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Five Animal Frolics

A Form Workbook

The

By John Du Cane A Complete Qigong Program for High Energy, Vitality and Well Being

Five Animal Frolics


A Form Workbook

The

By John Du Cane

Dragon Door Publications PO Box 4381, St. Paul, MN 55104 Phone: (651) 645-0517 Fax:(651) 644-5676 Credit Card Orders: 1-800-899-5111 E mail, dragondoor @ aol.com Website: www.dragondoor.com

Five Animal Frolics


A Form Workbook

The

By John Du Cane

The Five Animal Frolics Form Descriptions Copyright 2002 by John Du Cane All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any way by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the author. Published in the United States by: Dragon Door Publications, Inc P.O. Box 4381, St. Paul, MN 55104 Tel: (651) 487-2180 Fax: (651) 487-3954 Credit card orders: 1-800-899-5111 Email: dragondoor@aol.com Website: www.dragondoor.com Book design, Illustrations and cover by Derek Brigham Website http//www.dbrigham.com Tel/Fax: (612) 827-3431 Email: dbrigham@visi.com Manufactured in the United States Second Edition: May 2002
DISCLAIMER The author and publisher of this material are not responsible in any manner whatsoever for any injury that may occur through following the instructions contained in this material. The activities, physical and otherwise, described herein for informational purposes only, may be too strenuous or dangerous for some people and the reader(s) should consult a physician before engaging in them.

Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Daoist qigong techniques give promise of longevity, self-healing 1

Chapter 2 3 How Qigong Can Help You Relax Out of Stress Chapter 3 The Crane Chapter 4 The Bear Chapter 5 The Monkey Chapter 6 The Deer Chapter 7 The Tiger Five Animal Video Information 7 37 69 85 109 122

Chapter 1

Daoist qigong techniques give promise of longevity, self-healing


Daoism celebrates and cultivates the art of living in accord with the cyclical play of natural energies, maintaining an easy, humorous, yet commonsense approach to everyday life. Daoism cultivates our capacity to spiral from the serene and tranquil to the energetic and dynamic. In this spirit, the Daoists created refined qigong systems of meditative movement to induce harmony with nature, generate energy, and at the highest levels, to achieve spiritual illumination. Qigong teaches us to harmonize body, mind and breath while using scientifically choreographed movements to stimulate or relax our energy. Qigong bolsters the primal, reproductive vitality, or jing; it potentiates the daily bioelectrical energy, or qi; and it refines the light of our radiant spirit, or shen. Imagine yourself as a candle: the candle body is your jing, the flame is your qi, and the candle light your shen. These three treasures are interdependent. Cultivation of the one leads to cultivation of the others, just as neglect or dissipation of the one will adversely affect the others. Qigong divides into two main categoriesthe tranquil and the dynamic. But, typically of Daoist practice, tranquil qigong will have a dynamic componentmotionless on the surface, yet moving the qi internally. Dynamic qigong will also cultivate tranquility, learning to move vigorously from a still core. Skillful practitioners learn to be aware of and incorporate the full spectrum of internal and external activity, equally comfortable with the tranquil or the dynamic, always cultivating the seed of one within the soil of the other.
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One of the most delightful and accessible of the dynamic qigongs has to be the Five Animal Frolics. The exercises combine the internal with the external, invigorating the organs and soothing the nervous system, while strengthening and toning the external musculature. They affirm a playful, uninhibited approach to meditative movement, allowing for strong benefits without an overly serious slog for results. The father of Chinese medicine, Hua To concluded that the single greatest secret for a healthy life lay in the practice of correct movement. His analogy became dear to the hearts of all tai ji enthusiasts: A doors hinge wont get worm-eaten, if you use it. Today we would say "If you oil and use the hinge. Qigong and tai ji movements, when properly performed, stimulate that internal lubrication of free-flowing qi, blood, and lymph essential to our continued health and sense of well being. Believing also that the highest healing skill is to teach others to heal themselves, Hua To set out to create a complete self-healing system that anyone could use to stay healthy or cure themselves of most ailments. Synthesizing and refining a set of exercises based on a vast body of ancient shamanic and folk healing knowledge, he created The Five Animal Frolics. The Frolics incorporate many of the principles of tai ji but in a more basic form. They are far easier to perform than tai ji, very pleasurable and relatively simple to maintain as a daily practice. Individual sequences can be used as quick, invigorating stress-buster; the full program is an exhilarating therapeutic experience. The exercises model movement from the crane, the bear, the monkey, the tiger, and the deer. These are animals with very distinctive styles of movement. The idea is not merely to mimic the external motions of the animal, but to internalize the nature of that animal as you practice. Each Frolic also emphasizes different health benefits and you can choose a specific animal for specific results. Their movements form arcs, spirals, waves and spins, in accord with the Chinese belief that circular movement underlies all mental and subtle energetic activity. To avoid imbalance, the movements are sometimes slow, sometimes fast, and are deliberately designed to alternately strengthen and soften the body.

Chapter 2

How Qigong Can Help You Relax Out of Stress


Our birthright is to swim in an ocean of pleasure and harmony, luxuriating in the rolling swell of life. As young childrenif we are fortunatewe live that birthright. We celebrate life with a buoyant, carefree, vital engagement in the everyday moment. Then something starts to happen to us. We begin to tense up. We begin to close down. We begin to lose touch with our bodies and live in our heads. We become confused about our feelings. We start to regret the past or fantasize about the future. We begin to fragment. We start to lose our fluid integrity as fully expressed and responsive human beings. What happened? In a nutshell, stress happened. While a certain amount of stress is natural to life, our search for technological shortcuts to comfort and convenience has ironically created unprecedented waves of stress in our modern lives. Our nervous systems are constantly reacting to a barrage of phone calls, faxes, e-mails, frenzied traffic and numbing schedules. Life seems to have become more of a struggle, with less rather than more time to rest. Sooner or later we really hit the wall. We end up sick in bed. Or a major crisis stuns us into a temporary halt. Stress has got the better of us. Not surprisingly, the World Health Organization is now listing stress as a prime contributor to the five leading causes of death such as cancer and heart disease.

Although most of us are now aware of the dangers of stress, weve become so addicted to the surges and swings of feeling associated with stress, we can no longer imagine life any other way. If things get too quiet we start seeking out a new stressor to react to, for another chemical jolt, another toxic surge of excitement and nervous expenditure.

The Most Effective Self-Care System in the World?


There are many ways to intervene in this vicious cycle and reclaim our peace of mindrestoring balance and serenity in our lives. Meditation, yoga and moderate exercise can all help. But, after twenty-five years of personal research into what works best to counter stress, Ive found the ancient Chinese art of qigong to offer the surest results.

So why and how is qigong so effective in managing stress?


First, qigong emphasizes and teaches how to breathe correctly into the lower stomach. When we breathe this way consistently, our lymph systems are effectively activated, detoxifying the body and sending a gentle stream of energizing oxygen into the tissues. Activation of the lymph system automatically triggers a relaxation response throughout the body. We automatically feel balanced and well. Qigong also activates the lymph system with off-the-body stroking movements and an emphasis on pumping the legs with up and down squatting movements. Secondly, qigongs strong mental emphasis on internal relaxation shifts us out of the sympathetic nervous system (associated with fight-or-flight and our normal reaction to stress) into the parasympathetic nervous system (associated with feelings of pleasure and harmony). This is so important. Over-use of the sympathetic nervous system depletes our adrenals and floods the body with toxic levels of cortisol. We literally burn ourselves out. But like rats hitting the button for more cocaine, we just cant stop. Qigong slowly seduces us back into the gentle world of the parasympathetic and over time we build up a body-memory that allows us to choose a different, relaxed response to stress rather than the frazzled, knee-jerk reaction we usually employ. Thirdly, qigong balances the meridian energy flow in the body, through scientific movement and direction of mental intention. Areas that are depleted are restored to their correct levels; areas that are excessive are calmed down. As we become more energetically balanced, we are automatically capable of better adjusting to daily stress.

Fourthly, qigong practice builds the skill of becoming tranquil and appreciating the value of that tranquility. Qigong accomplishes this by meditative standing and sitting practices where we go deep inside and use our attention to release ourselves emotionally and psychically. Significant healing occurs at this level of qigong practice, with tremendous implications for stress management. Lastly, qigong integrates our three major centers or brains, the third eye area, the heart center and the stomach. In the computer age, we have become headier than ever, losing touch with the wisdom of our hearts and the grounding of our stomachs. Western science and organizations like HeartMath have proved that attention on the heart center can entrain the head to process emotions in a less stress-inducing manner. Through its emphasis and cultivation of all three centers, qigong ensures maximum resilience when it comes to handling stress effectively. Qigong is like a practical course in acceptance and letting go. We learn how to conserve our energy and stay calm, whatever the pressures. We learn how to gain control of our inner being and take responsibility for enhancing the quality of our lives. These are skills you can use and apply for the rest of your life.

Chapter 3

The Crane

The Crane Frolic


Breathing: inhale through the nose on the first movement, exhale through the nose on the second movement, unless otherwise indicated. Always breathe into the lower stomach, with slow, regular, "natural" breathing. Repetitions: Traditionally, practice at least nine repetitions of each movement. If time allows, or if you develop a special feeling or need for a particular form, do as many repetitions as you wish.

# One: Crane Breathing


Initial postural alignment:
Seek to reduce the impact of gravity on your body to minimize tension and maximize a relaxed flow of energy through your system. Stand with the heels touching and your feet angled out at 45 degrees. Distribute your weight equally across the whole of the foot. Bend the knees slightly. Tuck the hips under. Relax the lower dantien or stomach area. Relax the upper chest and lower your shoulders. Pull your chin in slightly and extend your head up, elongating and opening up your cervical vertebrae. Place your tongue lightly against the roof of the mouth. Maintain a level gaze with a soft, 180-degree focus. Put the hint of a smile on your face and allow the smile to permeate your whole body.

Movement:
The spirit of the crane encourages light, graceful and very relaxed movement. Place the palms facing up at lower stomach level, just off the body and slightly apart from each other. Move the palms up the front of the chest to the level of the heart region, then back down to the lower stomach.

Attention:
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Move your attention up the spine as the hands rise and move the attention down the spine as the hands descend.

# Two: Crane Beak


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing. Begin with the arms extended to the sides at shoulder level, with a slight bend in the elbow. Bring the fingers and the thumb of both hands together in a beak-like position.

Movement:
On the inhale, raise and bend the wrists slightly, so the fingers and thumb point downwards and you feel a gentle stretch in the forearms. On the exhale, open the hands and lower them very slightly, while spreading and extending the fingers.

Attention:
Place your attention in the centers of your palms as you inhale, drawing energy into the palms. Place your attention initially on the fingertips and then beyond the finger tips, on the exhale, to send energy out of the fingers.

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#Three: Crane Flaps Wing


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing. Begin with your arms at your sides.

Movement:
Raise your arms, like wings, out to the sides, to shoulder height, then bring them back down to your sides.

Attention:
Place your attention in the centers of your palms as you inhale. As you lower your arms, shift your attention to the wrist joints, then the elbow joints, and then the shoulder joints. At each attention point, "instruct" the joint to relax and open. Obstructed joints block energy. Consciously opening and relaxing the joints will restore and enhance energy flow through the limbs.

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# Four: Crane Squat


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing. Begin with your palms facing the juncture between your thighs and groin. Alternately, you can begin with the palms facing the lower stomach, as shown in the accompanying photograph.

Movement:
Arc your arms out to the sides at shoulder height, slowly spiraling the palms until they are facing up. As you arc the palms out the side, squat down, raising the heels off the ground. Keep the torso upright. Allow the knees and thighs to open at a 45-degree angle. Lower the palms back to the thigh/groin (or lower stomach) area following the same trajectory. Rise up out of the squat to the initial standing position, as you lower your arms.

Attention:
Place your attention initially between your palms and the thigh/groin (or lower stomach) area. As you inhale, have the attention in the palms, with a sense that you are pulling energy in an arc up from the groin or stomach area and out to shoulder height. As you lower your palms on the exhale, use your attention in the same manner to return the energy to your groin or stomach area.

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# Five: Crane Stands On One Leg


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing. Begin with your arms at your sides.

Movement:
Circle the arms and cross them in front of your chest, palms facing in. As your hands begin their initial movement in front of the chest, sink your weight into the right leg.

Breathing:
Inhale as you circle the arms up.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the whole of this sequence

(continued next page spread)

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# Five: Crane Stands On One Leg


(continued)
Movement:
Continue to raise the hands, turning the palms to face out as they pass the throat. Continue above the head, turning the palms out and then to the sides at shoulder level, palms facing down. As your arms circle above the head and out to the sides, bring the left foot up in front of the right knee. Lower the arms back down to your sides. As you lower the arms back to your sides, sink your weight into the left leg. Repeat the entire sequence to the other side.

Breathing:
Inhale as you circle the arms up and out, exhale as you lower the arms.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the whole of this sequence.

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#Six: Flying Crane


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing. Place the palms facing up at lower stomach level, just off the body and slightly apart from each other.

Movement:
Move the palms up the front of the torso to the level of the heart region, as in the initial movement of Crane Breathing. Turn the palms to face downward and extend the arms forward, crossing the left hand over the right. As your hands begin their initial movement in front of the chest, sink your weight into the left leg. Move arms out to the sides at shoulder level. Simultaneously, bend at the waist and squat down on the left leg, while raising the right leg straight out behind you until it is parallel to the floor.

Breathing:
Just breathe in a relaxed natural manner with this sequence, allowing the movement to determine the breath pattern.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the whole of this sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Six: Flying Crane


(continued)
Movement:
Bring right palm down to touch the outside of the left foot, palm facing in, while the left arm remains extended to the side at shoulder level. Bring the left arm behind your back, also parallel to the floor with palm facing in, while raising the right arm and extending it forward parallel to the floor, with the palm facing in.

Breathing:
Just breathe in a relaxed natural manner with this sequence, allowing the movement to determine the breath pattern.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the whole of this sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Six: Flying Crane


(continued)
Movement:
Staying in the low squat, cross both hands in front of the chest, while bringing the right leg bent behind the left. Rise up on the left leg, as you raise the arms above the head, turning the palms out and then to the sides at shoulder level, palms facing down. Bring palms back in front of lower stomach and repeat on the other side.

Breathing:
Just breathe in a relaxed natural manner with this sequence, allowing the movement to determine the breath pattern.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the whole of this sequence.

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#Seven: Crane Spreads Wings Behind


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing.

Movement:
Begin with your hands in front of the lower stomach, palms facing away from each other. Open your arms wide to the sides in an arcing motion, stepping to the left at a 45-degree angle, keeping the weight on the back leg. Bring your arms in an arc back to the stomach. Repeat this sequence to the other side and continue to alternate.

Attention:
Place your attention in the centers of your palms for the entire sequence.

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#Eight: Crane Walk


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing.

Breathing:
When performing the walking sequences, breathe naturally without making an effort to link the inhale and exhale to a particular part of the movement, unless otherwise indicated.

Movement:
Step out with the left leg to the front, keeping the weight back on the right leg. Simultaneously, raise both arms out in front of the body to shoulder height and shoulder width, with the fingers and palms relaxed.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the entire sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Eight: Crane Walk


(continued)
Movement:
Shift the majority of the weight onto the left leg, while opening the arms to the side of the body, shoulder height, palms facing out. Shift majority of the weight onto the right leg, arcing the arms down to the sides of the torso and finally just behind the torso, palms facing back. While the weight is still on the right leg, turn the left foot out at a 45degree angle, then step forward with the right leg and repeat the whole sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the entire sequence.

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#Nine: Crane Walks Along the River Bank


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing.

Movement:
Step out with the left leg to the front, keeping your weight back on the right leg. Simultaneously, bend your waist slightly, turn the torso to the left, while moving the left arm behind the body, palm up, and extending the right arm to the front, palm up. Repeat movement to the other side.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the entire sequence.

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#Ten: Crane Takes-Off from the River Bank


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Crane Breathing.

Movement:
Step out with the left leg to the front, keeping your weight back on the right leg. Simultaneously, bend your waist slightly, turn the torso to the left, while moving the left arm behind the body, palm up, and extending the right arm to the front, palm up. Bring the left foot up to the right knee, put it back down then step forward with the right leg and repeat the whole sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Place your attention in the dantien for the entire sequence.

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Chapter 4

The Bear

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The Bear Frolic


Breathing: Breathe into the lower stomach, with slow, regular, "natural" breathing. Inhale to the front, exhale to the side, unless otherwise indicated. Repetitions: Traditionally, practice at least five repetitions of each movement. If time allows, or if you develop a special feeling or need for a particular form, do as many repetitions as you wish.

#One: Bear Turns


Initial postural alignment:
Seek to reduce the impact of gravity on your body to minimize tension and maximize a relaxed flow of energy through your system. Adopt a wide low leg stance, with your feet angled out at 45 degrees. The two photographs on the opposite page illustrate the range of stance from very low to relatively high. Distribute your weight equally across the whole of the foot. Keep the knees in line with the feet. Tuck the hips under. Relax the lower dantien or stomach area. Relax the upper chest and lower your shoulders. Pull your chin in slightly and extend your head up, elongating and opening up your cervical vertebrae. Place your tongue lightly against the roof of the mouth. Maintain a level gaze with a soft, 180-degree focus. Put the hint of a smile on your face and allow the smile to permeate your whole body.

(continued next page spread)

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#One: Bear Turns


(continued)
Movement:
The spirit of the bear encourages a deliberate, rooted, powerful style of movement. Place your arms, elbows bent, above your shoulders, as if holding a log. Keep the chest open by holding the arms out to the sides throughout the movement. Twist your upper torso slowly to the left without moving the hips, so you feel a squeeze in the kidney/adrenal region. Inhale as you return your torso to the front. Repeat the movement to the right side.

Attention:
Have your attention in the lower dantien for the whole sequence.

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#Two: Bear Pushes Behind


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Place your arms, elbows bent, above your shoulders, as if holding a log. Keep the chest open by holding the arms out to the sides throughout the movement. Turn your torso to the left and push your left hand, bent back at the wrist, behind at a 45-degree angle, shoulder height, looking at the back of the hand. Withdraw your hand to its original position on the inhalation. Repeat sequence to the other side and continue to alternate.

Attention:
Place the attention in the hand that is pushing out and pulling back. When pushing out, sense that is hard to push out, when pulling back in, sense a resistance attached to the hand. The idea is to use your consciousness to imbue your movement with a feeling of deliberate power. There is no need to deliberately tighten up the muscles, just create a mental intensity in the movement.

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#Three: Bear Pushes Down


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Place your arms, elbows bent, above your shoulders, as if holding a log. Keep the chest open by holding the arms out to the sides throughout the movement. Turn your torso to the left and push the left hand directly downwards, wrist bent back, looking at the back of the hand. Withdraw your hand to its original position on the inhalation. Repeat sequence to the other side and continue to alternate.

Attention:
Place the attention in the hand that is pushing down and pulling back. When pushing down, sense that is hard to push down, when pulling back up, sense a resistance attached to the hand. The idea is to use your consciousness to imbue your movement with a feeling of deliberate power. There is no need to deliberately tighten up the muscles, just create a mental intensity in the movement.

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#Four: Bear Puts Out Claws


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Place your palms facing up, just off the breastbone, opposite the middle dantien area. Extend the left hand to the left side, looking at the left fingertips, while the right hand goes to the inside of the left elbow. Withdraw your hands to their original position on the inhalation. Repeat sequence to the other side and continue to alternate.

Attention:
On the exhalation, place the attention on the fingertips of the extended palm. On the inhalation, place the attention in the middle of both palms.

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#Five: Bear Double Push


Initial postural alignment:
Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Place your palms facing up, just off the breastbone, opposite the middle dantien area. Bring both hands to the side of the left ribcage and push both hands out to the left side, palms bent back at the wrists, keeping both hands in the same plane. Withdraw your hands to their original position on the inhalation. Repeat sequence to the other side and continue to alternate.

Attention:
On the inhalation and exhalation, place the attention in the middle of both palms. As you push out, create a feeling of pressure against the hands.

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#Six: Bear Push To Ground


Breathing:
Breathe naturally, without a deliberate attempt to match the inhalation and exhalation to the movement.

Initial postural alignment:


Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Bring both hands to the side of the left ribcage and push both hands out to the left side, palms bent back at the wrists, keeping both hands in the same plane. Bend at the waist, relax the hands and circle the arms down and around to just outside of the right ankle.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the palms for the whole sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Six: Bear Push To Ground


(continued)
Movement:
Draw the hands up the side of the right leg and torso, about one inch off the body, until they reach the middle of the ribcage. Push the hands out to the right, palms bent back at the wrists, keeping both hands in the same plane. Repeat the sequence in the opposite direction.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the palms for the whole sequence.

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#Seven: Bear Pushes Back


Breathing:
Breathe naturally, without a deliberate attempt to match the inhalation and exhalation to the movement.

Initial postural alignment:


Follow the same instructions as for Bear Turns.

Movement:
Bring both hands to the side of the left ribcage and push both hands out to the left side, palms bent back at the wrists, keeping both hands in the same plane. Circle both arms to the front of the body at height of the breastbone, palms bent back at the wrists, tented in toward each other at a 45degree angle.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the palms for the whole sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Seven: Bear Pushes Back


(continued)

Movement:
Bend at the waist, relax the hands and circle the arms down and around to just outside of the right ankle. Draw the hands up the side of the right leg and torso, about one inch off the body, until they reach the middle of the ribcage. Push the hands out to the right, palms bent back at the wrists, keeping both hands in the same plane. As you push, shift your weight into the left leg, keeping the torso erect. Repeat the sequence in the opposite direction.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the palms for the whole sequence.

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#Eight: Bear Ambles through the Woods


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a shoulder-width leg stance, with your feet facing forwards. Place your hands on the front of the thighs.

Movement:
Step forward with the left leg. Twist torso to the left, over the left thigh, palms staying on the thighs. The torso inclines at about a 45-degree angle. Transfer about seventy percent of the weight into the front leg. Shift the majority of the weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out at a 45-degree angle, then step forward with the right leg repeating the move to the other side.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the lower dantien for the whole sequence. Maintain a "heavy", slow, ponderous, and deliberate feeling when practicing the walk.

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#Nine: Bear Walk With Fists


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat" stance, with the left foot in front, very light. Have all the weight on the back leg. Make light fists and hold them at the lower dantien.

Movement:
Shift the majority of the weight into the left leg. Twist torso to the left, over the left thigh. The torso inclines at about a 45-degree angle. Circle your left fist simultaneously in front of the chest at heart level, fist facing down, while the right arm simultaneously circles up to guard in front of and just above the forehead, fist and forearm facing out. Shift the majority of the weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out at a 45-degree angle, circling the fists back to the stomach. Step forward with the right leg and repeat the same sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the lower dantien for the whole sequence.

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#Ten: Pointing at the Sun, Holding up the Moon


Breathing:
Inhale on one step, exhale on the next step.

Initial postural alignment:


Adopt a "cat" stance, with the left foot in front, very light. Have all the weight on the back leg. Place the left hand, palm-up at upper chest level. Place the right hand palm-down at lower stomach level.

Movement:
Step forward with the right leg and switch hand positions, with each palm turning over and moving in the opposite direction. The weight is now completely in the left leg. Step forward with the left leg and repeat the same sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Move the attention up the front of the torso on the inhalation and down the front of the torso on the exhalation.

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#Eleven: Bear Plucking Berries


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat" stance, with the left foot in front, very light. Have all the weight on the back leg. Place the left hand, palm-up at upper chest level. Place the right hand palm-down at lower stomach level.

Movement:
Shift the weight into the left leg and put your right foot in front of and at right angles to the left toes. Simultaneously arc your right hand up above the left palm, with the right fingertips touching the left fingertips.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the lower dantien for the whole sequence.

(continued next page spread)

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#Eleven: Bear Plucking Berries


(continued)

Movement:
Shift your weight into the right foot, step behind the right foot with the left foot. Shift the weight into the left foot and pivot 180-degrees to the left. Simultaneously, circle the right hand up and allow the left hand to move in a pendulum-arc to face downwards at stomach level. You are now back in the starting position with the right instead of the left leg forward. Repeat the sequence in the other direction.

Attention:
Keep the attention in the lower dantien for the whole sequence.

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Chapter 5

The Monkey

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The Monkey Frolic


Breathing: Breathe into the lower stomach, with slow, regular, "natural" breathing. Repetitions: All of the Monkey sequences are walks. Perform as many repetitions of each step as you wish.

#One: Monkey Grasping Branch


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold loose fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
The spirit of the monkey encourages a light, springy, agile style of movement. Step forward with your left leg, stretching both arms out in front at shoulder level and shoulder width. Form curled "monkey paws" with the palms, as if grasping at branches. Extend the left arm slightly, while pulling the right palm close to the left elbow. Simultaneously turn your head to look back and up at 45-degrees, keeping most of the weight on the left leg. Bring loose fists in front of the stomach, shift your weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out 45 degrees, and step forward with the right leg, repeating the sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Monkey sequences.

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#Two: Monkey Looks Behind


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt same initial alignment as for Monkey Grasping Branch.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, stretching both arms out in front at shoulder level and shoulder width. Form curled "monkey paws" with the palms, as if grasping at branches. Extend the left arm slightly, while pulling the right palm close to the left elbow. Simultaneously turn your head to look back and up at 45-degrees, keeping most of the weight on the left leg. Place your right foot in front of the left, instep facing out, while circling the left hand over the top and the right hand down and behind. The left hand stops at chest level, palm facing out. Look back at the outstretched right palm. Bring loose fists in front of the stomach, shift your weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out 45 degrees, and step forward with the right leg, repeating the sequence to the other side.

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#Three: Monkey Offers Fruit


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt same initial alignment as for Monkey Grasping Branch.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, keeping the weight on the right leg. Move the left arm straight out in front and bring the right hand to the inside of the left elbow. Circle both arms, bringing the right arm into the extended position in front of the torso and the left palm by the inside of the right elbow, while stepping forward with the right leg. Continue this sequence to the other side.

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#Four: Monkey Offers Fruit, Variation A


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt same initial alignment as for Monkey Grasping Branch.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, keeping the weight on the right leg. Move the left arm straight out in front and bring the right hand to the inside of the left elbow. Circle both arms up, round, and in front of the body, palms facing up, slightly apart at shoulder height, while stepping forward with the right leg. Continue by repeating the circling movement while stepping forward with the left leg.

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#Five: Monkey Offers Fruit, Variation B


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt same initial alignment as for Monkey Grasping Branch.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, keeping the weight on the right leg. Move the left arm straight out in front and bring the right hand to the inside of the left elbow. Circle both arms up, round, and in front of the chin, heels of the palms touching, cupped in front of the face, while stepping forward with the right leg. Continue by repeating the movement while stepping forward with the left leg.

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#Six: Monkey Offers Fruit Twice


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt same initial alignment as for Monkey Grasping Branch.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, keeping the weight on the right leg. Move the left arm straight out in front and bring the right hand to the inside of the left elbow. Step up lightly with the right foot into a "post position"no weight on the right foot as it rests next to the left. At the same time bring your fists in near the chest and turn them to face away from the body.

(continued next page spread)

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#Six: Monkey Offers Fruit Twice


(continued)
Movement:
Take a small step with the right foot, separating and opening the hands as if opening a veil. Take a small step with the left foot while circling both arms up, round, and in front of the chin, heels of the palms touching, cupped in front of the face. Step forward with the right leg, circling both arms back into the original starting positionwith the right arm now extended and the left palm by the inside of the right elbow. Continue the whole sequence on the other side.

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84

Chapter 6

The Deer

85

The Deer Frolic


Breathing: Breathe into the lower stomach, with slow, regular, "natural" breathing. Repetitions: All of the Deer sequences, other than Deer Standing, are walks. Perform as many repetitions of each step as you wish.

#One: Deer Standing


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Extend your arms bent at 45 degrees in front of the chest, palms facing out.

Movement:
The spirit of the deer encourages a strong, alert and graceful style of movement. There is no movement as this is a standing posture. Hold the position on each side for a period of one to five minutes.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

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#Two: Deer Turns Head


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, stretching both arms out in front at shoulder level and shoulder width. Curve the wrists gently so the fingers angle down and the palms are relatively hollow. Extend the left arm slightly, while pulling the right palm close to the left elbow. Simultaneously turn your head to look back and up at 45 degrees, keeping most of the weight on the left leg. Bring loose fists in front of the stomach, shift your weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out 45 degrees, and step forward with the right leg, repeating the sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

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#Three: Deer Turns Head, (hand to dantien)


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, stretching both arms out in front at shoulder level and shoulder width. Curve the wrists gently so the fingers angle down and the palms are relatively hollow. Extend the left arm slightly, while pulling the right palm close to the left elbow. Continue by bringing your right hand in front of chest. Turn the right palm so it faces the floor and move it down to the lower stomach. Simultaneously turn your head to look back and up at 45 degrees, keeping most of the weight on the left leg. Bring loose fists in front of the stomach, shift your weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out 45 degrees, and step forward with the right leg, repeating the sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

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#Four: Deer Sips from Stream


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with your left leg, stretching both arms out in front at shoulder level and shoulder width. Curve the wrists gently so the fingers angle down and the palms are relatively hollow. Extend the left arm slightly, while pulling the right palm close to the left elbow. Continue by bringing your right hand in front of chest. Turn the right palm so it faces the floor and move it down to the lower stomach. Simultaneously turn your head to look back and up at 45 degrees, keeping most of the weight on the left leg.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

(continued next page spread)

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#Four: Deer Sips from Stream


(continued)

Movement:
Guide your right hand along the belt channel, one inch off the body and place your palm on the right hip. Keep your left arm extended out. While your weight is still mostly in the left leg, turn your right foot to a right-angle position and shift your weight back on to the right leg. Rotate your hips to the front and bend over to touch the front of the left ankle with your left hand.

(continued next page spread)

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#Four: Deer Sips from Stream


(continued)

Movement:
Bring your hands in front of the body, forming them into fists. Raise the fists to the level of the lower stomach. Shift your weight into the right leg, turn the left foot out 45 degrees, and step forward with the right leg, repeating the sequence to the other side.

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#Five: Stag Leaps Up


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Raise both fists above the head, while bringing the left foot up in front of the right knee. Step down, with the left instep facing out, placing the right knee into the left calf, and circling your fists down to the stomach. Repeat this sequence to the other side.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

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#Six: Wild Stag Twists and Sits


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step out to the left diagonal raising both fists up at 45 degrees. Place your right heel in front of the left foot, forming an L shape. Pivot on the ball of the left foot, bringing the left knee into the right calf. As the torso straightens up the arms will naturally move above the head.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

(continued next page spread)

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101

#Six: Wild Stag Twists and Sits


(continued)
Movement:
Bring the left foot into a T position in front of the right foot. Pivot both feet and the body through 270 degrees, to face back to the front. Place the left knee into the right calf.

(continued next page spread)

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103

#Six: Wild Stag Twists and Sits


(continued)

Movement:
Lean over to the right side with both fists extended out. Straighten up. Straighten up and uncoil all the way round to the front with the arms above the head. Finish by circling the fists down to the stomach. Repeat the whole sequence to the other side.

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#Seven: Deer Parts the Grasses


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold light fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with the left foot very light, your right arm extended in front, your left arm behind, wrists slightly bent, weight staying in the back leg. Step forward with the right leg, reversing the arm positions. Repeat this sequence as many times as you wish.

Attention:
Maintain your attention in the lower dantien for all of the Deer sequences.

106

107

108

Chapter 7

The Tiger

109

The Tiger Frolic


Breathing:
The Tiger lends itself well to "reverse breathing". As the name implies, the breathing style is the opposite of "natural breathing". Draw the stomach in on the inhalation and allow the stomach to expand on the exhalation. Reverse Breathing is very warming and energizing and also helps to push qi up the spine. According to many leading Tai Ji and Qigong teachers, Reverse Breathing should be employed judiciously, because of its power. Most of these teachers advocate the long-term, regular cultivation of Natural Breathing as the best strategy for overall health and vitality.

Repetitions:
All of the Tiger sequences are walks. Perform as many repetitions of each step as you wish.

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111

#One: Tiger Searches for Food


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold relaxed fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
The spirit of the tiger encourages a powerful, coiling, explosive style of movement. Step forward with the left foot, bringing your hands out at shoulder level in front, forming claws. Deliberately tighten and tense up as you make the claw movement. Relax as you bring your fists back to the stomach. Step forward to the other side and repeat the sequence.

Attention:
Place your attention at the Ming Men on the inhalation and the lower dantien on the exhalation for all of the Tiger sequences.

112

113

#Two: Tiger Seizes Prey


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold relaxed fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with the left foot, bringing your hands out at shoulder level in front, forming claws. At the last moment turn the claws to face down as if digging into a prey. Deliberately tighten and tense up as you make the claw movement. Relax as you bring your fists back to the stomach. Step forward to the other side and repeat the sequence.

Attention:
Place your attention at the Ming Men on the inhalation and the lower dantien on the exhalation for all of the Tiger sequences.

114

115

#Three: Tiger Leaps from Den


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold relaxed fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with the left foot, to the left diagonal, bringing your hands out at shoulder level in front, forming claws. At the last moment turn the claws to face down as if digging into a prey. Deliberately tighten and tense up as you make the claw movement. Shift your weight into the right leg and relax as you bring your fists back to the stomach. Shift the weight back into the left leg and draw the right foot in close to the left instep. Step forward to the right diagonal and repeat the sequence.

Attention:
Place your attention at the Ming Men on the inhalation and the lower dantien on the exhalation for all of the Tiger sequences.

116

117

#Four: Tiger Leaps from Den Twice


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Hold relaxed fists at the level of the lower dantien.

Movement:
Step forward with the left foot, to the left diagonal, bringing your hands out at shoulder level in front, forming claws. At the last moment turn the claws to face down as if digging into a prey. Deliberately tighten and tense up as you make the claw movement. Shift your weight into the right leg and relax as you bring your fists back to the stomach. Lift the left foot and step out further to the left diagonal, really stretching out the body. Shift your weight again into the right leg and relax as you bring your fists back to the stomach. Shift the weight back into the left leg and draw the right foot in close to the left instep. Step forward to the right diagonal and repeat the sequence.

Attention:
Place your attention at the Ming Men on the inhalation and the lower dantien on the exhalation for all of the Tiger sequences.

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#Five: Wild Tiger Roams the Steppes


Initial postural alignment:
Adopt a "cat stance" with the left foot in front and all the weight on the right leg. The right foot is turned out at a 45-degree angle. Place the right hand in a claw-gesture above and in front of body. Place the left hand in a claw-gesture down and behind the body.

Movement:
Step forward to the other side, switching the arms in a crawl-like circling movement. Continue to repeat, always keeping the weight in the back leg. Remain relaxed through out the movement.

Initial postural alignment:


Place your attention at the Ming Men on the inhalation and the lower dantien on the exhalation for all of the Tiger sequences.

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121

What Health Benefits Can You Expect from the Regular Practice of Qigong?
Improve your metabolism, digestion, and eliminationfor weight control, more youthful appearance, and balanced energy. Stimulate the lymph systemfor a stronger immune system. Be less susceptible to flus and other viruses, and recover faster if you do get sick. Improve your circulationalleviating conditions such as arthritis and chronic fatigue. Give your internal organs an inner massageretarding the aging process by restoring your organs to healthy functioning. Increase oxygen in the tissuesreducing tensions, blocks and stagnant energy. Lubricate the jointsfor pain free movement and greater flexibility. Soothe the nervous systemfor feelings of contentment and serenity.

John

Du Cane

How to stay informed of the latest information on qigong and health

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Visit www.dragondoor.com and sign up for John Du Canes free monthly e-newsletter, Qigong Secrets. Visit http://forum.dragondoor.com/ and participate in Dragon Doors stimulating and informative Forum. Post your qigong questions or comments and get quick feedback from John Du Cane and other leading qigong experts. Visit www.dragondoor.com and browse the Articles section and other pages for groundbreaking theories and products for improving your health and well being. Call Dragon Door Publications at 1-800-899-5111 and request your FREE Vitalics catalog of health books, DVDs, supplements and exercise equipment.

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Youve inherited a body that deserves and needs an even greater level of maintenance,

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If not, then John Du Canes Qigong Recharge provides you with a fast-start solutiona daily program of qigong and joint techniques to quickly release tension, enhance mobility and improve energy. Qigong Recharge is perfect as a stand-alone practice or as an energizing warm-up before martial arts, qigong or athletic workouts.

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Johns Animal Frolics DVDs and form workbook combine to present what I consider the MOST FRUITFUL INVESTMENT in instructional materials Ive ever made.
John Du Canes interpretation of The Five Animal Frolics makes the most ancient qigong form readily accessible to the contemporary practitioner. John offers solid, highly competent instruction direct from his martial arts studio. My students who have purchased Johns videos and/or form workbook upon my recommendation comment that the videos hold their interest upon repeated viewing; I agree. John is a classy, intelligent British man whose style is at once intense and engaging, unpretentious and compelling. Johns version of The Five Animal Frolics is complete and satisfying, with excellent sequencing. Johns detailed instructions make even the most complex movement doable. Multiple repetitions mean that one need not endlessly rewind the tape to learn The Frolics. For learning the Animal Frolics walk, it is most useful that John presents the movements facing the camera, followed by turning his back to the viewer; one feels that one is in Johns studio following right behind him. The presentation of the video series is attractive and well organized, according the energetic state one wishes to enter: serenity, vitality, power. This choice of packaging in and of itself conveys the practitioners ability to change his or her inner landscape by moving through The Frolics. In addition, the health and fitness benefits of The Frolics are numerous. I wish every man reluctant to try qigong would watch these tapes to see the combination of strength and ease in his body that John exemplifies. The muscularity of his legs is a true testimonial to the strengthening aspect of practicing The Five Animal Frolics. The Five Animal Frolics form workbook is a marvelous accompaniment to the videotapes. The photos and instruction are exceptionally well presented and easy to follow. As a teacher, I appreciate the supplemental material presented in the workbook, which helps me and my students refine our Animal Frolics practice. When I travel I take along the workbook for easy reference. Johns Animal Frolics videos and form workbook combine to present what I consider the most fruitful investment in instructional materials Ive ever made. Nancy K. Herzberg, Qigong/yoga/stretching instructor, Florence, OR The videos and book on the Five Animals Frolics are models of instruction: John Du Cane talks you through and demonstrates the exercises in such a way that you think he is in front of you and that you are in a class of one. You can do the exercises along with him on a regular basis. The book that accompanies the videos has sharp, clear photos of each exercise, and the text reinforces the photos with to-the-point instruction. For ease of use, the book will lie completely flat. The book is very useful for overview, review, reminders, and class organization. Together, the videos and the book put the valuable Five Animals Frolics in the working knowledge of every martial artist, especially those who don't have the opportunity to learn them from such a well-qualified instructor as John Du Cane. In short, these videos and book are MUST-HAVES. Get them! Steve Condry, Tai Chi player (Cheng Man-Ching style), Knoxville, TN My experience with The Five Animal Frolics helps me to embrace the deep serenity within, the ability to raise or move the energyespecially with the spleen, liver, kidney, lung and thyroid areas. After doing all five animal frolics, I am left with a balance of inner currents flowing from head to toe, circulating simultaneously. I am left with an inner hum. Many thanks to John Du Cane for presenting these materials into an easily assimilated form. Sharon Sweet, Oregon The Animal Frolics involve a great number of good stretches along with different energies. Crane was calming. Monkey was energizing. Tiger gave great warmth to upper back and shoulder. The breathing is very beneficial to me. I am 74 with arthritis. Most of the movements hurt some while I did them, but no pain laterjust energy and more flexibility. I am improving my range of energy. One night, I couldnt sleep, because my nose stopped up so I wasnt breathing. I did a deer walk for about ten minutes. My head cleared and I went back to sleep. I intend to continue with these as they are beneficial to making me more flexible and pain-free. Patricia Romanov, Oregon The Animal Frolics gave me lots of kinetic energy and made me feel ready to meet the world with renewed strength. Ginny Kelly, Oregon I find that The Animal Frolics are a particularly effective way to wake up to/be in my body. I love feeling connected with the natural world. Because each animal gives access to a clearly differentiated energy pattern, I can rely on the movements to bring me back into balance however that needs to happen -whether with bear, tiger, crane, deer and/or monkey. And they are fun! Judy Child, Oregon

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ver the centuries, the ancient martial art of Tai Chi Chuan, better known as Tai Chi, has exerted an almost magnetic influence for millions of seekers, attracted to its promise of physical resilience, emotional well being and spiritual illumination.

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Graham Horwood first started martial arts in 1963 with Judo and Wado Ryu Karate, under the auspices of Tatsui Suzuki. In 1969 he studied Aikido and Tai Chi Chuan, then Hung Gar. In 1977 Graham began his relationship with Master Chu King Hung, 3rd adopted son of Yang Shou Cheung. Yang Shou Cheung was the eldest son of Yang Cheng Fu. Master Chu is considered to be the world's leading authority on Family Yang Style Tai Chi. Graham spent 10 years practicing and teaching with Master Chu, who informed him that he was the first of his students to understand the internal principles of Tai Chi. He also learnt Hsing I and Pa Qua with Master Chu and Grand Master Hon Sing Wun. Graham has studied and practiced herbal, complementary and Traditional Chinese Medicine since 1969. He presently teaches Tai Chi Chuan in the U.K.

Emblematic of Chinas greatest traditions in philosophical and religious enquiry, there is a grand, elusive mystique to Tai Chi that seems to transcend its apparent emphasis on self-defense and good health. What, really, is the basis for this enduring appeal? Why has Tai Chi become so popular in the West? And what benefits can we really expect from its practice? In Tai Chi Chuan and the Code of Life, Graham Horwood brilliantly explores these and many other questions. Horwood demonstrates how Tai Chi links not only to the I Ching, to Taoism and to Chinese alchemy, but also to the greatest traditions of both Western alchemy and modern science. A portrait emerges of Tai Chi as a dynamic blueprint for the true functioning of the universe. To practice Tai Chi correctly is to directly embody the great universal truths as they naturally unfold in our daily lives. But what is correct Tai Chi practice? Moving beyond the theory, Horwoods Tai Chi Chuan and the Code of Life reveals deeply practical techniques, drawn from the Yang Familys formerly secret teachings, on how to optimize ones energetic and spiritual development. Without this kind of specialized knowledge, Tai Chi is unlikely to reward you with its most powerful benefits. A treasure for novice and seasoned practitioner alike, Tai Chi Chuan and the Code of Life makes a welcome and far-ranging contribution to our understanding and practice of this mysterious discipline.

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Own an illustrated guide to the thirty-six most effective techniques for super-flexibility How the secret of mastering your emotions can add immediate inches to your stretch How to wait out your tensionthe surprising key to greater mobility and a better stretch How to fool your reflexes into giving you all the stretch you want Why contract-relax stretching is 267% more effective than conventional relaxed stretching How to breathe your way to greater flexibility Using the Russian technique of Forced Relaxation as your ultimate stretching weapon How to stretch when injuredfaster, safer ways to heal Young, old, male, femalelearn what stretches are best for you and what stretches to avoid Why excessive flexibility can be detrimental to athletic performanceand how to determine your real flexibility needs Plateau-busting strategies for the chronically inflexible.

"Pavel is the leading proponent of applied flexibility training at work in the field today. His ideas are dynamic and fresh. He shows the serious-minded fitness devotee another avenue of improvement. Real knowledge for real people interested in real progress."Marty Gallagher, WashingtonPost.com columnist, World Masters Powerlifting Champion "Pavel has great ideas on flexibility and strength exercises."Bill Superfoot Wallace, M.Sc., World Kickboxing Champion "Conventional stretching attempts to literally elongate your tissues, which is dangerous and ineffective. Relax into Stretch simply teaches your muscles to relax into a stretch. If you compare traditional training to a messy hardware reorganization, then Relax into Stretch is an efficient software upgrade. While stretching tissues may take years, changes in the nervous system are immediate! Your muscles will start noticeably elongating from your first Relax into Stretch practiceand within months you will have achieved a level of flexibility uncommon to our species."Pavel Tsatsouline

The Relax into Stretch drills 1. The Souped Up Toe Touch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 49 2. The Spine Decompression Hang . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 51 3. The Improved Cobra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 54 4. The Side Bend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 57 5. The Spine Rotation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 60 6. The Lateral Neck and Trap Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 61 7. The Headache Buster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 62 8. The Anti-Slouch Neck Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 63 9. The Head Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 64 10. The Chest Opener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 65 11. The Overhead Reach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 67 12. The Biceps and Shoulder Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 68 13. The Shoulder Blade and Lat Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 69 14. The Upper Back Loosener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 71 15. The Wrist Flexion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 73 16. The Wrist Extension . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 74 17. The Good Morning Hamstring Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 75 a) standing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 75 b) seated on a chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 76 c) seated on the floor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 77

18. The Kneeling Hip Flexor Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 78 19. TheLunge Hip Flexor Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 80 20. The Karate Stance Hip Flexor Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 82 21. The Karate Stance Groin Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 84 22. The Seated Groin Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 86 23. The Calf Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 89 24. The Shin and Instep Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 91 Advanced Russian Drills for Extreme Flexibility 25. The Side Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 100 26. The Cossack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 102 27. The Reverse Cossack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 104 28. The Hip and Side Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 106 29. The Crawling Lizard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 108 30. Hamstring Stretches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 109 31. Hip Flexor/Quad Stretches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 114 32. The Lower Calf Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 117 33. The Front Split . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 118 34. The Bent Press Stretch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 123 35. The Modified Reverse Triangle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 126 36. The Roadkill Split . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 128 37. The Side Split . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Page 131

Make it Easy on Yourself to be Flexible Fast!


Pavels companion videos, Relax into Stretch and Forced Relaxation, guarantee you effortlessly master every secret for super-flexibilityso you achieve the limber, stretched-out look and high performance body you always wanted.
Pavel is the leading proponent of applied flexibility training at work in the field today. His ideas are dynamic and fresh. He shows the serious-minded fitness devotee another avenue of improvement. Real knowledge for real people interested in real progress. Marty Gallagher, Washington Post.com columnist, World Masters Powerlifting Champion
O NOW N ! DVD

Relax into Stretch


Instant Flexibility Through Mastering Muscle Tension By Pavel Tsatsouline
Running time: 37 minutes Video #V104 $29.95 DVD #DV006 $29.95

Forced Relaxation
Advanced Russian Drills for Extreme Flexibility By Pavel Tsatsouline
Running time: 21 minutes $24.95 Video #V105 DVD #DV007 $24.95

Relax Video or DVD Set:

24 HOURS A DAY FAX YOUR ORDER (866) 280-7619

18008995111

Relax into Stretch & Forced Relaxation $49.95 Video set #VS7 DVD set #DVS002

$49.95

Relax Book and Video Set:


Relax into Stretch book and Relax into Stretch/Forced Relaxation videos $79.95 #VBS1

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O R D E R I N G I N F O R M AT I O N
Customer Service Questions? Please call us between 9:00am 11:00pm EST Monday to Friday at 1-800-899-5111. Local and foreign customers call 513-346-4160 for orders and customer service 100% One-Year Risk-Free Guarantee. If you are not completely satisfied with any productfor any reason, no matter how long after you received itwell be happy to give you a prompt exchange, credit, or refund, as you wish. Simply return your purchase to us, and please let us know why you were dissatisfiedit will help us to provide better products and services in the future. Shipping and handling fees are non-refundable. Telephone Orders For faster service you may place your orders by calling Toll Free 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days per year. When you call, please have your credit card ready.

24 HOURS A DAY FAX YOUR ORDER (866) 280-7619

18008995111

Complete and mail with full payment to: Dragon Door Publications, P.O. Box 1097, West Chester, OH 45071

Please print clearly

Please print clearly

Warning to foreign customers:


B
The Customs in your country may or may not tax or otherwise charge you an additional fee for goods you receive. Dragon Door Publications is charging you only for U.S. handling and international shipping. Dragon Door Publications is in no way responsible for any additional fees levied by Customs, the carrier or any other entity.

Sold To:

SHIP TO: (Street address for delivery)

Name__________________________________ Street __________________________________ City ___________________________________ State ______________________ Zip ________ Day phone*_____________________________ * Important for clarifying questions on orders ITEM # QTY. ITEM DESCRIPTION

Name___________________________________ Street __________________________________ City ____________________________________ State ______________________ Zip ________ Email ___________________________________ ITEM PRICE A OR B TOTAL

HANDLING AND SHIPPING CHARGES NO CODS


$100.00 to $129.99 add $12.00 $130.00 to $169.99 add $14.00 $170.00 to $199.99 add $16.00 $200.00 to $299.99 add $18.00 add $20.00 $300.00 and up Canada & Mexico add $8.00. All other countries triple U.S. charges.
Total Amount of Order Add: $00.00 to $24.99 add $5.00 $25.00 to $39.99 add $6.00 $40.00 to $59.99 add $7.00 $60.00 to $99.99 add $10.00

Total of Goods Shipping Charges Rush Charges Kettlebell Shipping Charges OH residents add 6% sales tax MN residents add 6.5% sales tax TOTAL ENCLOSED

METHOD OF PAYMENT ___CHECK ___M.O. ___MASTERCARD ___VISA ___DISCOVER ___AMEX Account No. (Please indicate all the numbers on your credit card) EXPIRATION DATE

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SIGNATURE

)
DATE

NOTE: We ship best method available for your delivery address. Foreign orders are sent by air. Credit card or International M.O. only. For rush processing of your order, add an additional $10.00 per address. Available on money order & charge card orders only.
Errors and omissions excepted. Prices subject to change without notice.
DDP 06/04