Idaho State Department of Education and Idaho State Board of Education

Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal

Submitted to the U. S. Department of Education September 29, 2006

Revised and Submitted November 20, 2006
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Table of Contents
Introduction ..............................................................................................3 Requirement 1 ..........................................................................................5 Requirement 2 .........................................................................................28 Requirement 3 .........................................................................................33 Requirement 4 .........................................................................................42 Requirement 5 .........................................................................................48 Requirement 6 .........................................................................................50 Appendices ..............................................................................................55

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Introduction

Idaho has a long history of commitment to ensuring that its preK-12 students are taught by highly qualified teachers. Idaho Code (§33-1201), enacted in 1963, requires that all teachers be certified and endorsed in the areas they teach (See Appendix A). For school districts to receive state funding for salaries, teachers must meet this requirement. In 1999, the Idaho State Board of Education established the Idaho’s MOST (Maximizing Opportunities for Students and Teachers) initiative to address teacher quality issues. MOST developed performance-based standards for the preparation of teachers and other professional school personnel. Groups of content areas experts, including preK-12 teachers and representatives from higher education, developed standards in the state’s certification and endorsement areas. The Idaho
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Standards for the Initial Certification of School Personnel modeled after the INTASC Standards with specific knowledge, disposition, and performance indicators, were approved by the State Board of Education in 2000 and the state legislature in 2001. State Board Rule (08.02.02.100.01) establishes the standards, which are aligned with the Idaho K-12 Content Standards, as the “vehicle” for the state approval of teacher preparation programs. All new teachers, whether from Idaho institutions or Idaho alternative routes, must meet these requirements. Idaho’s Professional Standards Commission (PSC) is responsible for revising 20 percent of the standards per year. The original standards for teachers of NCLB core subjects were reviewed and revised by teams of experts and then approved by the State Board of Education by 2005 and state legislature by 2006. The current standards are found at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/. State Board rule, effective September 1, 2004, also requires new teachers, teachers seeking additional certifications or endorsements, teachers needing to reinstate expired Idaho certificates, and out-of-state teachers to meet or exceed the qualifying score(s) on the appropriate Praxis II assessment(s) or American Board for the Certification of Teacher Excellence assessments. The Praxis II requirements are found at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/. ABCTE information is posted at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/ Additionally, to ensure that Idaho’s alternative routes to certification meet the same rigorous standards, the routes were re-written, approved by the State Board of Education and legislature, and became effective July 1, 2006. At that time emergency pathways to the classroom (letters of authorization, consultant specialist, and misassignments) expired. Individuals who are not appropriately certified or endorsed for the areas they teach must apply for an alternative route and meet the same rigorous standards and requirements as teachers in traditional routes. Information on Idaho’s alternative routes is found at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/ Idaho is a geographically large, rural state with many of its school districts and schools located in remote, isolated areas. Idaho has 120 school districts, six of which are charter districts. Forty-four of Idaho’s school districts have fewer than 500 students. The range of student population in districts is between four and 29,939 students. Forty-two percent of the districts qualify for eligibility under the Small, Rural School Achievement Program in Title VI-B of No Child Left Behind. The state has made progress toward its goal of ensuring a highly qualified teacher in every classroom. The following state plan presents data from 2005-2006; outlines technical assistance, programs, and services; and identifies next steps toward reaching the goal of 100% highly qualified teachers in every classroom. The State Plan will be reviewed and revised as appropriate from the results of the analysis of 2006-2007 data.
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Data for 2005-2006 displayed in the Idaho State Plan is available on the State Department of Education website: http://www.sde.state.id.us/

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REQUIREMENT 1: DATA ANALYSIS Requirement 1: The revised plan must provide a detailed analysis of the core academic subject classes in the State that are currently not being taught by highly qualified teachers. The analysis must, in particular, address schools that are not making adequate yearly progress and whether or not these schools have more acute needs than do other schools in attracting highly qualified teachers. The analysis must also identify the districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards, and examine whether or not there are particular hard-to-staff courses frequently taught by non-highly qualified teachers. Historical Summary Idaho has long-standing procedures that assure that teachers are qualified for the positions for which they are hired. Because of these safeguards, schools have historically been required to staff with highly qualified teachers. Idaho requirements, which predate NCLB, demonstrate the stringent and rigorous steps that have prevented Idaho schools from hiring or retaining non-qualified teachers. They include: 1. Every teacher is reported yearly through the Idaho Basic Educational Data System (IBEDS) to the state for each class period to validate his/her teaching assignment during each period of the teaching day (See question below on pp. 6-7 for IBEDS timeline). 2. The district is denied salary-based apportionment state funding for any teacher, or portion thereof, who does not meet state certification standards. 3. Prior to July 1, 2006, any teacher employed under the Letter of Authorization (LOA) alternate route was presented as an individual to the State Board of Education for formal approval/disapproval on a yearly basis. Teachers approved to work under LOA status were required to be fully qualified within three years or further approval was denied. Because funding was withheld, from districts for teachers not meeting Idaho certification requirements, Idaho schools were discouraged from employing non-qualified teachers on an on-going basis. Note: As of July 1, 2006, all former alternate avenues to teacher certification or the classroom were discontinued, and revised alternate routes to certification were put into place in State Board rule (See Requirement 1, p. 15 and Requirement 2, p. 29).

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Does the revised plan include an analysis of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? Is the analysis based on accurate classroom level data? Yes. The Idaho Basic Educational Data System (IBEDS) is the vehicle through which Idaho can analyze whether core academic subject classes are taught by highly qualified teachers. IBEDS requires each District/Charter Administrator to list each teacher for whom the district is claiming reimbursement according to Idaho’s statutory salary apportionment schedule. School districts must report every teacher through IBEDS by the classes they teach during each teaching period of the day to be able to receive state reimbursement for teacher salaries. This requirement was established in Idaho Code (§33-1201) in 1963 (See Appendix A). All of the data for 2005-2006 displayed in the Idaho State Plan is available on the State Department of Education website: http://www.sde.state.id.us/ For state funding purposes, all teachers, pupil services, and administrative positions (certificated) must hold the proper credentials or proportionate state funding will be withheld from the district/charter. A teacher is “misassigned” if he or she teaches outside of his or her subject area and a commensurate salary apportionment is withheld from the district or charter. Given the financial implications of misassignment, the IBEDS data reports are thoroughly reviewed by districts and by the State Department of Education to ensure the accuracy of the data. IBEDS data is collected in October of each school year, which means that the 2005-2006 data was collected in October 2005. For the 2005-2006 data collection, school districts reported all teachers, both new and veteran, for every class they taught. At that time, veteran teachers had not completed the HOUSSE process. Therefore, HOUSSE HQT data will be reported in the 2006-2007 data that was collected in October 2006 and is currently being analyzed for accuracy. For federal purposes, those teachers teaching in the core subject areas as defined by NCLB will be reported as not highly qualified if they do not hold the proper certificates and/or endorsements in these subject matter areas or have not passed the HOUSSE process by the July 1, 2006 deadline. Parents of children taught by non-HQTs per federal definition are notified of that fact. The State Department of Education upgraded IBEDS for 2006-07 data collection, aligning it more closely to NCLB requirements by incorporating HOUSSE highly qualified teacher data. IBEDS now uses the codes of the NCES Federal School Codes for the Exchange of Data (SCED), which will better align Idaho teaching credentials and endorsements to classes and grade levels taught. To ease the transition to the upgraded system, all teachers were required to complete HOUSSE before the July 1, 2006, deadline. The HOUSSE process was revised in April 2006 to incorporate the changes or revisions requested by the U.S. Department of Education in its March 2006 response to Idaho’s Highly Qualified Teacher Monitoring Report (See Appendix B: Idaho’s HOUSSE). Veteran teachers who did not pass the HOUSSE requirements by the deadline must meet or exceed the qualifying scores on the State Board-approved Praxis II assessments for the core content areas they teach.
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Teachers who do so will be considered HQ; if not, the employing district must report them as non-HQT on IBEDS for federal reporting purposes. The IBEDS process allows the State Department of Education to analyze which classes in schools or districts are being taught by non-highly qualified teachers. Following is the timeline for the annual submissions of district teaching data for the 2006-2007 school year: • District data on the number of core academic classes taught by highly qualified and non-highly qualified teachers is compiled as of the last Friday in September (September 29, 2006). This determines what data the district will enter into IBEDS. Districts/charters must submit IBEDS data to the State Department of Education by October 15, 2006. District superintendents/charter administrators must submit signed verification of the data. Between October 15 and November 15, 2006, the State Department of Education loads the IBEDS files into a centralized system and scrutinizes the data for completeness and reasonableness. By November 15, 2006, preliminary IBEDS reports are provided to the districts/charters. Between November 15 and December 15, 2006, districts have an opportunity to review and, if necessary, amend their data to ensure accuracy. Any major changes to the data require a special circumstance letter from the superintendent or charter administrator for changes to be considered. By mid-January, 2006, the State Department of Education will analyze district data to determine whether state funds will be withheld from a district based on its identification of teachers not holding the proper credentials. If so, state funds will be withheld from the February 15, 2007 State Foundation Support Payment.

• •

Note: Because 2006-07 information from districts is not due until mid-October, the information in this report is based on the 2005-06 data. Table 1 summarizes statewide data from the 2005-06 school year based on state requirements (i.e., certification for specific subjects taught). All K-12 teachers of core classes, except special education teachers, are included in the data. However, the table does not report HOUSSE data, which is currently being collected and analyzed for the first time for the 2006-2007 school year. These data will be analyzed and reported to the U.S. Department of Education and stakeholders in January 2007, which was Idaho’s understanding from the May 17, 2006, telephone conference with the U.S. Department of Education. Tables 5 and 6 below provide data on special education teachers for the 20052006 school year. The IBEDS data system has been adjusted so that beginning with the
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data collection for 2006-2007 districts will report on special education teachers according to NCLB requirements. Table 1: Statewide HQT Data (2005-2006)*
Category All Schools (Elementary and Secondary) All Elementary Schools All Secondary Schools All High Poverty Schools Total # of core classes 36,204 Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 244 % of core classes taught by non-HQT 0.67%

12,292 23,912 5,034

73 171 34

0.59% 0.72% 0.68%

* Table 1 does not include special education teachers. Refer to Tables 5 and 6 for special education data. Summary: The statewide aggregate data for 2005-2006 demonstrate that Idaho has made significant progress toward reaching the goal of 100% highly qualified teachers in all core academic classes. However, in-depth analysis (See Table 2) indicates the need for specific targeted technical assistance for districts and schools not meeting adequate yearly progress that have a percentage of non-highly qualified teachers higher than the state average of 0.67%. Using the state average of 0.67% for the data analysis is a sound statistical approach to data analysis. Action: Because Idaho does not have an overall state non-HQT problem, Idaho’s plan is to provide targeted technical assistance to districts and schools that have not met HQT and AYP requirements. (See Requirement 3: Technical Assistance, Programs, and Services for explanations of technical assistance, programs, and services.)

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Does the analysis focus on the staffing needs of school that are not making AYP? Do these schools have high percentages of classes taught by teachers who are not highly qualified? The following table presents data on all schools that have non-HQTs and have not met AYP requirements. Table 2: School Data (2005-2006) - All Idaho K-12 Schools Non- HQT and Non-AYP
Schools not making AYP with non-HQTs (School District) Idaho Leadership Academy Charter School (Snake River) Lindy Ross Elementary School (Clark) Riverside Alternative High School (Boundary) Idaho Distance Education Academy Charter School (Whitepine) Sugar-Salem Junior High School (Sugar-Salem) Middleton High School (Middleton) Challis Junior-Senior High School (Challis) Bruneau Elementary School (Bruneau) Hillcrest Elementary School (American Falls) Wilder Middle/High School (Wilder) Hansen Junior Senior High School (Hansen) Cambridge Elementary School (Cambridge) Bonners Ferry High School (Boundary) Bryan Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Farmin Stidwell (Lake Pend Oreille) West Elementary School (Mountain Home) Grangeville Elementary-Junior High School (Grangeville) Midway Middle School (Jefferson) Total # of core classes taught 23 12 8 53 32 183 66 14 37 56 56 42 118 25 55 28 57 Total # core of classes taught by non-HQT 4 2 1 6 3 14 5 1 2 3 3 2 5 1 2 1 1 % of core classes taught by nonHQT 17.39% 16.67% 12.50% 11.32% 9.38% 7.65% 7.58% 7.14% 5.41% 5.36% 5.00% 4.76% 4.24% 4.00% 3.77% 3.57% 3.45%

194

6

3.09%

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Schools not making AYP with non-HQTs (School District) Mountain Home High School (Mountain Home) Jefferson Middle School (Caldwell) Clair E. Gale Junior High School (Idaho Falls) Shoshone Middle School (Shoshone) Central Elementary School (Fremont County) Syringa Middle School (Caldwell) Skyline High School (Idaho Falls) Nampa Senior High School (Nampa) Parma Middle School (Parma) North Fremont Junior-Senior High School (Fremont) Middleton Middle School (Middleton) Skyline Senior High School (Idaho Falls) Idaho Falls Senior High School (Idaho Falls) South Fremont High School (Fremont) Mountain View High School (Meridian) Skyview High School (Nampa) Preston High School (Preston) Emmett Junior High School (Emmett) Minico Senior High School (Minico) East Valley Middle School (Nampa) Rocky Mountain Middle School (Bonneville)

Total # of core classes taught 190 214 144 37 138 197 154 291 61 75 154 157 181 111 362 369 137 153 159 191 204

Total # core of classes taught by non-HQT 6 6 4 1 1 5 3 5 1 1 2 3 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 1 1

% of core classes taught by nonHQT 3.06% 2.80% 2.78% 2.70% 2.63% 2.54% 1.91% 1.72% 1.64% 1.33% 1.30% 1.19% 1.10% 0.90% 0.83% 0.81% 0.73% 0.65% 0.63% 0.52% 0.49%

Summary: Data from 2005-2006 reveals that 39 schools of the 617 Idaho schools (6.32%) have a percentage of non-highly qualified teachers above the state average of 0.67%, some with significantly higher percentages. The chart also shows that four schools not making AYP are below the state HQT average of 0.67. The data above demonstrate that most of Idaho’s schools (93.67% are making significant progress toward
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meeting their objective of 100% HQTs, as indicated by the fact that their percentage of non-HQTs is below the state average of 0.67%. The two charter schools and one alternative school listed above have a significantly high percentage of non-HQTs (Idaho Leadership Academy Charter School, 17.39%; Riverside High School Alternative, 12.50%; and Idaho Distance Education Academy Charter School, 11.32%). As shown in Table 8, a total of ten charter and alternative schools have non-HQTs above the state average of 0.67%. Twenty of the 39 schools in Table 2 are in rural or extremely remote, rural areas of the state, as reflected in the low total number of core classes taught. These districts report challenges in recruiting and retaining highly qualified teachers. Also it is important to note that rural districts usually need teachers for only one or two classes, for instance, music. It is challenging for them to find teachers who are highly qualified in music as well as in another content area so that they assign and utilize them effectively. Data also indicate that several school districts (Idaho Falls, Boundary County, Nampa, Caldwell, Middleton, and Fremont County) have more than one school with the percent of core classes taught by non-highly qualified teachers above the state average. Action: The State Department of Education will provide targeted technical assistance to the charter and alternative schools listed in Table 2 as exceeding the state average for non-HQTs. This assistance will focus on HQT federal and state requirements and the options and strategies for ensuring their teachers meet them, and on a process to determine these schools’ specific needs. (See Requirement 3: Targeted Technical Assistance: Education and Needs Assessment) One available option in Idaho currently being used to address the HQ needs of rural, remote districts is the through the distance learning system established by the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA). IDLA provides districts the ability to have HQ teachers teach their students via the IDLA on-line system for NCLB core classes. Technical assistance will also focus on strategies and services to assist the rural schools in recruiting and retaining HQ teachers for all schools with non-HQTs above the state average. For instance, Idaho is currently assisting twenty districts with recruitment through Teachers-Teachers.com. The state is considering expanding this service. (See Requirement 3: Technical Assistance, Programs, and Services.) Does the analysis identify particular groups of teachers to which the State’s plan must pay particular attention, such as special education teachers, mathematics or science teachers, or multi-subject teachers in rural schools? The following table provides aggregate state data on core content areas and special education that are close to or above the state non-HQT average of 0.67%.

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Table 3: State Data (2005-2006) – Groups of Non-HQ Teachers
Groups non-HQT teachers Foreign Language English/Language Arts Reading Arts (Drama, Music, Visual Art) Mathematics Science Total # of core classes Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT % of core classes taught by non-HQT

1306 3925 688 2779 4930 4244

25 48 8 25 29 25

1.91% 1.22% 1.16% 0.90% .59% .59%

Summary: Table 3 shows that statewide the NCLB core content areas of foreign language, English/language arts, reading, and the arts statewide have the highest percentage of non-HQTs. This is not the case with either math or science, with aggregate data below the state average of 0.67%. However, Table 4 presents district data on science and math that indicate certain districts have non-HQTs above the state average. Table 4 presents disaggregated data by district in the core content areas of foreign languages, English/language arts, reading, arts, science, and math areas that have non-HQ teachers above the state average (0.67%). Table 4: District Data (2005-2006) – Classes Taught by non-HQ Teachers Greater Than State Average (0.67%)
Districts % of foreign language classes taught by non-HQT % of English language arts classes taught by non-HQT 2.70% (1/37) 10.6% (9/85) 50% (1/2) 8.53% (7/82) 50% (1/2) 1.51% (1/66) 2.70% (1/37) 6.66% (2/30) 23.8% 2.5% (1/40) % of reading classes taught by non-HQT % of arts classes taught by non-HQT % of science classes taught by non-HQT % of math classes taught by non-HQT AYP Met– Y/N

Bonneville Boundary Caldwell Cambridge Challis Coeur d’Alene Compass Charter Emmett Fremont Gooding Grangeville 28.5% (4/14)

4.5% (4/88) 16.7% (7/42) 1.98% (2/101) 40% (2/5) 25% 5/20) 3.39% (6/177)

N Y N N N Y N Y N Y N

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Districts

% of foreign language classes taught by non-HQT 50% (2/4) 2.3% (3/129) 50% (1/2)

Hansen Idaho Falls Idaho Virtual Charter Jefferson Lake Pend Oreille Liberty Charter McCallDonnelly Meridian Middleton Minidoka Mountain Home Mullan Nampa Parma Preston Shoshone Snake River SugarSalem Victory Charter West Jefferson Whitepine Wilder

% of English language arts classes taught by non-HQT 10.0% (1/10) 6.81% (3/44)

% of reading classes taught by non-HQT

% of arts classes taught by non-HQT

% of science classes taught by non-HQT

% of math classes taught by non-HQT

AYP Met– Y/N

N 1.3% (2/154) N Y

16.3% (8/49) 25.0% (2/8) 10% (2/20) 1.03% (2/193) 22% (11/50) 6.0% (2/33) 3.12% (1/32) 50% (1/2) 1.07% (2/187) 5.56% (1/18) 30.4% (7/23) 3.84% (5/130) 5.26% (1/19)

4.25% (2/47)

7.5% (6/80) 5.67% (6/106)

N Y N Y Y

1.96% (1/51) 7.89% (7/76)

N N N Y N N 2.4% (1/41) N N N

14.3% (1/7) 3.70% (1/27) 33.3% (1/3) 22.2% (2/9) 22.2% (4/18) 50% (3/6) 8.33% (2/24) 13% 3/23)

N Y N Y N

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Table 5 provides aggregate data on the number of non-HQ special education teachers in the state. Table 5: Data (2005-2006) – Non-HQ Special Education Teachers
Special education Special education teachers Total # of special education teachers 1467 Total # non-HQT special education teachers 116 % of non-HQT special education teachers 7.90%

Table 6 presents district data from 2005-2006 on the number of non-HQ special education teachers who were on Letters of Authorization or who were designated as Consultant Specialists. These two state pathways to teacher certification expired as of July 1, 2006. Further explanation is found below in the summary. Table 6: District Data (2005-2006) – Non-HQT Special Education Teacher Totals
District Basin Gooding West Jefferson Hansen Weiser Firth Challis Glenns Ferry Oneida Wendell Emmett Vallivue Twin Falls Minidoka Meridian Nampa Blackfoot Mountain Home Idaho Falls Cassia Caldwell Bonneville Coeur d’Alene Boise Total # of special education teachers 2 7 3 3 7 4 4 4 4 6 17 30 37 22 164 75 27 27 55 30 32 37 53 168 % of non-HQT special education teachers 50.0% 42.8% 33.3% 33.3% 28.6% 25.0% 25.0% 25.0% 25.0% 16.7% 11.8% 10.0% 5.41% 4.55% 4.26% 4.00% 3.70% 3.70% 3.34% 3.33% 2.86% 2.70% 1.89% 1.79%

Summary: Tables 3 and 5 present aggregate data from 2005-2006 on seven groups of teachers of specific areas (foreign language, English/language arts, reading, the arts, science, mathematics, and special education) that are above the state average of 0.67% for non-HQTs. Of these, the most significant number of non-HQTs is in special education, with 66 individuals on Letters of Authorization, which required them to develop and adhere to specific plans for seeking certification, and 50 as Consultant Specialists, an emergency pathway to the classroom that did not require a plan for
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certification. Both of these pathways were eliminated from State Board rule as of July 1, 2006. School districts have challenges retaining teachers in special education classrooms because these teachers, who often have dual special education-elementary certification, choose to teach at the elementary level. Since elimination of the Letters of Authorization and Consultant Specialists categories, all non-HQTs must apply for and be accepted into one of the alternative routes to certification and be working toward meeting HQT and state requirements. Otherwise, their districts will lose state funding. The individuals in alternative routes will not be reported as HQT for NCLB until they have met/exceeded the scores on the appropriate State Board of Education-approved assessments (Praxis II or ABCTE). Please refer to the description of Idaho’s alternative routes under Requirement 2 below or in Appendix A. Information is also posted at:http://www.sde.state.id.us/ Table 4 presents data on the areas in which there are non-HQTs. In addition to the other core content areas, mathematics and the sciences are areas in which there are percentages of non-HQ teachers above the state average, most often in rural, remote districts that are challenged by recruitment and retention. The rural nature of the state challenges districts with recruitment and retention for all content areas and levels. For example, a rural district finds it difficult to find a teacher who is qualified to teach more than one of the sciences, such as biology, chemistry, and physics. Rural districts usually have only one class in each of these science content areas. Table 4 also reveals that specific charter school districts (Compass, Idaho Virtual, Liberty, and Victory) have significantly higher percentages of non-HQ teachers compared to other districts. Although the number of core classes taught is lower than in other “traditional” districts, the data indicate the need for focused technical assistance to assist these charter districts in understanding NCLB and state highly qualified teacher requirements and the options to ensuring HQT, and to address their particular non-HQT issues. Of the 27 districts listed in Table 4, 17 are small and rural with several being remotely located. The aggregate data in Table 3 reveals that the percentage of non-HQ special education teachers is significantly higher than the other areas listed. Table 5 reveals that specific districts are having difficulty hiring/retaining HQ special education teachers. For example, Nampa School District has non-HQTs special education as well as in four NCLB core content areas listed. Table 6 presents data the percentage of non-HQ special education teachers at the district level. It is important to keep in mind that some of the districts with significantly high percentages are in rural areas and, therefore, may only have two or three special education teachers. For instance, Basin School District has only two schools, an elementary school and a high school.

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Action: As the state’s capacity to annually analyze student achievement, AYP information, and HQ data increases, the State Department of Education is piloting a new approach to monitoring (See to Table 9: Coordinated Monitoring Schedule under Requirement 4). The Department will conduct joint focused reviews of twelve school districts struggling to meet the needs of diverse learners. Three of the districts have also been identified for non-HQ status: Nampa, Caldwell, and Fremont. In addition to reviewing their Title II information, the Department will review all of their federal program efforts (Economically Disadvantaged, Limited English Proficient, Migrant, Special Education, etc.). At least one day of the review will be spent observing classrooms serving at-risk populations. Review documents are currently being developed by the State Department of Education Title and Special Education staff. The first joint focused review is scheduled for late October 2006. The outcome of the focused reviews will be the development and state approval of a district/Continuous Improvement Plan with identified areas for improvement, actions, timelines and expected outcomes. The State Department of Education is currently providing technical assistance to districts with non-HQTs to assist them with recruitment and retention of HQTs as well as to inform them of the alternative certification options. Focused technical assistance will continue to address the challenges districts face in ensuring HQ special education teachers for Idaho’s classrooms through retention strategies, such as TeachersTeacher.com. (See Requirement 3: Technical Assistance, Programs, and Services for further details for a description of options that might apply to district and schools needs.) The State Department of Education is currently working with districts to assist them with the recruitment and retention of special education teachers. This is discussed in detail under Requirement 3. Although IBEDS collects data on every teacher in every school in every district, it does not currently allow for extracting and reporting data on multi-subjects teachers in rural schools. The state will revise its data reporting system (IBEDS) to collect this data beginning with the 2007-2008 school year data collection. Does the analysis identify districts and schools around the State where significant numbers of teachers do not meet HQT standards? Districts and schools that have non-HQTs above the state average of 0.67%, and, therefore, have not met their annual measurable objective of 100% highly qualified teachers, are reflected in the following tables, first by district and then by school. The tables also list whether the districts/schools have met AYP requirements, whether they are high poverty, and their minority percentages. Poverty is identified as free and reduced lunch. Highlighted districts are a subset of the districts (42.1%) that are eligible for the Small, Rural School Achievement Program, based on free and reduced lunch (see Appendix C).

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Table 7: District Non-HQT Data (2005-2006) Greater Than State Average (0.67%) *
School Districts AYP Total # of core classes 90 62 81 106 95 37 417 92 Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 7 4 5 6 5 2 19 4 % of core classes taught by non-HQT 7.78% 6.48% 6.17% 5.66% 5.26% 4.88% 4.56% 4.35% % of Poverty Minority (nonwhite) % 29.8% 22.95% 0.60% 4.33% 9.15% 1.59% 9.14% 30.85% Total Student Population 406 305 167 288 448 126 2810 448

Hansen Castleford Cambridge Whitepine Challis Joint Mullan Middleton BruneauGrandview Boundary Clark Wilder Victory Charter Jefferson Liberty Charter Rolling Hills Public Charter Compass Charter Grangeville Shoshone Nampa West Jefferson

No Yes Yes Yes No Yes No No

52% 49% 42% 44% 37% 39% 37% 47%

Yes No No Yes No Yes Yes Yes No No No No

281 47 80 28 518 62 31 35 261 108 1686 126

12 2 3 1 18 2 1 1 6 2 27 2

4.27% 4.26% 3.75% 3.57% 3.47% 3.29% 3.23% 2.86% 2.30% 1.85% 1.60% 1.59%

49% 62% 61% 35% 40% 24% 33% 17% 46% 46% 40% 39%

8.32% 41.42% 77.75% 10.61% 13.96% 13.02% 6.58% 5.13% 6.94% 37.79% 29.37% 24.77%

1598 234 472 264 4124 407 228 234 1343 569 13,573 666

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School Districts

AYP

Total # of core classes 1513 862 89

Coeur d’Alene Caldwell Idaho Virtual Academy Moscow Gooding Fremont

Yes No Yes

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 12 11 1

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 1.51% 1.28% 1.12%

% of Poverty

Minority (nonwhite) % 5.31% 52.4% 4.64%

Total Student Population 9958 6053 1766

33% 55%

Yes No No

388 222 362

4 2 3

1.03% 0.90% 0.83%

21% 46% 42%

10.01% 26.77% 18.54%

2434 1345 2361

Idaho Falls Bonneville American Falls

No No No

1146 1197 281

9 9 2

.79% 0.75% 0.71%

26% 28% 49%

16.46% 11.39% 41.35%

10,198 8384 1574

* Table 7 does not include special education teachers. See Tables 5 and 6 for data. Summary: Many of the 28 districts listed in Table 6 (highlighted) that have percentages of non-HQTs above the state average, and, therefore, have not met 100% HQT, are in rural, possibly remote, areas of the state. For instance, in a rural, small district, it is a challenge to find a HQ teacher if the core content area classes are not a full teaching load. Rural districts may find it very difficult to find someone qualified to teach in all the areas for which the district needs the teacher. Action: An explanation of the technical assistance provided by the SDE for all districts is detailed under Requirement 3: Technical Assistance, Programs and Services. For example, in both Wilder and Caldwell, steps are in place to address both their AYP and HQT status. Specifically, Wilder has been invited to apply for a Reading First Grant. The Idaho Reading First program is hosting a grant writer’s workshop on October 3, 2006. It is the State Department of Education’s goal to have the additional funds received from Reading First used by Wilder to recruit more teachers that meet HQT criteria. It will also give the State Department of Education the opportunity to provide research based professional development to Wilder’s kindergarten-third grade staff. A different process is being implemented for Caldwell. The Department’s special education and title programs will conduct a joint review of all Caldwell’s federal
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

programs. HQT and Title II will be part of the review. The goal of the joint review is to provide specific guidance regarding systemic issues. Other technical assistance will focus on specific district needs. Identified needs will be determined district by district so that technical assistance can be planned to meet those needs. Table 8 presents data on schools statewide with percentages of non-highly qualified teachers greater than the state average. Highlighted schools meet the eligibility for the Small, Rural school Achievement Program. Note: Idaho has a Charter School Commission that approves charter schools that are not associated with specific school districts. That is why several districts have similar or identical listings as their schools.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Table 8: School Non-HQT Data (2005-2006)*
Schools (Districts) Gooding Accelerated Learning Center Charter School (Gooding) Lindy Ross Elementary School (Clark) Grand View Elementary School (BruneauGrandview) Hansen Elementary School (Hansen) Riverside Alternative High School (Boundary) Sugar-Salem Junior High School (SugarSalem) South Middle School (Nampa) Moscow Charter School (Moscow) Skyline High School (Idaho Falls) John Mullan Elementary School (Mullan) AYP Total # of core classes 10 Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 2 % of core classes taught by non-HQT 20.0% % High Poverty 75% Minority (non-white) % 30.65%

Yes

No

12

2

16.67%

80%

42.11%

Yes

20

3

15.00%

65%

25.68%

Yes

30

4

13.33%

76%

31.17%

No

8

1

12.50%

83%

15.15%

No

32

3

9.38%

36%

11.27%

Yes

185

5

2.70%

50%

29.86%

Yes

37

3

8.11%

35%

4.51%

No Yes

154 13

3 1

1.91% 7.69% 28%

17.64% 1.69%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Cambridge Junior-Senior High School (Cambridge) Challis Junior-Senior High School (Challis) Bruneau Elementary School (BruneauGrandview) Driggs Elementary School (Teton) Borah Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Hillcrest Elementary School (American Falls) Wilder Middle/High School (Wilder) Grangeville High School (Grangeville) Sunrise Elementary School (Shelley) Hansen Junior Senior High School (Hansen)

AYP

Total # of core classes 39

Yes

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 3

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 7.69%

% High Poverty 53%

Minority (non-white) % 1.23%

No

66

5

7.58%

35%

8.48%

No

14

1

7.14%

75%

42.62%

Yes

14

1

7.14%

50%

24.5%

Yes

31

2

6.45%

63%

10.87%

No

37

2

5.41%

68%

40.56%

No

56

3

5.36%

95%

81.59%

Yes

75

4

5.33%

21%

8.13%

Yes

39

2

5.13%

52%

15.16%

No

60

3

5.00%

48%

28.0%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Cambridge Elementary School (Cambridge) Purple Sage Elementary School (Middleton) Dalton Gardens Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) North Star Public Charter School (Meridian) Bryan Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Ramsey Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Clair E. Gale Junior High School (Idaho Falls) West Elementary School

AYP

Total # of core classes 42

No

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 2

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 4.76%

% High Poverty 59%

Minority (non-white) % 0.00%

Yes

22

1

4.55%

43%

11.19%

Yes

22

1

4.55%

21%

9.41%

Yes

49

2

4.08%

0%

8.59%

No

25

1

4.00%

54%

6.4%

Yes

26

1

3.85%

50%

7.32%

No

53

2

3.77%

47%

16.64%

No

28

1

3.57%

65%

38.88%

(Mountain Home)

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Lena Whitmore Elementary School (Moscow) Mullan Junior-Senior High School (Mullan) Grangeville ElementaryJunior High School (Grangeville) Midway Elementary School (Jefferson) Atlas Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Mountain View Elementary School (Cassia) Orofino Elementary School (Orofino) Liberty Charter School (Liberty) Terreton ElementaryJunior High School (West Jefferson)

AYP

Total # of core classes 28

Yes

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 1

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 3.57%

% High Poverty 29%

Minority (non-white) % 11.15%

Yes

28

1

3.57%

22%

1.49%

No

57

1

1.75%

39%

4.87%

Yes

29

1

3.45%

50%

8.78%

Yes

29

1

3.45%

53%

4.31%

Yes

30

1

3.33%

71%

36.24%

Yes

31

1

3.23%

58%

9.69%

Yes

62

2

3.20%

8%

13.02%

Yes

64

2

3.13%

62%

29.06%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________ Midway Middle School (Jefferson) No 194 6 3.09% 50% 14.05%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Skyway Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Fernan Elementary School (Coeur d’Alene) Compass Public Charter School (Compass) Skyline Senior High School (Idaho Falls) Central Elementary School (Fremont) Canfield Middle School (Coeur d’Alene) Lincoln Elementary School (Twin Falls) Syringa Middle School (Caldwell) Shoshone High School (Shoshone)

AYP

Total # of core classes 33

Yes

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 1

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 3.03%

% High Poverty 40%

Minority (non-white) % 6.69%

Yes

34

1

2.94%

51%

5.65%

Yes

35

1

2.86%

5%

5.13%

No

144

4

2.78%

23%

17.64%

No

138

1

2.63%

66%

26.36%

Yes

192

5

2.60%

28%

5.22%

Yes

39

1

2.56%

74%

24.84%

No

197

5

2.54%

77%

57.96%

Yes

40

1

2.50%

61%

30.82%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________ Pioneer Elementary School (Meridian) Highland School (Highland) Yes 47 1 2.13% 8% 27.44%

Yes

48

1

2.08%

47%

8.25%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Kimberly Elementary School (Kimberly) Sandpoint High School (Lake Pend Oreille) Nampa Senior High School (Nampa) Parma Middle School (Parma) North Fremont Junior-Senior High School (Fremont) Middleton Middle School (Middleton) Idaho Falls Senior High School (Idaho Falls) Bonners Ferry High School (Boundary) Mc CallDonnelly High School (McCallDonnelly)

AYP

Total # of core classes 48

Yes

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 1

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 2.08%

% High Poverty 48%

Minority (non-white) % 11.32%

Yes

293

6

2.05%

25%

3.26%

No

291

5

1.72%

52%

31.86%

No

61

1

1.64%

71%

33.09%

No

75

1

1.33%

48%

13.4%

No

154

2

1.30%

47%

9.04%

No

157

3

1.19%

14%

8.94%

No

181

2

1.10%

39%

8.02%

Yes

48

1

2.08%

15%

6.49%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________ South Fremont High School (Fremont) Mountain View High School (Meridian) Skyview High School (Nampa) No 111 1 0.90% 39% 15.88%

No

362

3

0.83%

18%

7.41%

No

369

3

0.81%

41%

24.82%

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Schools (Districts) Preston High School (Preston) Eagle Middle School (Meridian) Emmett High School (Emmett) Minico High School (Minidoka) East Valley Middle School (Nampa) Rocky Mountain Middle School (Bonneville)

AYP

Total # of core classes 137

No

Total # of core classes taught by non-HQT 1

% of core classes taught by non-HQT 0.73%

% High Poverty 52%

Minority (non-white) % 6.63%

Yes

291

2

0.69%

13%

6.82%

No No No

153 159 191

1 1 1

0.65% 0.63% 0.52%

34% 47% 52%

17.64%

30.85%

No

204

1

0.49%

50%

18.39%

*Table 7 does not include special education teachers, See Tables 5 and 6 for data. Summary: Sixteen of the schools (highlighted) in Table 7 are considered rural. These and other schools are located in rural, possibly remote, areas in the state, a factor that influences a school’s ability to recruit and retain HQ teachers. Veteran teachers often are lured away to larger districts. The state does not have a statewide salary schedule, only a state mandated beginning teacher salary that can be higher if a district chooses. Each district negotiates salary with its local teacher education association on a yearly basis. These factors greatly influence a school’s ability to recruit and retain HQ teachers, especially if the core content area classes may not be a full load for a teacher, such as when a school has only one or two music classes. Rural schools find it very difficult to find someone qualified in music who is willing to teach only one or two classes per day. And schools find it challenging to find teachers who are highly qualified in more than one core content area. Thirty-five of the schools in Table 7 have met AYP requirements but have teachers of core classes who are not highly qualified. Of these thirty-five, five (14.3%) are either charter or alternative schools. Action: Technical assistance will focus on the specific needs and challenges these schools face. Schools will be involved with the State Department of Education in determining their needs. Technical assistance will be provided to charter and alternative schools to assist them in understanding the requirements of NCLB and the state,
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

implementing the appropriate options to ensure teachers are highly qualified, and addressing their specific non-HQT needs. (See Requirement 3: Technical Assistance, Programs, and Services.) One technical assistance service option for schools, especially those that are rural, is for them to work with the Idaho Digital Learning Academy (IDLA), which provides classes taught on-line by HQTs. Does the analysis identify particular courses that are often taught by non-highly qualified teachers? Table 3 identifies core content areas that are frequently taught by non-HQ teachers. The state data system (IBEDS) is being upgraded again to allow extraction of data. Districts’ reporting of the course-specific data will begin in September of 2007 for data collection for the 2007-2008 school year. For the 2006-2007 school year, IBEDS, using the SCED structure referred to earlier, will begin collecting aggregate data on the course description and course level components of that structure. Idaho has built into its IBEDS file formats space to collect the remaining “available credit” and “sequence” components of the SCED schema. By adopting the SCED coding, the IBEDS system will be enhanced to crosswalk classes taught to the qualifications of certificated staff.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

REQUIREMENT 2: HQT STATUS Requirement 2: The revised plan must provide information on HQT status in each LEA and the steps the SEA will take to ensure that each LEA has plans in place to assist teachers who are not highly qualified to attain HQT status as quickly as possible. Does the plan identify LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives for HQT? Yes. Table 6 above provides detailed information about districts and Table 7 about schools that have not met their annual objective of 100% HQT, according to the 20052006 IBEDS data. Based on IBEDS data, Idaho will target districts and schools not meeting HQT and will provide individualized technical assistance and professional development to address their specific needs. • Each fall, data on the percentage of classes not taught by highly qualified teachers at all grade levels, and disaggregated data by high- and low-poverty schools, are reported to the public, as part of the Annual State Report Card required by the NCLB act in accordance with its highly qualified teacher definition. The 2005-2006 IBEDS data does not include HOUSSE data. Districts will incorporate HOUSSE data into their 2006 IBEDS reports that are due September 29, 2006. The data will be analyzed in December 2006 and any changes/adjustments to the state plan will be reported to the U.S. Department of Education in January 2007.

Does the plan include specific steps that will be taken by LEAs that have not met annual measurable objectives? Yes. The State Department of Education will withhold state funds from districts that have employed non-HQTs, funds that would be used to pay these teachers’ salaries. The State Department of Education’s decision is based on the current year’s IBEDS data; withholdings, which occur in January, are based on the teachers’ salaries. This withholding requirement is in Idaho Code §33-513 (See Appendix A). All schools must notify parents that their children are being taught by any non-HQTs. This notification can occur at any time during the school year. Verification of parental notification is sent to the State Department of Education. The state of Idaho has designated three options to assist districts and schools in meeting their objective of 100% HQT.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Continuous Improvement Planning (CIP) Process • The State Department of Education fully implemented the rigorous Idaho CIP process for school district reporting in fall of 2006. School districts are required annually to report to the State Department of Education in their CIPs on their progress toward the goal of 100% highly qualified teachers. If the state finds districts that have a disproportionately high number or percentage of classes taught by teachers not meeting the state and/or NCLB highly qualified provisions, the state will require districts to develop specific, detailed plans, using a variety of suggested state strategies, to indicate how they will reach this goal. These plan are submitted and approved by the Department. (See to Appendix D and E). In their plans, districts must explain how they: o Provide for instruction by highly qualified professional staff; o Offer intensive and sustained professional development that supports NCLB HQT requirements and the needs of the district and students; and o Include teachers in decisions regarding the use of assessments in order to provide information on student performance and on how to improve both students’ performance and the overall instructional program. Refer to Appendices A and B for district and school quality indicators, which are the defining statements for each of Idaho’s accreditation standards that districts and schools must meet. Standards 2 and 5 have specific requirements for highly qualified teachers and professional development. Districts are able to update their data as they make progress toward their CIP goals. Information on CIP is posted at: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/accreditation/ Also refer to Appendix F for the State Board Rule governing accreditation (IDAPA 08.02.01.140: Accreditation).

• • •

Alternative Routes to Teacher Certification • If districts have any classes (NCLB core or others) taught by non-highly qualified teachers, they must make sure that these teachers apply for and are accepted into one of Idaho’s alternative routes or into American Board for the Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE). They must also ensure that teachers complete the requirements within the specified timeline for the non-renewable alternative routes or ABCTE. If districts do not take this step, state funds will be withheld from districts. (See State Funding below for explanation of Idaho Code §33-513). • The state implemented two new alternative routes to certification on July 1, 2006 to ensure that unqualified teachers attain highly qualified status and full state certification as soon as possible: 1) Content Specialist to Teacher and 2) Teacher to New Certification. Teachers in these alternative routes will not be considered highly qualified for NCLB until they meet or exceed the State Board-approved qualifying score(s) on the appropriate Praxis II assessment required for full state certification. The timeline for completion of the routes is three years. Information on the alternative routes is posted at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

A third route, also implemented as of July 1, 2006, is designed for para-educators who want to become teachers. The Para-educator to Teacher route requires candidates to earn a bachelor’s degree, complete a teacher preparation program, and meet or exceed the State Board-approved qualifying score(s) on the appropriate Praxis II assessments for full state certification. Some course work may be waived if candidates have the equivalent knowledge and skills and relevant work/life experiences, thus expediting the process. These three alternative routes require: 1) ongoing preparation through coursework in needed content and pedagogy; 2) mentoring; 3) completion within a specific time period (three years for Content Specialist to Teacher and Teacher to New Certification and five years for Para-educator to Teacher); 4) successfully completing annual requirements; 5) meeting the Idaho Standards for Initial Certification and Professional School Personnel for their subject areas; and 6) meeting or exceeding the State Board-approved qualifying scores on the required Praxis II assessments. In November 2003, the State Board of Education approved a rule to allow for a computer-based alternative route to teacher certification, with the American Board for the Certification of Teacher Excellence (ABCTE) route as currently the only such route. The rule was amended on March 12, 2004, to include a required two-year mentoring program approved by the State Board. The state legislature approved the rule in April 2005. Once individuals have received ABCTE Certification, they apply for a three-year, non-renewable Idaho Interim Certificate that allows them time to meet Idaho requirements for full certification. These requirements include the Idaho Technology Competency Assessment and the Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Course/Assessment (the latter required for elementary teachers). The ABCTE assessments are the State Board-approved tests for this pathway to teaching.

Out-of-State Teachers • Idaho accepts valid out-of-state teaching certificates for individuals who have completed accredited teacher preparation programs in the subjects to which they are assigned. Individuals receive a three-year Interim Certificate that allows them time to complete Idaho requirements for full certification, including meeting or exceeding the State Board–approved qualifying scores on the required Praxis II assessments if they did not take the Praxis II for their out-of-state certification. They must meet Idaho State Board of Education-approved qualifying scores. Information on the certification of out-of-state teachers is found at: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/TeacherCertification/default.asp. Does the plan delineate specific steps the SEA will take to ensure that all LEAs have plans in place to assist all non-HQ teachers to become HQ as quickly as possible? Yes. The state has specific steps to ensure that districts develop and implement plans to assist their non-HQ teachers to become HQ as soon as possible. HOUSSE and required

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

assessments options identified below are the available options in Idaho for teachers to be identified as HQ: • All new teachers, teachers seeking new certifications, out-of-state teachers, and teachers wanting to reinstate certification are required by State Board Rule to meet or exceed the qualifying scores on the appropriate Board-approved assessments (Praxis II/ABCTE). This requirement went into effect as of September 1, 2004. Veteran teachers were required to complete the HOUSSE process by July 1, 2006. If they did not, they will have to take one of the Board-approved assessments to be considered HQ. In June 2006, the State Board of Education approved Praxis II #0014: Elementary Content Knowledge as a required assessment of content knowledge for Idaho’s Exceptional Child Certificate (special education). This requirement applies to any special education teachers in the categories listed above. It also meets NCLB HQT requirements. Another accepted assessment is through the ABCTE process. The State Board-approved assessments meet NCLB HQT requirements. Praxis II required assessments are found on the Department website: http://www.sde.state.id.us/

• • •

State Funding Requirements • Idaho Code §33-1201, established in 1963, requires all teachers to be certified and endorsed for the subjects and levels they teach (See Appendix A). If districts have teachers who are not in compliance, districts risk losing state funding. Local boards of trustees are not to use state allocated funds to pay teachers whom they report as not meeting this requirement. NCLB added more emphasis to the Idaho Code. As a result of NCLB, the state developed the HOUSSE rubric. The State Department of Education informed districts of the requirement to have veteran teachers complete the HOUSSE process for each of their teaching areas by July 1, 2006. The State Department of Education has informed districts through memos, monthly regional superintendents’ meetings and materials, the Department’s newsletter, and presentations at meetings and professional conferences of NCLB highly qualified teacher requirements, HOUSSE requirements and the deadline, and the importance of meeting the requirements of NCLB and the state. Districts are fully aware of the funding consequences if they do not comply with federal and state requirements. • In January 2007, once 2006-2007 data has been collected and analyzed, the state will determine which districts have not met state law and will withhold state funds for districts non-HQTS.

Continuous Improvement Plan for Continuous School Improvement
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

As stated above, the State Department of Education requires districts with teachers not meeting state and/or federal NCLB highly qualified teacher criteria to use the CIP tool to develop detailed plans on how they will meet the goal of 100% highly qualified teachers for their classrooms. Their plans will be monitored on an ongoing basis and evaluated annually by the State Department of Education. Information on CIP is posted at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/. See the question above and Appendix A, B, and C for more information on the state accreditation process and CIP.

Alternative Routes to Teaching • The Professional Standards Commission (PSC) reviews and approves applications for Teacher to New Certification and the Content Specialist alternative routes and monitors individuals’ annual progress toward meeting the goal of becoming fully certified and highly qualified. The three-year alternative routes are non-renewable. For more information, refer to information on the State Department’s website: http://www.sde.state.id.us/) Ongoing Monitoring • The State Department of Education and the Professional Standards Commission monitor districts on an ongoing basis with regard to their plans to ensure that their non-highly qualified teachers become highly qualified. Evidence of compliance is found in districts’ Continuous Improvement Plans and in their non-HQT teachers’ applications for the alternative routes and their progress toward meeting highly qualified requirements. The Department closely monitors the HQT progress each district/school makes according to the improvement plan timelines. The Professional Standards Commission will also prioritize monitoring the progress of non-HQ teachers through the state’s alternative routes. If teachers have not met the requirements within the three-year timeline, they will be unable to continue in the alternative route and will not be considered HQ.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

REQUIREMENT 3: TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE, PROGRAMS, AND SERVICES Requirement 3: The revised plan must include information on the technical assistance, programs, and services that the SEA will offer to assist LEAs in successfully completing their HQT plans, particularly where large groups of teachers are not highly qualified, and the resources the LEAs will use to meet their HQT goals. Because Idaho’s percentage of non-HQ teachers is 0.67%, the State Department of Education is able to work with districts collaboratively to determine focused, one-on-one technical assistance, programs, and services. Appendix G lists the technical assistance, services, and programs provided to districts and schools by the State Department of Education, State Board of Education, and higher education. Does the plan include a description of the technical assistance the SEA will provide to assist LEAs in successfully carrying out their HQT plans? As described in Requirement 1, each LEA submits a detailed accounting of each teacher’s teaching assignments to the Idaho Basic Educational Data System (IBEDS). That information is incorporated into the State Department of Education’s integrated program review process that combines school accreditation, Title I reviews, and special education monitoring for each school district. As part of that process, locally-developed Continuous Improvement Plans (CIPs) outline strategies to address the findings of the reviews, including progress toward meeting the goal of 100 percent highly qualified teachers (See Appendices D and E). The State Department of Education’s role is to monitor the CIPs, educate LEAs about NCLB requirements for HQTs, work with LEAs to assess their HQT needs, and provide both targeted technical assistance and a wide range of support services to help LEAs implement their strategies and meet the goal of 100 percent HQTs. Monitoring The HQT status of each district and school is monitored through two different State Department of Education activities: IBEDS and CIPs. “Misassignments” – teachers assigned outside of their subject areas – are subject to state-level financial penalties. In addition, non-HQT teachers must participate in one of Idaho’s alternative routes to certification or in the American Board for the Certification of Teacher Excellence (as described in Requirement 2). A separate body, the state’s Professional Standards Commission, reviews and approves applications for the alternative routes and monitors participants’ progress. These three LEA submissions – IBEDS data, CIP documents, and alternative route progress reports – give the State Department of Education a comprehensive look at each LEA’s HQT status and progress. Districts are being monitored by the State Department of Education in a coordinated process. See Requirement 4 for more details on the monitoring schedule.
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Education For school districts, schools, charter schools, and alternative schools that have teachers who do not meet the NCLB highly qualified criteria, the State Department of Education will provide information on options for ensuring that their teachers become highly qualified as soon as possible. Information on alternative routes and HOUSSE will be provided through webcasts and presentations at monthly regional superintendents’ meetings. The presentations will emphasize that districts will only be able to use HOUSSE, as specified by law, for special education teachers and rural teachers of multiple subjects. (The HOUSSE process for all other veteran teachers terminated as of July 1, 2006.) Needs Assessment Using the information described above, the State Department of Education will work with each LEA to determine its HQT needs, barriers to success, and strategies for achieving its goals. This will be done either at regional or one-on-one assessment meetings. These meetings are scheduled for the spring of 2007 and will be based on the HQT status of districts, schools, charter schools, and alternative schools once that data is extracted from the 2006-2007 IBEDS submissions. The Department is currently assembling data by courses taught by non-HQTs, which will help both the Department and the LEAs refine their strategies. The State Department of Education is making Keeping Quality Teachers, by Karen Mikkelson, available to districts that have not met the 100 percent HQT goal, and is asking LEAs to help develop appropriate strategies for meeting the goal. Technical Assistance/Supporting Services Technical assistance to each LEA will depend on the findings of its needs assessment. The following list of technical assistance options shows the range of services available to the LEA, depending on its unique circumstances and needs: Recruitment: The State Department of Education uses State Improvement Grant funds to purchase services of Teachers-Teachers.com, a national teacher recruitment resource, for 20 school districts with a high number of non-HQT special education teachers. (Note: this service allows districts to recruit all teachers.) A meeting is scheduled in November to determine the feasibility of expanding Teachers-Teachers.com or a similar recruiting tool. More information is available at http://www.teachers-teachers.com The Idaho Education Employment Website, funded by Idaho’s State Improvement Grant, is a free service that allows districts to post vacancies and teachers to submit applications electronically. More information is available at www.idahoeducationjobs.com
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

The Idaho State Board of Education’s “Grow Your Own Teacher” program supports (1) school districts employees and volunteers who earn associate or baccalaureate degrees in education with bilingual or ESL endorsements and (2) Native Americans preparing to teach in school districts with significant Native American populations. Participants receive scholarships, instructional support, and mentoring as they work through degree completion and teacher certification. More information is available at http://www.boardofed.idaho.gov/scholarships/gyo.asp Career ladder: The Idaho State Board of Education has applied for grant funding to develop a pilot career ladder program that focuses on levels of compensation, incentives to recruit or retain effective teachers and principals, and staffing needs of high-need urban and rural schools and/or hard-to-staff subject areas.

Special education/ The Idaho State Board of Education is using Transition to On-line certification: Teaching funds to develop an on-line alternative route to special education certification. The state’s higher education institutions are developing courses that will be recognized by each institution for recommending certification upon completion. Initial courses will go on-line in the spring of 2007, with the full curriculum to be offered by the fall of 2007. Students who agree to work for at least three years in high need districts that serve high poverty students will be eligible for stipends to offset expenses. Professional Development: The State Department of Education offers a variety of professional development workshops and activities for teaching staff. In many instances, teachers are able to earn credit for participation, which helps them achieve HQT status. Examples include regional academies for K-3 teachers on the five components of reading instruction; summer programs on Improving Middle School Math Performance; and research-based instructional leadership practices and strategies for improving student performance. In addition, grant funds are available to state higher education institutions that partner with high-need school districts to provide professional development, particularly for districts that need assistance for limited English proficient students.

In most of the above options, priority is given to schools or districts that have HQT concerns or that have not made AYP. Does the plan indicate that the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP will be given high priority?

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

The Idaho State Department of Education has been consolidated its federal programs under the Bureau of Special Populations. The bureau encompasses Title I-A, Title IB (Even Start and Reading First), Title I-C Migrant Education, Title II-A, Title IV, Title V and Special Education. This umbrella allows all of the SDE specialists working with at-risk populations to coordinate activities and provide comprehensive technical assistance to schools struggling to meet AYP and HQT. The Department has a list of schools and districts (facing year 2 of school improvement) that will receive first priority in terms of all professional development and technical assistance offered by the Department. The State Department of Education recognizes that because Idaho is rural, it needs to build capacity among district and building administrators. Teachers are most effective when they are part of a school and district that models a “culture of success” for all students. Idaho’s accountability system is unique. NCLB sanctions apply to all schools, not just schools receiving funds from Title I-A. Because most districts choose to focus federal funds for primary grades, principals in middle schools identified as “needs improvement” report that they struggle to meet the rigorous requirements. NCLB asked for systematic change; the reauthorization of the Individual with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires it. Accountability means ensuring a rigorous and relevant curriculum is provided to all students with the necessary prerequisite skills for proficiency in every content area. The State Department of Education believes a critical component of all of these expectations and requirements is highly qualified leadership and focused professional development. To reach the next level of proficiency for all children requires skilled and responsible leadership in every classroom. o To provide the schools support, the State Department of Education is using one third of the state’s Title II-A set aside funds to create the Principals’ Academy of Leadership (PALs). Thirty principals from middle schools identified for school improvement are asked to commit to working with the State Department of Education for the next three years. The goal of the project is to improve instructional leadership. The project has three components o Creation of Learning Communities for Building Leaders - Middle school principals convened twice during 2005-2006 to discuss obstacles and brainstorm solutions. In addition, two regional meetings were facilitated by the State Department of Education. The goal of both the statewide and regional meetings was to encourage the creation of formal and informal learning communities. o Use of Surveys of Enacted Curriculum - Surveys of Enacted Curriculum (SEC) is the method for collecting, reporting, and using consistent data on instructional practices and subject content taught in classrooms. The principals were provided with detailed information regarding the use of SECs, methods of administering the survey, and support in the form of SDE personnel to proctoring the first administration. Each principal will administer SEC for the next three years so that the state will be able to collect data on the effectiveness of the program and the principal will see whether or not the school is moving forward to meet state content

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o

o

o

o o

standards. SEC data will also provide important data for future professional development planned by the State Department of Education. o Instructional Reviews. Each of the thirty schools has been visited by a team of distinguished educators who observed every class and every teacher. The team includes other PAL administrators, State Department of Education content area specialists, and Distinguished Educators (district level special education, federal program, and LEP directors recognized for their accomplishments within specific subgroups). The team is there to collect data on the specific instructional strategies used in the classrooms. No teacher names are used or attached to the data collected. The results of the surveys and the classroom observations are aggregated and given to the principal. The goal is to provide principal with a snapshot of instruction in their school. Each school also receives a summary report that will allow data-based professional development decisions. Achievements to date: The first year of the PAL project (2005-2006) led to the identification of critical areas of professional development needed on a statewide basis. The principals in the project have reported that the project provides data that will inform their improvement efforts. Evaluation: Success will be evaluated in terms of the specific use of the data collected. Data will be examined as to whether the school made significant changes in curricular materials, extended time for learning, personnel, or professional development. In the second year of implementation, success will be measured by 1) the alignment of SEC data and Idaho K-12 Content Standards, 2) the increased percentage of standards-based lessons, and 3) higher level questioning as measured by the Instructional Reviews. Ultimately, the success of the Leadership Academy will be based on the improvement of student outcomes. In each year of the project, data will be collected on the number of schools no longer identified as “needs improvement” as well as the number of schools that have made progress toward closer meeting their AYP target. District Level Support: The State Department of Education will continue to support the PALs project using Title II state set aside funds in 2006-2007. Interviews with principals in the project reveal their need for greater district level support. During the 2006-2007 school year, the State Department of Education will work to create a plan to replicate the program for district level administrators (superintendents, federal program managers, special education directors, etc.). The State Department of Education will be working with Northwest Regional Education Laboratory Comprehensive Center on the creation of the project. Each participant will develop an action plan based on data for his or her school to increase student achievement and evaluate the implementation of the plans. In March and April 2007, the goal is to have the project consultants, team participants, and State Department of Education analyze the data from PALS to determine its efficacy and to seek sources of funding to expand the project to elementary and high schools that have not met AYP.

As requested by the Idaho State Legislature, the State Board of Education formed a committee to examine teacher mentoring models currently in use and how to best to

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

implement mentoring models. In fall 2006, several models will be piloted and evaluated for efficiency and effectiveness. Mentor trainers and administrators from fourteen Idaho school districts have already received mentor training conducted by the New Teacher Center of Santa Cruz, California. Quantitative and qualitative data will be analyzed by the committee, and a report will be generated and presented to the Legislature in 2007. The goal is to procure state funding to support statewide mentoring for all new teachers. • The State Department of Education has presented three Continuous Improvement Plan workshops throughout the state. Schools and districts identified as in need of improvement have been invited to attend these two-day sessions where they receive specific technical assistance and guidance from State Department of Education staff in creating their Continuous Improvement Plans. These workshops have proven successful and will continue in the future. (See Appendices D and E) The 2006 Idaho Legislature appropriated funds for a statewide grant program to provide school improvement funds to districts and schools that have not met AYP in the Limited English Proficiency subgroup. The State Department of Education is managing a competitive grant process and requiring schools/districts that are recipients of the awards to provide mentoring and professional development for teachers serving LEP students. Grant applications are currently being reviewed and grants will be awarded in 2006. The State Department of Education Bureau of Special Population funds annual instructional coaches’ training in reading and math for schools not making AYP that are identified as high poverty areas. Coaches assist teachers with utilizing classroom data to design and deliver scientifically researched-based curriculum with fidelity. This professional development will continue to focus on schools not making AYP in reading and math, areas identified in Table 3 as having non-HQTs. Because of the success of the Response to Intervention/Results Based Model program (see Appendix G), the State Department of Education is requesting schools and districts identified for needs improvement to adopt the model as part of their restructuring process. To be eligible to participate in the program, the school must send a team for five days of training in the first year. The training will include: o Creating Problem Solving Teams o Parental Involvement o Functional Assessment o Outcome Oriented Intervention o Ongoing Progress Monitoring o Systematic Data-Based Decision Making In addition to the training, the RBM teams will be supported by State Department of Education regional special education consultants as well the Department special education and Title programs staff. In the second year of the process, RBM teams
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

will return for an additional five days of advanced training where teams continue to focus on schoolwide systems of support such as: o Integration of resources o Prioritized learning activities o Emphasis on research-based instructional practices The State Board of Education has also created an online learning community that will be launched in the fall of 2006 to support both existing and new sites. Does the plan include a description of programs and services the SEA will provide to assist teachers and LEAs in successfully meeting HQT goals? Professional Development Model • The Educator Quality and Leadership Team formed an action team composed of State Department and Office of State Board personnel, representatives from higher education, and K-12 teachers and administrators to develop a professional development model based on Idaho’s educator standards and focused on the needs of students, schools, and teachers. Once completed, the draft will be reviewed by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction in October 2006 and the Professional Standards Commission in November 2006 and appropriate revisions will be made. The State Department of Education will present the model to the State Board of Education in January 2007. Based on Board approval to continue, the State Department will draft a State Board Rule governing the requirements for professional development for the 2008 legislative session. The State Department of Education will develop the process and procedures for the rule when it is approved. The rule will go into effect for all teachers as of 2013, which allows for the five-year certification renewal cycle. However, upon Board approval, teachers will have the option of utilizing the new process if they choose. • The Idaho Transition to Teaching grant identifies college graduates interested in changing to a career in teaching and provides stipends to assist them in completing coursework and testing for teaching certification. These students agree to teach for at least three years in a high need district that serves high poverty students. The grant also will continue to serve paraprofessionals and new bachelor’s degree candidates, who agree to serve in high need districts. The State Department of Education will provide targeted technical assistance to districts, including charter districts that have non-highly qualified teachers above the state average of 0.67%. The Department will begin in January 2007 with those districts with non-HQTs above 0.67% that have not met AYP requirements. Some targeted technical assistance will be delivered via a web cast to districts with common needs and individually to districts with specific needs. The Department will provide districts the information they need to ensure their non-HQ teachers become HQ. The State Department of Education will conduct a web cast to provide districts information about the programs and services that may be of assistance to them in meeting their 100% HQT goal. These programs and services are listed above and

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

include CIP, Teacher-Teachers.com, PALS, the Idaho Education Employment Website, targeted training, and School Improvement Workshops. As 2006-2007 data is analyzed, other programs and services will be developed. Does the plan specifically address the needs of any subgroups of teachers identified in Requirement 1? Technical Assistance - Non-HQ Subgroups of Teachers • Data indicates that districts have more non-HQ teachers in special education than in any other area. The State Department of Education has initiated targeted technical to address the needs of special education teachers in meeting HQ. o As stated above in Requirement 2, the Idaho State Board of Education approved Praxis II #0014: Elementary Content Knowledge as a requirement for Idaho’s Exceptional Child Certificate for new teachers, out-of-state teachers, teachers seeking an additional certificate, and teachers who let their certificates lapse. This became effective September 1, 2006. Requiring this assessment of teacher content knowledge will assist these teachers in gaining HQ status. Another accepted assessment process is through the ABCTE. o The State Department of Education is financially supporting twenty districts that have difficulty recruiting teachers allow them to use Teachers-Teachers.com for three years (2005-2008) to help with recruitment. The service will be used to recruit all teachers, not just special education teachers. The service will allow districts to search a national data base for teachers they need. Link: http://www.teachers-teachers.com o The Idaho Training Clearinghouse (ITC) is a website that lists current special education professional development training opportunities. ITC, created as part of the State Department of Education’s State Improvement Grant in collaboration with the University of Idaho, acts as a link for special education teachers and parents of students with disabilities to identify opportunities from various agencies and parent groups. ITC provides expedited electronic registration for trainings, evaluative feedback on trainings, and online tools to foster communities of trainers and participants statewide. ITC will be utilized more specifically for posting professional development assistance to help teachers in meeting HQT and districts in meeting AYP. Link: http://www.idahotc.com Does the plan include a description of how the State will use its available funds (e.g., Title I, Part A; Title II, Part A, including the portion that goes to the State agency for higher education; other Federal and State funds, as appropriate) to address the needs of teachers who are not highly qualified?
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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Federal Funds Use – Non-HQT • The State Agency Higher Education (SAHE) grant Title VI-B monies are being used to train teachers in schools that meet the high need school criteria in the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol. This method of teaching is noted for its effective ways of working with English language learners. Two years of training have been completed. Additional sub grants have been awarded to higher education institutions to provide professional development to teachers to improve their teaching of math and science content literacy. • Federal funds support the following: o Title II – Principal’s Academy of Leadership (PALS) and Math Academies o Title VI B IDEA – Response Intervention and reading achievement projects o Title I B and Title VI B IDEA – Reading achievement project

Does the plan for the use of available funds indicate that priority will be given to the staffing and professional development needs of schools that are not making AYP? Schools that are not making AYP are given preferential status to enable them to access both financial and technical assistance from the State Department of Education.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

REQUIREMENT 4: ENSURING 100% HQT Requirement 4: The revised plan must describe how the SEA will work with LEAs that fail to reach the 100 percent HQT goal by the end of the 2006-07 school year. Does the plan indicate how the SEA will monitor LEA compliance with the LEAs’ HQT plans described in Requirement 2 and hold LEAs accountable for fulfilling their plans? Accountability for HQT • Each Idaho school district through its annual Continuous Improvement Plan has set annual measurable objectives for increasing the percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers. The State Department of Education conducts an annual evaluation of LEAs’ responses to the CIP tool and to the accreditation standards and monitors progress on an ongoing basis (See Appendices D and E). o Beginning with the 2006-2007 school year, each district’s reporting of its annual measurable objectives for increasing the percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers will be integrated into the state’s online Continuous Improvement Planning tool. The CIP tool allows districts to align their annual teacher quality objectives with specific action steps to be implemented by the district. The plan also provides a comparison to each previous year’s actual percentage of classes taught by highly qualified teachers, allowing the state to determine the extent to which each district is meeting or failing to meet its annual objectives. The Consolidated Plan is integrated into the Continuous Improvement Planning tool (CIP) so that proposed related uses of Title II-A or other funds are described. Consolidated Plan funds are not released to a district until all data elements are entered. Districts will be accountable for meeting their objectives and the State Department of Education will monitor their progress toward meeting the 100% HQT goal. • As an additional verification mechanism, the teaching assignments, funding sources, and high quality teacher status of all Title II-A teachers are reviewed during the state’s on-site program review process. All districts participating in Consolidated Plan programs receive an on-site consolidated federal program review on a rotating cycle. The program review process for on-site monitoring of local NCLB programs has recently been revised and strengthened following recommendations from the U.S. Department of Education Title II-A program review. Program review documents are posted on the department’s website at: http://www.sde.state.id.us/ As districts and schools implement Continuous Improvement Plans, the State Department of Education monitors them according to designated timelines established by the districts and the State Department of Education.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

The Professional Standards Commission’s review/approval/rejection process for alternative route candidates will continue to monitor on an ongoing basis districts’ compliance with NCLB and state requirements for HQTs. The State Department of Education will withhold state special education funds for districts that are out of compliance.

Does the plan show how technical assistance from the SEA to help LEAs meet the 100 percent HQT goal will be targeted toward LEAs and schools that are not making AYP? As explained in Requirement 3, all technical assistance, programs and services provided by the State Department of Education are targeted and will continue to be targeted to nonHQT districts and schools that have not met AYP. The Department determines assistance based on IBEDS data that identifies the AYP and HQT status of districts and schools. Does the plan describe how the SEA will monitor whether LEAs attain 100 percent HQT in each LEA and school:  in the percentage of highly qualified teachers at each LEA and school • Districts that have not met 100% HQT status will be monitored through their Continuous Improvement Plans according to designated timelines as to their progress toward the HQT goal. Districts will also be monitored through their non-HQTs’ progress through the non-renewable alternative routes requirements.  in the percentage of teachers who are receiving high-quality professional development to enable such teachers to become highly qualified and successful classroom teachers? • The State Department of Education has several mechanisms for insuring that funds from federal programs are only used to support high-quality professional development. The Title II Coordinator reviews and approves each district’s plan annually. In addition, for those schools and districts in Year 1 of School Improvement, Department Grants/Contract Specialists verify that the proper amount of funds has been set aside for professional development and then one of Department Coordinators reviews the specifics of the plan. Specifically, the Department looks to see that the professional development plan is targeted towards the AYP issues. The Department also reviews the sufficiency of training (number of days and hours) and whether or not they have a mechanism for providing ongoing assistance to teachers. • The CIP tool requires districts to provide information on the professional development they will provide teachers. See Requirement 6 below.

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Idaho Revised State Plan for Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Goal ______________________________________________________________________________________

Consistent with ESEA §2141, does the plan include technical assistance or corrective actions that the SEA will apply if LEAs fail to meet HQT and AYP goals? • If districts have non-HQTs employed, they will lose state funding for those teachers’ salaries. Based on a review of state data, and/or AYP, the State Department of Education will withhold funding as appropriate. This withholding will occur in January of 2007 and continue until required corrections are completed. The State Department of Education will conduct focused reviews and provide guidance and direct technical assistance to districts and schools that have not met 100% HQT and AYP. Since Idaho does not have a statewide HQT problem, all technical assistance will be targeted to districts’ issues and needs. Those activities have been described in Requirements 2 and 3. SEA Technical Assistance and LEA Accountability (ESEA §2141) o After the second year of the plan, if the State Board of Education (SBOE) and the State Department of Education (SDE) determine the an LEA has failed to make progress toward meeting its annual measurable objectives for HQT and AYP for two consecutive years, the SBOE and SDE will develop an improvement plan to enable the LEA to meet its annual measurable objectives and specifically address issues that prevented it from meeting its annual measurable objectives. o During the development of the improvement plan and its implementation, the SDE will: (1) provide technical assistance to the LEA, and (2) provide technical assistance, if applicable, to schools served by the LEA that need assistance to enable the LEA in meeting its annual measurable objectives for HQT and AYP. o After the third year of the plan, if the SBOE and SDE determine that the LEA has failed to make progress toward meeting its annual measurable objectives for HQT and has failed to make AYP for three consecutive years, the SBOE and SDE will enter into an agreement with the LEA on the use of its funds. As part of this agreement, the SBOE and SDE will:  develop, in conjunction with the LEA, teachers, and principals, professional development strategies and activities, based on scientifically-based research, that the LEA will use to meet its annual measurable objectives and require LEA to utilize appropriate strategies and activities; and  prohibit the use of funds received under part A of Title I to fund any paraprofessional hired after the date such determination is made;  allow the use of such funds to fund a paraprofessional hired after that date if the LEA can demonstrate that the hiring is to fill a vacancy created by the departure of another paraprofessional funded under Title I and the new paraprofessional satisfies the requirements of NCLB; and  allow the use of such funds to fund a paraprofessional hired after that date if the LEA can demonstrate that a significant influx of population has substantially increased student enrollment; or that there is an increased need for translators or assistance with parental involvement activities.

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Refer to the Table 9 for the coordinated monitoring schedule for 2006-2007.

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Table 9: Coordinated Monitoring Schedule for 2006-2007
Date District Type of Review
Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes, disproportionality, DO

Team Leader

Regional Consultant

Title 1, Field Colleagues, & Others
Marcia Beckham – Title 1 Margo Healy – Title 1 Mike Murphy – Title 1 Deb Pfost – Title 1 Val Schorzman -- G/T Jacque Hyatt -- SPED MaryBeth Wells -- SPED Mark Kuskie – SPED Liz Compton -- SPED Deb Pfost – Title 1

Oct. 23-25

Blackfoot

Jean Taylor
Marybeth Flachbart

Beth EloeReep

Oct. 26-27 Nov. 15-17

Lakeland Fremont

Verification Visit Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes

Russ Hammond Jean Taylor Margo Healy

Bev Benge

Beth Eloe-Reep Jacque Hyatt Marcia Beckham Debbie Smith Mike Murphy – Title 1 Rose Rettig – Title 1 Annie Dalgetty – Title 1 Russ Hammond -- SPED Liz Compton -- SPED Mike Murphy – Title 1 Rose Rettig – Title 1 Larry Streeter -- SPED Jean Taylor -- SPED *

Nov. 27-Dec. 1

Nampa

Dec. 4-8

Mountain Home

Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes

Jean Taylor Deb Pfost Rene Rohrer

Date
Dec. 11-12 Basin

District

Type of Review
Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes

Team Leader
Russ Hammond Marcia Beckham

Regional Consultant

Title 1, Field Colleagues, & Others

Rene Rohrer Jean Taylor Rose Rettig Mary Bostick Margo Healy Rene Rohrer Debbie Smith Marcia Beckham – Title 1 Margo Healy – Title 1 Liz Compton -- SPED Mike Murphy – Title 1 Rose Rettig – Title 1 Annie Dalgetty – Title 1 Marcia Beckham – Title 1 Wendy St. Michell -- ESL Mary Bostick -- SPED

Jan. 16-19, 2007 Jan. 29-Feb. 2

Emmett

Caldwell

Feb. 21-22

Glenns Ferry

Verification Visit

Mark Kuskie

Rene Rohrer Debbie Smith
Annie Dalgetty – Title 1 Mike Murphy – Title 1 Liz Compton -- SPED

Feb. 21-22

Liberty Charter

Verification Visit

Jean Taylor

Feb. 21-23

Jerome

Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes Verification Visit

Jacque Hyatt Deb Pfost – Title 1 Rich Henderson Mark Kuskie

Mar. 13-14

Swan Valley

Frank Howe

Date
Mar. 13-14

District
Blaine Co.

Type of Review
Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes Verification Visit

Team Leader
Marybeth Wells Margo Healy

Regional Consultant

Title 1, Field Colleagues, & Others
Wendy St. Michell - ESL

Robin Carter

Mar. 19-20

Snake River Leadership Academy Coeur d’Alene

Jean Taylor
Mary Bostick Deb Pfost – Title 1

Frank Howe
Margo Healy Marcia Beckham – Title 1 Vickie Green -- SPED Jacque Hyatt -- SPED Liz Compton-- SPED Vickie Green -- SPED

Mar 20-22 Confirmed

Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes

Bev Benge

Mar. ?

IDJC

Integrated Focused Review

Jacque Hyatt
Mark Kuskie

Debbie Smith Beth EloeReep

Reschedule

Preston (Cancelled)

Verification Visit

Reschedule Mar. 5-8

Cassia

Integrated Focused Review System issues related to student outcomes

Jean Taylor Margo Healy

Deb Pfost – Title 1

Rich Henderson

REQUIREMENT 5: HOUSSE Requirement 5: The revised plan must explain how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for teachers not new to the profession who were hired prior to the end of the 2005-06 school year, and how the SEA will discontinue the use of HOUSSE procedures for teachers hired after the end of the 2005-06 school year (except for the situations described below). Does the plan describe how and when the SEA will complete the HOUSSE process for all teachers not new to the profession who were hired before the end of the 200506 school year? Completion of HOUSSE Process • The state required districts to complete the HOUSSE rubric process by July 1, 2006 to determine the highly qualified status of their current veteran teachers of the core academic subjects they are currently assigned to teach, will be teaching in the next school year, or are qualified to teach. At the end of the 2005-2006 school year and at the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year, State Department of Education provided detailed information on the continued use of HOUSSE. Districts were notified of the July 1, 2006 sunsetting of HOUSSE on April 21, 2006 and again on May 1, 2006. Notification was through memos, announcements at regional superintendents’ monthly meetings, and one-on-one telephone conferences as necessary. • • HOUSSE will continue to be used for special education teachers and rural teachers of multiple subjects. The State interprets the HOUSSE requirement to embody the broader point that, consistent with NCLB, HOUSSE may be used on a very limited basis in other situations where it is urgently needed, such as when a veteran highly qualified teacher in one core subject must be assigned at the last minute to teach another core subject, or when a district, despite its best efforts to hire only highly qualified teachers, must hire a teacher who is highly qualified but who has not had the opportunity to complete the HOUSSE process. All districts may use HOUSSE on a limited basis for such critical situations where it is needed until the re-authorization of ESEA-NCLB.

Does the plan describe how the State will discontinue the use of HOUSSE after the end of the 2005-06 school year, except in the following situations: Multi-subject secondary teachers in rural schools who, if HQ in one subject at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within three years of the date of hire.

• •

As specified in federal guidance, districts designated as rural by the U. S. Department of Education will continue to utilize HOUSSE rubric process for secondary teachers of multiple subjects. The State Department of Education notified rural-designated districts of this change in HOUSSE policy on April 21, 2006 and again on May 1, 2006 as well as at monthly regional superintendents’ meetings and the annual Department of Education Superintendents meeting in August 2006.

Multi-subject special education teachers who are new to the profession, if HQ in language arts, mathematics, or science at the time of hire, may use HOUSSE to demonstrate competence in additional subjects within two years of the date of hire. HOUSSE and Special Education Teachers • In regard to special education teachers teaching multiple subjects, the state will follow guidance provided by the U.S. Department of Education. The following information is taken directly from a vetted OSEP document found at: (http://www.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/idea2004.html). “When used with respect to a special education teacher who teaches two or more core academic subjects exclusively to children with disabilities, “highly qualified” means that the teacher may either: Meet the applicable requirements of Section 9101 of ESEA for any elementary, middle or secondary school teacher who is new or not new to the profession; In the case of a teacher who is not new to the profession, demonstrate competence in all the core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches in the same manner as is required for an elementary, middle or secondary school teacher who is not new to the profession under Section 9101(23)(C)(ii) of ESEA, which may include a single, high objective uniform state standard of evaluation (HOUSSE) covering multiple subjects; or In the case of a new special education teacher who teaches multiple subjects and who is highly qualified in mathematics, language arts or science, demonstrate competence in the other core academic subjects in which the teacher teaches in the same manner as is required for an elementary, middle or secondary school teacher under Section 9101(23)(C)(ii) of ESEA, which may include a single, HOUSSE covering multiple subjects, not later than two years after the date of employment.” [602(10)(D) of IDEA] The State Department of Education has informed districts of these guidelines and requirements for the use of HOUSSE through a variety of methods, such as memos, monthly superintendent information and regional meetings, Department newsletter, and phone conferences with LEAs and schools needing assistance. LEAs are well aware of the limited uses of HOUSE and are applying HOUSSE

appropriately. The State Department of Education is confident that the data will verify use of the HOUSSE requirements when it is analyzed in January 2007.

REQUIREMENT 6: EQUITY PLAN Requirement 6: The revised plan must include a copy of the State’s written “equity plan” for ensuring that poor or minority children are not taught by inexperienced, unqualified or out-of-field teachers at higher rates than are other children.

IDAHO EQUITY PLAN for HIGHLY QUALIFIED TEACHERS GOAL: Ensure that 100% of the poor and minority children in Idaho are taught by experienced, qualified teachers. Description of the Data Collection Process • By October 15 of each year, school districts are required to report to the State Department of Education through the Idaho Basic Educational Data System (IBEDS) on the number of classes taught by HQTs and non-HQTs, poverty levels, adequate yearly progress, and student ethnicity. • • Data reveal that inequitable distribution is at a district-by-district and school-byschool level. Each situation is unique to its setting. The following timeline delineates the institutionalized IBEDS process established by the State Department of Education: o Districts use the number of core academic classes taught by highly qualified and non-highly qualified teachers as of September 29, 2006, to determine what data to enter into IBEDS. o By October 15, 2006, districts must summit IBEDS data to the State Department of Education. o Districts have access to their data and are responsible for reconciling their data between October 15 and December 15, 2006 and ensuring accuracy of the data. School principals/district superintendents must sign off to verify the accuracy of data they are submitting to the Department and submit this verification along with their IBEDS data. o December 31, 2006 is the date when the State Department of Education will determine from which districts state funds will be withheld. Each year the State Department of Education will review the data collection process and upgrade IBEDS to ensure appropriate data is being collected.

Course specific data for 2006-2007 has been collected from districts. The data will be analyzed to determine inequities in teacher distribution by course. Technical assistance, programs, and services will be determined to address these inequities, the State Plan will be revised, and the revised Plan will be sent to the U.S. Department of Education in January 2007. IBEDS will be upgraded for the 2007-2008 data collection process so districts will be able to report the experience levels of their teachers. The system needs this upgrading to allow access to teacher experience data. Since data for the 2006-2007 school year has been collected from districts and is currently being analyzed as to its accuracy, collecting teacher experience data cannot occur until the system is revised and data collection begins in October 2007 for the 2007-2008 school year.

Does the plan identify where inequities in teacher assignment exist? Note: Many Idaho teachers return the areas of their youth for family and business reasons. Others seek positions within rural communities for quality of life issues, such as snow skiing, white water rafting, clean air, etc. • Idaho has not identified a statewide inequity problem. The total percentage of nonHQTs by core academic classes is 0.67% (see Requirement 1: Table 1). However, analysis at the district and school level reveals inequities. Inequitable distribution is at district-by-district and school-by school levels. Each situation is unique to the setting. Identification of the unique inequities will be at the district or school level so that technical assistance will be targeted to each setting. Inequities in teacher assignment are more frequently found in rural districts, as evidenced in their percentages of non-HQTs above the state average of 0.67% (Requirement 1: Table 6 and 7). Specific inequities in teacher assignments include special education, foreign language, English/language arts, reading, and the arts (drama, music, and visual art) with special education the highest at 7.90%. Three school districts have non-HQTs in more than one area. (see Requirement 1: Tables 4 and 6) The State Department of Education has identified school districts in quadrants as high resources/low need, high resources/high need, low resources, low need, and low resources/high need (See Appendix C). These quadrants along with data reported by districts through IBEDS guide the State Department of Education in its technical assistance, services, and programs and the targeting of resources. The State Department of Education will inform the administration of all districts and schools of their status of being a targeted site for technical assistance based on whether they are above the state average (0.67%) for the percentage of core academic classes taught by non-HQTs. Based on this status, districts/schools will be required to review and amend their Continuous Improvement Plans to address this concern. They

will also be offered priority for State Department of Education resources, including training targeting at improving the skills of teachers in the critical areas of special education, foreign language, English/language arts, reading, and the arts.

Does the plan delineate specific strategies for addressing inequities in teacher assignment? Highly Qualified Teacher Committee • By October 2006, the State Department of Education’s Educator Quality and Leadership Team will establish a Highly Qualified Teacher Committee that will be responsible for studying the equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers in the state, other highly qualified issues, and the challenges districts and schools face in these areas. Committee membership will include a broad, statewide representation from the following stakeholder/policy maker groups: o State superintendent/chief deputy superintendent o State Board of Education member o State legislator o Governor’s education advisor o Professional Standards Commission member o Pre-K-12 teachers, including elementary, middle level, high school, and special education o Idaho Education Association o School Administrators o Idaho Association of School Administrators o Higher education teacher preparation program dean o Higher education provost o PTA o Idaho School Boards Association o State Department of Education HQT staff o Office of the State Board of Education staff • The tentative timeline for the HQT Committee is as follows: o November 2006 – Orientation on HQT and NCLB and review of baseline data (2005-2006) and current technical assistance, programs, and services; work with consultant to design a program to report data that will inform the Committee as to which variables (teacher experience, poverty, rural status, etc.) are most closely correlated to the lack of HQTs, and identify which districts/schools to target. o February 2007 – Review of 2006-2007 data report, comparison of new data to 2005-2006 data, and development of preliminary draft of proposed policy changes. o March 2007 – Continuation of data and inequities analyses and development of proposed policy changes to address teacher inequity. o April 2007 – Finalization of equity plan and policies to address teacher inequity. o May 2007 - Present to the State Board of Education Potential policies and strategies that the State Department of Education and the Highly Qualified Teacher Committee might consider: o Recruitment and retention workshops for districts o Implementation of professional development standards that focus on district, school, and student needs

o Collaboration with higher education to provide professional development, online courses, etc. o Collaboration with higher education to recruit individuals into high need subject areas o Targeted assistance to districts and schools on how best to distributed teachers equitably o Workshops/web casts to assist district and schools on how to effectively use resources/funds, state data system, available recruitment sites, online professional development, alternative routes, etc. o Continued support for state’s high quality alternative routes o Continued support for the Grow Your Own program o Support for state funding of teacher mentoring o Utilization of distance learning to permit student access to qualified teachers o Rehiring of retired teachers and principals specifically to work in high-need schools o Support the continued development of teacher coaching programs to assist teachers in the lowest-performing schools. Does the plan provide evidence for the probable success of the strategies it includes? • Districts and/or schools identified in this plan will be required to submit a Continuous Improvement Plan that addresses the HQT issues for Department approval by January 15, 2007. Plans will be approved by the Department by February 15 and will be monitored in the September of 2007 when the submission for progress reporting and revisions is required. Each plan must include specified activities, timelines, and resources allocated to ensure progress. The state’s HQT data (99.33% HQT) is evidence that the state is making progress toward all teachers being HQ. The State Department of Education has experience in implementing large scale professional development. In 2005, Idaho was one of only three states to significantly increase reading achievement among fourth graders. The State Department of Education attributes much of that success to the Department’s ever increasing certification requirements, as well as the consistent high quality professional development offered to primary educators. With the recently enacted alternative routes to certification, the state is confident that the districts’ percentages of non-HQTs will decrease as districts move toward their goal of 100% HQT. As of July 1, 2006, non-HQ teachers must 1) apply for and be accepted into one of the alternative routes, 2) complete it within the three year timeframe, and 3) meet or exceed the State Board-approved qualifying score on the required Praxis II assessment(s). They are not considered HQ T until they have completed the three steps. National research indicates the importance of having highly qualified teachers and administrators for advancing school improvement and closing the student achievement gap. The state’s PALS program will continue to provide teachers and

building administrators focused professional development on ways to improve student achievement. Success will be measured by improvement in student outcomes. • The State Department of Education has evidence that the Department’s SAHE program is successful. The schools that participated in the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) trainings improved outcomes for English Language Learners. Two participating schools in Caldwell (an LEA with HQT challenges) were able to meet AYP in all forty-one areas. This is especially significant because they have had challenges meeting AYP for LEP students in the past. The State Department of Education knows its Response-to-Intervention/Results Based Model program works. Idaho has two sites (Dalton Gardens in Coeur d’Alene and Acequia Elementary in Minidoka) that were recognized as exemplary models by the National Research Center on Learning Disabilities. Dalton Gardens was named as one of the top five programs in the U.S.

Does the plan indicate that the SEA will examine the issue of equitable teacher assignment when it monitors LEAs, and how this will be done? • The State Department of Education will monitor the equitable teacher assignment through: 1) the review and analysis of IBEDS data from districts; 2) the integrated program review process of school districts that combines school accreditation, Title I, and special education monitoring; and 3) the Continuous Improvement Plans submitted by districts and schools. The State Department of Education will take the following steps to ensure equitable distribution of highly qualified teachers: o The State Department of Education will review and analyze IBEDS data collaboratively with the Highly Qualified Teacher Committee and consultant to determine inequities. o Districts and the State Department of Education will collaborate with schools and districts in the development of individualized plans based on HQT, AYP, poverty level, and minority data. o Districts/schools will implement plans to address inequities. o If improvement is demonstrated, districts will continue with plans until goals are met. o If no improvement, the Department will provide oversight until corrective actions are made according to a developed corrective action plan and timeline. o Final action for non-compliance will be withholding federal funds until corrections are made. Refer to Requirement 4: Ensuring 100% HQT (pp. 44-46) for:

o Details on technical assistance and corrective actions the State Board of Education and State Department of Education will apply if districts fail to meet HQT and AYP goals; and o Coordinated Monitoring Schedule for 2006-2007.

APPENDIX A:
Idaho Code §33-1201 Every person who is employed to serve in any elementary or secondary school in the capacity of teacher, supervisor, administrator, education specialist, school nurse, or school librarian shall be required to have and to hold a certificate issued under authority of the state board of education, valid for the service being rendered . . .

APPENDIX B: Idaho’s Highly Objective Uniform State Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE): Highly Qualified Teacher Rubric (Revised March 2006)
Directions: • Idaho’s HOUSSE rubric is a tool Idaho school districts should use in determining the highly qualified status of all veteran teachers *. • All veteran K-12 teachers should complete a rubric for each of their assigned core academic teaching areas (English, reading or language arts; mathematics; science; foreign languages; civics and government; economics; arts; history; and geography), sign the assurance form, and submit them to his/her school/district administrator for signature. • Special Education teachers need to fill out HOUSSE for each of their assigned core academic content teaching areas if they are primary/initial deliverers of core subjects. • The district maintains the rubrics and assurance forms in their records for reporting on IBEDS beginning in the fall of 2006. • Do NOT send the rubric to the State Department of Education. (1) Bachelor’s Degree 1. I have documentation that I have a bachelor’s degree. (Required of ALL teachers) Yes ** _____ No (2) State-Approved Teacher Preparation Program or Alternative Certification Program 2. I have documentation that I have completed: 1) an Idaho state-approved teacher preparation program, or 2) an Idaho state-approved alternative certification program, or 3) an out-ofstate-approved teacher preparation program (out-of-state alternative programs are not acceptable). Yes _____ No (3) Current Valid Idaho and/or Out-of-State Certificate(s) for Assigned Teaching Area **

3. I have documentation that I hold a valid Idaho
Interim/Elementary/Early Childhood Blended/Exceptional Child/Secondary Certificate(s) and/or a valid out-of-state teaching certificate for my current assigned content teaching area. _____ Idaho Certificate(s) _____ Out-of-State Certificate State: _________________ Special education teachers who are NOT primary/initial teachers of academic core content areas (English, reading or language arts; mathematics; science; foreign languages; civics and government; economics; arts; history; and geography) are considered highly qualified if they answer “yes” to 1, 2, and 3. 4. I have documentation that I have an endorsement (teaching field) in my assigned content teaching area (traditional/Idaho alternate route). _____Yes _____ No

(4) Endorsement(s) in Assigned Teaching Area **

* Veteran teacher – a teacher who has completed one or more years of teaching. ** If you answered “No” on question 1, you do NOT meet the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) highly qualified teacher requirements. Do NOT continue with the rubric.

(5) Advanced Degree/National Board Certification in Assigned Teaching Area 100 points for advanced degree or NBCT ______ points (6) Credits Earned in Assigned Teaching Area 40 points ______ points (7-8) Idaho Educator Technology Assessment and/or Idaho Comprehensive Literacy Course/Exam 20 points for answering “yes” to questions 7 and/or 8 (#8 required for all new elementary and all elementary and special education teachers seeking certification renewal) ______ points (9) Ongoing Professional Development 15 clock hours/1 semester credit = 9 points per year Maximum = 45 points ______ points (10) One Year of Contracted Teaching Experience in Assigned Teaching Area 9 points per year of experience Maximum = 45 points ______ points

5. I have documentation that I have earned an advanced degree (masters/doctorate) or a National Board Certification in my assigned content teaching area (elementary, early childhood, special education, secondary content area, etc.). Yes No

6. I have documentation that I have earned at least twelve (12) semester credits in my assigned content teaching area (i.e., math, reading, science, elementary content, etc.) for which I do not currently hold a certificate/endorsement. _____Yes _____ No 7. I have documentation that I passed an Idaho Educator Technology Assessment. _____Yes _____ No 8. I have documentation that I passed the Idaho Comprehensive Literacy course or assessment required for all new elementary and all elementary and special education teachers renewing certificates. _____Yes _____ No _____ NA (I am a secondary teacher NOT teaching reading)

9. I have documentation that I participated in ongoing professional development in the last five years related to my assigned content teaching area (i.e., standards/assessment development, data analysis, curriculum development/alignment, publications, mentoring, supervising instruction, college/university credit, etc.). Credits earned for #6 do not count for #9. _____Yes _____No

10. I have documentation that I have at least one year of fulltime contracted teaching experience in my assigned content teaching area in an Idaho OR out-of-state K-12 school. _____Yes _____ No

(11) Related Work Experience 3 points per year of experience Maximum = 30 points ______ points (12) Advanced Degree Related to Assigned Teaching Area(s) 25 points per degree Maximum = 25 points ______ points

11. I have documentation of at least one year of work experience related to my assigned content teaching area (i.e., paraprofessional, tutor, day care provider/teacher, chemist, accountant). _____Yes _____ No If yes, describe relationship of work experience to assigned content teaching area:

12. I have documentation that I have earned an advanced degree related to but not in my assigned content teaching area (i.e., curriculum and instruction, administration). _____Yes _____ No

TOTAL POINTS ON RUBRICS = ___________________ Minimum of 100 + points = Highly Qualified

HOUSSE ASSURANCE FORM
______________________________________________________________________ Full name as listed on Teaching Certificate(s) Certificates: _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ Endorsements *: _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ Teacher Signature Date ______________________________________________________________________ Administrator Signature Date ______________________________________________________________________ Employing School District Employing School

*

Meeting Idaho’s Highly Objective Uniform Standard of Evaluation (HOUSSE) does NOT add an endorsement (teaching field) to a certificate. Teachers must meet the state requirements for an endorsement to be added. Refer to: http://www.sde.idaho.gov/TeacherCertification/default.asp

Appendix C Quadrants – District Resources and Needs
Quadrant 1 High R Low N District 001 011 041 061 071 092 111 121 181 182 191 274 281 282 283 285 287 292 Resources 6217.12 High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources Need 60.4 Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Quadrant 2 High R High N District 013 044 073 148 149 150 161 171 234 241 242 262 288 304 312 314 316 341 Resources 6217.12 High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources Need 60.4 High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need Low Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need Quadrant 3 Low R Low N District 002 003 021 033 052 060 072 084 091 093 134 151 202 271 272 273 291 321 Resources 6217.12 Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Need 60.4 Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Quadrant 4 Low R High N District 025 055 058 059 083 101 131 132 136 139 192 193 201 215 221 231 232 233 Resources 6217.12 Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Need 60.4 High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need

Quadrant 1 High R Low N District 302 305 340 364 383 392 393 394 416 421 422 432 Resources 6217.12 High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources Need 60.4 Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need Low Need

Quadrant 2 High R High N District 342 365 382 415 417 418 Resources 6217.12 High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources High Resources Need 60.4 High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need

Quadrant 3 Low R Low N District 322 351 372 381 391 411 414 Resources 6217.12 Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Need 60.4 Low Need Low Need Low Need High Need Low Need Low Need Low Need

Quadrant 4 Low R High N District 251 252 253 261 331 371 373 401 412 413 431 COSSA Resources 6217.12 Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Low Resources Need 60.4 High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need High Need

Appendix D QUALITY INDICATORS FOR IDAHO DISTRICT ACCREDITATION STANDARDS STANDARD I – VISION, MISSION AND POLICIES District and school vision and mission statements are to serve as directional statements that form the foundation of all policies, guidelines and practical decisions that support student achievement. Education stakeholders in the district and school communities will collaboratively develop these guiding principles and review them periodically. Vision, mission and policies will be aligned with the Thoroughness legislation defined by Idaho Code 33-1612 and referenced in the Thoroughness Chapter of Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. VISION, MISSION AND EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING -- 24 points (Unless otherwise noted in parentheses following the quality indicator, each indicator has a value of 3) The district's vision and mission statements describe the essence of what the district is seeking to achieve for its students. The expectations for student learning are based on and drawn from the mission statement. These expectations are the fundamental goals by which the district continually assesses the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process in its schools. Every component must focus on enabling all students to achieve the district’s expectations for student learning. 1. The district shall have clearly written vision and mission statements that guide the development of school vision and mission statements. (6) 2. The mission statement and expectations for student learning shall be developed by the community and be approved and supported by the professional staff, the school board and/or other district-wide governing organization. 3. The district's mission statement shall represent the community's fundamental values and beliefs about student learning. 4. The mission statement and the expectations for student learning shall guide the policies, procedures and decisions of the district. (6) 5. The vision and mission shall be regularly reviewed and communicated to the community. (6) SCHOOL BOARD POLICIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES -- 30 points The local board of trustees develops and/or adopts district-wide policies. Schools within the district are subsequently responsible for developing, implementing and monitoring a comprehensive set of administrative procedures that are aligned with district policies.

1. The district has written policies congruent with its vision and mission and reflective of broad public input. (6) 2. The district has a parent/community involvement policy. (6) 3. District policies and procedures are available to students, parents, staff and the community. (6) 4. District policies are reviewed and updated regularly to reflect district needs. (6) 5. District policies and administrative procedures reflect, at a minimum, state and federal laws, rules and regulations. (6) LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATION -- 18 points The district administrators and school board members have the responsibility to coordinate the allocation and utilization of resources to maximize school capacity to meet the needs of all students. District decision-making should be characterized by thoughtful, reflective and constructive discourse about practices that support student learning and well being. 1. The superintendent shall provide leadership in the school community by creating and maintaining a shared vision, direction and focus for student learning. (6) 2. The instructional schedule adopted by the school board shall be driven by the district’s mission and expectations for student learning and shall support effective implementation of curriculum, instruction and assessment at the school building level. (6) 3. Meaningful roles in the decision-making process shall be accorded to students, parents and school staff to promote an atmosphere of participation, responsibility and ownership. (6) STANDARD II – HIGHLY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL The most important factor for improving student achievement is the quality of the classroom teacher. Placing and retaining a competent, caring and qualified teacher in every classroom will maximize opportunities for student learning. All educators of Idaho students will be highly qualified as defined by the Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. Individual professional development plans and a staff evaluation model that effectively promotes the continuous improvement of school personnel are required components of this standard. STAFFING – 24 points 1. Certificated personnel meet all state and federal requirements. (18)

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2. Non-certificated personnel meet all state and federal requirements. (6) INDIVIDUAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – 18 points 1. The district involves staff in the development and implementation of district professional development plans that align with the goals defined in the district strategic plan. (6) 2. The district provides the organizational structure, support, time and resources to schools in order to meet the objectives of individual and school-wide professional development plans. (12) STAFF EVALUATION – 18 points 1. The district uses a staff evaluation model that effectively promotes the continuous improvement of school personnel. (18) STANDARD III – EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Schools will provide a comprehensive educational program focused on meeting the needs of all students. High expectations for student success and frequent monitoring of student progress are critically important to student learning. Deep alignment of curriculum, instruction and assessment to standards considered essential for all students is imperative. A school’s educational program must be aligned with the Thoroughness legislation, Idaho Code 33-1612; the State Board of Education’s Idaho Content Standards K-12; and the testing and high school graduation requirements defined in the Thoroughness Chapter of the Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. ELEMENTS OF THOROUGHNESS -- 6 points 1. The following Elements of Thoroughness, as cited in Idaho Code 33-1612, are integrated throughout the district’s educational program: (6) a. provision of a safe learning environment conducive to learning b. educators empowered to maintain classroom discipline c. emphasis on basic values of honesty, self-discipline, unselfishness, respect for authority and the central importance of work d. provision of instruction in effective communication skills

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e. provision of a basic curriculum that enables students to enter academic or professional-technical postsecondary educational programs f. instruction in skills necessary to enter the workforce g. introduction of students to current technology h. skill acquisition for responsible citizenship at home, school and in the community CONTENT STANDARDS --24 points 1. The district staff has aligned curriculum, instruction and assessments with the Idaho Content Standards. (18) 2. Non-traditional courses such as distance education, correspondence courses, web-based courses and the Portable Assistance Student Support (PASS) program are aligned with the Idaho Content Standards and district-approved for use in the schools. (6) CURRICULUM – 36 points The curriculum, which includes coursework, co-curricular activities and other school-approved educational experiences, is the district's formal plan to fulfill its mission statement and expectations for student learning. The curriculum links the district's beliefs and its expectations for student learning. The strength of that link is dependent upon the commitment and involvement of the professional staff to a comprehensive, ongoing review of the curriculum. 1. A written curriculum is provided and utilized for each subject area. (6) 2. The district effectively implements a well-defined plan for the review and adoption of curriculum and materials. (6) 3. The district selects primary curricular materials for all subject areas from the Idaho Adoption Guide as approved by the State Board of Education. (6) 4. The district effectively implements a well-defined plan for the integration of technology into its curriculum, instruction and assessments. (6) 5. Curricular coordination and articulation shall be evident between and among all academic areas and schools in the district. (6) 6. The district shall commit time, financial resources and personnel to the development, evaluation and revision of curriculum. (6) INSTRUCTION–27 points The quality of instruction in a district’s schools is the single most important factor affecting the quality of student learning, the achievement of expectations for student learning, the delivery of the curriculum and the assessment of student progress. Instructional practices must be grounded in the district's mission and expectations for student learning, supported by research in best practice and refined and improved based on identified student needs.

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1. The district policies and procedures address: (15) a. a parent-approved student learning plan by the end of eighth grade or by age 14 for special education students regardless of grade level. (N/A for grades K-7) b. an individual learning plan that is aligned with the Idaho Content Standards for limited English proficient students who require testing accommodations. c. a current individual education plan that is aligned with the Idaho Content Standards for all special education students. d. provision of the opportunity to develop academic skills, professional-technical skills and life skills to all students. e. allocation of instructional time to support student learning. 2. The district endeavors to meet the teacher/student ratios and teacher loads recommended by the state for each school: (12) Elementary (K-3) = 20 Elementary (4-6) = 26 Middle/junior high = 160 teacher load High school = 160 teacher load for traditional schedule (140 for trimester school schedules, 180 for block school schedules) Alternative school (7-12) = 18 average daily class load ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING–12 points Assessment informs the district regarding student progress and ways to adjust the curriculum and instruction to respond effectively to the learning needs of students. Further, it communicates to the community the progress of students in achieving the district's expectations for student learning and course-specific learning goals. Assessment results must be continually utilized to improve curriculum and instruction. 1. The district participates in the annual statewide student assessment program as required by Administrative Rules. 2. The district regularly monitors student achievement. 3. The district uses data to improve student performance, facilitate high quality instruction and provide appropriate intervention. 4. The district communicates district and school progress in achieving all district-wide expectations for student learning to the community. STANDARD IV – LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

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Schools will provide a safe, nurturing, disciplined and orderly learning environment conducive to learning. School site, facilities, equipment and related services serve as a vehicle for the implementation of the school mission and factor into the functioning of the educational program. The school’s learning environment should contribute to a positive educational atmosphere and address the physical, emotional and social health and safety of all persons in the school. Maintenance of discipline and attention to reducing student behavior problems will improve learning opportunities for students. The provision of a productive climate and culture is an essential factor impacting student achievement. SCHOOL PLANT AND FACILITIES – 30 points 1. The district has established regulations regarding matters of public health including sanitation, sewage disposal, a safe water supply and emergency procedures. (6) 2. Facilities meet all building codes, safety standards and public health regulations required by state and local authorities. (6) 3. School sites, buildings, equipment and furnishings are designed and maintained to facilitate the safety of all occupants and to maintain the quality of the school’s instructional and co-curricular programs. (6) 4. All district facilities are inspected annually per Idaho Uniform School Building Safety Act. (6) 5. A planned and adequately funded program of building and site management shall ensure the appropriate maintenance, repair and cleanliness of all school facilities within the district. (6) SAFE, POSITIVE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT – 30 points 1. According to IDAPA 08.02.03.160, the district has developed, written and annually reviewed comprehensive districtwide policies and procedures that provide for a safe learning environment conducive to learning and encompass the following: (30) a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. school climate discipline violence prevention gun-free schools substance abuse suicide prevention student harassment drug-free school zones contagious or infectious diseases

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j. building safety including emergency drills DISTRICT/COMMUNITY RESOURCES FOR LEARNING – 60 points Student learning and well-being are dependent upon adequate and appropriate support programs and services. The district is responsible for providing an effective range of integrated resources to enhance and improve student learning and well-being and to support the district's mission and expectations. 1. The district employs classified and support personnel to meet the needs of the staff and students. 2. Students have access to the following school-based programs required in Idaho statutes: (21) a. comprehensive developmental school counseling b. programs for gifted/talented and disabled students c. school psychological services d. health and school nursing services e. physical therapy and/or occupational therapy services f. supplemental academic support programs g. extended time 3. Students have access to the following community-based services required in Idaho statutes: (18) a. public health b. community mental health c. child protective services d. vocational rehabilitation e. job services f. law enforcement and/or juvenile justice liaison 4. The district works collaboratively with communities and families in a school readiness program to prepare children for success in school. 5. The district shall foster business/community/higher education partnerships that support student learning. 6. The district shall conduct ongoing planning to address future programs, enrollment changes, staffing, facility and technology needs as well as capital improvements.

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7. The district endeavors to meet state-recommended caseloads for pupil personnel services: counselors, social workers & psychologists = 400:1 (*student/district average) 8. The district endeavors to meet the state-recommended ratios for building administrative personnel: not to exceed 500:1* 9. The district endeavors to meet the state-recommended ratios for elementary/secondary media generalists and assistants: elementary = 500:1* /secondary = 500:1* STANDARD V - CONTINUOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT Continual improvement of the educational program is essential in providing quality results. Idaho schools must be actively involved in a dynamic and data-driven Continuous Improvement Planning process. Professional development programs and parent/community participation in the planning process are required elements that distinguish good schools. Successful improvement programs should focus on the systematic analysis of student performance data and how the school’s instructional and organizational practices impact student achievement. DISTRICT STRATEGIC PLAN–36 points 1. The district develops and implements a comprehensive district strategic plan encompassing the priorities and needs of its schools. (12) 2. The district conducts an annual review of strategic and Continuous Improvement Plan progress with the local board of trustees. (12) 3. The district distributes strategic and Continuous Improvement Plan results to staff, parents and other stakeholders. (12) PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT–24 points 1. The district has ensured that time and resources are made available to staff in order to meet professional development needs. (12) 2. Professional development is an integral part of and aligned with the district strategic plan. (12)

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STANDARD VI – STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The primary focus for Idaho schools is student learning and growth. Districts and schools, in partnership with parents and the community, must be accountable for student achievement. Accountability refers to the systematic collection, analysis and use of data and information to provide for continuous improvement in student performance. The State Board of Education’s accountability measures defined in Administrative Rules set forth the basic requirements contained in this standard. ACCOUNTABILITY–24 points 1. The district has established high school graduation requirements that, at a minimum, align with those of the State Board of Education. 2. The district reports attendance rates, student dropout rates, and graduation rates and incorporates goals for reducing the number of absences and dropouts in the district strategic plan. 3. The district develops and communicates written administrative policies and procedures to staff, students and patrons regarding: (18) a. a comprehensive and effective plan for evaluating student achievement b. grading and graduation requirements c. attendance d. promotion and retention e. expulsion and suspension f. persistently dangerous schools STUDENT PROGRESS–59 points 1. The district disaggregates all student data and reports progress annually, adhering to current state and federal guidelines. (6) 2. The district publishes annual report cards, which include state assessment data; makes them broadly available in understandable language to the public; and submits them as required by state and federal requirements. (6) 3. The district demonstrates student growth and/or progress on statewide assessments as measured by the Fall Idaho Standards Achievement Test (ISAT), and the Fall to Spring Idaho Reading Indicator (IRI). (47) a. ISAT:

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i. ii. iii. iv. b. IRI: i. ii. iii. iv.

students do not meet typical (expected) growth students meet typical (expected) growth students exceed typical (expected) growth students demonstrate extraordinary growth students do not meet state established proficiency targets students are making progress toward the established proficiency targets students meet state established proficiency targets (85% etc) students exceed state established proficiency targets

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Appendix E QUALITY INDICATORS FOR IDAHO SCHOOL ACCREDITATION STANDARDS STANDARD I – VISION, MISSION AND POLICIES District and school vision and mission statements are to serve as directional statements that form the foundation of all policies, guidelines and practical decisions that support student achievement. Education stakeholders in the district and school communities will collaboratively develop these guiding principles and review them periodically. Vision, mission and policies will be aligned with the Thoroughness legislation defined by Idaho Code 33-1612 and referenced in the Thoroughness Chapter of Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. 1.01. VISION, MISSION AND EXPECTATIONS FOR STUDENT LEARNING–24 points (Unless otherwise noted in parentheses following the quality indicator, each indicator has a point value of 3) The school's mission statement describes the essence of what the school as a community of learners is seeking to achieve. The expectations for student learning are based on and drawn from the school's mission statement. These expectations are the fundamental goals by which the school continually assesses the effectiveness of the teaching and learning process. Every component of the school community must focus on enabling all students to achieve the school's expectations for student learning. 1. The school shall have clearly written vision and mission statements that are aligned with the district vision and mission. (6) 2. The mission statement and expectations for student learning shall be developed by the school community and be approved and supported by the professional staff, the school board and/or other school-wide governing organization. 3. The school's mission statement shall represent the school community's fundamental values and beliefs about student learning. 4. The mission statement and the school's expectations for student learning shall guide the procedures, policies and decisions of the school and shall be evident in the culture of the school. (6) 5. The vision and mission shall be regularly reviewed and communicated to the school community. (6)

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1.02. SCHOOL BOARD POLICIES AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES – 24 points The local board of trustees develops and/or adopts district-wide policies. The school is subsequently responsible for developing, implementing and monitoring a comprehensive set of administrative procedures that are aligned with district policies. 1. The school shall have written procedures aligned with district policies that promote the effective operation of the school. (12) 2. The school procedures shall promote parent/community involvement and shall be available to students, parents, staff and the community. (12) 1.03. LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATION -- 24 points The way in which a school organizes learning for students, fosters leadership and engages its members has a profound effect on teaching and learning. The professional culture of the school must be characterized by thoughtful, reflective and constructive discourse about decision-making and practices that support student learning and well being. 4. The principal shall provide leadership in the school community by creating and maintaining a shared vision, direction and focus for student learning. 5. Teachers as well as administrators other than the principal shall provide leadership essential to the improvement of the school. 6. The organization of the school and its educational programs shall promote the school’s mission and expectations for student learning. 7. The instructional schedule shall be driven by the school’s mission and expectations for student learning and shall support the effective implementation of the curriculum, instruction and assessment. 8. Meaningful roles in the decision-making process shall be accorded to students, parents and all members of the school staff to promote an atmosphere of participation, responsibility and ownership. 9. The professional staff shall collaborate in support of learning for all students. 10. Student grouping patterns shall reflect the diversity of the student body, foster heterogeneity, reflect current research and best practices and support the achievement of the school’s mission and expectations for student learning. 11. Student success shall be regularly acknowledged, celebrated and displayed.

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STANDARD II – HIGHLY QUALIFIED PERSONNEL The most important factor for improving student achievement is the quality of the classroom teacher. Placing and retaining a competent, caring and qualified teacher in every classroom will maximize opportunities for student learning. All educators of Idaho students will be highly qualified as defined by the Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. Individual professional development plans and a staff evaluation model that effectively promotes the continuous improvement of school personnel are required components of this standard. 2.01. STAFFING – 24 points 3. Certificated personnel meet all state and federal requirements. (18) 4. Non-certificated personnel meet all state and federal requirements. (6) 2.02. INDIVIDUAL PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – 30 points 3. The school has a process in place to create and monitor individual professional development plans. (9) The individual professional development plan: a. engages the professional educator in examination of best practices for teaching and learning as defined by research. (3) b. identifies the organizational structure and support needed to improve the educator’s performance. (3) c. is job-embedded, data-driven and supports increased student achievement. (3) 4. The school involves staff in the development and implementation of individual and school professional development plans that align with the goals defined in the district strategic plan and the continuous Continuous Improvement Plan. (6) 5. Organizational structure, support, time and resources are provided to staff in order to meet the objectives of individual and schoolwide professional development plans. (6) 2.03. STAFF EVALUATION – 18 points 2. The school uses a staff evaluation model that effectively promotes the continuous improvement of school personnel. (6)
3.

Teacher supervision and evaluation processes shall be used to improve instruction for the purposes of enhancing student learning and meeting student needs. (6)

5. Teachers shall be expert in their content area, knowledgeable about current research on effective instructional approaches and

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reflective about their own practices. (6) 2.04 . STAFF TURNOVER/RETENTION – 6 points 1. The school evaluates staff turnover and addresses any concerns about staff retention. (6) STANDARD III – EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM Schools will provide a comprehensive educational program focused on meeting the needs of all students. High expectations for student success and frequent monitoring of student progress are critically important to student learning. Deep alignment of curriculum, instruction and assessment to standards considered essential for all students is imperative. A school’s educational program must be aligned with the Thoroughness legislation, Idaho Code 33-1612; the State Board of Education’s Idaho Student Achievement Standards K-12; and the testing and high school graduation requirements defined in the Thoroughness Chapter of the Idaho State Board of Education Administrative Rules. 3.01. ELEMENTS OF THOROUGHNESS -- 6 points 2. The following Elements of Thoroughness, as cited in Idaho Code 33-1612, are integrated throughout the educational program: (6) a. provision of a safe learning environment conducive to learning b. educators empowered to maintain classroom discipline c. emphasis on basic values of honesty, self-discipline, unselfishness, respect for authority and the central importance of work d. provision of instruction in effective communication skills e. provision of a basic curriculum that enables students to enter academic or professional-technical postsecondary educational programs f. instruction in skills necessary to enter the workforce g. introduction of students to current technology h. skill acquisition for responsible citizenship at home, school and in the community 3.02. CONTENT STANDARDS -- 15 points 3. The curriculum, instruction and assessments shall be aligned with the Idaho Content Standards. (12) 4. Non-traditional courses such as distance education, correspondence courses, web-based courses and the Portable Assistance

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Student Support (PASS) program shall be aligned with the Idaho Content Standards. (N/A for elementary schools) 3.03. CURRICULUM -- 27 points The curriculum, which includes coursework, co-curricular activities and other school-approved educational experiences, is the school's formal plan to fulfill its mission statement and expectations for student learning. The curriculum links the school's beliefs, its expectations for student learning and its instructional practices. The strength of that link is dependent upon the commitment and involvement of the professional staff to a comprehensive, ongoing review of the curriculum. 7. Each curriculum area shall identify those school-wide academic expectations for which it is responsible. 8. A written curriculum for each subject area shall be utilized. 9. The curriculum shall be aligned with the school-wide academic expectations and shall ensure that all students have opportunity to practice and achieve each of those expectations. 10. Curricular coordination and articulation between and among all academic areas shall be evident within the school as well as with feeder schools in the district. 11. Instructional materials, technology, equipment, supplies, facilities, staffing levels and the resources of the library/media center shall allow for the implementation of the curriculum. 12. The professional staff shall be involved in the ongoing development, evaluation and revision of the curriculum based on assessments of student performance in achieving the school's academic expectations. 13. The school or district shall commit time, financial resources and personnel to the development, evaluation and revision of curriculum.
14.

The school selects primary curricular materials for all subject areas from the Idaho Adoption Guide as approved by the State Board of Education. (include provision for waivers)

15. Technology shall be integrated into and supportive of teaching and learning. 16. 3.04. INSTRUCTION -- 24 points The quality of instruction in a school is the single most important factor affecting the quality of student learning, the achievement of expectations for student learning, the delivery of the curriculum and the assessment of student progress. Instructional practices must be grounded in the school's mission and expectations for student learning, supported by research in best practice and refined and improved based on identified student needs. Teachers are expected to be reflective about their instructional strategies and to collaborate with their colleagues about instruction and student learning. 3. Instructional strategies shall be consistent with the school's mission statement and expectations for student learning.

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4. The teaching and learning program focuses on instructional best practices. 5. Instructional time is allocated and protected to support student learning. 6. All students have a parent-approved student learning plan by the end of eighth grade or by age for special education students regardless of grade level. (possible N/A for elementary schools) 7. Limited English proficient students who require testing accommodations have an individual learning plan that is aligned with the Idaho Content Standards. 8. All special education students have a current individual education plan that is aligned with the Idaho Content Standards. 9. The school or district endeavors to meet the teacher/student ratios and teacher loads recommended by the state: (6) Elementary (K-3) = 20 Elementary (4-6) = 26 Middle/junior high = 160 teacher load High school = 160 teacher load for traditional schedule (140 for trimester school schedules, 180 for block school schedules) Alternative school (7-12) = 18 average daily class load 3.05. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING – 15 points Assessment is an integral part of the teaching and learning process. Its purpose is to inform students regarding their learning progress and teachers regarding ways to adjust the curriculum and instruction to respond effectively to the learning needs of students. Further, it communicates to the school community the progress of students in achieving the school's expectations for student learning and course-specific learning goals. Assessment results must be continually discussed to improve curriculum and instruction. 5. The school staff uses data to improve student performance, facilitate quality instruction and provide intervention as needed. 6. The school participates in the annual statewide student assessment program as required by Administrative Rules. 7. The school regularly monitors student achievement using multiple assessment measures. 8. Parents/guardians are informed of assessment results, invited to participate in the development of plans for improvement and are aware of methods to help their students. 9. The school’s professional staff shall communicate the school's progress achieving all school-wide expectations to the school community.

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STANDARD IV – LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Schools will provide a safe, nurturing, disciplined and orderly learning environment conducive to learning. School site, facilities, equipment and related services serve as a vehicle for the implementation of the school mission and factor into the functioning of the educational program. The school’s learning environment should contribute to a positive educational atmosphere and address the physical, emotional and social health and safety of all persons in the school. Maintenance of discipline and attention to reducing student behavior problems will improve learning opportunities for students. The provision of a productive climate and culture is an essential factor impacting student achievement. 4.01. SCHOOL PLANT AND FACILITIES – 21 points 6. Facilities meet all building codes, safety standards and public health regulations required by state and local authorities. 7. The site, buildings, equipment and furnishings are designed and maintained to facilitate the safety of all occupants and to maintain the quality of the school’s instructional and co-curricular programs. 8. The school building is inspected annually per Idaho Uniform School Building Safety Act. (6) 9. A planned and adequately funded program of building and site management at the district and/or school level shall ensure the maintenance, repair and cleanliness of the school plant. 10. The school site and plant shall support and enhance all aspects of the educational program and the support services for student learning. 11. Equipment shall be adequate, properly maintained, catalogued and replaced when appropriate. 4.02. SAFE, POSITIVE SCHOOL ENVIRONMENT – 21 points 2. The school has a written code of student conduct that was cooperatively designed by members of the school community including students, staff, administration and patrons. (6) 3. Policies and procedures regarding student behavior are clearly communicated and consistently enforced and applied. 4. The climate of the school shall be safe, positive, respectful and supportive, resulting in a sense of pride and ownership. 5. The school has established a school safety team with representation from the school and community for development, implementation and monitoring of the safe learning environment.

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6. The school has developed and implemented procedures for supervision and applicable training of employees to ensure a positive school environment. 7. Data is collected on student behavior referrals, suspensions and expulsions and, if applicable, used for the development and implementation of improvement goals and strategies. 4.03. SCHOOL RESOURCES FOR LEARNING -- 21 points Student learning and well-being are dependent upon adequate and appropriate support programs and services. The school is responsible for providing an effective range of integrated resources to enhance and improve student learning and well-being and to support the school's mission and expectations. 1. The district or school employs classified and support personnel to meet the needs of the staff and students. 2. Student records, including health and immunization records, shall be maintained in a confidential and secure manner consistent with federal and state law. 3. The school has financial resources to provide services to students to meet the stated purposes of the school and to provide the educational program to the student. 4. Proper budgetary procedures and generally accepted accounting principles are followed for all school funds. 5. The school endeavors to meet state-recommended caseloads for pupil personnel services: counselors, social workers & psychologists = 400:1 (*student/district average) 6. The school shall provide special education services related to the identification, monitoring and referral of students in accordance with local, state and federal laws. 7. The school endeavors to meet the state-recommended ratios for elementary/secondary media generalists and assistants: elementary = 500:1*/secondary = 500:1* 4.04. COMMUNITY RESOURCES FOR LEARNING – 9 points Active community and parent participation, facilities that support school programs and services and dependable and adequate funding are necessary for the school to achieve its mission and expectations for student learning. 1. The school shall engage parents and families as partners in each student's education and shall encourage their participation in school programs and parent support groups. 2. The school shall foster business/community/higher education partnerships that support student learning.

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3. There shall be ongoing planning to address future programs, enrollment changes, staffing, facility and technology needs as well as capital improvements.

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STANDARD V - CONTINUOUS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT Continual improvement of the educational program is essential in providing quality results. Idaho schools must be actively involved in a dynamic and data-driven Continuous Improvement Planning process. Professional development programs and parent/community participation in the planning process are required elements that distinguish good schools. Successful improvement programs should focus on the systematic analysis of student performance data and how the school’s instructional and organizational practices impact student achievement. CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT PLAN – 42 points 1. The school develops and implements a Continuous Improvement Plan focused on student achievement that is reviewed and revised on an ongoing basis. 2. The continuous Continuous Improvement Plan utilizes school leadership teams and provides for a collaborative, organized process of planning and decision-making, which includes parental and community involvement. 3. There is a commitment to the school improvement process by the school leadership team and the school staff. 4. The school utilizes a continuous school improvement process that includes each of the following common core elements: a. vision, mission and belief/commitment statements that guide school improvement and focus on student performance b. ongoing collection, review and analysis of pertinent data that builds a profile of the school and assesses staff and student needs c. utilization of data analysis/needs assessment results to select the most appropriate areas upon which to focus improvement efforts and to identify needed student support services d. development of data-driven and measurable student achievement goals e. assessment and analysis of staff strengths and challenges in relation to the student achievement goals f. review of pertinent research and use of scientifically research-based models, programs and practices when selecting improvement strategies g. strategies that focus on improving student performance h. action plan and timeline for implementing strategies and achieving goals i. professional development goals aligned with the Continuous Improvement Plan j. monitoring and evaluation of the effect of the plan on student achievement and staff practices in order to make adjustments, as needed, to ensure success 5. Evidence of school improvement is identified, documented, utilized and communicated to all stakeholders.

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PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT – 30 points 3. The school has ensured that time and resources are made available to staff in order to meet professional development needs. (6) 4. Professional development is an integral part of and aligned with the Continuous Improvement Plan (6) 5. The school is utilizing a staff development plan that reflects identified instructional needs. (6)
6. 7.

The school's professional development program shall provide opportunities for teachers to develop and improve their instructional strategies. (6) The school's professional development program shall provide opportunities for teachers to collaborate in developing a broad range of student assessment strategies. (6)

STANDARD VI – STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT The primary focus for Idaho schools is student learning and growth. Districts and schools, in partnership with parents and the community, must be accountable for student achievement. Accountability refers to the systematic collection, analysis and use of data and information to provide for continuous improvement in student performance. The State Board of Education’s accountability measures defined in Administrative Rules set forth the basic requirements contained in this standard. ACCOUNTABILITY – 27 points 4. The school follows or has established high school graduation requirements that, at a minimum, align with those of the State Board of Education. (NA for elementary & middle schools or if district is responsible) 5. The school reports attendance rates, student dropout rates and graduation rates and incorporates goals for reducing the number of absences and dropouts in the continuous Continuous Improvement Plan as needed. 6. The school clearly documents student achievement on school records and ensures that all student records are physically secured against fire, misplacement, loss or other unauthorized access. 7. The school develops and communicates written procedures to staff, students and patrons regarding: a. comprehensive and effective plan for evaluating student achievement b. grading and graduation requirements c. attendance

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d. promotion and retention e. expulsion and suspension f. persistently dangerous schools STUDENT PROGRESS – 92 points 4. The school disaggregates all student data, tracks subpopulations longitudinally and reports progress annually, adhering to current state and federal guidelines. (6) 5. The school publishes annual report cards, which include state assessment data; makes them broadly available in understandable language to the public; and submits them as required by state and federal requirements. (6) 6. The school demonstrates student growth and/or progress on statewide assessments as measured by the Fall Idaho Standards Achievement Test (ISAT), and the Fall to Spring Idaho Reading Indicator (IRI). (80) a. ISAT: i. students do not meet typical (expected) growth ii. students meet typical (expected) growth iii. students exceed typical (expected) growth iv. students demonstrate extraordinary growth b. IRI: i. students do not meet state established proficiency targets ii. students are making progress toward the established proficiency targets iii. students meet state established proficiency targets (85% etc) iv. students exceed state established proficiency targets

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Appendix F STATE BOARD RULE: ACCREDITATION
IDAPA 08 TITLE 02 CHAPTER 02 08.02.02 - RULES GOVERNING UNIFORMITY

140. ACCREDITATION. All public schools and districts in Idaho will be state accredited. State accreditation is voluntary for private and parochial schools. (Section 33­ 119, Idaho  Code) (4­6­05) 01. District   Strategic   Plan.   School   districts   will   develop   and   implement   a   minimum   three   to   five­year   strategic   plan   focused   on   the  improvement of student performance. The district strategic plan (DSP) will be monitored by a representative review team established by each district’s  administration and board of trustees, which will recommend revision of goals as necessary and provide regular reports on implementation of the plan to the  district’s trustees.  (4­6­05) 02. performance. Continuous Improvement Plan. Schools will develop Continuous Improvement Plans (CSIP) focused on the improvement of student  (4­6­05)

03. Plan Alignment and Focus. District strategic plans (DSP) and Continuous Improvement Plans (CSIP) will align and focus on improving  school and staff capacity (structure/resource allocation/teacher skill sets) to increase student achievement.(4­6­05) 04. Standards. Districts and schools will meet state­approved accreditation standards as adopted by the State Board of Education. (4­6­

05)

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05. Reporting. Accreditation reports on DSP/CSIP and the attainment of standards will be submitted, as requested, to the State Accreditation  Committees, whose members are approved by the State Board of Education and representative of each region of the state. The Committees will review the  reports and make recommendations to the State Board of Education for accreditation status. Accreditation status may be appealed to the State Board of  Education. (4­6­05) 06. Elements of Thoroughness. The requirements for thoroughness referenced in Section 33­1612, Idaho Code will be met. (4­6­05)

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Appendix G Historical Overview of Technical Assistance, Services, and Programs Reading • Idaho has been very successful in reading achievement. According to the 2005 NAEP results, Idaho was one of three states that significantly increased reading achievement among fourth graders. The data supports that one of the reasons for this success has been the professional development provided by the State: o Beginning in 2000, teachers of grades kindergarten through eight were required to take a three-credit graduate course based on the findings of the National Reading Panel (April, 2000). o In 2001, the State Department of Education began grade level statewide Reading Academies. o First Grade Academies were offered twelve times and in seven locations across the state in 2001 and 2002. o In the 2002-2003, the State Department of Education offered eight regional Second Grade Reading Academies o In 2003-2004, the State Department of Education offered eight regional Third Grade Reading Academies o In 2004-2005, the State Department of Education offered eight regional Kindergarten Reading Academies. o In 2005-2006, the State Department of Education offered eight Reading Academies for paraprofessionals. o The State Department of Education has sponsored Reading Coach training annually beginning in 2003. The Coach training has been provided by the Consortium of Reading Excellence (CORE). There have been five elementary cohorts and two secondary cohorts. o The State Department of Education has also sponsored Reading Leadership training for district and building level administrators (also facilitated by CORE). The program began in 2003 and four cohorts completed the training. Both the coaching and reading leadership training will be offered again during the summer of 2007. Math • In 2002, a task force jointly appointed by the Office of the Governor and the State Department of Education identified a need to provide professional development to middle grade math teachers. The goal of the Idaho Math Academy is to create a comprehensive and sustainable professional development opportunity for teachers. It also provides opportunities for networking and follow-up activities. o In 2003, 100 middle school math teachers attended the one week institute at the University of Idaho in Moscow. o In 2004, 100 middle school math teachers attended the one week institute at Idaho State University in Pocatello. o In 2005, 100 middle school math teachers attended the one week institute at Boise State University.

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The 2006 Math Academy, priority was given to math teachers from middle schools struggling to meet AYP. One hundred teachers from those middle schools attended the institute at the University of Idaho. o Three two-day workshops on “Effective Strategies for Struggling Middle School Math Students” were sponsored by our Special Education Department. Invitations went to all middle schools in needs improvement. Schools sent teams of general education, special education, ESL teachers, and administrators. The focus was on research based instructional strategies and curricular evaluation of math intervention programs. o As a follow-up, middle schools were invited to send a team to “Improving Middle School Math Performance.” This three-day conference focused on research based best practices, progress monitoring, leadership, coaching, and curricular materials. The 2006 summer conference was facilitated by Dr. Marcy Stein and Dr. Diane Kinder from the University of Washington (authors of Effective Math Instruction, 2005) and attended by more than 120 teachers, teacher leaders, and administrators.

Plato Learning • In 2004, the Idaho State Board of Education contracted with Plato Learning, Inc., to provide for all Idaho public K-12 schools unlimited, perpetual licenses for reading, language arts, and math courseware. The computer courseware, aligned to Idaho’s K-12 content standards, consists of thousands of hours of classes across all grades and beyond. An integral part of the contract is the provision of professional development for teachers to assure that they learn not only how to use the technology but also how to use the courses for maximum impact. At this point, all Idaho school districts are implementing I-PLN for many purposes that include Idaho Student Achievement Test (ISAT) intervention and remediation (its originally intended purpose); acceleration and college preparation; classroom support; special populations support: special education and limited English proficient students; alternate graduation mechanism; and credit recovery. I-PLN is a tool that allows teachers to individualize learning paths for each student to address student learning needs and goals. In addition to being available for the regular public school system, the courseware, technical support, and professional development are also available to public charter schools, Idaho Youth Ranch facilities, 21st Century Community Learning Centers (after school programs), Idaho School for the Deaf and the Blind, juvenile detention centers, and the Idaho Correctional Institutions where K-12 students continue to be educated. Idaho institutions of higher education with responsibilities for pre-service teacher preparation also have access to I-PLN. Response to Intervention/Results Based Model • Idaho began researching Iowa’s Response-to-Intervention Model (RTI) in 1997. In 1998, the State Department of Education launched Idaho’s version, the Results Based Model (RBM). RBM is a schoolwide problem solving approach focused on increasing outcomes for struggling learners. While the process originated in the Bureau of Special Education, it is not limited to students with disabilities. The program started with approximately 30 pilot sites but has now grown to 185 schools in 54 districts. Two of our sites (Dalton Gardens in Coeur d’Alene and Acequia Elementary in Minidoka) have been identified as exemplary by

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the National Research Center for Learning Disabilities. In 2005 the Bureau of Special Populations created a prioritized list of schools based on AYP status and students with disabilities to be served by the project and have made a consistent effort to encourage and include teams from those schools in the program. In 2006, the State Board of Education adopted RBM as a means of corrective action planning. PACE • Pathway for Accelerated Certification and Endorsement (PACE) offered by Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho, provides individuals presently working in the schools and individuals who would like to work in the schools an opportunity to earn full elementary or secondary teaching certificates through programs servicing a highly diverse clientele on and off campus at nontraditional times and by means of nontraditional delivery modes. This program is functioning and will continue. Link: http://www.lcsc.edu/education/pace Troops to Teachers • Troops to Teachers provides financial aid to qualified applicants in the form of a $5,000 stipend to help individuals complete teacher training and teach in a high need district for three years, or a $10,000 bonus to teach in a high need school for three years. Troops to Teachers also provides advising and referral assistance to those who transition to public school teaching.

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