7:30 p.m., FIRST
pRESBYTERIAN CHuRCH (97 S. FRANklIN
ST., wIlkES-BARRE); ApRIl 28, 4 p.m.,
CHRIST luTHERAN CHuRCH (467 mAIN
ST., CoNYNgHAm). $15, AdulTS; $10,
STudENTS ANd SENIoRS.
CHoRAl SoCIETY oF NoRTHEAST
pENNSYlVANIA
• chilDren anD youth ensembles
mId-wINTER pRogRAm: ApRIl 7, 3
p.m., ST. lukE’S EpISCopAl CHuRCH,
SCRANToN. $10, AdulTS; 18 YEARS
ANd YouNgER, FREE; $2 dISCouNT
FoR SENIoRS, STudENTS, lACkAwA-
NNA lIBRARY SYSTEm CARd HoldERS,
mEmBERS oF wVIA, ANd mEmBERS
oF THE RAYmoNd Hood Room AT THE
SCRANToN CulTuRAl CENTER.
THE CommoNwEAlTH mEdICAl Col-
lEgE
(525 pINE ST., SCRANToN, 570.504.7000,
THECommoNwEAlTHmEdICAl.Com)
• obesity symPosium: aPril 6.
REgISTRATIoN BEgINS 7:30 A.m. wITH
SpEAkERS To Follow AT 8.
dIETRICH THEATER
(60 E. TIogA STREET, TuNkHANNoCk,
570.996.1500, www.dIETRICHTHEATER.
Com).
• sPring 2013 Film Festival oPening
SEE AGENDA, PAGE 34
agenda
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CABINET
CAPTAIN SMIRK
JARED CAMPBELL
40 LB. HEAD
ED RANDAZZO
SHANNON
MARSYADA
MELISSA
KRAHNKE
102.3-FMThe Mountain
Every Sunday
from 8-9 p.m.
LI STEN
TOTHESE
ARTISTS
THIS WEEK
AND PLENTY
MORE
MUSIC
ON THE
MENU
LIVE
WITH ALAN K. STOUT
FACEBOOK.COM/
MUSICONTHEMENU
weekender
theater
Dietrich Theatre
(60 E. Tioga STrEET, Tunkhannock,
570.996.1500, diETrichThEaTEr.com)
• “Auntie MAMe:” April. 24-27, 7 p.M.;
April 28, 3 p.M.
• toM Knight puppet Show: April 17,
1:30 p.M.
Jason Miller Playwrights Project
(570.591.1378, nepAplAywrightS@
live.coM)
• DrAMAtiStS Support group: thirD
thurSDAy of eAch Month, 7 p.M., the
olDe BricK theAtre (126 w. MArKet
ST., ScranTon).
• SuBMiSSionS for DyoniSiA ’13: the
thirD AnnuAl JASon Miller plAy-
wrightS’ proJect invitAtionAl Being
AccepteD through MAy 15.
King’s College Theatre
(ADMin. BlDg., 133 n. river St., wilKeS-
BArre, 570.208.5825)
• “richArD iii” By williAM ShAKe-
SpeAre: April 11-13, 15, 7:30 p.M.;
April 14, 2 p.M. $12, StuDentS/Senior
citizenS; $5.
Limelight Players
• “into the wooDS:” April 5-6, 7 p.M.;
April 7, 1 p.M., phoenix perforM-
ing ArtS centre (409-411 MAin St.,
DuryeA). $12.
Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire
AuDitionS for the 33rD SeASon,
MAnSion At Mount hope eStAte,
route 72. cAllBAcKS will Be helD
in the Afternoon AnD will StreSS
MoveMent. thoSe AuDitioning ShoulD
weAr looSe fitting or coMfort-
ABle clothing. By AppointMent only,
717.665.7021, ext. 120.
Pines Dinner Theatre
(448 north 17th St., Allentown.
610.433.2333. pineSDinnertheAtre.
com)
• “i love A piAno:” through June
2. thurSDAy AnD SunDAy, 12:30 p.M.
Dinner, 2 p.M. Show; friDAy AnD SAt-
urDAy, 6:30 p.M. Dinner, 8 p.M. Show.
$48.50.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420 n. wAShington Ave., ScrAnton,
570.346.7369)
BroADwAy ScrAnton (BroADwAy-
ScrAnton.coM) preSentS:
• cAthy rigBy iS “peter pAn:” April
5-7, fri., 8 p.M., SAt., 2 & 8 p.M., Sun., 1
& 6 p.M.
• “hAir:” April 15-16, 7:30 p.M.
• “DreAMgirlS:” MAy 10-12, fri., 8 p.M.,
SAt., 2 & 8 p.M., Sun., 1 & 6 p.M.
Stage Directions Performing
Arts Academy
: July 28-Aug. 3, 9 A.M.-5 p.M. DAily,
ferrwooD MuSic cAMp (257 MiDDle
roAD, DruMS). co-eD , AgeS 6-18.
Theatre at the Grove
(5177 nuAngolA roAD, nuAngolA.
nuAngolAgrove.coM, 570.868.8212,
groveticKetS@frontier.coM)
ticKet pricing: $18, plAyS; $20, Mu-
SicAlS; $86, SuMMer pASS, firSt five
ShowS; $120, SeASon pASS. All ShowS
Are ByoB AnD feAture cABAret SeAt-
ing.
• “ring of fire: the MuSic of Johnny
cASh:” April 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27, 8
p.M.; April 14, 21, 28, 3 p.M.
• “neil SiMon’S Brighton BeAch
MeMoirS:” MAy 10, 11, 16-18, 8 p.M.;
MAy 12, 19, 3 p.M.
• “Annie get your gun:” June 14, 15,
21, 22, 28, 29, 8 p.M.; June 16, 23, 30,
3 p.M.
• “cAtS:” July 26, 27, Aug. 2, 3, 8-10, 8
p.M.; July 28, Aug. 4, 11, 3 p.M.
• “the MouSetrAp:” Sept. 13, 14, 19-
21, 8 p.M.; Sept. 15, 22, 3 p.M.
• “Sweeney toDD: the DeMon BArBer
of fleet Street:” oct. 18, 19, 25, 26,
nov. 1, 2, 8 p.M.; oct. 20, 27, nov. 3, 3
p.M.
• “it’S A wonDerful life:” nov. 29, 30,
Dec. 6, 7, 12-14, 8 p.M.; Dec. 1, 8, 15,
3 p.M.
The Vintage Theater
(326 Spruce St., ScrAnton, info@
ScrAntonSvintAgetheAter.coM)
• ScrAnton coMeDy night: MArch 30,
DoorS 7 p.M., Show At 8. $5.
Wyoming Area Drama Club
(wyoMing AreA SeconDAry center, 20
MeMoriAl St., exeter.)
• “SeuSSicAl the MuSicAl:” April 12-
13, 7 p.M.; April 14, 2 p.M. $10.
ExPAnDED LiSTinGS AT
ThEWEEKEnDER.CoM. W
Send your listings to WB-
Wnews@civitasmedia.com,
90 E. Market St., Wilkes-
Barre, Pa., 18703, or fax
to 570.831.7375. Deadline
is Mondays at 2 p.m. Print
listings occur up until three
weeks from publication date.
‘The Andalucian Friend’
Alexander Soderberg
Rating: W W W V
Auditions for the 33rd season of the Pennsylvania Renais-
saince Faire are being held at Mount hope Estate, Route 72
Those auditioning should wear loose-fitting or comfortable
clothing. By appointment only, 717.665.7021, ext. 120.
Stockholm syndrome
Sophie Brinkmann lives a
seemingly quiet life. Ayoung
widower, Sophie divides her time
between raising her teenage son,
Albert, as a single mother and
working as a nurse in a Stock-
holm hospital. Most of the time
Sophie’s life is nothing more
than a blank white page, but one
stroke of fate is about to change
that.
In “The Andalucian Friend”
by Alexander Söderberg, readers
are introduced to a new Swedish
crime series that follows leading
lady, Sophie. The work, which is
the frst for Söderberg, is part one
of a trilogy.
As the frst installment, read-
ers are introduced to pivotal
character, Hector Guzman, who,
after a hit-and-run, is brought to
the emergency room. Naturally,
Sophie comes to his aid. As
time advances, Sophie begins
to develop feelings for Hector,
extending into a welcoming
and loving companionship that
Hector likewise initiates through
firtation - but not everything is
as it seems.
When readers frst become
acquainted with Sophie, we are
given a glimpse of her the night
before she meets Hector: “Sophie
went on as normal. She cleared
the table, tidied up, watched
some television, called a friend
and talked about nothing — and
the evening passed. She went up
to bed and tried to read some of
the book on her bedside table,
about a woman who had found
a new life helping the street
children of Bucharest. The book
was dull; the woman was preten-
tious and Sophie had nothing in
common with her. She closed the
book and fell asleep alone in her
bed as usual.”
Before Hector, what Sophie
failed to recognize was that while
she was not like the protagonist,
she did share a commonality
with the book: her life was just
as lackluster. Now, in meet-
ing Hector, there was danger
involved as his identity unrav-
eled. His soft exterior masked a
brutish interior, one that had no
less captured Sophie’s heart.
It is revealed that Hector
is the maestro behind a large
crime network that orchestrates
narcotic and weapon traffcking
around the world. As other crime
organizations become aware of
Hector’s success, many seek to
usurp him. The most confdent of
them all is a repugnant German
crime boss who has no reserva-
tions when it comes to cruelty.
Unfortunately, with Sophie
being added to the mix, she soon
becomes a target and almost in-
stantaneously her life goes from
dull to risky.
Other than Sophie, the work
lacks many endearing charac-
ters. However, Sophie’s resolute
compassion and naivety brings a
positive serenity to a world full
of darkness, balancing the scale.
The unraveling and expansive
nature of Söderberg’s frst piece
of the puzzle that is this series
will no doubt grow more com-
pelling in time.
W
Novel approach
Book reviews and literary insight
kacy Muir | Weekender Correspondent
Books released the week of April 1:
• ‘Life after Life’ by Kate Atkinson
• ‘Gulp: Adventures on the Alimentary Canal’ by Mary Roach
• ‘A Broth of Betrayal (Soup Lover’s Mystery Series #2)’ by Connie
Archer
• ‘Fever (The Breathless Trilogy #2)’ by Maya Banks
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• Spring 2013 Film FeStival Opening
night gala: april 5, 5:30 p.m. $35.
• Spring 2013 Film FeStival: april
5-8. $9, evening (aFter 6 p.m.); $8,
matinee.
• philadelphia BuS trip tO the
BarneS: april 11, BuS departS 7 a.m.,
returnS apprOximately 10 p.m. $135
• tOm Knight puppet ShOw: april 17,
1:30 p.m.
• philadelphia BuS trip tO the
BarneS: april 11, departS 7 a.m.
returnS 10 p.m. $135.
KidS ClaSSeS:
• Quilting FOr KidS – “Starry SKy”
wedneSdayS, thrOugh marCh 27,
3:30-5 p.m. ageS 6 and up. $6 per
ClaSS.
• mOvement and StOrytelling FOr
preSChOOlerS: ageS 4 and 5. SerieS
2, april 3, 10, 17, 24, 10-10:45 a.m.
intergeneratiOnal ClaSSeS:
• Quilting FOr everyOne: “atlantiC
Star:” ageS 13 and up. wedneSdayS,
thrOugh marCh 27, 6-7:30 p.m. $6
per ClaSS, inCluding materialS.
adult ClaSSeS:
• Kundalini yOga: ageS 16 and up.
10-11:30 a.m., SerieS 3 april 27, may
4, 11, 18. $40, FOur ClaSSeS; $15,
drOp-in.
Eighth Annual Mothers Day
Intertribal Powwow:
may 11, nOOn-6 p.m., may 12, nOOn-5
p.m., nOxen Fire CO. FOundS (Stull
rOad, nOxen, wyOming COunty). Free.
FOr mOre inFOrmatiOn COntaCt
natalie “wiSteria” at 570.947.2097
Or via email at wiSteria18704@
yahOO.COm.
The Greater Scranton Chamber
of Commerce
(222 mulBerry St., SCrantOn)
• ladieS night at the COuntry CluB:
april 3, 5-8 p.m., glen OaK COuntry
CluB (250 OaKFOrd rOad, ClarKS
Summit)
• develOp Key aCtiOnS tO Create
mOre meaningFul COnverSatiOnS:
april 10, 8 a.m.
• leaderShip laCKawanna alumni
reuniOn: april 10, 5:30 p.m.
• emplOyment expO: april 11, 11 a.m.
irem CluBhOuSe
(64 ridgeway drive, dallaS)
• eaSter BuFFet: marCh 31, nOOn-4
p.m.
• health aging Seminar: minding the
mind: april 10, 2-3 p.m.
Jim Thorpe events:
• BaCh and handel ChOrale eaSter
COnCert: april 6, 3 p.m., St. marK’S
epiSCOpal ChurCh (21 raCe St., Jim
thOrpe). $18, adultS; $15, SeniOrS
and StudentS; Free, Children 10
and under.
Johnson College
(3427 n. main ave., SCrantOn,
570.342.6404, JOhnSOn.edu)
• 21St annual gOlF tOurnament:
may 17, Blue ridge trail gOlF CluB,
mOuntain tOp. inFO: Stephanie Orza-
leK, COOrdinatOr OF inStitutiOnal
advanCement, 570.702.8908 Or
SOrzaleK@JOhnSOn.edu.
King’s College
(133 nOrth river St., wilKeS-Barre,
570.208.5957 Or KingS.edu)
• CantOreS ChriSti regiS Spring
COnCert: april 19-20, 7:30 p.m. J. Car-
rOll mCCOrmiCK CampuS miniStry
Center. Free. inFO: 570.208.6044.
Lackawanna College
(501 vine St., SCrantOn,
1.877.346.3552, laCKawanna.edu)
envirOnmental inStitute (10 mOFFat
dr., COvingtOn twp.)
• On exhiBit: a walK thrOugh na-
tureS glOry: thrOugh april 19.
• live native animalS: april 3, 6:30-8
p.m. $5.
• amphiBian walK: april 17, 6-8 p.m.
$5. pre-regiStratiOn reQuired.
• art in nature: Clay pOt wreathS:
april 20, 9 a.m.-nOOn. $25. pre-reg-
iStratiOn reQuired.
• art Opening: three artiStS FrOm
elmhurSt: april 26, 5-7 p.m. runS
thrOugh June 3.
Lake-Lehman Last Knight 2013
Graduation Night Lock-in
vera Bradley/COaCh BingO Fun-
draiSer: april 6, 1 p.m., dOOrS at
nOOn. laKe lehman high SChOOl
(Old rOute 115, lehman). $20, 20
gameS OF BingO. FOr advanCe tiCK-
etS COntaCt amy, 570.239.0737.
LOGAN Foundation
• eaSter egg hunt FOr individualS
with SpeCial needS: marCh 30, 11
a.m., wyOming valley SpOrtS dOme.
pre-regiStratiOn reQuired By Call-
ing 570.704.8054 Or 570.762.8407.
regiStered individualS muSt COme
Between 10-10:30 a.m. tO CheCK in.
Misericordia University
(www.miSeriCOrdia.edu,
570.674.6400; BOx OFFiCe, 674.6719,
miSeriCOrdia.edu)
• adult learner Open hOuSe FOr
expreSSway aCCelerated degree
prOgram: april 9, 4-7 p.m., rOOm 405,
Building 4, lCCC (1333 S. prOSpeCt
St., nantiCOKe); april 10, 4-7 p.m.,
laCKawanna COllege BOardrOOm
(145 e. BrOad St., hazletOn); april
18, 4-6 p.m., laCKawanna COllege-
hazletOn Center (145 e. BrOad St.,
hazletOn).
• “impOrtanCe OF Keeping reCOrdS
FOr liBrarieS and natiOnal ar-
ChiveS” preSentatiOn: april 16, 4:30
p.m., mary Kintz BevevinO liBrary.
Monroe County Garden Club
• meeting: april 10, 11:30 a.m.. mOn-
rOe COunty COnServatiOn diStriCt
envirOnmental eduCatiOn Center
(8050 running valley rd., StrOudS-
Burg). Free, memBerS; $5, gueStS.
mOuntain grange nO. 567
• mOnthly FleamarKet: SeCOnd
Saturday OF eaCh mOnth. 9 a.m.-2
p.m., mOuntain grange hall (1632 w.
8th St., CarvertOn).
Nescopeck State Park
(1137 hOney hOle rd., drumS,
570.403.2006)
• SOundS OF a Spring night: marCh
30, 7 p.m. Bring a FlaShlight. Free.
Northern Tier
Symphony Orchestra
(570.289.1090, nOrtherntierSym-
phOny@yahOO.COm, nOrtherntier-
SymphOny.Org)
• perFOrmanCeS: april 6, 8 p.m.,
hOneSdale high SChOOl (459 ter-
raCe St., hOneSdale); april 13, 8
p.m., tunKhannOCK middle SChOOl
(200 FranKlin ave., tunKhannOCK).
$8, adult in advanCe; $4, Student in
advanCe; $9, adult at the dOOr; $5,
Student at the dOOr.
The Osterhout Free Library
(71 S. FranKlin St., wilKeS-Barre,
www.OSterhOut.inFO, 570.821.1959)
• 29th annual geOrge ralStOn gOlF
ClaSSiC hOSted By the rOtary CluB
OF wilKeS-Barre: april 26, mill raCe
gOlF COurSe, BentOn. regiStratiOn
BeginS 11 a.m., ShOtgun Start at
nOOn. $100 per perSOn. tO regiSter,
Be a SpOnSOr, Or dOnate a prize,
COntaCt ChriStOpher Kelly at
570.823.0156, ext. 218 Or CKelly@
OSterhOut.liB.pa.uS.
Penn State Wilkes-Barre
(rte. 115, lehman, 570.675.2171,
wB.pSu.edu)
• Spring Film and diSCuSSiOn SerieS
– “the unCOnQueraBle human
Spirit: Five degreeS OF diverSity:”
thurSdayS thrOugh april 18, 7 p.m.,
r/C wilKeS-Barre mOvieS 14 (24 e.
nOrthamptOn St., wilKeS-Barre)
FriendS OF Salt SpringS parK
(pO BOx 541, mOntrOSe. 570.967.7275,
inFO@FriendSOFSaltSpringSparK.
Org.)
• ChainSaw day: april 13, 9 a.m. pre-
regiSter: 570.967.7275.
• trail Clean up day: april 20, 11
a.m. pre-regiSter: 570.967.7275.
• CyCle & reCyCle - CeleBrate earth
day: april 21, 12:30-5 p.m. rain date,
april 28.
• egg hunt: april 27, 1-4 p.m.
Salvation Army
• annual awardS dinner: may 16,
5:30 p.m., BeSt weStern genetti hO-
tel and COnventiOn Center (77 eaSt
marKet Street, wilKeS-Barre). reS-
ervatiOnS By COntaCting lieutenant
SharOn treSSler at the SalvatiOn
army at SharOn.treSSler@uSe.
SalvatiOnarmy.Org Or 570.824.8741.
Scranton Cultural Center
(420 n. waShingtOn ave., SCrantOn,
570.346.7369, SCrantOnCultural-
Center.Org)
• “the view” with a SCrantOn at-
titude: april 5, 7 p.m., COCKtail hOur
at 6. $6.
Sons of the American Legion
Post 781
(ChurCh rd. mOuntain tOp,
570.474.2161, alpOSt781.Org)
• 5th annual Flea marKet: may 5,
7 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 under COver with
taBle Or $5 in yard, ByOt. regiStra-
tiOn By phOne, 570.474.2161.
The University of Scranton
(800 linden St., SCrantOn,
570.941.7400, SCrantOn.edu)
• alumni day OF ServiCe, Clean-up
OF laCKawanna river heritage trail:
april 13, 10 a.m. tO vOlunteer Call
570.941.4263.
• hill SeCtiOn Street Sweep and
alumni day OF ServiCe: april 14 1
p.m. tO vOlunteer Call 570.941.4263.
• perFOrmanCe muSiC preSentS “in
COnCert” Featuring the univerSity
OF SCrantOn SingerS with the
manhattan SChOOl OF muSiC BraSS
OrCheStra: april 7, 7:30 p.m., hOuli-
han mClean Center.
• “Federal and internatiOnal gun
COntrOl: an hiStOriCal perSpeC-
tive” leCture: april 8, 4:30 p.m., rOSe
rOOm, Brennan hall.
• BrOwn Bag lunCh: “eQual pay day”
a puBliC awareneSS event tO illuS-
trate the gap Between men’S and
wOmen’S wageS: april 9, 11:45 a.m.,
mCdOnnell rOOm, denapleS Center.
Waverly Community House
(1115 n. aBingtOn rd., waverly,
waverlyCOmm.Org)
• 21St annual hOuSe, garden and
giFt ShOw: april 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.;
april 28, 11 a.m.-4 p.m.
• Beginner’S italian: eight weeKS
Beginning april 9, 7-8 p.m.
wayne COunty BuilderS aSSOCiatiOn
(www.wayneCOuntyBuilderS.COm )
• hOme and garden FeStival: april
27, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; april 28, 9 a.m.-4
p.m., ladOre Camp retreat and
COnFerenCe Center (OFF OwegO
turnpiKe, waymart). Free tO the
puBliC.
• legO Building COnteSt: april 27
at the wBCa hOme and garden FeS-
tival, ladOre lOdge Camp retreat
and COnFerenCe Center (waymart).
pre-regiStratiOn reQuired, 40 SpOtS
availaBle, By april 1.
Wilkes University
(84 w. SOuth St, wilKeS-Barre, 1.800.
wilKeS.u, wilKeS.edu)
• 65th annual luzerne COunty
COunCil OF teaCherS OF mathemat-
iCS (lCCtm) COnteSt: april 6, 9 a.m.,
rite aid auditOrium in the StarK
learning Center. high SChOOl
JuniOrS and SeniOrS FrOm luzerne
COunty high SChOOlS and tunKhan-
nOCK high SChOOl are eligiBle tO
COmpete. the JuniOr and SeniOr
diviSiOn eaCh have a maximum limit
OF 10 StudentS per diviSiOn per
SChOOl. $5 per Student.
• panel diSCuSSiOn: StrategieS that
will help yOung peOple SuCCeed
in SChOOl and in liFe with SpeaK-
erS mahmOud Fahmy, raBBi larry
Kaplan, rev. rOBert zaniCKy, and
mOnSignOr vinCent grimalia: april
16, 4:30 p.m., henry Student Center
BallrOOm.
• allan hamiltOn diCKSOn Spring
writerS SerieS: 7 p.m., KirBy SalOn.
marCh 18, JeFF mOCK and margOt
SChilpp; april 15, tim parriSh.
• max rOSenn leCture By nOah
Feldman: april 28.
wyOming COunty ChamBer OF COm-
merCe
• Bi- annual legiSlative BreaKFaSt:
marCh 27, 8-9:30 a.m., ShadOw-
BrOOK inn and reSOrt (201 reSOrt
lane,tunKhannOCK). Free, wyCCC
memBerS; $10, nOn-memBerS. FOr
reServatiOnS Or mOre inFOrmatiOn,
COntaCt deBOrah at 570.875.8325 Or
By e-mail at deBOrah@wyCCC.COm.
• 21St Birthday BlOCK party: may 3,
6-10 p.m., COmFOrt inn & SuiteS (5 n.
eatOn rOad, tunKhannOCK). $35, in
advanCe; $45 at the dOOr. tiCKetS
Can Be purChaSed Online at www.
wyCCC.COm Or By Calling deBOrah
at 570.875.8325.
LEARNING
A Quest for A Good
Life workshops:
wedneSdayS, 6:30 p.m., Six-weeK
COurSe, new Bridge Center (480
pierCe St., Suite 117 KingStOn) and
mOndayS, 6:30 p.m., 29th Street
OFFiCe COmplex, 1201a ChurCh
St., hazletOn. $25, per wOrKShOp;
$125, all Six. tO regiSter Call
570.643.0222. FOr mOre inFO viSit
www.aQueStFOragOOdliFe.COm.
ArtWorks Gallery & Studio
(503 laCKawanna ave., SCrantOn.
570.207.1815, artwOrKSnepa.COm):
Children’S ClaSSeS
• the yOung artiSt explOreS: Sat-
urdayS, april 6, 13, 20, 27, nOOn-1
p.m. ageS 5-12. $100, inCludeS all
SupplieS.
teen and adult ClaSSeS and wOrK-
ShOpS
• wet & wild: watermedia painting:
SerieS ii: marCh 26, april 2, 9, 6-8
p.m. $100.
• drawing wOrKShOpS with nina da-
vidOwitz at artwOrKS: intrOduCtiOn
tO COlOred penCil drawing, april 4,
11, 18, 25, 6-8 p.m., $100.
• intrOduCtiOn tO COlOred penCil
drawing: april 4, 11, 18, 25, 6-8 p.m.
$100.
• all aBOut theatre FOr very
SpeCial artiStS: wedneSdayS, 5:30-7
p.m. $95, per SerieS. all SupplieS
inCluded. SerieS ii: april 3, 10, 17,
24, may 1, 8. perFOrmanCe may 8 at
7 p.m.
BallrOOm danCing
Downtown Arts at
Arts YOUniverse
(47 n. FranKlin St., wilKeS-Barre,
570.970.2787, www.artSyOuniverSe.
COm)
Phoenix Perfrming Arts Centre:
409-411 main St., duryea,
570.457.3589, phOenixpaC.vpweB.
COm, phOenixpaC08@aOl.COm.
pOCOnO artS COunCil
(18 n. Seventh St., StrOudSBurg.
570.476.4460. www.pOCOnOartS.Org)
adult ClaSSeS
• mixed media: april 8, 15, 22, 29,
6:30-9:30 p.m. $110, memBer; $120,
nOn-memBer; $90, SeniOr memBer;
$95, SeniOr nOn-memBer.
• intrOduCtiOn tO paStel painting:
april 9, 16, 23, 30, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $110,
memBer; $120, nOn-memBer; $90,
SeniOr memBer; $95, SeniOr nOn-
memBer.
• COllage tO COlOgraph: mixed
media and printmaKing: april 13, 20,
27, 1-3 p.m. $60, memBer; $70, nOn-
memBer; $50, SeniOr memBer; $55,
SeniOr nOn-memBer.
• BOtaniCal art: FlOwerS with
BulBS: april 3, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $40,
memBer; $50, nOn-memBer; $30,
SeniOr memBer; $35, SeniOr nOn-
memBer.
ExPANDED LISTINGS AT
THEWEEKENDER.COM. W
AGENDA, FROM PAGE 28 Send your listings to WB-
Wnews@civitasmedia.com, 90
E. Market St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa.,
18703, or fax to 570.831.7375.
Deadline is Mondays at 2 p.m.
Print listings occur up until three
weeks from publication date.
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Planning the Big Day?
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Complimentary Overnight Stay
for the Bride and Groom
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242 Highland Park Boulevard
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By Sara Pokorny
Weekender Staff Writer
F
our words in the form
of a question can
change everything:
Will you marry me?
It’s exhilarating, a moment
charged by love and happiness
that lingers on and on as the
news is spread to family and
friends. “I’m going to spend the
rest of my life with this person,”
you say, and it’s thrilling – until
the second it starts to wear off
and reality hits.
Now we have to plan this
thing.
It’s no secret that putting
a wedding together can be
daunting, but it doesn’t have to
be according to Rebecca Barry
of Harding, who runs Rebecca
Barry Events. Barry doesn’t
only know the feeling from a
professional standpoint but a
personal one, as she got married
this past October.
“There’s a lot to do, of course,
but it’s just a matter of taking it
one step at a time,” Barry said.
“And I won’t lie, it’s not going
to be easy. Something will go
wrong; it always does. But what
you need to concentrate on is
the fact that you’re marrying
your best friend, the love of
your life, and what happens in
between is just going to happen,
but the end result is what
matters.”
Barry can’t put a finger
on one particular facet that’s
constantly overlooked, though
she will say that it’s most often
the small things. Hitches to keep
in mind include transportation
(“I’ve talked to so many limo
places that have couples coming
in a week before the wedding
to book a ride.”), asking the
right questions (“Couples need
to write down everything they
need to know about something
from a vendor to avoid
overlooking hidden fees.”), and
even bridal accessories (“When
I got married, I had my dress,
shoes, and jewelry and was so
excited, until my mom was like
‘Hey, what about a veil?’”).W
Planning a wedding can be overwhelming, but don’t run away just yet - The Weekender is
here to help.
B
elow is a checklist of some things that are oft forgot, yet
necessary to pull off the day of your dreams. Though
it’s not complete, it’s certainly a good starting point.
PICK A DATE.
SELECT YOUR RECEPTION AND
CEREMONY VENUES. (MAKE
SURE TORESERVE ROOMS AT A
NEARBY HOTEL FOR ANY OUT-
OF-TOWNERS.)
SELECT AN OFFICIANT.
MAKE A GUEST LIST.
SEND OUT SAVE THE DATES.
PICK OUT A PROPER
INVITATION.
SIGN UP FOR A REGISTRY.
SHOP FOR A GOWN, AS WELL
AS ACCESSORIES TOGOALONG
WITH.
SEEK OUT A STYLIST TODO
YOUR HAIR AND MAKEUP,
AS WELL AS THE WEDDING
PARTY’S, IF YOU WISH.
FIGURE OUT BRIDESMAID AND
GROOMSMEN ATTIRE.
BOOK YOUR HONEYMOON.
(DON’T FORGET THE
PASSPORTS AND PAPERWORK
IF YOU’RE GOING SOMEWHERE
OUT OF THE COUNTRY.)
PURCHASE WEDDING RINGS.
DECIDE UPON WEDDING
FAVORS.
PLAN THE BRIDAL SHOWER.
PLAN BACHELOR AND
BACHELORETTE PARTIES.
BOOK A PLACE FOR THE
REHEARSAL DINNER.
GIVE GIFTS TOTHE WEDDING
PARTY OR ANYONE ELSE YOU
SEE FIT THAT’S INVOLVED IN
THE WEDDING.
GET YOUR MARRIAGE LICENSE.
HIT UP VENDORS FOR
YOUR FOLLOWING
NEEDS: PHOTOGRAPHER/
VIDEOGRAPHER,
FLOWERS, DÉCOR, FOOD,
ENTERTAINMENT, AND
TRANSPORTATION.
PLANNING YOUR
SPECIAL DAY
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W
e asked you, our
readers, for your
funny or interesting
engagement and wedding stories
online last week, so here are
some of our favorites.
LIGHTS OUT
S
cranton resident Rob
Lettieri has plenty of
stories as a wedding
photographer, but one of
his funniest was when a
thunderstorm hit the wedding
area and the power went out
while the band, featuring local
jazz/blues musicians Marko
Marcinko and Clarence Spady,
was trying to play. As candles
were lit under their tent for
light, someone produced a
generator, but it ran out of
gasoline, leaving only the drums
for music. Marcinko kept the
beat while Spady would run
for gas, filling the generator
periodically.
“They had to position it
far away from the tent with a
long extension cord because
of the noise competing with
the music. It was hysterical,”
Lettieri recalled.
“Everyone had a blast, and
they didn’t let the power outage
ruin anything at all!”
WHAT’S BROKEN
IS FIXED
D
anielle McCullough,
a former Scranton
resident, and
YOUR WEDDING
STORIES
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
By Mary Therese Biebel
Special to the Weekender
her husband, Patrick, of
Philadelphia set their wedding
date for Sept. 18, 2010, shortly
after their engagement Feb. 4,
2009. By the end of January
2010, they had arranged the
church and venue, picked the
best man and maid of honor,
and Danielle had her dress.
Everything seemed set until one
night in February. The couple
met some friends at a bar where
a man tried to steal one of their
friend’s purses, but Danielle
was quicker and snatched the
bag back. After an argument, the
attempted thief was kicked out.
The group stepped out of the
bar for a smoke when the man
returned to quarrel with the
bouncer again, attacking Patrick
and dislocating his shoulder.
Weeks later, his job was
downsized, making it difficult
to pay for medical bills and
physical therapy on one income
while trying to plan a wedding.
On March 11, Danielle
randomly woke her fiancé and
said, “Let’s get married.” While
shocked, he happily agreed that
they would marry just days later
on St. Patrick’s Day, going to
the courthouse to get the license
that day. They called a friend
to perform the ceremony on
the steps of Patrick’s childhood
home in the City of Brotherly
Love, saying their written vows
in front of close family, but
in true Scranton fashion, the
McCulloughs celebrated the
holiday afterward and have
every year since.
WEDDING
CRASHERS
T
he guests at the Aug.
19, 2012 wedding of
Brian and Lisa Avrich
of Dunmore couldn’t wait for
the party to begin, pre-gaming
prior to the ceremony and
accidentally tipping a beer
bottle that noisily rolled around
as the couple exchanged their
vows. They had such a fun
service and reception at the Inne
of the Abingtons, giving out red
chocolate Rocky Horror Picture
Show lips to guests and banning
all synchronized dance music
(with the exception of “The
Time Warp,” of course) from the
festivities, that some attendees
of another wedding at the Inne
decided to sneak in.
They were easily caught,
however.
“It really isn’t a good idea
to go up to the groom while
waiting for a beer and ask him
where the bride and groom are
so you can congratulate them,”
Brian said.
Everything worked out
fine, however, and the party
continued into the evening
at a surprise post-reception
private gathering at The Keys in
Scranton, the couple’s favorite
bar, and the man and woman
who caught the garter and
bouquet actually ended up being
the next to be married. W
N
ever mind the
teeming rain.
On the day before
she exchanged vows with Rick
Park under her favorite willow
tree at Lake Louise in July, the
former Morgan Carey ventured
out into a storm with 10 people,
including her 93-year-old
grandmother, to pick Queen
Anne’s lace for the homemade
bridal centerpieces.
Her cousin and her sister
helped the bride dig moss
out of the lake to add to the
decor, someone found a nice
round rock to serve as the
ring-bearer’s cushion, and the
festivities included a bonfire.
Is it any surprise that under
her formal white gown, the
bride wore a bright blue pair of
Converse sneakers?
Actually, the bride admits,
that was in keeping with a
tradition – of her own making.
“For my confirmation, I
wore sneakers. For high school
graduation, I wore sneakers.
For First Holy Communion, I
wore sneakers,” she said. “So it
seemed fitting.”
In a way, that sentence
sums up the perfect wedding.
However a bride and groom
decide to celebrate, it should
feel right to them. It should
“fit.”
Perhaps they want to share
with their guests the DJ music
they’ve enjoyed at several of
their friends’ weddings; perhaps
they prefer to opt for fiddles,
banjos, and a square dance.
Acouple might write their
own vows, or they might be
more than happy to recite the
age-old “for better, for worse,
for richer, for poorer” pledge
their parents and grandparents
promised before them.
Abride might join a long line
of women who carried the same
family Bible; a groom might
be the most recent of many
generations to get married under
the family chuppah, or canopy.
Or a couple might decide to be
the first in their families to have
a camouflage-themed wedding,
perhaps in honor of their
enthusiasm for the outdoors.
For Rachel Rosenbaum and
Joshua Stewart of Bloomsburg,
an out-of-the-ordinary addition
to their wedding resulted in a
special keepsake.
They ordered a guestbook
signature tree the groom spotted
on etsy.com and set out several
ink pads in shades of green and
yellow. Each guest was invited
to dip his or her thumb into the
ink and “add a leaf” to the tree
that way.
“We were afraid if we did the
(conventional) guest book, it
would be closed and put away,”
the bride said. “But this is
framed and put on the wall. You
can see it and reminisce about
who came.”
In case anyone is worrying
about stains, the couple arranged
for some pre-moistened towels
to be conveniently placed for
guests to wash the ink off their
thumbs. W
MAKING IT
YOUR OWN
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make her love
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www.theweekender.com
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Courtesy Photo
Lil Wayne will bring along T.I.
and Future for this go-round
at Montage Mountain.
Lil Wayne coming back,
‘Carly’s Angels’ rejoice
Northeastern Pennsylvania is
home to many things: Old Forge
pizza, the setting of NBC’s “The
Offce,” and the birthplace of
Vice President Joe Biden.
Since the fall of 2008 the area
has also seemed to serve as a
second home for Lil Wayne. The
platinum-selling artist announced
this week that he will perform
yet again on the main stage at
Toyota Pavilion at Montage
Mountain. “The America’s Most
Wanted Music Festival 2013”
stops in Moosic on July 21. T.I.
and Future will support the bill.
Wayne toured under the same
moniker in 2009, stopping at
Montage with Young Jeezy,
Soulja Boy, Jeremih, Drake, and
Nicki Minaj in tow. He returned
to Toyota Pavilion in 2011 with
the “I Am Still Music” tour
featuring Rick Ross, Keri Hilson,
Far East Movement, and Lloyd.
On October 29, 2008,
independent promoter E&R
Entertainment brought the
rapper to what is now known as
the Mohegan Sun Arena. The
performance came at arguably
the height of his career; Wayne’s
“Tha Carter III” had debuted
the previous June with a million
copies sold. Prior to showing up
in Northeastern Pennsylvania,
the artist no-showed appearances
in Rochester, N.Y. and Boston.
Lil Wayne released “I Am Not
a Human Being II” on Tuesday.
He was released from a Los
Angeles hospital after another
bout with seizures last week. As
of press time, no on-sale date or
ticket prices for the show were
released by Live Nation.
X-FACTOR RUNNER-
UPWORKING ON DEBUT
ALBUM
Good news for “Carly’s
Angels.”the name given to fans
of Carly Rose Sonenclar. It
seems “The X-Factor” runner-up
will have no problem releasing
her album to the masses.
“I’m in pre-production on
my album,” Sonenclar told me
inside the Hard Rock Café in
Times Square. The Westchester,
NY native attended J-14’s “Little
Mix” showcase. “I got signed
to Simon Cowell’s company,
so they picked up my recording
option, which I’m very happy
about.”
The 13 year-old has good
reason to be pleased. It is hard
enough for winners, let alone
second and third place fnishers,
to release music on a large scale
following a reality TV show.
Now signed with Cowell’s
SYCO Music, Sonenclar is
almost guaranteed a major record
label debut with Sony Music
Entertainment, probably through
either the Epic or Columbia
Records imprint.
“I’ve been in the studio, I’m
fnishing school and stuff like
that,” said the teenager, who is
back in New York where she
will record most of her music.
Sonenclar even brought a group
of her friends down to the red
carpet at the Hard Rock Café for
the event.
Another friend that Carly Rose
hopes to talk with soon is Britney
Spears.
“She just switched agents to
my agent, so now hopefully I’m
going to be able to get in touch
with her,” she said. Spears left
William Morris Endeavor for
Creative Artists Agency after
calling off her engagement with
Jason Trawick. He represented
Spears, but later stepped down
as her agent to focus on their
relationship.
- Listen to “The Ralphie
Show” weeknights from 7 p.m. -
12 a.m. on 97 BHT.
W
ralphie report
the
EntErtainmEnt rEport
ralphie aversa | Special to the Weekender
www.theweekender.com
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FANTASTIC FLORA
BEAUTIFUL BAUBLES
By Mary Therese Biebel
Special to the Weekender
By Mary Therese Biebel
Special to the Weekender
T
alk to floral designer
David Stout about what
your bridesmaids will
wear and he’ll suggest flowers
that “pop.”
“I tell people, ‘Don’t
get flowers that match the
gowns. Get something that
complements the gowns.’”
So if a dress is coral?
“Maybe a hot pink, yellow,
or lavender,” advised Stout,
who works at Mattern’s Florist
in Kingston.
What if a gown is green?
“Oh, if it’s green, you can
get really crazy and go into
oranges and creams and off-
tone greens.”
As for the bride, more
often than not, she’ll carry
something especially vivid that
stands out against the white or
cream of her dress.
“We do very few bridal
bouquets that are actually solid
white,” Stout said. “They’re
more likely to be all yellow
A
sk a bride whether
she’s wearing
something old,
something new, something
borrowed and something blue,
and if she says yes, chances are
at least one of those things is
jewelry.
“During my bridal shower,
my grandmother gave me a
pearl bracelet with turquoise
stones, so that covered old and
blue,” said Kingston native
Holly Sirkin, who got married
in November. “I borrowed my
aunt’s earrings.”
“I borrowed a diamond
hairclip from my friend who
wore it when she got married,”
said autumn bride Lynda
Ciaruffoli Lang, whose parents
live in Shavertown.
“I had a lovebird pin from
my grandma,” Morgan Carey
Park of Lake Louise said,
explaining how it was pinned to
the bouquet her mother, Janet
Carey, “the most creative person
or all red – flowers that really
pop.”
But, of course, there’s room
for the traditional.
“My florist tried to get me
to incorporate pink flowers or
ribbons or any kind of color. He
was extremely surprised that I
decided to keep them colorless,”
said Holly Sirkin, formerly of
Kingston, who carried white
calla lilies when she married
Eric Danko in November in
Washington, D.C.
“I felt that having colorful
bouquets would take away from
the dresses, and I wanted the
I know,” had fashioned from
just-picked Queen Anne’s lace.
On their wedding day,
Morgan’s husband, Rick Park,
sported a matching lovebird on
his tie.
Of course,
heirlooms aren’t the
only kind of wedding
jewelry.
An engagement
ring is often the
“something new” a
bride is wearing, and
sometimes it’s even
custom-designed for or
by her.
“She sent me
exactly what she
wanted,” jewelry
designer Marc
Williams of MarcCo.
Jewelers in Luzerne
said, showing off
an electronic image of an
intricately carved engagement
ring he made “just this past
Christmas” to the specifications
of a bride fromAtlanta.
The center stone was a
square, naturally yellow
diamond appraised at $125,000
flowers to be an accent, not a
focal point,” she said. “When it
came to planning the wedding,
I wanted things to be warm and
simple, yet elegant.”
Simple or complex, rustic or
elegant, florists will tell you just
about any flower is available
any time of year nowadays,
so the floral possibilities seem
infinite.
Recognizing
that, Alison Taroli
decided that
because each of her
attendants was an
individual, there
was no reason for
Lauren, Kristin,
Julie, Maria, and
Kylene all to carry
the same kind of
bouquet.
“Each of my
bridesmaids had
a different color,”
said the Dallas native, who
exchanged vows with Eric
Gelsleichter in October. “One
was yellow, one was a deep
blue. There was deep red, and
a pale green. It suited their
that the bride already owned.
Williams’ craftsmanship, which
included embellishing the band
with several smaller diamonds
in a floral pattern, added about
$5,000 to the value.
“The structure of the ring just
flowed together,” Williams said.
“I wish I could do one of those
every day.”
That said, Williams said he
is happy to work with people
who have much smaller jewelry
budgets.
personalities. My bouquet was a
combination of all their flowers
put together.”
“It’s really cool to do
something like that,” Stout said,
admitting he hasn’t seen that
very often. What the designer
has noticed is a trend to pay
more attention to the groom’s
boutonniere.
After decades of being
content with a simple carnation,
today’s groom might sport
anything from a red orchid that
matches the bridal bouquet to a
mix of herbs and berries.
“We’ve done some that are
very herbal, with rosemary and
mint and things of that order,”
Stout said. “We’ve used berries
and branches – little twigs and
stuff – or had a variation of
different greens, like ferns and
pine.”
For a very individual touch,
summer bride Morgan Carey
Park said her mother, Janet
Carey, personally crafted a
boutonniere for new son-in-law
Rick Park using burlap and
a fishing lure in honor of his
enthusiasm for fishing.
“Somebody could come in
here and say, ‘Look I have $500
to spend,’ and I would work
with him,” the designer noted.
The most frequently chosen
stone for an engagement ring is
a round diamond with a brilliant
cut, said Williams’ father, Tom,
who worked for Bartikowsky
Jewelers in Wilkes-Barre for
many years before its recent
closing.
But there are other cuts
to consider – among them
Adding to the rustic feel at the
Carey/Park nuptials, the bride
said, “We used handmade farm
tables, mismatched napkins
and old bottles to decorate the
tables. We made all our own
centerpieces from hydrangeas
and Queen Anne’s lace. The day
before the wedding, my family
and friends, about 10 people
total including my grandma, got
up at 6 a.m. to collect flowers
from the side of the road and
neighbors’ yards.
“It took us six hours in our
garage to cut and make all the
centerpieces.”
If you’re going to let a
professional florist handle the
flowers, Stout recommends
setting up an appointment at
least six months before the
wedding.
“But we’ve done it with as
little as a month’s notice,” he
added.
“Ideally, as far as choosing
flowers,” he continued, “I
suggest the bride have her gown
and at least know the color of
her bridesmaids’ (dresses). That
dictates style.” W
marquise, pear-shaped, heart-
shaped and princess – as well as
different colors of stones.
“The presence of a certain gas
when the diamond is formed
can influence the color,” Tom
Williams said. “Boron makes
it blue.”
Stones also can be artificially
tinted, and then they’re much
less expensive.
Speaking of color, Marc
Williams said one bride had an
idea to add a small birthstone
for herself and for her fiancé to
either side of the diamond in
her engagement ring. “I believe
they were a sapphire and a
garnet,” he said.
Less expensive jewelry can
be an ideal gift for the bride to
give her bridesmaids, Williams
said, suggesting sterling silver
beads that can be engraved with
the date of the wedding, song
lyrics, or something else that is
meaningful to the bride.
He makes them in a size that
would fit a necklace or bracelet
the same way the popular
Pandora charms do.W
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THURSDAY
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Lager
Snowboard
Giveaway
$1 Lagers
Photo by Rich Howells
A fan captures a moment at the KMFDM show at the Irving
Plaza in New York City.
Experiencing the music
I’m not just a geek over comic
books and movies – I’m also a bit
of a music geek…just maybe not
in the traditional sense.
I don’t own an extensive
collection of frst pressings of
obscure vinyls. I can’t identify
every Beatles song in two or
three notes. I’m not aware of
every new indie band before
they hit the mainstream. But I
am utterly fascinated by music
itself, particularly the strange and
unpredictable mix of bands I grew
up with.
That’s why I’m constantly
reading magazines and websites
detailing their histories, diving
deeper with extensive interviews,
tour diaries, and any other tidbits I
can get my hands on. I could care
less if people scoff at my taste or
question my hipness; I like what
I like, and my curiosity regarding
creative origins is one of many
reasons why I do what I do now.
That’s why I couldn’t pass up
the opportunity a few weeks ago
to chat with Sascha Konietzko, the
founder and only steady member
of KMFDM in its 29 year history,
for an article in The Weekender.
From Nine Inch Nails to Fear
Factory to Stabbing Westward,
I’ve always had an affnity for
industrial metal music. KMFDM,
which roughly translates to “no
pity for the majority,” is not only
one of its originators, but it is
an uncompromising blend of
rebellious political stances, catchy
dance beats, and badass hard rock.
I’ve listened to the German
pioneers of “the Ultra-Heavy
Beat” since I was a teenager,
so even though this has been
my profession for years now, I
still found myself overwhelmed
by the thought of talking to the
Käpt’n K (as he is known to
fans), considering my long-term
relationship with his music. As
soon as he called from his home
in Hamburg, however, my anxiety
turned into familiarity as we went
back to his beginnings as an artist,
his technical work and writing
process on 17 (!) studio albums,
his unwavering musical vision,
and the fact that he’s not as big
a fan of his earlier work as his
listeners are.
Even as a fan, I learned quite a
bit, and while I would have been
content with just that, he said he
would add me to the guest list
of any show I wanted to see. I
couldn’t make Philadelphia due
to deadlines, so New York City it
was – did I really just get invited
to a concert by Sascha himself?
Yes, it was still strange to me.
When we arrived in the Big
Apple, my friend and I made our
frst stop at the Chat ‘n’ Chew
on E. 16th Street, a cozy little
diner with a drool-worthy menu.
After explaining that we came
all the way from Scranton, the
manager came back with a free
bowl of their “Quintessential
Macaroni and Cheese,” which
puts any Kraft product you’ve
ever had to shame, and two cans
of delicious Porkslap Pale Ale to
wash it down, also on the house. I
mention this not only as a “thank
you,” but to help illustrate a later
point.
Before KMFDM’s set, I ran
into a good friend of mine who
lives in the city (and I don’t see
often enough) and Rey Roldan,
the band’s publicist, who I had
worked with many times but
had yet to meet in person. Many
stories and laughs were shared
before the band began a career-
spanning set of fan favorites and
new tracks, all blending together
into a seamless medley that
rocked the Irving Plaza and its
wild occupants.
“You drove all the way up here
for this show?” Rey asked.
“Of course!” I replied. “Why
wouldn’t I?”
And that’s when it occurred to
me – not everyone would make
a three-hour trek on a Thursday
night with work the next morning.
Amusic geek doesn’t think twice
about being overtired or the
price of gas, though, and I knew
I wasn’t alone. While standing
outside in the cold after the show,
we ended up talking to some other
fans as they waited for the band
to exit and climb aboard their
tour bus. Within minutes, it was
like conversing with old friends –
again, these tunes had brought me
closer to complete strangers.
Each member of KMFDM
signed autographs and posed for
pictures for anyone who asked,
and when I told Sascha that I
was the guy who had interviewed
him recently, he said, “Yes, Rich
Howells,” and told me how much
he enjoyed our exchange. He
remembered my name? How
much better could this night get?
Too hyped up to go home just
yet, we went out and found the
last bar open with our fellow
fans we had just met and got one
drink in before last call. While
the music at its core will always
be signifcant, it’s the experiences
and subsequent stories that
derive from it – from talking
to renowned singers to eating
complimentary food to running
around after 1 a.m. in bitter
conditions looking for a beer –
that make it memorable, and, in
turn, make me geek out.
You can keep your limited
edition clear vinyl with the
misprinted sleeve – but I’d love to
come over and see it sometime.
-Rich Howells is a lifelong
Marvel Comics collector, wan-
nabe Jedi master, and cult flm
fan. E-mail him at rhowells@
theweekender.com.
W
Infinite Improbability
Geek Culture & more
rich Howells | Weekender Editor
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Andrea Talarico McGuigan still
remembers her frst poem.
Assigned to her by her 5th grade
teacher, it was titled “United in
Peace” with an accompanying
illustration of “a black hand
shaking a white hand.”
“It rhymed and it was pretty
horrible, but unbeknownst to me,
Mr. Gregory submitted the whole
class’ poems to a local contest and
mine won,” McGuigan recalled.
“Several schools participated,
and so I had to read my poem
at the Fine Arts Fiesta, and 5th
grade was the youngest grade. I
was the youngest kid on stage,
the only one from Tunkhannock,
so the very frst poem I wrote I
ended up having to read in public,
and I kind of knew from that
point on that not only did I like
writing poetry, but I really liked
performing it a whole lot.”
She tried music and sports, but
writing always unconsciously
went to the forefront of her mind.
With supportive teachers and
family, she continued writing
with socially conscious messages
throughout her youth, thinking her
“poetry could save the world.” She
published her frst poetry collec-
tion, “Spinning with the Tornado,”
through Paper Kite Press in 2003.
“I had no idea what I was
doing or what kind of impact a
book might have on my work.
I’m incredibly grateful for the
experience – I defnitely learned a
lot from it. It’s hard now to look
back because the poems feel and
sound incredibly young to me. I
was a lot angrier, defnitely, when
I was younger. I dealt with a lot
of those feelings, and I think I’m
writing from a better balanced
place now,” she explained, adding
that she has another manuscript
in the works that she’s hoping to
publish within the next year or
two.
“I think people who have read
my frst book and have struck
with me through that process will
probably be…maybe not surprised
because the voice is still here,
but they’ll see that there’s been
growth, I think. I hope.”
The 31-year-old Scranton
resident, who describes herself
as a “confessional poet” and
“addictive revisionist,” is much
more confdent in her work when
she’s reading it to an audience,
inspired by performance poets like
Buddy Wakefeld, Jeanann Verlee,
Anis Mojgani, and Jon Sands.
When coaching Poetry Out Loud
students, she offers advice that
comes from her experience hosting
various poetry readings over the
years.
“The word ‘stanza’ itself comes
from the Latin for ‘room,’ and if
you think about that then, your
poem is a house. You have an
entrance, you have rooms, and you
have an exit to your poem, and
what I tell them is to metaphori-
cally walk through and fnd every
nook and cranny in that house.
Open the windows, explore the
basement, explore the attic – get
to know that poem inside and out
before you even think about trying
to memorize it,” McGuigan said.
“It’s very apparent when some-
one knows not just how to say the
poem, but knows what to say and
knows what they mean by what
they’re saying.”
As a rostered artist-in-residence
with the Northeastern Educational
Intermediate Unit #19 who has
also taught poetry workshops in
schools, Arts Alive, and Arts Alive
Intermediate, she has additional
sound advice for students still
mastering their craft.
“I teach them to journal every
day. If they make the time when
they frst wake up in the morning
to put down whatever scattered
thoughts they have on paper, they
will fnd material in that to work
into something larger. I think it’s
very hard to sit down with the
idea that you’re going to craft a
poem right now about a subject,”
McGuigan continued.
“That’s intimidating for a lot
of people, especially people
who have never written poetry,
so what I tell them is to gather
their scattered thoughts and leave
a record of their life and their
thoughts, and when they feel the
creative urge come on, they can
then mine through that material to
fnd the gems in there.”
As she prepares to take over the
Prose in Pubs series at Jack’s Draft
House in Scranton, McGuigan
said she’s looking forward to
reading at the New Visions Writers
Showcase on March 30 with her
best friend, Heather M. Davis,
and Stanton Hancock, Laurel
Radzieski, Shelby Fisk, and Chris
Campion.
“I’ve been to other cities, and
I’ve been to obviously a lot of
other readings and workshops,
and when I tell people about how
many events and what we have
going on in this area, people from
larger cities honestly can’t believe
it. I have writers from New York
City telling me they can’t wait to
come to Scranton and read and
meet the people around here,” she
noted.
“I think we do have kind of a
unique situation with our writers. I
don’t know if it’s the history of the
area or the slow economy – I don’t
know where it comes from, but we
are defnitely very rich in writers
in this area.”
W
Courtesy Photo
Andrea Talarico McGuigan had her first taste of poetry in
fifth grade, an experience that sparked the flame of her inner
writer.
United in poetry
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
Writers Showcase: March 30, 7
p.m., New Visions Studio & Gal-
lery (201 Vine St., Scranton). Free.
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LOOKWHATYOU MISSED
Bad Religion, The Bronx, and Polar Bear Club
@ Electric Factory, Philadelphia • 03.24.13
Photos by Rich Howells • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
LOOKWHATYOU MISSED
Deftones and Periphery
@ ShermanTheater • 03.12.13
Photos by Jason Riedmiller • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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Beverly Donofrio lives her life
out in the open, but he says she
wouldn’t have it any other way.
Her very personal memoirs
have touched millions of readers
over the years, particularly women
dealing with teen pregnancy or the
physical and mental trauma of rape.
Her frst book, “Riding In Cars
with Boys,” was adapted into a flm
in 2001 starring Drew Barrymore,
and her latest, “Astonished: A
Story of Evil, Blessings, Grace, and
Solace,” delves into faith, violence,
and other heavy issues openly and
honestly.
The New York-based author,
who teaches at the Low Residency
MFAProgram in Creative Writ-
ing at Wilkes University, shared
with The Weekender her writing
process, the underlying messages
in her work, and her Hollywood
experience before her free lecture
at Marywood University on April 4.
THE WEEKENDER: What
frst got you interested in writ-
ing?
BEVERLYDONOFRIO: Oh
gosh, I have to back to 7th grade
when I had this wonderful teacher
who made us write an essay or a
short story every week, and she
would often invite me to read it
to the class, and so it was the frst
thing that I really ever got praise or
attention for, and plus it was fun.
She made it fun; we were kind of
given free reign. But then I kind
of forgot about that. I would write
poems; I always kept writing, but
I thought that I was going to be an
actress instead.
I was in all of the plays in high
school and junior high school, and
then I got pregnant when I was
a senior, and acting would have
required a babysitter. But reading
and writing didn’t, so I went to
the library all the time. I read
everything I could get my hands
on as though it would save my life,
and it really did.
W: What is your writing pro-
cess like?
BD: I write in all different places
and all different ways. Lately, my
process is I get up in the morning,
I make coffee, I read my spiritual
readings, I meditate for a half an
hour, most mornings I do some
yoga, and then I am calm and
centered and focused and I start
writing. I write all over the house;
I write on the foor often because I
like to sit in different yoga postures
with my legs because writing in
one position is so bad for your
body. I sometimes will go to a
coffee shop, but if I do that, I print
out what I’ve written and do some
editing by hand or rewriting by
hand.
W: When your frst mem-
oir was released, what kind of
response did you receive from
readers, and how did that lead
into the flm adaptation?
BD: Before it was even released,
as soon as the editor and the
publishing company accepted it, it
was bought by the movies, and I
made more money then I had made
probably accumulatively in my
whole life in that one moment, so
everything was changed. And then
it got great reviews; it was very
well received.
I always thought it was going
to be a movie. When I wrote it, I
wrote it thinking it will be a movie,
so it kind of infuenced a little
bit how I wrote it. I wrote it very
scenically in scenes, imagining
them as movie scenes… (But) it
took 11 years – that was surprising.
W: The book differed from the
movie in several ways. Were you
OK with those changes?
BD: I knew about it. My biggest
disappointment was that you don’t
get to know that I went to college.
You don’t get to see that she gets
accepted into college, and my
whole motivation, my messianic
mission when I was writing the
book was that I wanted young
people who had screwed up in high
school or in their youth to know
that it is not the end of the world
and you can turn it around, and
the best way to do that is to go to
college.
W: What was it like being
portrayed by Drew Barrymore?
Did you meet her at all?
BD: Yes, I met her, and she was
a sweetheart. I was foolish enough
to think that she wanted to hang
out with me because she liked
me so much when now I see she
was studying me! [Laughs] I have
friends who say, “Oh my god, she
nailed you!”
W: Would you like to see any
of your other books adapted into
flms?
BD: I can’t really see it. The next
two, they’re about faith. There’s
lots of things that happen, but the
real journey is interior, and I don’t
think that’s so easy to translate. I
am thinking, though, of making
the latest one into a play. At frst it
was going to be a one-woman play,
but now I’m thinking it would be
the main character, a woman actor
and a male actor who plays several
different roles.
W: What do you want readers
to take away from your work?
BD: It’s a different thing in each
one. Well, actually, “Riding In Cars
with Boys” and the latest one are
not so dissimilar…In “Riding In
Cars with Boys,” it was basically
that, as Hamlet said, nothing is
good or bad, but thinking makes it
so. I could view getting pregnant
in high school as a blessing or a
curse – it’s my choice, and by the
end of the book I came to look at it
as a blessing.
The next book is about if you
act as though you believe, belief
will follow, and having belief that
God is a loving god and that God
loves you makes you feel loved,
which is healing. And in that book,
God to me was the Virgin Mary,
a feminine manifestation of God.
God was a mother. In this next
book, it’s basically the same. In
this book, I was raped; the trauma
was being raped. For other people,
it could be losing their job or their
spouse or a child or whatever, but
for me, the traumatic experience
was being raped. I could look at it
as a horrible thing that happened in
my life or a possible gift that I may
not know. At the moment, I didn’t
know what the gift would be, but I
had faith that one day I might.
W: What has your teaching
experience been like at Wilkes
University?
BD: I love the students, and they
do such great work… More often
than not, I can’t see how they’re
any less good than us, than the
teachers. I mean, the stuff they
come up with is great. My fellow
teachers are my peer group; they’re
my writing family, and twice a
year for the residencies, we have to
present 10 minutes in a reading, so
I get to hear what my fellow writers
are writing and watch it develop
and get infuenced by them. They
really raised the bar for me.
W
Donofrio shares her blessings
By Rich Howells
Weekender Editor
show us some skin
Name: Jessica Livsey
Town: MountainTop
E-mail a photo of your tattoo (at least 200 dpi) with your full name,
address and phone number to weekender@theweekender.com to
enter our weekly contest. Each month, Weekender readers vote for
their favorite, and the winner receives a $75 gift certifcate to Marc’s
Tattooing. Must be 18 to participate
HOWTO ENTER:
sponsored by
NEPATATTOO.COM
Beverly Donofrio lecture: April
4, 7 p.m., Marywood University
(Nazareth Hall). Free, open to
the public.
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‘God of War: Ascension’ is certainly one big funfest that’s
great to look at, but it doesn’t quite measure up to its prede-
cessors.
‘God of War’ prequel not as
epic, but still worthy
Since 2005, Kratos has been on a
revenge-driven odyssey to take down
the gods. Through his travels, he has
been to Hades and back a few times,
killed countless waves of Minotaur,
Medusas, titans, gods, and even Zeus
himself. In “God of War: Ascension,”
we fnally get to see the beginning
of the tale and what started Kratos
down the path he will eventually take
in the rest of the series.
If you are new to the series, “God
of War” is set in ancient Greece
and is flled with all manner of
ancient Greek mythology. You play
as Kratos, a proud Spartan warrior
in service of the God of War, Ares.
Kratos was involved in a losing
battle against a barbarian horde, so
he made a pact with the God of War
himself. Ares spared his life and
granted Kratos the power that he
needed to defeat the invasion, but
he was doomed to be a slave to him
forever.
When I frst
heard this was
going to be a
prequel, I was
skeptical because
I thought the frst
game did a great
job of explaining
his back-story; however, “Ascen-
sion” does tell an interesting tail that
expands the mythology.
“God of War: Ascension” takes
place after his deal with Ares and
before the events of the original 2005
game. The story is not as epic as
the main entries, but it is still quite
interesting. After Kratos is tricked by
Ares into killing his family, Kratos
is so angry he has vowed to break
his oath, which causes him to be
punished by the three Furies.
He is sent to Hades and tortured
with visions of his family for years,
which understandably drive him
mad. This is the real start of what
drives Kratos to revenge against
Ares. In order to accomplish this
goal, Kratos needs to redeem himself
in the eyes of the other gods; he must
kill the Furies in order to sever his
ties to Ares and avenge his family.
For two console generations, the
“God of War” series has been one of
the hallmarks of third-person action
titles, and the action in “Ascension”
does not disappoint. Even though
this game doesn’t have as many epic
moments as its predecessors, there
are some really incredible scenes that
are nothing short of spectacle.
When it comes to combat, the con-
trols and action are what you remem-
ber. You kill all manner of beasts in
order to collect
orbs that upgrade
all of your combat
abilities and spells.
The only differ-
ence here is there
are not alternative
weapons this time
around; there are
only the chains of chaos. However,
you can attain different attributes for
the chains this time around, which do
change the combat in some interest-
ing ways.
Most of the new abilities are
elemental-based: there is Ares fre,
Poseidon ice, Zeus lightning, and the
non-elemental ability from Hades
that can call the undead. Along
with the upgraded chain blades, the
magic system is more advanced.
Magic does much more damage and
is harder to unlock, so you have to
think wisely about how you want to
allocate orbs. There are also some
sub weapons, but they aren’t that
useful.
The biggest addition to this game
is the multiplayer – this is the frst
“GOW” game to have any type
of multiplayer experience. One
good thing is that no one can play
as Kratos, so there are no matches
with four versions of Kratos to keep
track of. Instead, you pick from
one of four customizable warriors
that are aligned with a certain god,
which gives them different abilities
and weapons. The multiplayer is an
interesting distraction; the different
modes include variants of free-for-
all, team deathmatch, team objective,
and capture the fag. The levels are
pretty cool; they include different
locations from throughout the series
and have elements that can be used
to your advantage. It is very fun to
experiment with the different parts
of each map. The multiplayer is fun,
but it grows old rather quickly in my
opinion.
Overall, “God of War: Ascension”
is a pretty good game, but it doesn’t
quite live up to the standard of the
previous games. The story does a
good job of feshing out Kratos as
a character more, but it just doesn’t
feel as important because we know
what happens to him in the later
games. The graphics are still amaz-
ing, the action and combat stands up,
and the multiplayer is quite fun, so
if you are “GOW” fan, you should
play this to learn more about why
Kratos is so warm and cuddly, but
this shouldn’t be the jumping-on
point. I recommend picking up the
“GOW HD” collection and playing
the remastered original two games.
-Robbie Vanderveken is the digital
operations specialist at The Times
Leader. E-mail him at rvanderveken
@timesleader.com.
W
game on
Video game ReViews
Robbie Vanderveken | Special to the Weekender
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wonderful combination! After
swallowing, a brief lingering
taste of honey is left on the pal-
ate but quickly dissipates due
to the high carbonation within
this beer cleaning up after itself:
certainly a dry fnish. I must say
that each sip of this beer was a
wonderful experience, and by
the time you fnish a glass, you
certainly want another one.
Food pairing: Iron Throne
is a wonderful beer to have
on-hand while sitting down to
watch your favorite show on
TV with a wonderful cheese
and meat platter or other fnger
foods of your liking. However,
don’t simply think that this
beer was made for consumption
while watching TV. Iron Throne
would be a wonderful addition
to a spaghetti and Alfredo sauce
dinner; the creamy sauce would
blend perfectly with this beer.
Also, be sure to open a bottle of
Iron Throne during your next
fsh dinner, especially if you are
the type to squeeze a wedge of
lemon on top; the lemon favors
within this beer are absolutely
mind-blowing with this combi-
nation!
Is it worth trying? Abso-
lutely! I personally believe that
anything Brewery Ommegang
releases is worth a try, but this
unique collaboration beer is
just stunning. Also, it has been
released at the perfect time,
and no, not just because the 3rd
season of “Game of Thrones”
begins airing March 31, but be-
cause this beer is perfect for the
spring season. It is light enough
to enjoy on a lovely warm after-
noon, but hefty enough to enjoy
with your dinner. So whether
you are a fan of the show or
not, be sure to seek this beer out
and grab some while you can,
because something tells me that
this one is going fast!
Rating: W W W W V
Where can I get it? Cur-
rently available in bottles at
Exit 190 Beer & Deli, Dickson
City, and Backyard Ale House,
Scranton, but check with your
favorite craft beer shop, as many
more are starting to receive this
wonderful beer!
Remember, enjoy responsi-
bly! Cheers!
-Derek Warren is a beer ex-
pert, avid homebrewer, and beer
historian. Derek can be reached
at NEPABeerGeek@gmail.com.
W
I’d Tap That
BeeR ReViews
derek warren | Weekender Correspondent
‘God of War: Ascension’
System: PS3
Genre: Action
Rating: M for Mature
Publisher: Sony Computer Enter-
tainment
Developer: SCE Studios Santa
Monica
Upcoming game releases:
March 24: Luigi’s Mansion:
Dark Moon
March 26: Tiger Woods PGA
Tour 14
March 26: BioShock Infinite
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Long days and short nights can take a toll on the body, but
there are quick and easy fixes to ensure you’re balanced out
and feeling your best.
Stress no more
Life’s journeys often lead us to
discover important lessons, and
this week I learned something
invaluable.
I always thought of myself as
“invincible” and that working
as much as I did made me feel
empowered. I thought that
the more I took on, the more
successful I could be. While
this may be partly true, I now
understand that long hours don’t
come without complications.
Stress is often overlooked and
giving in to it may make you feel
defeated. For me, I thought I could
do it all and, for a while, I did.
But the long days caught up with
me and sent me into a downward
spiral. My days started early, by
4:30 a.m., and often continued
until 10 p.m. I wasn’t sleeping
nearly enough and soon all I was
doing was working not only every
weekday, but on weekends as well.
It left zero room for anything else
and often left me irritable and
exhausted.
Long work hours and highly
stressful jobs can hamper anyone’s
ability to create a balance between
work life and personal/family life.
Instead of choosing positive coping
strategies like exercise, laughter,
developing personal relationships,
sleeping more and good nutrition,
some people choose negative
behaviors that can affect their
health, such as smoking, less
sleep, poor nutrition, drinking, and
skipping exercise.
These negative coping strategies
will ultimately have a negative
effect on your health, body, mood
and behavior. Common effects
of stress are headaches, fatigue,
disturbed sleep patterns, anxiety,
irritability, anger, over/under
eating, and alcohol and drug use.
This past Monday I returned
from my frst full week off from
work. It was absolute serenity:
no phone calls or emails, no
scheduling, deadlines, or even
feeling the need to do work. I
knew I needed this break and was
fully committed to taking it. Now
I feel 100 percent rested and ready
to get back to work. My schedule
will remain the same, for now, but
I am committed to scheduling in
down time more often. After all,
my health is worth it.
Here a few tips to help recapture
the balance in your life:
1. Take a mental health day.
People everywhere can identify
with the need to take a break from
the daily grind and doing so can
restore your motivation.
2. Say no. Although it may be
diffcult, saying “no” will allow
more time to help you tackle things
that need to be completed.
3. Plan. Planning out your day
and setting goals will enable you to
stay on track and be effcient, and
being effcient is the way to stay
effective.
W
just for the
health of it
Fitness tips & tricks
tim Hlivia | Special to the Weekender
email photos and name, hometown to:
mgolubiewski@civitasmedia.com
timesleader.com
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LOOKWHATYOU MISSED
Circa Survive and Minus the Bear
@ ShermanTheater • 03.20.13
Photos by Jason Riedmiller • For more photos, go to www.theweekender.com
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WAR is not a band. WAR is a Movement! Get Your Tickets Now!
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Join New Orleans Drag Diva Bianca Del Rio and a gaggle of New
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Enter your pet for Weekender’s PET OFTHEWEEK
by sending photo, pet’s name, breed if applicable, owner’s
name and hometown to: weekender@theweekender.com
subject line: Pet of the Week
Owner: Kendra Innocenti
Kingston
American Eskimo
BUDDHA
A traditional twist
Chicken parmesan is defnitely a
staple on most dinner tables, and,
as wonderful as the dish is, I have
a slight problem with the sauce
causing super soggy breading on
the chicken. I love the taste, but that
texture throws me off a bit, so I was
delighted when I found a recipe for
chicken parm meatballs.
Not only does it put a little twist
on a classic dish, it’s also incredibly
easy and the perfect thing if you’re
throwing a party and need to ham-
mer out a good amount of eats in a
short amount of time.
I say “easy” because you’re pretty
much chucking ingredients into a
bowl, mixing, forming balls, and
baking.
Preheat your oven to 400 degrees
Fahrenheit.
Put ground chicken, breadcrumbs,
chopped onion and parsley, par-
mesan cheese, salt, pepper, minced
garlic, fennel seeds, an egg, and half
a lemon into a bowl. You can forego
the fennel seeds if you wish, like I
did.
Gently mix all these ingredients
together until completely combined,
and don’t be afraid to get a little
messy. My grandmother always
taught me that hands were the best
mixers in a case like this, so dig
right in.
Shape the mixture into balls that
are a bit smaller than a tennis ball
and place these two inches apart
from one another on a foil-lined
baking sheet.
Once all the balls are rolled, mix
pizza sauce and olive oil in a small
bowl. Brush this mixture on top of
each meatball. (I went nuts and put a
lot on each, so don’t be afraid to do
that.) Put it in the oven and bake for
15 minutes.
Remove the tray from the oven
and brush some more sauce on the
top again, then top each one with a
slice of mozzarella. Broil them until
the cheese is golden brown, about
three minutes.
Serve each meatball with a side
of sauce and enjoy, soggy breading
free.
W
mama’s kitchen
Culinary wizardry
Sara Pokorny | Weekender Staff Writer
not your
Had an encounter with someone famous? If so, the Weekender wants
your picture for our Starstruck.
It doesn’t matter if it happened five months ago or five years ago. Send
us your photo, your name, hometown, the celebrity you met, and when and
where you met them, and we’ll run one photo here each week. E-mail high
resolutin JPEGs to weekender@theweekender.com or send your photos to
Starstruck, c/o The Weekender, 1 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA, 18703.
starstruck
Kyla Cull of Hazleton with teen idol Cody Simpson at the
‘Let it Show’ concert at the F.M. Kirby Center in Wilkes-
Barre in November of 2012.
Chicken Parm Meatballs
(Courtesy of amazingpinterestworld.blogspot.com)
Yields a dozen meatballs
Ingredients:
• 1 1/4 pounds ground chicken
• 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
• 2 tablespoons chopped onion
• 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
• 1/2 cup parmesan cheese
• salt to taste
• pepper to taste
• 1 clove garlic, minced
• 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
• 1 egg, whisked
• zest of half a lemon
• 3 tablespoons olive oil
• 1 14-ounce can pizza sauce
• A dozen thin slices of fresh mozzarella
How-to:
• Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
• In a large bowl, gently mix together the frst 11 ingredients.
• Shape into balls that are slightly smaller than a tennis ball and line them
up on a foil-lined baking sheet about two inches apart from each other.
• In a small bowl, mix one spoonful of pizza sauce with olive oil and brush
mixture on top of each meatball.
• Bake for 15 minutes.
• Remove the meatballs from the oven and put some sauce on top of
each, then cover with a slice of cheese. Broil until cheese is golden brown,
another 3 minutes.
• Serve with a side of pizza sauce mixture.
advertise
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weekender
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for more
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Wyoming Valley Motors
56D Pierce Street º KinQston, PA
57D-714-9924
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year, $159 per month with $1,999 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees. Subject to VW credit approval. 2013 Beetle 2.5L, manual transmission. MSRP $20,790. Lease for 36 months and 12,000 miles per year, $199 per month with $2,349 due at signing. Excludes tax, title, license, and other fees.
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Ma-scare-a
“If you were stranded on a
desert island, what is the one item
you couldn’t live without?”
I remember asking that question
a lot to people, or the more subtle
question, “What is the one item
you cannot leave your house with-
out?” The answer I always get at
one point or another is “Mascara.”
To me; mascara is one of the
essentials that really completes a
look and helps enhance a person’s
fnal appearance. When it comes
to choosing mascara that’s right
for you, automatically ignore
any drugstore brand unless its
Physicians Formula Organic Wear
Mascara.
Most mascara can cause
your lashes to become dry and
brittle, synthetic elements/fbers
can cause eye
irritation, and
most will cause
you to lose your
lashes over time.
This Physicians
Formula Mascara
is 100 perfect
free of harsh chemicals, synthetic
preservatives, colors, fragrances,
GMOs (Genetically Modifed
Organisms), parabens, fllers, and
dyes, but it can still give you a
gorgeous no-clump, smudge-free,
fake-free lash!
If you are looking for a
professional brand mascara on
the higher end of the spectrum
with similar properties (water-
proof, conditioning, non-drying,
non-irritating formula), Stila
Cosmetics has the Stay All Day
Waterproof Volumizing Mascara.
The Stila Stay All Day Mascara
is a long-wearing mascara that
contains special polymers with
a strong resistance to water.
The super rich formula pumps
volumized lashes, is buildable and
unlike other waterproof mascaras,
leaves lashes soft and shiny with
mango butter and coconut oils,
and yet will not smudge, budge,
or fake while leaving lashes soft,
protected, smooth, and shiny, and
its paraben free.
When applying mascara, to
get the best application, I suggest
tipping your head back slightly,
lifting your eyebrow, and looking
down towards the foor. To start, I
like to comb down the lashes with
the mascara to
get the back
side of them (in
case you have
fallout of lighter
shadows). It
will clean them
up and give you
fuller coverage on the lash, giving
you a thick, luscious lash.
Once you have your mascara
on, I like to take a clean mascara
wand and comb through the lashes
to really defne and separate them.
Stay away from eyelash curlers;
instead, while mascara is still wet
on the lash, hold your pointer fn-
ger under the outer corner of your
lashes while drying to give them
that extra lift you need.
W
Makeup Rules
with The Real King Bob
Makeup tips & tricks Made easy
Bobby Walsh | Weekender Correspondent
By Chuck Shepherd
Weekender Wire Services
News of the weird
RECURRING THEMES
— Being identifed with the
number 666 (the “mark of the
beast” in the Bible’s Book of
Revelation) continues to trouble
the righteous. Walter Slonopas,
52, felt required to resign as a
maintenance worker for Contech
Casting in Clarksville, Tenn.,
in February after receiving his
W-2 form, which he noted was
the 666th mailed out by Contech
this year. (However, perhaps
Slonopas is not so innocent. He
had been working for Contech
for less than two years, yet had
already been “assigned” the
number 666 twice — on the
company’s payroll books and the
company’s time-clock system.)
— The Iconic Phantom
Black/Hispanic Perpetrator:
In February, victims of crimes
in San Antonio, Texas, and
Terrebonne Parish, La.,
complained to police that
they had been assaulted by,
respectively, a “Hispanic
male” and an “unknown black
man” — whom the victims
admitted later did not exist. San
Antonio police learned that their
victim had been accidentally,
embarrassingly, shot by a friend
mishandling his gun. Louisiana
authorities found that their
victim had not been abducted
and raped (and had her baby
stolen). Rather, she had wanted
to hide her miscarriage from
family and friends and invented
a phantom attack as more
acceptable.
— Chinese New Year,
especially, turns out not
so festive if busy young
professional women are unable
to show off a boyfriend to
their parents. Thus, men offer
themselves as fake boyfriends
for the equivalent of about $50 a
day, plus extras including about
$5 an hour to accompany the
woman to dinner, $8 for a kiss
on the cheek, and $95 to spent
the night — on the couch, of
course, since “sex” is not part of
the concept. Recently, a reality
TV series appeared for men
needing women for home visits
— often they are gay men who
have not “come out” to their
parents.
— Backward Incentives:
Society continues to suffer from
questionable company policies
that encourage precisely the
wrong behaviors. Bartender
Twyla DeVito said she knew
that one of her regulars at the
American Legion Post in Shelby,
Ohio, was too inebriated to
drive home and thus telephoned
police, alerting them to a
potential drunk driver. An
offcer responded, observed the
driver, and arrested him when
his blood-alcohol read twice the
limit for presumed impairment.
Two days later DeVito was fred
because, as her boss allegedly
said to her, “(I)t’s bad for
business to have a bartender that
will call the cops.”
— The Fabulous British
Government “Safety Net”:
Heather Frost, 36, and mother
of 11, is getting a brand-new,
specially designed house through
the Tewkesbury (England)
Borough Council, which deemed
inadequate the duplex that
the family had been using at
taxpayer expense for fve years.
Frost had complained that she
needed larger quarters because
one daughter now owns a horse
and needs to stable it (and, said
a stable worker, had almost
acquired two more horses, but
that deal fell through).
— Fathers caught up unfairly
in state laws on child support
have appeared in News of the
Weird, but Lional Campbell’s
story seems unusually harsh.
Authorities in Detroit continue
to bill Campbell for past-due
support (which Campbell admits
he owes even if unsure how
much), but only recently did he
discover that they were counting
$43,000 past-due to support
“Michael,” who had died 25
years ago at age 3. Campbell
said he had thought the support
was for another child, born
seven years after Michael, but it
turns out neither the authorities
nor Campbell knows precisely
which fatherhood Campbell
is paying for. The latest audit
reduced Michael’s $43,000
balance to about $6,500.
— Third-World Penis-
Snatchings Continue to Vex:
In Tiringoulou (pop. 2,000) in
the Central African Republic,
phantoms are thought often to
steal penises, or shrink them, but
according to a March dispatch in
the magazine Pacifc Standard,
the stories’ origins may simply
refect distrust of outsiders.
Townspeople over-attribute
worldly powers to strangers,
and when outsiders’ business
deals go sour, men check their
genitals. Also, animal-organ
poachers operate nearby and
arouse suspicion that they may
be after human genitals, as well.
(Asking for perspective on this
weirdness, though, the Pacifc
Standard reporter wondered
what Tiringoulou citizens might
think about Americans who, for
instance, starve themselves “near
to death because their refection
in the mirror convinces them that
they are fat.”)
— More Poor Planning: (1) In
San Diego, Calif., in February,
two people broke into a Hooters
after closing and stole a
jukebox, apparently, said police,
mistaking it for an ATM inside
the darkened restaurant. (2) Jose
Perales Jr., 24, was charged with
breaking into Dr. John’s Lingerie
Boutique in Davenport, Iowa,
in February. Surveillance video
revealed he was wearing men’s
clothing when he entered, but
left in a dress and blond wig. In
fact, while changing clothes, his
bare back was visible, revealing
“Perales” tattooed on his
shoulder.
— Loretta Lacy, 49, perhaps
set some kind of record in
January as she sped from Sioux
Falls, S.D., to Racine, Wis.
(about 500 miles away) just to
make her granddaughter’s school
dance. Although her daughter
told a Minneapolis Star Tribune
reporter that her mother “can
make it fromAto B faster than
maybe the average person,”
Lacy collected four speeding
tickets during one 2 1/2-hour
stretch, including for speeds of
88, 99 and 112. Of course, she
arrived late.
W
FINES TO FIT THE CRIMES
In March, Microsoft was fined 561 million euros (about $725 million) by
the European Commission after, apparently, a programmer carelessly
left out just one line of code in Microsoft’s Service Pack 1 of European
versions of Windows 7. That one line would have triggered the system
to offer web browsers other than Microsoft’s own Internet Explorer,
which Microsoft had agreed to include to settle charges that it was
monopolizing the web-browser business.
Tip: When testing mascara out at
a department store, it’s always
safer to test the formula on your
arm hair to prevent possible
contamination.
P
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2014 KIASorentoLX
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FINANCING
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2013 KIAOptimaLX
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* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
$186
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FINANCING
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EPAHighway Estimate
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· UVO Systèm
· Kèylèss Entry
· 6 /irbags
· Cooling Glovè Pox
· 6 Spèèc /uto Tramsmission
27
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
2013 KIA Soul
#K3187
* PHOTOMAY NOT REPRESENT TRIM
$139
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/ucio Controls
· Kèylèss Entry
FINANCING
FOR UP TO
60MONTHS
1.9%
30
MPG
EPAHighway Estimate
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Courtesy Photo
His good intentions were for naught, as Justin got a boot off
the stage that put a stop to the whole show.
A smokin’
showstopper
Black people are way cooler
than white people. It’s just a fact.
We can’t dance, we can’t jump,
and we can’t get Mariah Carey to
admit she’s one of us. That’s why
I performed in the Black Student
Union’s annual talent show when
I was a freshman in college, Mom
and Dad. I wanted to make some
cooler friends.
While walking through the Stu-
dent Union with my pledge brother,
Eddie, I grabbed a fyer announcing
an upcoming talent show.
“You’ve got to be kidding me,”
Eddie said and sighed after noticing
the event was sponsored by the
Black Student Union.
“What?” I questioned. “This is
my chance to be the token white
guy in an all African American
entourage. Don’t f—k this up for
me!”
The fact that I took jungle fever
to another level was no secret to
my friends. They were well aware
that I ached to be in a social circle
with more cultural diversity, but
didn’t take me seriously when I
assured them that once I started
rollin’ with my homies, I would
make like a recovering drug
addict shying away from their bad
infuences and cut all the Caucasian
friends out of my life. Therefore,
this talent show was my chance to
be taken seriously.
“I think you’re the only white
person performing tonight,” sug-
gested one of my friends on the
night of the show.
“I hope so,” I shuddered. “This is
my moment.”
When it was time for my per-
formance, I began singing a song
about how small our school’s town
was, lyrics by yours truly. While
rolling on the ground singing the
chorus, smoke covered the stage.
“They love me so much they
turned on the fog machine!” I
thought to myself.
It wasn’t until a crowd of
coughing students started gagging
their way to the exit that I
realized it wasn’t a fog machine.
Someone backstage sprayed fre
extinguishers from underneath the
stage curtain!
Acloud of chemicals fooded the
auditorium. I quickly realized that
maybe the organization’s mem-
bers were not as welcoming to the
idea of a token white friend as I
anticipated.
After getting charged for two
fre extinguishers, and with an
ambulance bill from an asthmatic
student in attendance that passed
out, I learned the organization
bitterly accused me of being
responsible for the stunt as they
were banned from ever hosting a
talent show again. I then realized
maybe making new friends
isn’t what I was meant to do
at that talent show, but instead
realized that I’m a party rocker,
showstopper.
W
sorry mom&dad
A 20-something’s wild Adventures
Justin Brown | Weekender Correspondent
motorhead
RIDE OF THE WEEK
Michael Golubiewski | Special to the Weekender
To submit your vehicle,
email: mgolubiewski@theweekender.com
1993
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Wilkes-Barre
“The paint color is teal blue with
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The truck is body dropped on air
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“It has a custom white and teal
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All paintwork was done by Dave
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ARIES (March 21-April 19)
Lately you’ve been feeling like a wild
animal in a modern zoo. Effort has been
made to simulate your natural habitat, but
still you keep running into the electrifed
fencing and wondering how limited your
world really is. Meanwhile, people keep
riding through your life on a monorail,
snapping pictures and throwing junk food
at you and your friends. Don’t settle for
mediocre happiness because you’ve got it
better than the gorillas who are still living
in cages. It’s true; this level of freedom
is better than what you used to have. But
when the monorail hurtles off its track
and knocks down the fences holding you
in, run like hell. The beautiful, real jungle
awaits.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
When I was a kid at summer camp,
they had a snake pit, which fascinated and
repelled me. The most intrepid campers
captured serpents to inhabit the concrete
hole; the rest of us caught frogs to feed
them. I watched in horror as one hapless
amphibian had the misfortune of being
consumed by two snakes at once—one
started on each end until they met nose
to nose with half a frog down each their
throats. This incredibly symbolic dilemma
reminds me of your situation. Like the
snakes (who needed to eat) you were just
fulflling one of your needs. But now
you’re in a face-to-face stalemate with
your competition. Since your opponent’s
not likely to back off any time soon, I
suggest you do so; it’s the only route to
freedom.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
These grapes are beyond sour. They’re
bile-bitter. Admit it; you sorely resent
having to give up that piece of forbidden
fruit that came so temptingly close to
being in your grasp. But come on; it’s
nobody’s fault but your own. The sooner
you admit that it was your self-imposed
limitations that kept you from enjoying the
deliciousness that awaited you, the sooner
you’ll get your second chance at it. Come
on, baby. You know you still want it. Stop
convincing yourself that you can’t climb
the tree it’s growing in and go get it.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
Damn, you have been trying on some
really different hats lately. I love how
you’re entertaining some personally
revolutionary ideas and trying to fgure
out how to incorporate them into your
life. This week, you’ll have a chance to
make room for one of your most out-there
dreams, your most revolutionary work
ethic, or an attitude about love (or maybe
just sex) that seemed like a mere fringe
fantasy before. I can’t wait to see what
happens. I’m hoping you’ll rise to the
occasion: Show us that you can not only
don the title “Consciousness Rebel,” but
wear it like a rock star.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
I thought she was a Leo: Her leopard-
print dress; her long, golden mane; the
way she imperiously shoved her way
through a crowd, toting a somehow
glamorous luggage-sized purse and
shopping bags while deftly clutching a
cigarette between delicately outstretched,
ring-laden fngers. All these things pointed
to her Sun-ruled nature. I was convinced,
in fact, until she rebuffed a stranger’s
compliment (“I just wanted to tell you how
much I love your fabulous coat.”) with
a very cold, “So?” I cite her lameness to
remind you what you can and can’t get
away with: Go ahead and be the king or
queen of your little world; but don’t forget
the warmth and generosity (as well as the
sweet susceptibility to sincere fattery)
that make your rank superiority adorable
instead of intolerable.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Not that you should go around lifting
manhole covers or sneaking into people’s
basements, but a lot of what you’re
looking for is underground these days,
at least fguratively. Your craving for the
intense and the real is at high tide again,
and the things that will best satisfy it are
all well off the beaten path, especially
your beaten path. They exist in placed
you’d never think to look. Never fear:
The universe is erecting some well-placed
signs to clue you in to where the best
locations to embark on educative and
entertaining detours might be. Heed them.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
It’s just a stab in the dark. But, lo and
behold, it actually struck something solid.
You’ve been thrusting blindly into the
unknown, trying out new things, hoping
to fgure out who or what the next chapter
will be mostly about. Your latest jab
hit. This week, fgure out what this new
inclination essentially is. Your goal: By
this time next week, you ought to know
exactly how the subject of your newest
chapter will ft cleanly into your life, or
get stuck rereading the chapter you just
fnished for at least one more month.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Whether it’s working behind-the-
scenes on a porno, writing a novel, or
constructing a skyscraper, getting a taste
of all the work that goes into the things
you usually take for granted can only
heighten your appreciation of them.
This week, indulge your evolving and
expanding need to not just do, but make.
Besides the obvious benefts of the act of
creation, you’ll reap an almost equally
important secondary boon: relearning how
to acknowledge and understand the great
efforts your undervalued companions go to
for you. You’ll be a surprised at how far a
newly sincere “thank you” gets you.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
I’d love to bury you up to your knees,
just to keep you still. Sometimes the
best way to catch something is to stop
chasing it. Plant yourself. Choose a lovely
spot with lots of sunshine and good
cellphone reception. Then watch while
everything vital practically takes care
of itself, important people make thrilled
pilgrimages to you, and all you need is
provided, on location—wherever you are.
As you watch your mountain of desire
magically melt down to molehill size from
the power of sunlight and the occasional
phone call, you’ll wonder why in hell
you’ve spent so much of the last few
months trying to climb the damn thing.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Don’t be alarmed by your loss of vision.
Although the kaleidoscope of fascinating
colors and venues you’re used to has
dropped out of sight, it’s been replaced
by some very directed tunnel vision. Take
advantage of this extreme focus. Make a
beeline for one of those long-term goals
that usually gets a backburner position in
favor of the wild distractions of your daily
life. You’re bound to get at least halfway
to it, maybe further. Be single-minded for
once, and don’t worry: When you switch
your mental camera from zoom to wide-
angle again, the delicious pandemonium of
your “normal” life will still be there.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Van Gogh sacrifced an ear for love,
right? Of course, instead of severing
yours and sending it to your sweetheart
as a sign of your devotion, you’ll be
surrendering it by cutting off all blood
fow with the earpiece of your phone.
Of course, those marathon long-distance
calls to demonstrate your unfagging ardor
wouldn’t be necessary if you just made
some actual room in your life for your
sweetheart to move into. It may still be too
soon for that; only you can know for sure.
But until you do, be prepared to give up
not only an ear, but probably an arm and a
leg, too.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
For well over a thousand years, oracles
sat at Delphi and channeled the wisdom
of the gods to give advice to rulers,
philosophers and ordinary people; deliver
orders; and issue prophecies. The ancient
Greeks attributed the oracle’s trancelike—
often impassioned—state to vapors that
rose from the temple foor. Modern science
dismissed that explanation until recently,
when a team of scientists produced
substantial evidence that crisscrossing
fault lines beneath the temple probably
produced ethylene, a gas that can cause
altered mental states. Euphoric substances
or no, your oracular powers are peaking.
And while presidents and royalty might
not care what you have to say while you’re
channeling the bad s—t, nearly everyone
else will.
-To contact Caeriel, send mail to sign.
language.astrology@gmail.com.
W
Sign language
By Caeriel Crestin
Weekender Correspondent
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS
Jessie J
March 27, 1988
Vince Vaughn
March 28, 1970
Jessica Chastain
March 29, 1981
Eric Clapton
March 30, 1945
EWAN MCGREGOR
(pictured)
March 31, 1971
Susan Boyle
April 1, 1961
Michael Fassbender
April 2, 1977
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100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
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100
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VEHICLES
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LOST DOG, Sheltie,
by Hunlock Creek
Main Road near
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“Boomer” small tan
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570-574-5482
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570-542-7588
Looking for the right deal
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LOST. Jack Russell
miniature pincher
mix, rusty orange,
resembles Chihua-
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If found, please call
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120 Found
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VITO’S
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949 Wyoming Ave.
Forty Fort
288-8995
310 Attorney
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800-324-9748 W-B
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570-822-1959
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
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FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
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570-675-5046.
Leave message,
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93,000 original
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412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
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Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
412 Autos for Sale
BARBUSH
AUTO
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223 Sleepy
Hollow Road
Drums, PA 18222
(570) 788-2883
(570) 233-3360
‘99 CHRYSLER
CIRRUS......$1,999
‘99 MERCURY
TRACER GS
..................$2,499
‘00 GMC JIMMY
SLE ...........$3,599
‘00 FORD TAURUS
LX.......$2,599
‘01 SATURN SL1
..................$3,499
‘01 CHEVY
VENTURA VAN
...................$1,799
‘01 GMC
SOMNOMA
EXCAB 4X4
..................$5,899
‘02 CHEVY
CAvaLIER
..................$3,499
‘02 NEON 95K
..................$2,999
‘03 DODGE
GRAND CARAVAN
SE .............$3,999
‘03 FORD TAURUS
SE..............$3,699
‘04 PONTIAC
GRAND AM
..................$4,300
‘05 CHEVY MAIiL-
BU CLASSIC
..................$3,299
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
412 Autos for Sale
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
We’ll run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNLLLLLLLLYONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNE LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEADER.
timesleader.com
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518 Customer
Support/Client Care
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
506 Administrative/
Clerical
506 Administrative/
Clerical
506 Administrative/
Clerical
MAKE YOUR NEXT CAREER
MOVE A TRIPLE PLAY
GREAT JOB - GREAT BENEFITS - GREAT
ENVIRONMENT
Training Class to start April 22nd
Please apply online at
www.rcn.com/careers
WWW.RCN.COM
We are proud to be an EEO/AA employer M/F/D/V.
As the nation’s frst & largest competitive provider of bundled
cable TV, phone and high-speed internet services, RCN
is proud to offer its employees a great team environment,
exceptional rewards and limitless growth potential. If you
have a proven track record of providing exceptional sales and
customer service, consider a career at RCN
CUSTOMER CARE
ADVOCATES
Your responsibilities will include resolving billing and technical
issues as well as inbound sales calls, help retain customers,
up sell services and increase customer satisfaction.
• $11 - $14hr based on experience + commission
and incentives
• Work schedules available include afternoon and evening
hours and weekends
• Up to twelve weeks of paid training is provided
• Minimum of one year customer service experience or
technical experience
• Must possess a high school diploma or GED
• Ability to solve complex issues is necessary
TELESALES
REPRESENTATIVES
Your responsibilities will include educating potential
customers on RCN’s products and services and acquiring
new RCN customers along with assisting customers with
billing or general customer service issues.
• Hourly + Commission
• High School Diploma or GED required
• Minimum of one year of sales experience required
• A history of exceptional consultative sales success
• Must be able to work fexible hours, including nights,
weekends and holidays
RCN offers an excellent benefts package including competitive
salary, incentive and bonus, health insurance, dental, vision,
401k, tuition assistance and career growth opportunity.
View a complete listing of all career opportunities at
www.rcn.com/careers
Lord & Taylor is looking for an aggressive, analytical and
results-oriented individual with strong PC skills and
excellent communication skills to work in our Wilkes-Barre
Service Center. The executive level opportunity is:
T & A Systems Analyst
Support the Time & Attendance payroll and scheduling system.
Develop and produce various reports utilized at all levels of the
organization. Devise solutions within Staffing that result in
increased productivity and data integrity, timelier information
flow and reduction in task interference.
Strong PC skills including extensive Excel and Access
experience along with the ability to develop/support macros
required. Qualified candidates need to
apply on our career website at:
http://lt.lordandtaylor.us/ltdocs/careers/corporate.html
Lord & Taylor Service Center
250 Highland Park Blvd.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18702
We offer a competitive salary, medical/dental/vision/life insurance,
401(k).We also offer generous merchandise discounts.
Lord & Taylor is an equal opportunity employer.
412 Autos for Sale
VITO’S
&
GINO’S
Auto Sales
949 Wyoming
Ave, Forty Fort
288-8995
93 UD Tow Truck
with wheel lift.
64k. $8,995
‘94 Jeep
Cherokee V8.
Runs great.
Power windows
& doors.
$2,995
‘96 F150 Pickup.
auto, runs good.
$2,495
‘96 Pontiac
Grand Prix.
White, air,
power windows
& brakes, 4
door, runs good,
106K. $2,995
‘01 Ford Taurus
SES
4 door, air, power
doors & win-
dows.
$2,995
‘99 Chevy S10
Blazer 4 door,
power windows,
doors & seats.
126,000 miles.
$3,995
‘03 Ford Wind-
star 4 door, all
power options.
96,000 miles.
$4,300
‘04 Nissan
Armada, 7 pass-
enger. 4wd.
Excellent condi-
tion. $10,900
‘09 Mercedes
GL450, 7 pass-
enger. Too many
options to list. 30K
miles. Garage
kept. Cream puff.
$42,500
Buying
Junk Cars
Used Cars
&Trucks
Highest Prices Paid
574 -1275
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
MERCEDES-BENZ ‘12
C300
4Matic Sport
Sedan 4-Door 3.0L
AWD. Only 7,700
miles. Black
exterior & interior.
Premium 1 pack-
age. Garage kept.
Like new $32,000
570-881-0866
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800
GL INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
Collect cash, not dust!
Clean out your
basement, garage
or attic and call the
Classified depart-
ment today at 570-
829-7130!
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,000, OBO.
570-793-5593
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
457 Wanted to Buy
Auto
All
Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
472 Auto Services
$ WANTED JUNK $
VEHICLES
LISPI TOWING
We pick up 822-0995
WANTED
Cars & Full Size
Trucks. For prices...
Lamoreaux Auto
Parts 477-2562
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
506 Administrative/
Clerical
ASSISTANT WANTED
Part time.
Answering phones
and multi-tasking.
M-F approx 30 hrs
a week. Nanticoke
area. Call
570.735.4100 or
email:
info@rkfurs.com
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
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515 Creative/Design
FLORAL DESIGNER
Part time, must
have experience.
Call Stephanie at
570-454-0352
or 570-362-0845
Stephanie’s Greens
And Things
West Hazleton
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
RESIDENT MANAGER
Upscale apart-
ment community
in Wilkes Barre,
PA seeks resident
manager. Manag-
er is responsible
for overseeing the
entire apartment
operations.
Friendly and
organized. Good
salary and bene-
fits. Please send
resume and salary
requirements to:
agreen@the
manorgroup.com
522 Education/
Training
FORTIS INSTITUTE
FORTY FORT
Exciting Teaching
Opportunity
Part time instructor
position in CDL
program. The ideal
candidate will have
3 plus yrs work
experience in the
trucking industry
and a valid CDL.
Teaching experi-
ence a plus, but not
required.
Fax resume to:
570.287.7936
or mail to:
Director of
Education
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort PA 18704
PART TIME
Help Wanted
Little People
Day Care School
280 Hanover
Street
Wilkes-Barre
littlepeopleWB.com
Experience preferred
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
AIRLINE CAREERS :
Begin here-Become
an Aviation Mainte-
nance Tech. FAA
approved training.
Financial aid if quali-
fied-Housing avail-
able. Job placement
assistance.
CALL Aviation Insti-
tute of Maintenance
888-834-9715
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
FACILITY CLEANING
MANAGER
2nd shift New addi-
tion for a full time
experienced person
with no less than 5-
7 years in related
EVS- Housekeep-
ing-Custodial and
leadership knowl-
edge in the facility
cleaning industry.
Ability to manage,
work with staff,
train and be in a
working supervisory
role. Floor care
knowledge
required. This posi-
tions is 2nd shift
mainly 40-45 hours
a week 3p-12mid
some 2p-10pm.
Occasional Sat
maybe needed.
Traveling will be
required between
Luzerne-Lackawan-
na- Lehigh Valley
Area- with other
opportunities within
75 mile radius.
Working with
employees on all
facets of cleaning
will be needed.
Flexible, profession-
al and ability to
multi task under
high pressure
results. Excellent
salary- car
allowance, iPad and
phone will be
available. Clean
MVR and valid driv-
er license required.
Must be able to lift
up to 60 lbs.
Apply online:
www.sovereigncs.com
NO phone calls
please!
EOE and Drug Free
Workplace
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
542 Logistics/
Transportation
ASPHALT
PAVING CREW
Experienced
asphalt operators
and laborers. Call
570-825-2688
EXPERIENCED
SERVICE MANAGER
Opening for:
Experienced
Service Manager,
2nd Shift. We Offer
Top Wages and
Benefits Package.
Call for Interview
and Ask for Paul or
Dave:
Falzone Towing
Service, Inc.
271 N. Sherman St
Wilkes-Barre, Pa
18702
570.823.2100
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers:
BOLUS BOLUS
FREIGHT FREIGHT SYSTEMS SYSTEMS
NOW HIRING
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS
-Make up to
$1400 Weekly!
Immediate
openings for:
-Day-Trip/Local
-N.E Regional
-Over-The-Road
-Mon-Fri
Work Week
-No Touch Freight
-Weekends Optional
-Spend more time
at home!
Excellent Mileage
Pay Plus:
-$1200 Safety/Per-
formance Bonus
-$6000 Average
Accessorial Pay
-Flexible Work
Schedule
-Part-Time/Week-
end runs also!!
EOE, Holidays
Health Packages,
401K, Vacation,
and much more!
Call at
(570) 342-1903
1-800-444-1497
ext.721
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
548 Medical/Health
HOME HEALTH RN
Openings for:
Full time, part
time, per diem
and on call.
Covering
Wyoming Valley,
Scranton, and
Tunkhannock
areas. Call
Associated Family
Homecare, Inc.
570.283.5917
to schedule
interview
M-F 8am-4:30pm
548 Medical/Health
NURSING NURSING
SUPERVISOR SUPERVISOR
OPPOR OPPORTUNITIES: TUNITIES:
Geisinger-
Bloomsburg Hospital
is currently accepting
applications for two
Nursing Supervisor
positions. Candidates
must be available to
work rotating shifts
for both the Part-time
or PRN/Flex open
positions. Graduate
from an accredited
school of nursing
with current licensure
by the Pennsylvania
State Board of
Nursing. Baccalaure-
ate Degree in Nursing
required. Two (2)
to five (5) years
of clinical experience,
including experience
as a Charge Nurse
required. Apply in
person or online @
www.bloomhealth.net
Geisinger-Blooms-
burg Hospital
Human Resources
Dept., 549 Fair Street,
3rd Fl. Prof. Bldg.,
Bloomsburg, PA
17815
EOE/M-F-H-V-D
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
554 Production/
Operations
MACHINIST
Local firm has
immediate opening
for CNC Lathe
Operator. Experi-
ence preferred, but
will train the right
applicant. 2nd shift -
4 day work week.
Excellent benefits.
R&H Mfg., Inc.
Woodward Hill
Edwardsville, PA
570-288-6648
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Full time sales/
online advertising
position. at local
used car dealership.
Will train right per-
son. Advertising or
finance degree a
plus. Salary plus
commission. Send
resume to:
BOX 4335
C/O Times Leader
15 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
COCCIA COCCIA FORD FORD
LINCOLN
Due to a recent
expansion, one of
the area’s largest
& fastest growing
Dealerships is
now seeking
SALES PEOPLE
AUTOMOTIVE
SALES
EXPERIENCE
REQUIRED!!
AUTO MECHANIC
CAR WASHER
Excellent pay and
benefits including
401k plan.
Apply to:
Greg Martin
577 E. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA,
18702
570-823-8888
email:
grmartin@
cocciacars.com
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
573 Warehouse
WAREHOUSE/
DISTRIBUTION CENTER
POSITIONS
Dance Distribution
Center
Job duties may
include: order
picking/packing,
inventory of incom-
ing merchandise,
and shipping.
Physical require-
ments include the
ability to twist,
bend, squat, reach,
stand and/or walk
for extended peri-
ods of time. Lifting
up to 45 lbs may be
required.
Primary shift is
9 am - 5:30 pm
M-F. Applicants
must possess a
strong work ethic,
sharp attention to
detail, and be
reliable. Employees
must work quickly
and efficiently with
a high level of
accuracy.
vkasha@hill
corporation.com
600
FINANCIAL
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
Find Something?
Lose Something?
Get it back where it
belongs
with a Lost/Found ad!
570-829-7130
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-’75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-’52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-’61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
’68, HANOVER 1951-
’74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
732 Exercise
Equipment
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
Palletized
Bluestone/
Flagstone Auction
(600) Pallets of Cut Stone /
Landscape Stone (600)
Inventory Reduction For:
Johnson Quarries, Inc.
Le Raysville, PA 18829
(Lawton / Wyalusing Area)
Saturday April 6, 2013
9:30 AM
Auction To Be Held At
Johnson Quarries,
15962 Route 467, Stevensville, PA. From
Lawton: Take Route 706 To 467, Go 2
Miles to Auction Site. From Wyalusing:
Take Route 706 To Route 467.
(600) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone,
Pattern Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc.,
(600)
Including: Thermaled Full Colored & Blue
Pattern, Asst. Dimensions & Thicknesses;
Full Color Patter, Asst. Dimension &Thick-
nesses; Lilac Pattern, Asst. Dimensions &
Thicknesses; Full Color, Blue & Red Colo-
nial; Full Color Irregular; Full Color Irreg-
ular Tumbled; Full Color & Lilac Irregular
/ Standup; Lilac Colonial; Blue Gaged
Colonial; Tumbled & Regular Bluestone
Pavers, 1’ x 1’ & 1’ x 18” & Asst. Sizes;
Blue Treads, 3’ x 12-18”; Creek Stone;
Snapped Colonial; Other Asst. Types &
Varieties; Field Stone Rounds; Natural
Slabs; Steps; Etc.; Palletized Stone To Be
Sold By The Pallet Or By Square Ft. And
Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pallets & Types
Will Be Offered By The Pallet And Buyer
Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling Arrange-
ments Will Depend On Types, Varieties And
Way Stone Is Palletized. Types, Sizes, Sell-
ing Terms & Other Pertinent Info Will Be
In Detailed Catalog On Our Website By
March 27, 2013 @ www.manasseauc-
tions.com;
Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded
For Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Fol-
lowing Auction, From Monday – Friday
8:00AM – 3:00PM, By Appointment.
Trucking Available By Contacting Wyalus-
ing Transport, (570) 744-1284 / (570) 744-
0100
Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyers Premi-
um Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day
Of Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major
Credit Card, 3% Discount For Payments
Made By Cash Or Check. Nothing
Removed Until Settled For.
Auction Preview: Friday, April 5, 2013
From 12PM To 4PM & Day Of Auction
From 8AM Until Auction Start Time.
Auctioneers Note: The Johnson Family
Are Reducing Their Stone Inventory; These
Are All Top Quality Items, Not Seconds;
All Selling Absolute To The Highest Bid-
der, Plan To Attend. Buy Your Spring
Inventory Early In The Season Here &
Homeowners Plan To Buy For Your Spring
Projects!!
Mel & Matt Manasse
PAAuctioneers License
# AU571L & AU3517L
Sales Managers & Auctioneers
Whitney Point, NY
607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE
www.manasseauctions.com
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551 Other 551 Other 551 Other 551 Other
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
522 Education/
Training
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
522 Education/
Training
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
522 Education/
Training
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
$900.00
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
Routes Currently Available:
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Bowman St. • Chapel St. • Hillard St.
Kidder St. • NewGrant St.
183 Daily Papers • 205 Sunday Papers
$830 Monthly Proft
WILKES-BARRE/PARSONS
Wyoming St. • Brookside St.
E. Chestnut St. • Harry St. • Madison St.
169 Daily Papers • 206 Sunday Papers
$850 Monthly Proft
WAPWALLOPEN MOTOR ROUTE
St. Mary’s Rd. • St. John’s Rd.
Moyers Grove Rd. • Sunset Rd.
94 Daily Papers • 155 Sunday Papers
$800 Monthly Proft
LEE PARK
Alexie Rd. • Betsy Ross Dr.
Constitution Ave. • David Rd. • Lee Park Ave.
252 Daily Papers • 285 Sunday Papers
$1,000 Monthly Proft
MANAGER
TRAINEES
SEND US YOUR RESUME
Expanding Burger King Franchise in the area needs
enthusiastic, aggressive people for Management
Positions. Benefits Include:
• Health Insurance Plan
• 401 (K)
• Dental And Life Insurance Available
• Bonus Plan
• Paid Vacation
• Paid Sick Days
• 45 Hour Work Week
• Competitive Salary
If You Have Pride In Your Own Ability
Send Your Resume To:
Burger King
Attn: Personnel Dept.
185 Ferguson Avenue
Shavertown, Pa 18708
E-Mail: Hr@Pdmco.Net
E.O.E.
Aooreoifeo by NACCAS º Finonoiol oio ovoiloble for fhose who quolify ºDoy & eveninQ soheoules
For Jolie Aoooemy's Sfuoenf Consumer |nformofion visif www.jolieooooemy.oom/info
HEALTH AND BEAUTY ACADEMY
Rozlefon 45º-5501
Wilkes-Borre 825-83ó3 jolieooooemy.oom
Unleash
Your
Creativity
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Courses offered in:
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Noil !eohnoloQy
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
744 Furniture &
Accessories
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
744 Furniture &
Accessories
WALL UNITS by
Hooker, 3 solid oak
and lighted with
adjustable shelves.
$550. SOFA, sec-
tional, light brown
leather, recliners on
each end. $445.
570-288-1981
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
758 Miscellaneous
CLOTHING girls,
various sizes,
pieces and prices.
$7-$37, Call for fur-
ther details. Books,
paperback and
hardcover, $15, a
box, three boxes
total, Sleeping bags,
two person $35,
one person with air
mattress insert,
$30, like new.
Shelving unit, cor-
ner, $20.
570-474-6028
758 Miscellaneous
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19” COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
786 Toys & Games
BICYCLE girl’s 6-
speed Pacific
Jubilee; blue & pur-
ple with 20” wheels;
adjustable seat. $50
Little Tikes chalk-
board, good condi-
tion $10.
Call 570-474-2170
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
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542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
554 Production/
Operations
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
542 Logistics/
Transportation
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Ryder is hosting
a Hiring Event!
Interviews on Site.
The Residence Inn
700 Lackawanna Ave., Scranton, PA
Friday March 29th
10am-5pm
Class A Drivers
with Flatbed Experience!
Dedicated
Excellent Pay and Benefits
Class A CDL w/ 1 yr. exp.
call 1-800-7933754
www.ryder.jobs
EOE. Drug test required for employment
We are growing and we are looking for the best Experienced Class A CDL Route
Delivery Drivers. Core-Mark is accepting applications for
FULL TIME 4 DAY WORK WEEK - Guaranteed 40 hours per week.
This is ideal for drivers who want to be able to be home with their families.
We are a national convenience store distribution company seeking full timeCLASS
ACDL DRIVERS. Generous benefit package to include Medical/Dental/Vision/STD/
LTDand 401k. $1,500 sign on bonus as well as Attendance/Safety and Performance
Bonus programs available. Annual and merit increases. Designed Route Deliveries.
Company provided uniformand work boots.
Part-time opportunities are
also available for drivers
looking to make some extra
money on their days off.
a
CLASS ACDL DRIVERS
Apply @Core-Mark
100West End Rd.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
570-823-6865
Or apply online @
http:www.core-mark/
careeropportunities/
careers.aspx
Prior military/ government
civilian contractor
experience welcomed.
Attention TYAD:
MegaPhase MegaPhase Wants You! Wants You!
MegaPhase in Stroudsburg, PA
is a diversified company serving
Military and commercial customers
worldwide. We are hiring: engineers,
technicians (especially RF/Microwave),
designers, CNC machinists, tool
& die makers, logisticians, proposal
writers and many more skilled workers.
We are an equal opportunity employer
and offer a competitive salary,
excellent benefits, health, dental,
vision and 401(k) retirement plans.
Please email your resume in
Word or PDF format to:
teamwork@megaphase.com
or stop in to fill out an application
between 9 and 2pm
Monday through Thursday.
MAINTENANCE
TECHNICIAN
Local area manufacturing facility has an
immediate need for a Maintenance Technician.
Applicant should have a working knowledge of
Electrical and Mechanical Systems with the
ability to read schematics and troubleshoot
various pneumatic and hydraulic systems as
well as PLC’s and motors. Candidate must have
a working knowledge of computers in an
industrial environment including hardware
configuration and troubleshooting, software
configuration and troubleshooting and some
limited network configuration and trou-
bleshooting. Must be a reliable, self starter;
able to work 6 days a week. Applicant must
have at least 5 years experience. Consideration
will be given to all relevant training and work
experience. The company offers a competitive
wage/benefits package including medical,
dental, prescription, 401(k), life insurance,
profit and team sharing. Qualified applicants
may apply by mailing a resume to:
THE TIMES LEADER
BOX 4325
15 N. MAIN STREET,
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
Nursing Human Resources
Coordinator
Full time
Responsibilities include coordinating
recruitment, hiring, orientation, retention, and
performance appraisals of nursing staff.
Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources
Management or related degree required.
Long-term care knowledge or experience
preferred
Excellent salary and benefit package.
Apply online, or send resume to:
Colleen Knight
The Jewish Home of Eastern PA
1101 Vine St., Scranton, PA 18510
Telephone: 344-6177/Fax: 344-6859
Jhep.org EOE
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 26 - $1,598.00
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 26 - $1,598.00
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
ENGLISH BULLDOG
AKC Puppy,
female. $2,000.
Call for pictures.
570-839-1917
POMERANIANS. 8
weeks, 1st shots, 1
female 3 males. No
papers. $375 each
570-864-2643
815 Dogs
GOLDEN RETRIEV-
ER. BLOND, male
big boned. 8 months
old. Housebroken,
very well mannered.
AKC reg. $400
570-288-2893
570-852-7064
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
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554 Production/
Operations
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE AVAILABLE
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS, INC.,
A LEADING COMMERCIAL MODULAR
MANUFACTURER IS PRESENTLY
TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS
ALL SKILL LEVELS NEEDED: ALL SKILL LEVELS NEEDED:
• SKILLED TILE SETTER
• SKILLED ROOFERS/SIDERS
• PLUMBERS
• ELECTRICIANS
• SPACKLERS W/TOOL EXPERIENCE/
DRYWALL FINISHERS
• ROUGH AND FINISH CARPENTERS
• MIG WELDERS
• CONCRETE FINISHERS
• UTILITY (MULTIPLE TRADE
SKILLS & EXPERIENCE)
COME JOIN THE DELUXE TEAM! COME JOIN THE DELUXE TEAM!
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT:
YOUR LOCAL CAREER LINK
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS, INC
or 499 WEST THIRD STREET
BERWICK, PA 18603
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS IS A
DRUG FREE FACILITY,
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING
WILL BE REQUIRED.
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100’
x 125’. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
906 Homes for Sale
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level house fea-
tures 2 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths, recre-
ation room with
propane stove.
3 season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PLAINS
Nothing to do but
just move in!
23 Laurel Street
4 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms
Excellent condition!
Off street parking,
new roof,
and all new appli-
ances included.
Playground right
around the
corner.
$139,900
Call (570)690-2886
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
for lease. Units
ranging from 600-
2700 sq ft. prime
Mountaintop area,
great for busi-
ness!!! High traffic
area for retail or
office space.
Prices ranging
from $500.00/
month for smallest
off street unit to
$2700.00/month
for large 2700
square foot
building. call
Amanda Colonna
570-714-6115
CENTURY 21
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-287-1196,
for details and to
view units.
S. WILKES-BARRE
$25,000 / 6 bed-
room - 2, 500 sq.
ft. Contractor
Special $5,000.00
down. Owner will
finance balance!
Zoned R-3.
Currently 2 bed-
room apartment on
first floor. 2nd and
3rd floor together
as a 4 bedroom
unit. Needs work. 4
off street paved
parking spaces
included. Close to
Wilkes University.
Call Scott
302-249-4264
WILKES-BARRE
Owner Retiring
Turn Key Night
Club For Sale.
Two full bars,
game area.
Four restrooms.
Prime Location!!!
Creative financing
Available $80,000,
Dave Rubbico, Jr.
Rubbico
Real Estate
826-1600
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
WILKES-BARRE
302 HAZLE STREET
Duplex. Each unit
has 2 bedrooms,
kitchens, living
rooms, basement
storage, gas heat.
Big back yard, off
street parking.
$60,000, negotiable
570-760-7378
912 Lots & Acreage
NEWPORT TWP.
LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS - - LOTS LOTS
1 mile south of
L.C.C.C.
Established
developement with
underground utili-
ties including gas.
Cleared lot. 100’
frontage x 158.
$35,000.
Lot 210 ‘ frontage
158’ deep on hill
with great view
$35,000.
Call 570-736-6881
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
EXETER
Beautiful 1st floor. 1
bedroom 1/2 duplex.
Eat-in kitchen, appli-
ances included
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, &
washer / dryer
hook-up. No pets.
$720/ mo + security
heat, hot water &
sewage included.
570-301-7247
Looking to buy a
home?
Place an ad here
and let the
sellers know!
570-829-7130
GLEN LYON
1st floor, NEW
Appliances &
Floors. 4 room apt.
Electric & propane
gas heat. Off street
parking. Washer
/dryer hookup, ref-
rigerator, garbage
included. No dogs.
$400/month refer-
ences required, 1
year lease + 1 month
security.
570-714-1296
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
3029 South Main St
1st floor, 3 bed-
rooms, wall to
wall carpeting and
freshly painted,
central air, eat in
kitchen with appli-
ances. Off street
parking. Laundry
room with bonus
washer and dryer.
Heat & cooking
gas included. Ten-
ant pays electric &
water. $640 +
security. No Pets.
Call 570-814-1356
HARVEYS LAKE
2 bedroom , wall to
wall carpet, appli-
ances, Lake rights.
Off street parking.
No pets. Lease,
security and
references.
570-639-5920
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment, features
a fireplace, built-in
bookcases, large
living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen,
sun room & much
more! $525 +
utilities. Available
April 1st. Please call
570-714-8568
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted. Security
system, garage
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No pets.
References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $730.
month. Call
570-287-0900
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, wall to wall,
off street parking,
washer/dryer hook-
up in the basement.
$510/per month.
Call (570)288-9507
NANTICOKE
Nice 2 bedroom
Eat-in kitchen, living
room, full bath,
stove/fridge,
washer/dryer
hook-up.
$500 + utilities.
NO PETS.
Call:
570-760-3637 or
570-477-3839
PITTSTON
1 room + bath effi-
ciency. Wall to wall
carpeting, includes
all utilities plus
garbage & sewer.
Stove & refrigerator
included. Security.
No pets. $400/
month. Call
570-655-1606
To place your
ad call...829-7130
PLYMOUTH
Beautiful 1 bedroom
Newly remodeled
from top to bottom.
If interested please
call 570-239-3950
PLYMOUTH
TOWNHOUSE
Convenient loca-
tion, very low
maintenance.
Total electric. Liv-
ing and dining
room, 1.5 baths. 2
large bedrooms.
Appliances, w/d
hookup included.
Very small yard.
Private parking
sewer paid, secu-
rity reference and
lease. Not section
8 approved. No
smoking or pets
$575 + utilities.
570-779-2694
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
SHICKSHINNY
(1 mile north of
Shickshinny) 1 open
efficiency, on Route
11, Includes heat,
air, garbage, satel-
lite TV, & water.
Tenant pays elec-
tric. $575/month +
security. New stove
& refrigerator
included. Plenty
of parking. Truckers
Welcome!
570-793-9530
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South St E.
2 bedroom, avail-
able early April. 1st
floor. New windows
& carpet. Ceramic
tile in kitchen &
bath. 6 x 8 porch.
$650/month. Land-
lord pays heat &
water. No hook ups.
No Pets. 1 month
security & 1 month
rent. Call Manny
718-946-8738 or
917-295-6254
WILKES-BARRE
447 S. Franklin St.
1 bedroom with
study, off street
parking, laundry
facility. Includes
heat and hot
water, hardwood
floors, appliances,
Trash removal.
$580/mo Call
(570)821-5599
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
1 block from
General Hospital, 3
room apartment,
washer/dryer,
stove, refrigerator,
1st & last months
rent + security,
references
required.
Water Paid.
$525/per month
570-706-6487
After 6 p.m.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WILKES-BARRE
PARRISH ST
Very Nice 2 bed-
room. 2nd Floor
$540 + utilities.
Security, Refer-
ences, Background
check.
570-332-8792
WILKES-BARRE
VICTORIAN CHARM
On S. Franklin St.
1st floor, 1 bedroom,
wood floors, eat-in
kitchen with stove
& refrigerator, mod-
ern bath, coinop
washer & dryer.
Off street parking.
Secure building.
$550/ month
includes everything
except phone &
cable.
570-822-7670
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
By General Hospital
Large 1 bedroom,
hardwood floors,
appliances. Eat in
kitchen. Parking
space available.
$500/month +
utilities. No pets.
570-540-5312
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
947 Garages
WANTED GARAGE
Duryea & surround-
ing area. Wanted
garage to rent for
boat storage. Easy
access.
570-760-1548
950 Half Doubles
HANOVER TWP.
#5 and #7 Regina St.
3 bedrooms 1 bath,
off street parking,
washer and dryer
included. #5-$750
Plus utilities, #7-
$800 plus utilities.
Background and
credit check.
570-765-4474
KIINGSTON
67 Pulaski St.
fully renovated 2
bedroom 1 bath,
large living room,
new carpet, washer
and dryer included,
credit and back-
ground check. $750
+ utilities.
570-765-4474
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, stove provid-
ed, washer/dryer
hook up & wall to
wall carpet.
$475/month +
security & utilities.
570-472-2392
WEST PITTSTON
5 bedroom, 1.5
baths, living & din-
ing rooms, kitchen
with stove, refriger-
ator & dishwasher.
Gas heat & off
street parking.
$800/month
+ utilities, security
& references.
570-237-5478
953Houses for Rent
DALLAS
3 bedroom, 2 bath,
brick ranch house
with gas heat &
central air, attached
2 car garage. Full
basement. $1,300/
month. Security &
references.
570-690-2570
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
EDWARDSVILLE
49 Rice Avenue
Recently remodeled
single family home.
2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
laundry room. Dri-
veway & yard. Gas
steam heat. $600 +
utilities & 1 month
security.
NO PETS
570-472-9453
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile. Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
Wanna make your
car go fast? Place
an ad in Classified!
570-829-7130.
Need a Roommate?
Place an ad and
find one here!
570-829-7130
To place your
ad call...829-7130
P
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Gaughan Auto Store
114 South Main St., Taylor • 562-3088
www.gaughanautostore.com
$2000 MinimumTrade Allowance! Offer Expires March 30th!
*2000 Minimum Trade Allowance applies to Truck & SUV purchases. Please see dealer for details.
$7,988 and Under
98 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS L
Extra Clean....................
$
4,988
03 CHRYSLER SEBRING LX
80K Miles......................
$
5,988
02 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS/LX
AWD .............................
$
6,988
01 BMW 330I ALL WHEEL DRIVE
#S94769 .........................
$
7,988
01 CADILLAC CATERA
#001199, 25,000 Miles ....
$
7,988
01 VW JETTA GLS
Very Nice ........................
$
7,988
03 CHEVY IMPALA
70K Miles........................
$
7,988
03 GMC ENVOY
Moonroof ........................
$
7,988
04 DODGE DAKOTA SPORT
Extra Cab ........................
$
7,988
04 MERCURY GR. MARQUIS L
Low Miles .......................
$
7,988
05 CHEVY EQUINOX LS
#050603..........................
$
7,988
02 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
#119669..........................
$
7,988
06 MERCURY MILAN PREMIER
1-Owner ..........................
$
7,988
07 SATURN AURA
Red, Moonroof ................
$
7,988
08 KIA OPTIMA EX
4-Door ............................
$
7,988
$8,988 and Under
02 CHEVY TAHOE K1500
#222133 ......................
$
8,988
02 GMC ENVOY
#304833........................
$
8,988
02 TOYOTA CELICA GT
Moonroof ......................
$
8,988
03 GMC ENVOY
Black.............................
$
8,988
03 NISSAN ALTIMA SL
1-Owner ........................
$
8,988
03 VW PASSAT GLS
Moonroof ......................
$
8,988
04 GMC SONOMA
4-Door ..........................
$
8,988
04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GLS/LX
AWD .............................
$
8,988
04 JEEP LIBERTY LIMITED
Moonroof ......................
$
8,988
04 SCION XB
4-Door Hatchback..........
$
8,988
05 CHEVY IMPALA
1-Owner ........................
$
8,988
06 HYUNDAI SANTA FE GL/LTD
Black.............................
$
8,988
07 CHRYSLER SEBRING TOURING
Clean ............................
$
8,988
07 KIA RONDO EX
#042008, 3rd Row Seating
$
8,988
$9,988 and Under
04 SAAB 9-5 ARC
60K Miles......................
$
9,988
06 JEEP LIBERTY SPORT
#152375........................
$
9,988
06 SUBARU IMPREZA 2.5I
#819390........................
$
9,988
07 SAAB 9-3 2.0T
Moonroof ......................
$
9,988
08 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT
4x4 ...............................
$
9,988
08 JEEP COMPASS SPORT
4x4 ...............................
$
9,988
08 CHEVY IMPALA LS
1-Owner ........................
$
9,988
08 PONTIAC G5
Convertible....................
$
9,988
03 ACURA MDX
3rd Row........................
$
9,988
03 INFINITI G35
1-Owner ........................
$
9,988
03 NISSAN MAXIMA GLE/GXE
1-Owner ........................
$
9,988
05 SCION TC
1-Owner ........................
$
9,988
07 MAZDA MAZDA6I
Automatic......................
$
9,988
07 DODGE NITRO SXT
Save Thousands ............
$
9,988
06 CHRYSLER 300
#330600........................
$
9,988
07 CHEVY MONTE CARLO LT
#107551........................
$
9,988
$12,988 and Under $14,988 and Under
08 HONDA PILOT EX
3rd Row...................
$
13,988
08 TOYOTA RAV4
3rd Row...................
$
13,988
09 NISSAN FRONTIER LE/SE
Xtra Cab...................
$
13,988
09 TOYOTA CAMRY LE
#305781...................
$
13,988
10 DODGE NITRO SE
#142967...................
$
13,988
03 HUMMER H2
White ........................
$
14,988
07 FORD EDGE
59K Miles..................
$
14,988
07 JEEP WRANGLER X
Unlimited, Auto .........
$
14,988
07 SATURN OUTLOOK XR SPEC
3rd Row....................
$
14,988
08 NISSAN TITAN XE/SE/LE
Extra Cab ..................
$
14,988
09 MITSUBISHI LANCER GTS
Moonroof ..................
$
14,988
10 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
Save Thousands ........
$
14,988
11 FORD FUSION SE
Like New...................
$
14,988
12 FORD FOCUS SEL
40K, 4-Door ..............
$
14,988
Here’s Your
to Cash In.
09 CHRYSLER SEBRING LX
40K Miles.................
$
10,988
10 FORD FOCUS SE
81K Miles, 4-Door ....
$
10,988
08 HYUNDAI TIBURON GS
#290297...................
$
10,988
11 NISSAN VERSA
4-Door .......................
$
11,988
11 TOYOTA YARIS
Automatic...................
$
11,988
09 PONTIAC G6
Like New....................
$
11,988
07 FORD FUSION SEL AWD
#219588.....................
$
11,988
09 DODGE JOURNEY SXT
#150314.....................
$
11,988
07 JEEP COMMANDER
3rd Row.....................
$
11,988
07 HONDA CIVIC LX
40K Miles..................
$
12,988
10 TOYOTA COROLLA S/LE/XL
#8145A .....................
$
12,988
08 SATURN VUE XR AWD
Moonroof ..................
$
12,988
07 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SE/LIM
Moonroof ..................
$
12,988
06 MERCURY MOUNTAINEER PREMIER AWD
3rd Row....................
$
12,988
05 GMC CANYON 4X4 4DOOR
#262693....................
$
12,988
Gaughan Auto Store
114 South Main St., Taylor • 562-3088
www.gaughanautostore.com
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public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice
public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice • public notice
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
SOLD
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19 Asian
Spa
Open 7 Days 10am-11:30pm
FEATURING BODY AND
FOOT MASSAGES
$10 OFF HOUR
SESSIONS
570-337-3966
Unit 19A Gateway Shopping
Center, Edwardsville
7
7
2
5
3
9
Magical Asian
Massage
570-540-5333
177 South Market Street, Nanticoke
OPEN:
9:30 A.M.-12:30 A.M.
Featuring Table Shampoo
7
9
5
5
0
4
S w e d is h & R e la xa tion M a s s a ge
750 Ju m p e r R oa d , W ilk e s - B a rre
M in u te s from
the M ohe ga n S u n Ca s in o
$10 off 60 m in . m a s s a ge
H EAVEN LY TOU CH
M AS S AGE
Tra c to rTra ilerPa rk ingAva ila b le
Sho w erAva ila b le
8 29- 30 10
Im m e d ia te H irin g
N ew Cu s to m ers Only
2042 N. M em orial H wy., Sh avertown,PA
675-1245
H E AL T H &
RE L AX AT IO N S PA
GO L DIE ’S BAC K ! AV AIL ABL E M O N DAY S
& W E DN E S DAY S 4- 12.
$10 O F F
AN Y S E RV IC E W IT H C O UPO N
E X PIRE S 4- 3- 13
The Aroma A Spa
405 N. River Street • Wilkes-Barre
ORIENTAL SHIATSU
BODY MASSAGE
570-991-8566
10 AM
to 10 PM
DAILY
7
7
9
6
4
9
7
9
5
3
2
9
570-599-0225
ORIENTAL SPA
Rt. 93
Hazle Twp.
Near
Laurel
Mall
Hours:
10AM-10PM
7
4
7
0
1
8
ELITE SPA
N E W S TA F F !
Orien ta l S ta ff
Body S ha m poo
M a ssa ge-Ta n n in g
318 W ilkes-Ba rre Tow n ship Blv d., R ou te 309
L a rge P a rkin g A rea • Open D a ily 9a m -M idn ight
570.824.9017
7
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3
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M&R Agency
Rt. 11, West Nanticoke
735-4150
STOP IN, RELAX, ENJOY!
$20 OFF
ANY SESSION WITH AD
EXPIRES 4-2-13 • NOWHIRING, INCENTIVES OFFERED
MOST MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED
7
9
2
8
2
6
Secret Moments Massage
ARE YOU LONELY & IN NEED
OF A WOMAN’S TOUCH
ENJOY A WARM
SENSUAL MASSAGE
PRIVATE BY APPT. DAILY 10A-10P
EXIT 182 SCRANTON • 570-702-2241 2
0
6
5
3
9
SENSATIO NS
New A m ericanStaff
A cceptingallm ajor credit cards
5 70 -779 -4 5 5 5
14 75 W.MainSt.,Plym outh
NOW INTR OD UCING ASH L E E !
D AILY SP E CIAL
1 H OUR $40
W E E K LY SP E CIAL
COM E SAY H I TO AL E X IS &
GE T $10 OF F ANY SE SSION
M OND AY & W E D NE SD AY
H AL F OF F
TUE S., TH UR S., SUN.
2 F OR 1
ASK AB OUT F R E E B OD Y
SH AM P OO!
Ultima II
A Health & Relaxation Spa
1-866-858-4611
570-970-3971
Call our friendly staff about our new services and
masseuses. Waxing, skin esthetics, facials and
more available. Couple specials Fri-Sat-Sun 6-
Midnight Gift certificates available.
Lather up in the company of “Peaches” and
“Cream” in the Jacuzzi of Dreams. Call for rates.
EVERY TUESDAY 6 P.M.-MIDNIGHT is “COUGAR
CUB DAY” FRI., SAT., SUN. 6 P.M.-MIDNIGHT
MEET THE ANDREW SISTERS
COME SEE OUR HONEYS & GO HOME
WITH A BUNNY!
Cali’s Delight come see our new affordable girl.
Free waxing or parafin w/ a 1 hour spa.
She’s the best in town
Appointments preferred - Any day by appointment
South Rt. 309 • Hazleton
(entrance in
back, 2nd
floor)
FREE
PARKING PARKING
570-861-9027
Spa 21
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3
4
TS MAXY MAGNUM
Visiting from NYC
(*82) 917-428-7456
8
0
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5
3
9
TS CARMEN
Here visiting!
SEXY BOMBSHELL
READY TO FULFILL
ALL YOUR
FANTASIES!
(*82)
856-283-7765
T.S.
T.S.
Strawberry
Strawberry
Always sweet red Always sweet red
candy. Call to find out candy. Call to find out
(812)585-9625
(812)585-9625
T.S. SUSIE SUCKEMZ
1week only!
WB near mall 24/7
1st timers welcomed
404-919-6636
W
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953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bed-
room townhome
features hard-
wood floors on
main floor, fin-
ished basement,
large master
suite, private out-
door deck and
back yard, off
street parking,
granite counter-
tops, stainless
steel appliances,
DirecTV, high-
speed internet,
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with
brand new fur-
nace, central air
conditioning with
brand new com-
pressor, brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all
bedrooms, extra
closet space,
large basement
storage room,
wood blinds in
aLL rooms, all
yard maintenance
and snow plowing
included. This is
an end unit with
only one other
unit attached.
Rent is $1,400.
per month &
requires $1,400.
security deposit.
Minimum one
year lease
required. Must fill
out credit applica-
tion.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
959 Mobile Homes
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood School
District. Great get-
a-way. 2 bedroom
mobile home with
an 18x18 3 season
sunroom. Large
deck, situated on 2+
acres. Quiet setting.
Location conve-
niently close to Jack
Frost, Big Boulder &
White Water Chal-
lengers along with
I-80, I-81 & PA Turn-
pike. Stove, fridge,
washer / dryer,
dishwasher &
microwave included.
Water & sewer by
landlord. Tenant
covers electric &
propane. Pet friend-
ly with landlord
approval (additional
deposit required). 6
month lease
required. $650 +
security. 570-474-
0388 OR 417-8751
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
OCEAN CITY .
MARYLAND. Best
selection of afford-
able rentals. Full/
partial weeks. Call
for FREE brochure.
Open daily. Holiday
Real Estate. 1-800-
638-2102. Online
reservations:
www.holidayoc.com
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
Shedlarski Construction
HOME IMPROVEMENT
SPECIALIST
Licensed, insured &
PA registered.
Kitchens, baths,
vinyl siding & rail-
ings, replacement
windows & doors,
additions, garages,
all phases of home
renovations.
Free Estimates
570-287-4067
Selling a Business?
Reach more poten-
tial buyers with an
ad in the classified
section!
570-829-7130
1039 Chimney
Service
A-1 ABLE
CHIMNEY
Rebuild & Repair
Chimneys. All
types of Masonry.
Liners Installed,
Brick & Block,
Roofs & Gutters.
Licensed &
Insured
570-735-2257
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
C&C MASONRY &
CONCRETE
Absolutely Free
Estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-840-9913
570-346-4103
PA084504
D. PUGH
CONCRETE
All phases of
masonry &
concrete. Small
jobs welcome.
Senior discount.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured
288-1701/655-3505
1084 Electrical
ECONOLECTRIC
No Job
Too Small.
Generator
Installs.
Residential &
Commercial
Free Estimates
Licensed-Insured
PA032422
(570) 602-7840
1093 Excavating
All Types Of
Excavating,
Demolition &
Concrete Work.
Lot clearing, pool
closing and
retaining
walls, etc.
Large & Small Jobs
FREE ESTIMATES
(570) 760-1497
1132 Handyman
Services
20 YEARS EXPERI ENCE
All types of home
repairs & alterations
Plumbing, Carpentry,
Electrical
No job too small.
Free Estimates.
570-256-3150
1135 Hauling &
Trucking
Mike’s $5-Up
Hauling Junk &
Trash from Houses,
Garages, Yards, Etc
826-1883 472-4321
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
1165 Lawn Care
GRASS CUTTING
Reasonable Prices
Free Estimates
570-822-6498 (H)
570-266-0463 (C)
1204 Painting &
Wallpaper
MARTY’S PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Top Quality Work
570-468-9079
1234 Pressure
Washing
PRESSURE WASHING
Reasonable Prices
Free Estimates
570-822-6498 (H)
570-266-0463 (C)
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classified
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
503 Accounting/
Finance
503 Accounting/
Finance
524 Engineering 524 Engineering
PAYROLL ACCOUNTANT
McCarthy Tire Service Company, one of the
largest commercial tire dealers in North America,
is seeking a full time Payroll Accountant at our
headquarters located in Wilkes-Barre, PA.
The successful candidate must have hands on
payroll administration experience using an in
house payroll system to process the weekly
payroll of the entire organization. This includes
date entry, verification of hours, reconciliation
and completion of payroll tax calculations. This
person will also be responsible for sales tax entry,
process of yearly tax returns, and the generation
of the annual W-2 forms.
Successful candidate must have at least 5-7 years
of experience in this function. Attention to detail
is crucial as well as the ability to work in a fast
paced environment. Experience in Microsoft
Word and Excel is required as this position also
assists other members of the Accounting depart-
ment with monthly general ledger account
reconciliations. Candidates must have excellent
written and verbal communication skills in order
to deal with all levels of employees and must
maintain a high level of discretion and
confidentiality.
Interested applicants may send resume
with salary history to
tschooley@mccarthytire.com or fax to
1.866.694.9499. NO phone calls please.
United One Resources is seeking full time
real estate processors. The successful candi-
dates should be able to type a minimum of 50
wpm, possess excellent phone and organiza-
tional skills, the ability to multi-task, conscien-
tious with an attention to detail, work in a fast
pace environment and successfully meet daily
goals. Previous title insurance processing,
banking or lending experience preferred but not
required. We offer a competitive benefit
package. Hours: 10am-6pm.
REAL ESTATE
PROCESSOR
For consideration,
forward your resume to:
iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com
EOE M/F/D/V
Berwick Offray, leading manufacturer
of decorative bows and ribbons seeks
a Logistics Supervisor to direct the
daily operation of our Domestic
and International shipments.
We offer competitive compensation,
medical, dental, 401(k) and more.
For details and qualifications
visit our website at
www.cssindustries.com
GET IT
TOGO.
Search the app store
and install The Times Leader
mobile app now for when
you need your news to go.
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JUSTIN KURTZWEIL
AGE: 20
HOMETOWN: WEST WYOMING
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
MODEL OF THE WEEK
WHAT’S SOMETHING MOST PEOPLE DON’T KNOWABOUT YOU?
I REALLY ENJOY RYAN GOSLING MOVIES.
FOR MORE
PHOTOS OF
JUSTIN, VISIT
THEWEEKENDER.COM.
PHOTOS BY
AMANDA
DITTMAR
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C
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weekender
my LOWEREND
BAR&RESTAURANT
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MARANDA KOEHN
AGE: 18
HOMETOWN: SHICKSHINNY
FAVORITE WEEKENDER FEATURE:
MODEL OF THE WEEK
MY THEME SONG WOULD BE …
‘LAST FRIDAY NIGHT’ BY KATY PERRY.
FOR MORE PHOTOS
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weekender
my LOWEREND
BAR&RESTAURANT
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FEATURED EXCLUSIVELY ON DRAFT
AT THESE NEPA TAVERN RESTAURANTS
L.T. VERRASTRO, INC. * IMPORTING BEER DISTRIBUTOR * 1-800-341-1200
NATURALLY GLUTEN-FREE
AATT THESE NEP AA A T PP A TT VVEERRRNNNN RREST A A TT URANTS
LACKAWANNA
AJ’S CLUB SODA ........................................................ PECKVILLE
BACKYARD ALE HOUSE ........................................... SCRANTON
BELLISIMO ............................................................... CHINCHILLA
BILLY B’S ................................................................ DUNMORE
BUONA PIZZA ........................................................... SCRANTON
GUBBIO’S RESTAURANT ............................................ DUNMORE
JJ BRIDGES ...................................................... CLARKS SUMMIT
JESSUP PLAZA BEVERAGE CTR ...................................... JESSUP
JOHNNY D’S PUB ........................................................ JESSUP
KILDARE’S ............................................................. SCRANTON
L & M BAR ........................................................... CARBONDALE
LUIGI’S PIZZA .................................................... OLYPHANT
MOON TOWER ............................................................. ARCHBALD
MULLIGAN’S PUB .................................................. SCRANTON
OLD BROOK INN ................................................... MOSCOW
QUAKER STEAK & LUBE ............................... DICKSON CITY
SCHOONER’S PUB ................................................... OLYPHANT
SMILER’S .......................................................... DICKSON CITY
THIRST T’S BAR ......................................................... OLYPHANT
WELLINGTON’S PUB ........................................ CLARKS SUMMIT
Y KNOT ................................................................... ELMHURST
POCONO MOUNTAINS
BLUE MOUNTAIN SKI AREA ..................................... PALMERTON
BIG BOULDER SKI AREA .................................... LAKE HARMONY
PALMERTON HOTEL ................................................. PALMERTON
FERNWOOD HOTEL ........................................... MARSHALL’S CREEK
LUCKY LUCIANO’S ............................................. POCONO LAKE
MULLER FAMILY RESTAURANT ........................... E STROUDSBURG
NEWBERRY YARD OF ALE ........................................ STROUDSBURG
NEWMAN SMITH POST 514 .......................................... BUSHKILL
POCONO BREWING CO .......................................... SWIFTWATER
POUR HOUSE ................................................ MOUNTAINHOME
SARAH STREET ..................................................... STROUDSBURG
INN AT LACKAWAXEN .............................................. LACKAWAXEN
JOHN’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT ............................... GREENTOWN
ROHMAN’S PUB ......................................................... SHOHOLA
LUZERNE
ARENA BAR ...................................................... WILKES-BARRE
BEERS BOY’S SPORTS BAR ............................ WILKES-BARRE
BENJAMIN HARVEY INN .................................. HARVEY’S LAKE
BOTTLENECKS SALOON .................................... WILKES-BARRE
BUCA DEL VINO .................................................... PITTSON
CHICKEN COOP ................................................. WILKES-BARRE
CHRIS NICS ..................................................... WILKES-BARRE
METRO BAR & GRILL .............................................. DALLAS
MURPHY’S ........................................................ SWOYERSVILLE
O’SULLIVAN’S ................................................... WILKES-BARRE
PARKWAY ...................................................................... ALDEN
R BAR ..................................................................... NANTICOKE
RODANO’S ............................................................. WILKES-BARRE
SMOKEY BONES ................................................... WILKES-BARRE
SUSQUEHANNA ALE HOUSE ............................... WILKES-BARRE
TWIST ..................................................................... WILKES-BARRE
VESUVIO’S PIZZERIA ...................................... WILKES-BARRE
HONESDALE AREA
BEACH LAKE INN ............................................ BEAC HLAKE
GRAVITY INN ........................................................ WAYMART
KIM’S PUB & GRUB .................................................. HONESDALE
RIVERVIEW RESTAURANT ......................................... HONESDALE
SUSQUEHANNA/WYOMING COUNTIES
ARMETTA’S PIZZA ............................................... NEW MILFORD
MALONEY’S ............................................................. HALLSTEAD
THE OFFICE ............................................................ NICHOLSON
HAZLETON AREA
DAMON’S .................................................................. HAZLETON
HOME COURT ......................................................... HAZLETON
SPORTS PAGE ........................................................... HAZLETON
DONAHUE’S .......................................................... CONYNGHAM
ELI’S PLACE ................................................... WEST HAZLETON
BRASS BUCKLE ................................................... CONYNGHAM
BUTLER TOWNSHIP FIRE ................................................ DRUMS
HELL’S KITCHEN ............................................. WEST HAZLETON

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