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Jacksonville Review Page 2 April 2013
740 E. C alifornia, Jac ks onville
$279,900
3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths
1870 S quare Feet • .35 Ac res
Private s etting. S late Floor.
Water feature. Overs ized 2 c ar
garage RV Parking. In- ground pool
3650 Ros s L n C entral Point
$479,000
4 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
3000 S quare Feet • 2.910 Ac res
Gated Drive
In- ground pool add Tennis C ourt,
Pond & privac y
4350 E Barnett Rd. Medford
$1,350,000
6 Bedroom • 4.5 Baths
5953 S quare Feet • 7.56 Ac res
Fis h Pond, 5 C ar Garage, Travertine
& Hardwood floors , Outdoor
Kitc hen, s team s hower...
8150 Old S tage Rd
C entral Point
$429,000
4 Bedrooms • 3 Baths
2690 S quare Feet • 2.49 Ac res
Gated drive, s hop, s torage
3 C ar Gar, lots of extras
23251 Ventura L n,
C entral Point
$299,000
3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
2192 S quare Feet • 2.32 Ac res
C ountry S etting, Amazing Views
Bring your hors es .
3450 Dark Hallow Rd, Medford
$250,000
Dark Hollow C ountry Es tates .
Build Your Dream Home.
4.81 ac res , paved drive & gated
entry. Per owner 60 GPM well and
s and filter s ys tem ins talled,
underground utilities .
760 L aurel L n, Jac ks onville
$529,000
4 Bedrooms • 3 Baths
3389 S quare Feet
Gary S haw C us tom Home
Near Woodland J'ville Hiking Trail
& Britt. Butlers Pantry, Gues t S uite
11847 Upper Applegate Rd
Applegate
$449,900
3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths
2420 S quare Feet • 5.09 Ac res
Vaulted C eilings , Gas Fireplac e
Finis hed Garage & Works hop
"Finding YOU & your family & friends the right property at the right price."
#1 Real Estate
Broker in
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for John L Scott
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Doug Morse MAR 2013:Doug Morse MAR 3/21/13 6:17 PM Page 1
Jacksonville Review Page 3 April 2013
by Whitman Parker, Publisher My View
Many women suffer in silence with
urinary incontinence, a common
and distressing condition.

The good news is much can be
done to improve this condition.
Providence Urogynecology Center offers the most comprehensive
program for incontinence and pelvic foor disorders in southern
Oregon. We have the only fellowship trained urogynecologist in the
region, along with incontinence experts and a dedicated pelvic foor
physical therapist. Our team of specialists can help you regain control.
www.ProvidenceOregon.org/so/women
Call today to learn the
treatment options available
for your condition.
541-732-7460
Urinary
Incontinence
More common and
treatable than you think
Publishers:
Whitman & Jo Parker
Print Layout & Design:
Andrea Yancey
Mail: PO Box 1114
Visit: 235 E. Main Street
(above Gogi's)
Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-9500 Ofce
541-601-1878 Cell
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
production@jacksonvillereview.com
Website & Kiosk: Jo Parker
jo@jacksonvillereview.com
Te Review is printed locally
by Valley Web Printing
Jacksonville Publishing LLC
JacksonvilleReview.com
Advertising available!
Contact us for rates
and options.
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rw_WH_Jacksonville_686x5.indd 1 2/19/13 2:31 PM
This Month's Cover Photographer – Jym Duane
"I grew up in picturesque
Pennsylvania. As a young boy I was
always composing my world around
me in images and was constantly
drawing things I saw in my mind and
on paper. I noticed everything and
remembered it well, admiring the outdoors and scenery
and also artwork of all kinds. My other passions were
science and later music. Today I enjoy all three by
creating music, capturing images and designing media.
I love to photograph all subjects. Jacksonville and
Southern Oregon are a photographer’s dream come true.
I shoot at local events, local businesses, family events and
weddings, as well as concerts and car shows to name a
few. Images of many local events and scenery and area
and town can be seen on JymDuanePhotography.com,
and all are available to the public to view. You may see
yourself there at a parade or hike.
I am currently one of many fne artists at The
Creator's Gallery in Jacksonville where my fne art
photography is featured. I ofer photography and photo
design services there as well as large format printing.
I would like to say that photography is really about
capturing what is happening right before us, the
creation in the moment, how grateful I am each day
that our Creator lets me be present at the moment
something grand is happening and to capture that
image, whether in nature or with people an events, it is
creation and life in motion, a grand canvas that reveals
endless images to capture and treasure forever."
W
ithin an hour or so, I will have completed
this column which is always my fnal task
before the newest issue of the Review is sent
to Valley Web, our printer. Although I’m stuck behind
my desk for the time being, I know it’s worth it because
my next “tasks” will be taking my dog Annie on a nice
long walk through the woods and then atending to
some garden chores. After that, Jo and I have dinner
planned at home to catch-up with friends we haven’t
seen in a while. I know you are thinking it’s a rough life
here in Jacksonville and that it’s a good thing there are
people willing to bear theses burdens!
Seriously, when you stop for a moment and take a
good look around, you must admit we have much to
be thankful for here in this micro-village of a town!
This spring, I hope you will take advantage of some of
the fun and interesting activities going on and hit the
Rising Stars music competition on Saturday afternoons
at South Stage Cellars, join the Jacksonville Woodlands
Association Annual Hike-a-Thon, take in an art exhibit
at the Art Presence Center, get to the Rogue Valley
Food and Wine Festival, atend a Saturday Workshop
in the Cemetery, take-in Movie Night at Old City Hall,
visit one of the 20+ wineries in the Applegate Valley
and surrounding area, and have a great meal at one of
Jacksonville’s restaurants...so get moving and get out
and enjoy life in Our Small Town with Big Atmosphere!
Jacksonville Review Page 4 April 2013
Dr. Jason Williams
Chiropractic Physician
580 Blackstone Alley
Jacksonville, Oregon
(541) 899-2760
JACKSONVILLE
WOODLANDS
ASSOCIATION
Begins: 9:30 a.m. - Food 12:00 p.m.
Courthouse Square
Saturday April 20, 2013
20th Annual Jacksonville
Sponsor - Jacksonville Chiropractic Clinic
Impact ing Li ves Through
Healt hy Hiking
Hike-A-Thon Cover.indd 1 2/25/13 11:10 PM
JOIN US!
Help preserve the Jacksonville
Woodlands by joining Jana Jensen of
Cycle Analysis and Dr. Williams at
this community event.
JACKSONVILLE
WOODLANDS
ASSOCIATION
Begins: 9:30 a.m. - Food 12:00 p.m.
Courthouse Square
Saturday April 20, 2013
20th Annual Jacksonville
Sponsor - Jacksonville Chiropractic Clinic
Impact ing Li ves Through
Healt hy Hiking
Hike-A-Thon Cover.indd 1 2/25/13 11:10 PM
JACKSONVILLE
WOODLANDS
ASSOCIATION
Begins: 9:30 a.m. - Food 12:00 p.m.
Courthouse Square
Saturday April 20, 2013
20th Annual Jacksonville
Sponsor - Jacksonville Chiropractic Clinic
Impact ing Li ves Through
Healt hy Hiking
Hike-A-Thon Cover.indd 1 2/25/13 11:10 PM
Proud Co-Sponsors
Begins: 9:30 a.m.
For more info call: 541-899-7402
“Impacting Lives through Healthy
Hiking” is the theme of the Jacksonville
Woodlands Association 20th Annual Hike-
a-Thon. The event is on Saturday, April
20. The public is invited to join the JWA
for an informative half-day program that
starts with registration at 9:30am, followed
by a short presentation by JWA Executive
Director Larry Smith at 10:00am. At
10:45am, those wishing to take the narrated
hike will depart from the Courthouse
grounds and return at noon for lunch.
The JWA has shifted venues this year and
is holding the Hike-a-Thon on the historic
Courthouse lawn near the intersection of
5th Street and California Street. Atendees
will be treated to brief stories told by
everyday trail users about how the trail
system impacts their daily life.
Not only will Hike-A-Thon atendees
be treated to an informative program and
a narrated hike, a picnic lunch will be
ofered to those who pay the suggested
$15 Hike-A-Thon registration fee.
The 2013 narrated hike features an
introduction to an 11-acre parcel of land
purchased by the city in 2010, unofcially
called the “Galpin Cemetery Addition.”
The hike will traverse portions of a
longstanding circular-looped trail to
the west of the cemetery grounds. After
hikers leave the Courthouse grounds and
make their way to the entrance of the
Cemetery on North Oregon Street, they
will proceed west and pick-up the Old
Catholic Wagon Trail which connects
to the Galpin loop trail. Although not
ofcially a JWA trail yet, the Galpin
trail is as scenic as other woodlands
trails, ofering great views set amidst
Madrone and pine trees, with abundant
wildfowers including Jacksonville’s
famous Fritilaria Gentneri. The nicely
contoured and well-maintained loop trail
ofers easy walking and connectivity to
the Pair-a-Dice Ranch and Mary Ann
Drive section of town and is a must-see
for active hikers.
Hikers will be back to the Courthouse
square in plenty of time for a picnic lunch
provided by Dr. Jason and Jacqueline
Williams of Jacksonville Chiropractic Clinic.
By spending the day in the Woodlands
and enjoying the scenic beauty of Historic
Jacksonville, you will be helping the JWA
preserve the natural and cultural history of
Jacksonville. 100% of all money raised at the
event will be used to continue preserving
Jacksonville’s rich history and heritage.
At the Courthouse, ever-popular custom
cofee mugs crafted by Jacksonville artists
Ray Foster and Warren Straus will be
ofered for sale. Following the event, Anne
Brooke and her group, Art Presence, will
hold open the Art Presence Gallery where
atendees may view paintings of wild
fowers and woodland-themed art. And,
artists will have handmade walking sticks
available for purchase during and after the
Hike-A-Thon.
Those wishing to register in advance
are encouraged to send their $15 check
payable to Jacksonville Woodlands
Association, P.O. Box 1210, Jacksonville,
Oregon 97530. For more information on
the event, please contact Larry Smith at
541-899-7402 or email info@jvwoodlands.org.
Since 1989, the Jacksonville Woodlands
has preserved 290 acres of historic woodlands
formed from 22 land parcels and has developed
16 miles of hiking trails, all within the
Jacksonville Woodlands Historic Natural
Park and Trail System. Our thanks go to
our supporters and members for helping to
preserve Jacksonville’s historic woodlands. If
you cannot atend this year’s Hike-A-Thon
please consider sending a tax-deductible
contribution to the address above.
Jacksonville Woodlands Association
2013 Hike-a-Thon to Explore New Trail
Photo: Jym Duane Photography
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 5 April 2013
Trail Talk
by Tony Hess and Bob Budesa
A
h, the weather is fnally
warming up, and you’re ready
to lace up the boots and hit the
trails! Good show! I reckon you’ll not be
alone in your search for peace and quiet
though – you’re sure to encounter other
like-minded folks out there too, especially
during the Jacksonville Woodlands
Association Hike-a-thon on April 20th!
I know most of you were brought
up right, knowing the proper way to
conduct yourselves while enjoying our
great trail system. But just in case, or for
those raised by wolves, here are a few
things to keep in mind:
• If you bring it in, take it out when
you leave. Clothing, food wrappers,
beverage containers, whatever! It
doesn’t belong out in the woods, no
mater how far you throw it! If you
happen to fnd liter left by others,
please pick it up and take it to the
trash receptacle at the trailhead.
• If your dog brings it in, take it out
when you leave, and carry it with
you after you bag it. I can’t recall
the number of times I’ve picked up
litle black bags of poop left along the
trail. I don’t know if the ‘owner’ was
intending to return via the same route
and pick it up on the way out or not.
• Keep your dogs on leashes! Signs
have been posted for years, but for
some reason, this rule only applies
to certain people. I’ve heard all
the excuses, or reasons your dog
doesn’t need to be leashed (“Oh,
he wouldn’t hurt anyone!” “He
stays with me all the time!” “What
harm does it cause?”) Most of you
are missing the point. Easements
allowed by private land owners and
those administered by Southern
Oregon Land Conservancy (SOLC)
stipulate this requirement. If these
simple requirements are violated,
easements can be rescinded, and the
trail system could be shut down!
On top of that, rangers armed with
ticket books occasionally roam the
woodland trails, and citations can
and will be issued!
• Don’t carve on trees, benches, or
signs. There are a few who can’t help
but leave a calling card of some shape
or description, but shouldn’t. Please
refrain from this practice.
• Stay on the trails. If the trails are
too muddy to hike on, then don’t!
Find some other place to hike, or
fnd something else to do. You know
when the trails will be too mucky to
hike on—after days of rain or snow.
Give the soil a chance to absorb the
moisture, and for the surface to dry
out before heading out again. It can’t
be pleasant sloshing and sliding
around in conditions like this, so give
the trails a break!
• Stop creating short-cuts from one trail
to another, or on switchbacks! How
tough can it be to walk the litle extra
distance? And aren’t you out there to
get some exercise anyway?
• If you ride your bike, please ride
cautiously. Although not a good idea,
some hikers wear earphones to listen
to music (really?), and can’t hear you
approach. Don’t skid around corners,
or lock up your brakes on downhill
sections. If it’s too steep, walk your
bike until it levels out. And if it’s
muddy and wet, ride someplace else.
You’re not helping the trails.
• If you see someone violating any
of the rules listed above, or doing
something you KNOW to be wrong,
do something about it. Don’t just
walk by. If violations continue,
certain uses can and will be dis-
allowed. These are your trails and
your responsibility is to help take
care of them!
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and thyroid conditions.
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Grants Pass, OR 97527
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��ENDG���_JR
Asante Physi ci an Partners Asantee Physi ci an Partners
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Photo: Jym Duane Photography
Jacksonville Review Page 6 April 2013
The Jacksonville Garden Club’s 28th
Annual Flower and Bake Sale will be
held on Friday, May 10, and Saturday,
May 11, from 10:00am-2:00pm near the
Post Ofce in downtown Jacksonville. The
sale will feature unusual plants as well
as beautiful bouquets and arrangements
created from fresh-cut fowers, just in
time for Mother’s Day. Cookies, brownies,
breakfast pastries, and other home-baked
goods to feast on will also be available
for purchase. Susan Casaleggio, Club
President, says, “Our members have a
wonderful gift for creating interesting and
lovely arrangements at very reasonable
prices, and all the proceeds go to support
good causes in the Rogue Valley.” Money
raised from Garden Club activities
provides scholarships to local young
people studying in related felds and also
supports local beautifcation projects at
the Peter Brit Garden, Doc Grifn Park,
and the Jacksonville Post Ofce.
Plan to visit the Spring Flower and Bake
Sale on May 10 or 11, and bring home
some spring beauty and sweet treats!
For more information about the Spring Sale or
Jacksonville Garden Club events, please contact
President Susan Casaleggio, 541-899-2029.
Photo: Jeanena Whitewilson
Save The Dates: Jacksonville Garden Club
Spring Flower and Bake Sale
Petra Irwin of Jacksonville Garden Club
This April, Mark
& Linda Medeiros
are celebrating their
7th-Anniversary at
White’s Country
Farm on West Main
Street, just outside
Jacksonville. Before
opening the farm
store market, both
were with Cartwright
Meats in Grants Pass where Mark was
the produce manager. Today, White’s
ofers an extensive inventory of farm-
fresh produce, a full-line of British goods,
locally-made pies, breads, jams, artisan
baked goods, salad dressings, sauces and
much, much more.
“The best part of our business venture
has been making friends with so many
of our customers and being a part of the
local community,” Linda says. Mark
notes, “We really enjoy working directly
with the local
farmers and being
an outlet for them
by bringing their
produce and fruit
directly to our
customers who
want the best
local products
they can fnd.”
In addition,
Linda pays homage to her British heritage
by ofering an extensive array of British
products and groceries. “We’ve expanded
our line of imported teas, biscuits, candies
and other British favorites to include
frozen Cornish pasties, pork pies and
more. And, we still have the best price in
the valley on PG Tips tea!”
Find White’s Country Farm at 3939 West
Main, just outside the Jacksonville city limits,
online at www.whitescountryfarm.com, on
Facebook, or call 541-773-8031.
White's Country Farm Celebrates 7th Anniversary!
Wine Hopper Tours – Showcasing the Best
of the Southern Oregon Wine Region
S
ure, we locals know what a
versatile region we live in, and
if you enjoy wine you are aware
of the diverse wines that are produced
nearby. But visitors to our region seemed
to be in need of a jumping-of point to
help make their wine journey happen.
With that in mind, in 2011, Brad Niva,
owner of local rafting company called
“Rogue Wilderness Adventures,” got
a wild idea, did a litle research, and
started to make something happen. The
vision began after a conversation with
an area lodging concierge who thought
there must be something more out there
for her guests in the way of wine tours.
From this conversation, Wine Hopper
Tours was born last year—this spring
they’re kicking of their second season.
“The focus of our tours is to showcase
the Southern Oregon Wine industry and
basically tell the story about our wines
from grape to glass,” explains Niva.
“A great tour is basically a story telling
experience and our local wine region is a
really good story.”
The tour engages one of the vineyard
owners or managers who teach Wine
Hopper guests about things such as
soils, aspect, varieties, and climate.
Tasting commences along with a light
snack, providing guests ample time to
purchase favorite wines.
Next, the tour is guided through
another winery’s barrel room where
one hears about the nuances involved
in creating remarkable wines. Tasting
follows with a light lunch and
opportunities to accumulate more wines.
The tour makes two more stops with
a chance to connect with the vintners
about the strengths of their wines and
what new things they may be working
on. Snacks, tastings, and purchases
round-out this stop before being
delivered to the pick-up point for each
guest. Along the way, guests interact
with winery owners and staf, ask
questions, while listening and learning
as they tour.
Tours depart daily with pick-ups at
the Ashland Springs Hotel at 10:00am,
then the Harry & David Country Store
in Medford at 10:20am, and fnally in
Downtown Jacksonville at 10:30am.
After meeting their driver/guide, guests
hop on the Wine Hopper, a super-
comfortable, custom Mercedes Sprinter
van that can seat up to 13 guests and
hold 20 cases of wine. Cost is $79 per
person and features four wineries,
tastings, lunch and transportation. Most
wineries also ofer Wine Hopper guests
a discount on the tour if they choose to
purchase wine along the way.
The van departs the wine region around
4:00pm and drops guests of between
4:15pm and 5:00pm, giving them plenty of
time to relax before an evening play, Brit
concert, or fne dining experience.
Wine Hopper Tours also ofers other
tours besides a daily tour. New this year
will be an Evening Rogue Valley Tour
highlighting a number of wineries that
are open in the evenings. The tour will
not include tastings or food, but will
ofer transportation between wineries
that ofer evening tastings. The Wine
Hopper Mercedes Benz will be available
for 2-13 people for a three-hour excursion
for $200 and is perfect for ofce groups,
birthday celebrations, anniversary
parties and other special occasions. Also
available is a Rogue River Evening Wine
Float operated by Rogue Wilderness
Adventures for $110 per guest where
guests take an evening rafting trip down
through Hellgate Canyon with wine
tastings and light appetizers served.
For more information, phone (855) 550-
WINE, or visit winehoppertours.com.
See ad on page 3.
Expanding
to meet your needs
We’re expanding our
services to give you
even more choices.

Open MRI technology,
now at our new
Central Point location.
CLARI TY WHEN I T MATTERS MOST
Now at three convenient locations
www.oaimaging.com
541-608-0350
We already offer the largest and most
sophisticated selection of MRI technology
in the region. Now we’re adding even more
options. Why? Because meeting every
patient’s individual needs is our priority.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 7 April 2013
Focus on the Farm by
Kerri Hecox, Hanley Farm Volunteer
A
t Hanley Farm, March literally
went out like a lamb—make
that a litle black lamb, four
kids, and still counting...yes, baby animals
are being born at Hanley! New this season
at the farm are a fock of sixteen Icelandic
sheep and a herd of seven goats, from
whom more than two dozen babies are
expected over the course of the summer.
The prospect of baby animals frolicking
on the hillside is an exciting one for both
farmers and visitors alike,
and there will be a special
viewing pasture so visitors
can see the babies up-close
during events. In addition
to their mothers, watching
over the young ones are
the farm’s two new guard
donkeys, Frito and Slim,
who use their loud brays
and powerful front legs to
ward of predators. Guard
donkeys are becoming
increasingly popular on
farms, as donkeys get
along well with other
grazers but have a ferce dislike for
canines, and will charge any stray dog
or coyote that comes too close. Come
out and see these wonderful creatures at
upcoming events this season!
Sixth Annual Heritage Plant Sale and
Mother’s Day Tea, May 11-12—Once
again this year, Historic Hanley Farm
is hosting its annual heritage plant sale,
where discriminating gardeners can fnd
vegetable starts, fruit trees, herbs and
ornamentals. The plant sale had record
atendance last year, so mark the 10:00am
start time on your calendar to arrive
for choice selection. The sale continues
until 3:00pm on Saturday, and tours of
the Hanley gardens will be given from
1:00-3:00pm. On Sunday, plant sales will
continue and we will also be serving a
special Mother’s Day Tea, from 11:00am-
3:00pm. Bring Mom out for a truly
memorable afternoon and a unique way
to say “thank you” for all she has done.
House and garden tours will be given
from 12:00-3:00pm on Sunday.
Children’s Heritage Fair Public Day,
June 1—The Children’s Heritage Fair just
keeps geting beter! The public day of
the Children’s Heritage
Fair runs from 11:00am-
4:00pm on Saturday
June 1st, and is chock-
full of activities such
as buter churning,
tin punching, candle
making, hay rides,
and many more. There
will be live music, and
hands-on time for kids
with the farm animals.
Children’s Heritage Fair
is a hit with children of
all ages every year—
bring your young ones
and those young at heart!
Farm Stand Opening, June 1—The
Historic Hanley Farm Stand opens for the
season on Saturday June 1. Come out for
your CSA pick-up from 10:00am-2:00pm
or simply to stock-up on the freshest
vegetables anywhere. The farm stand
will be open Saturdays and Sundays
for the summer season and will feature
fresh Coquete Bakery bread in addition
to produce and homemade preserves.
Behind the stand, picnic tables will be
available for those wishing to have their
own farm-fresh meal and to enjoy the
grounds—come out and enjoy!
Stay up-to-date on the Farm at
www.hanleyfarm.org.
Spring at Historic Hanley Farm
David Pfrimmer
Principal Broker, Accredited Buyers Agent
Certified Residential Marketing Specialist
Cell: (541) 326-6262
pfrimmer@windermere.com
www.SouthernOregonHomes.org
Principal Broker
541.944.2700
Branscum@charter.net
Van Vleet Jacksonville • 505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530 • 541-899-2000
W
W
Wade Branscum
Search for properties at: WADE.withWRE.com
or call Wade at 541-944-2700
Van Vleet Jacksonville • 505 N. 5th St,
Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
Search the ENTIRE MLS:
SouthernOregonHomes.org
Commercial & Residential • Free Market Evaluation
Providing Professional Real Estate Locally For 22 Years
$1,000/mo
Combination of Suite
#103 & 104. 3600 s.f.
Two 12' x 14' roll up doors
and man doors,
plus two ADA
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FOR LEA
SE
3600 s.f.
BEAUTIFUL RIVER FRONT
HOME
w/ Guest cottage
on Applegate River
216 &196 Eastside Rd.
Jacksonville/Ruch.
4 bd, 3.5 bath,
3084 sq' living. Large deck, 2 fireplaces,
hardwood and tile 17.80 acres
$795,000
Wade-Dave-FEB 2013:Wade-Dave-JAN 2/21/13 9:37 AM Page 1
Lions Club Gives Back
Each year, the Lions Club donates dozens of stufed animals to the fre and police department
who use them to comfort children during difcult times. The 2013 drive was another huge
success! From l-r, Bill Hanlan, John Harris, Firefghter Alex Cummings, Firefghter Brian
Barret, Mick Nichols, Lou Mayersky and Karl Edding.
Jacksonville Review Page 8 April 2013
Up Close and Personal with Local Artist,
Linda Evans
Fourth in a series of artist profles by Randall Grealish
S
aving the planet, going green,
conserving resources and global
warming are topics we hear in the
news almost every day. For
some, it is for capital gain
while others have a genuine
concern for the planet. Too
often it is difcult to tell the
good guys from the proft
mongers. So how does one go
about expressing their love of
nature with honest intentions
that are not motivated by
politics or money? Linda Evans
ofers her art as a conduit to
honestly express and convey
her thoughts concerning the
importance of nature in our lives.
With spontaneity being very important
to Linda, her plein air kits are always at
the ready to get away from the noises
of the city. Linda would rather paint
outdoors where she fnds it easiest to
be in a meditative state of mind, in-tune
with nature and her
own intuitiveness.
“Artists look at their
surroundings much
more deeply and for
a greater length of
time than the average
person.” Perceptual
ability is the hallmark
of a good artist. To
paint something so
that it is not a just a
thing is the challenge,
to put on canvas a
painting that gives
the viewer a chance
to see through the artists’ eyes and make
a connection without the use of words.
Native Americans and indigenous
shamans around the world believe that
we impact the weather and climate
with our thoughts and consciousness.
Although we won’t end natural disasters
overnight with our thoughts alone, we
can have a collective infuence by paying
atention to how we conduct ourselves
and our relationship with nature. We
must move forward, learning from
past wrongs while avoiding a future of
disastrous mistakes. And as our children
are our future, Linda Evans greatly enjoys
teaching kids about the wonders of nature
through art. By providing them with
encouragement and allowing them an
uninhibited approach to create art, she has
found that their output is quite prodigious.
Linda’s own approach to art has
evolved over the years as she continues
to study new techniques and relearns the
rules that she is fond of breaking. Linda
now has a beter
understanding
of and enjoys the
logic and structure
involved in creating
a good painting and
revels in having a
strong armature,
good color choices,
composition and
ardent sense of
emotion. “With more
knowledge comes
more confdence…
the paintings turn out beter and the
experience is more fun,” says Linda.
“When we paint in nature we become
balanced.” Preservation of our natural
environment is of great concern to Linda.
“Far too many walk through life and
don’t understand what our relation is to
the land, how we are part and parcel
of it. The unique diversity, how it
nurtures, honors and receives us.
How much can we sacrifce before
we don’t have it anymore?”
In the Rogue Valley, the grass is not
greener on the other side, and art is
a great way to convey that message
to those with an afnity for the
diverse beauty of nature right here
in our own backyard. Linda Evans
enjoys painting the environment that
surrounds her on a daily basis with
positive intention rather than negative
images. Linda is not trying to convert
you to any agenda, rather, she wants
you to look at her art and be uplifted.
Linda’s art can be seen at the Art
Presence Center where you can also
atend her free presentation on painting
techniques on April 6th from 2:00-3:00pm.
For more information, visit her artist page
at www.ashlandartcenter.org.
970 Old Stage Road | Jville
541- 499- 0449
Just One Mile North of the
Jacksonville Post Ofce.
• Taste the wine, love
the Alpacas!
• Silver Medal Winner at
World of Wine Festival
• Hours: Thurs - Mon 12pm
to 5pm. Closed Tues & Wed.
• Shop our country store:
alpaca fber, sweaters, hats,
gloves, scarves, jewelry,
hand spun yarns
and Alpaca Farm
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 9 April 2013
660 G St, Jacksonville
$350,000
Commercial Building
In Nunan Square Community. Nicely finished.
All four spaces currently rented.
This fabulous New
25 Home Community in
Jacksonville is surrounded by a vineyard, orchard,
Daisy Creek and offers walking paths and park area
with gazebo. HURRY! Only 19 6 lots left!
Call Sally for details & pricing!
Lot/Home packages are available.
1887 Willow Glen, Medford
$217,900
3 BR • 2 BA • 1801 SF
On Cul-de-sac in East Medford
Breakfast nook, covered deck & RV parking
98 Placer Hill, Jacksonville
$799,000
3BR • 3BA • 3012 SF • 5.05 Acres
Warm & Inviting home w/ Amazing Views
Inground Pool, & easy access to Jacksonville &
Woodlands Trails. A one of a kind property!
2748 Old Stage Rd Central Point
$595,000
4 BR • 4.5 BA • 1.4 Acres
Craftsman-Style orchard home built in 1908
In-Ground Pool, Spa and Play area. Must See!
575 Applegate St, Jacksonville
$299,900
3 BR • 2 BA • 1849 SF • .36 Acres
Historic Broad House. Close to Britt Festival.
Updated furnace, C/A, floors, walls & paint.W
W
Van Vleet Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St • Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
CCB# 184948
Sally MAR 2013:Sally Jan 3/22/13 10:20 AM Page 1
Since my last article I am sure you
have come home with fresh olive oil
selections. Now it is time to crack open
a botle and get to tasting. Tasting oil
without food allows you to really focus
on the characteristics of each oil
without distraction. It is also
easier to detect of favors and
defects such as rancidity. If
the olive oil is good straight,
it will be even beter with
the right food.
Like wine tasting, there
is technique and vocabulary
around the art and science of tasting
olive oil. There are three positive
characteristics—fruitiness, biterness
and pungency—which ideally will
be well balanced. The intensity of
biterness and/or pungency will classify
the oil as mild, medium or robust.
• Fruitiness can be perceived as ripe
or green fruit such as green grass,
artichoke, tomato, dried apricot,
green banana, and almond.
• Olives are a biter fruit, and some
biterness is expected in the oil.
It is never a defect. Sensitivity to
biterness is individual, but learning
to appreciate some biterness is
good for your health. Biterness is
typically a sign of higher polyphenol
(antioxidant) levels.
• Pungency is the warm, peppery kick
at the back of your throat when you
swallow olive oil. Robust oil with a
big pepper fnish can cause coughing.
Pungency is caused by oleocanthal, an
antioxidant with anti-infammatory
properties similar to ibuprofen.
To enjoy your own private tasting,
gather a few oils and a glass or cup for
each. Pour a small amount of oil into a
glass. Professionals often use perfectly
designed blue tasting glasses. The blue
color hides the oils’ color which isn’t
considered a reliable indicator
of quality. In reality, a litle
plastic cup or small wine
glass is all most of us need.
Hold the glass in your palm
and cover the top of the glass
with your other hand to trap
the aromas that build in the
glass as the oil warms. You
may gently rotate the glass
to speed the warming and
the release of compounds
responsible for the aroma.
Continue to keep the top of
the glass covered. Uncover the oil and
snif. Repeat. Try to describe your initial
impressions of the aroma and fruitiness.
Take a small sip and let the oil roll
around to completely coat your tongue
taking note of the favor, thickness and
biterness. Forcefully suck air in through
your teeth and slurp the oil to distribute
and aerate. You can work on your own
style, but be careful not to inhale the
oil. Also, if you taste very robust oil, get
ready for a cough! Swallow the oil to
sense the pungency in the back of your
throat. Think about what you smelled,
tasted and felt. Did the aroma remind you
of fresh olives, herbs or tropical fruit? Does
your mouth feel clean or greasy? Is the oil
mild or more robust? A slice of Granny
Smith apple and sip of water works well as
a palate cleanser. As you taste more oils you
will get beter at defning characteristics
and selecting oils you prefer.
I always keep a collection of oils in my
pantry. Mild to robust, each oil brings
its own favor and style to the table. If
you’d like to stay local, terrifc oil is being
produced on the West Coast. We are lucky
to have a bountiful supply of olive oils that
can stand alone in a glass or add the perfect
touch to your latest culinary creation.
For oil tasting fight suggestions please
email Lara at laraknack@charter.net.
Olive Oil 101: Tasting Oil Like a Pro
by Lara Knackstedt
Art Presence members will present
"The Fine Art of Pastels" from April 5th
through April 28th. The Art Presence
Art Center is open on Friday, Saturday
and Sunday from 11:00am-5:00pm. A
reception will be held on Friday, April
12th, from 5:00-7:00pm for the show.
Linda Evans will have a solo exhibit in
the front gallery of her pastels. She will
also do a demonstration of her process
with many tips on using the medium on
April 6th, Saturday from 2:00-3:00pm.
In concert with the Jacksonville Hike-
a-thon, Art Presence Art Center will
display wild fower and woodlands
images in the main gallery. The event
will take place on the courthouse
grounds on Saturday, April 20th.
Walking sticks done by Art Presence
members will be for sale at reduced
prices at this event.
For more art information and current art
events and exhibits, please see the Southern
Oregon Artists Resource calendar on page 20,
and 'Like' the 'Art Presence' and 'Jacksonville
Celebrates the Arts' facebook pages.
April Events at Art Presence Art Center
The Unfettered Critic by
Paula Block Erdmann & Terry Erdmann
Baseball Goes to the Movies
A
pril 1st marks the opening day
of Baseball Season.
Stop yawning.
Yeah, yeah, we know. In this era of
quick edits and short atention span, it’s
considered cute to call baseball the mullet
of sports. It’s also short-sighted. Think
about it: football likes to be played by the big
and bulky; basketball by
the long and lanky—and
most professionals retire
exhausted at age 39. But
baseball calls to all of us,
regardless of age, size,
shape. Right-felder Wee
Willie Keeler hit over
.300 in sixteen seasons,
yet he stood 5’4” and
weighed l40 pounds.
Right-felder Babe Ruth
dominated the game
throughout his career
and, let’s face it, he was chubby. Name
one other sport in which kids, moms, dads
and grandparents can team up “on a level
playing feld” and have a really fun time.
Knew ya couldn’t.
We think baseball and movies go together
like mustard and hot dogs. Thomas Edison
shot the frst baseball movie, The Ball
Game, in l898. Since then, Hollywood has
produced over 200 productions set against a
baseball background.
We say “set against,” because our
favorites aren’t really about the game;
they’re about the fun that moviemakers
can insert into the game.
It Happens Every Spring stars Ray
Milland as a chemist who discovers a
lotion that repels wood. So he soaks
baseballs with the stuf and joins the
Cardinals as a pitcher, striking out
baters with his outrageous curveball.
When things go wrong, you’ll realize that
baseball is home base for a good laugh.
We really like A League of Their Own,
an enlightening look at the All-American
Girls Professional Baseball League that
maintained the game during WWII while
male players traded their bats for rifes.
It’s so gender-friendly that it’s directed by
a woman, Penny Marshall.
And then there’s Rhubarb, about a cat that
inherits a baseball team from his eccentric
millionaire owner. Yes, you’ll laugh.
We’re not alone in liking baseball
movies. Kevin Costner has starred in
three excellent choices you’d do well to
watch again: Bull Durham, Field of Dreams
and For the Love of the Game. That last title
defnes the reason he makes them.
To get an actual sports perspective,
we tossed the ball to baseball executive
David Pinsky, past president and district
ofcer of OSSA, the Oregon School Athletic
Association. When not serving as umpire
for Litle League
and American
Legion games,
Pinsky is a
baseball movie
enthusiast.
“I’ve seen them
all,” he says.
“I like Kill the
Umpire, when
William Bendix
accidentally
puts a tonic in
his eyes that
makes him see double, and The Natural,
when Robert Redford hits the ball into the
clock. And Angels in the Outfeld, where
there literally are angels in the outfeld.
“But the really good baseball movies
are based on true events,” Pinsky states.
“Like the Lou Gehrig biography, The Pride
of the Yankees. Of course, the best baseball
movie ever made is The Jackie Robinson
Story, because it stars Jackie Robinson
as himself. It shows the struggle he had
geting into the major leagues—possibly
the top sporting story of all time.”
Our fngers are crossed for the April 12th
opening of 42, a new flm with Chadwick
Boseman as Robinson and Harrison Ford
as Dodger owner Branch Rickey.
Movies aside, there’s nothing like the
real thing, and happily, the Rogue Valley
has an active baseball community, with
teams playing on nearly every high
school feld. Or if you’re a wee one at
heart, check the Litle League schedule at:
medfordamericanlitleleague.com. Plus there’s
the Middle School League, and the American
Legion League—including the Medford
Mustangs, the area’s most decorated team.
Or just gather your friends and family
around a ball and a bat in the back yard.
You’ll like it. We wouldn’t throw you a
curve ball.
Paula and Terry each have long impressive-
sounding resumes implying that they are
batle-scarred veterans of life within the
Hollywood studios. They’re now happily
relaxed into Jacksonville.
"There's no crying in baseball!"
Jacksonville Review Page 10 April 2013
Cemetery News From The Friends of
Jacksonville's Historic Cemetery
From Dirk J . Siedlecki, President - FOJ HC
News From Britt Hill by
Donna Briggs, Britt Executive Director
Connect
with Britt
BRITT SEASON LAUNCH IS APRIL 3!
Become a member today
and secure your spot on the hill
with early access to tickets.
www.brittfest.org
2013 Member Pre-Sale
April 11-May 15
photo by Reilly Owen, 2012 Intern
Building Support
Fundraiser a Success!—The Odd
Fellows and the Friends of Jacksonville's
Historic Cemetery would like to thank
everyone who atended the Spagheti
Dinner on Saturday, February 23, and
for helping us to raise money to restore
the Jacob Ish Block. And, thanks to those
of you who couldn't atend but
made generous and thoughtful
donations to support the efort.
It was a fun evening with good
food, wonderful wine and great
conversation—a real Community
Dinner. Special thanks to
Michael Wisnovsky at Valley
View Winery for making the
event even more enjoyable by ofering a
selection of their great wines with dinner.
The FOJHC would also like to thank the
IOOF and its members for all they’re doing
to support this restoration project, including
making the Spagheti Dinner such a success.
Meet the Pioneers-The Movie—We’d
also like to thank everyone who was
able to atend the two showings of Meet
the Pioneers-The Movie, on Saturday,
March 9. This was also a fundraiser for
the restoration of the Ish Block. Those
atending really enjoyed the DVD
produced by Bill and Debbie Miller
as a gift to the FOJHC. Most people in
the audience were fans of our Meet the
Pioneers program and really enjoyed the
DVD but said atending in person is very
special. The 8th Annual Meet the Pioneers
program will be back on Friday, October
11 and Saturday, October 12.
Marker Cleaning Workshops—Get
Involved in This Volunteer Project
Join us on Saturday, April 20 (no
workshop in May) and then the third
Saturday of the month, June 15 through
September 21, for these hands-on
workshops and learn the latest techniques
to safely clean cemetery markers. Many
of the markers are covered in moss and
lichen and have darkened over time and
become difcult to read. With a litle
water, time, and patience you can help us
to restore these markers. Workshops will
run from 9:00am until 12:00noon. Meet us
at the Sexton's Tool House for instructions
and to pick up supplies. You may want
to bring a stool to sit on while working,
sunscreen and a hat.
History Saturday—Our ever-popular
History Saturday program returns to
Jacksonville's Historic Cemetery for its
third season with all new, fun, interesting
and exciting
programs on
Saturday, May
11. Workshops
will continue
on the second
Saturday of the
month through
September
14. We kick-of the season in May
with "Jacksonville's Early Doctors and
Medical Practices of the Day," presented
by Docents Robert Hight and Vivienne
Grant. The program starts promptly at
10:00am and you can meet your Docents
by the Sexton's Tool House at the top of
the Cemetery Road. Parking is available
within the cemetery grounds. Be sure
to wear comfortable walking shoes and
dress for the weather. While there is no
charge for our History Saturday programs,
donations are sincerely appreciated
and help with restoration, preservation,
and educational projects. Our major
fundraising campaign this year is for
restoration of the Jacob Ish Block.
Cemetery Clean-Up—Thank you
to the hard-working and dedicated
volunteers, all 34 of them, who showed
up on Saturday, March 16 for our Annual
winter clean-up of the cemetery grounds.
An amazing 162 bags of debris were flled
in less than 3 hours time. The cemetery
is well on its way to being ready for
Memorial Day and our summer visitors.
Joining the Friends of Jacksonville's
Historic Cemetery were Boosters Club
Members, local and Medford community
volunteers, and a couple of students
earning some Community Service Hours.
Our next clean-up day is scheduled for
May 18, 8:00am-12noon. Please join us.
For additional details on events and other
cemetery activities, please visit our website at
www.friendsjvillecemetery.org.
Membership
support is very
important to
Brit. It provides
critical fnancial
support, and, equally important, it forms
a network of individual supporters. Those
supporters form a core base of our ticket
buyers, and form a strong Brit community.
We’re deeply appreciative of the support
our members provide. Over the past few
years, however, we have struggled with
declining numbers in membership support.
Our membership reached a high-water
mark in 2005, and enjoyed high renewal
rates in 2006. Since then, we have seen those
numbers steadily decline.
We know there are many reasons for
the downturn, not the least of which
is that, as the economic downturn hit,
people everywhere were forced to tighten
their purse strings and scale back their
giving. We’re not alone in this, as non-
proft membership and subscription
rates have trended downward for arts
organizations across the country. Now,
as the economy slowly but steadily
improves, we are optimistic that we will
win back many of those members.
If you have let your Brit membership
lapse, please think about what the Brit
hill has meant to you over the years and
reconsider supporting our work and the
meaningful impact Brit has on this valley.
Continuing on that optimistic note,
we also see potential for expanding
our support base in new generations
of donors. The members of Generation
X and Generation Y (the later of
which rivals the size of the Baby Boom
generation), are energetic and highly
creative, and are intent on leaving a mark
now. My four sons, now in their 30s, say,
“They don’t call it philanthropy; they call
it having an impact.”
This speaks directly to our commitment
to appeal to the future of Brit, both in
terms of programming, and in terms of
building supporters. Over the past several
years, we have seen a great response to
our broadened programming, and will
continue to work to turn those patrons into
supporters, building on our loyal base.
No mater what generation you belong
to, we hope you’ll join us and be part of
our crucial group of Brit members. Join
or renew today by giving online at www.
britfest.org/becomeamember, or by calling
541-779-0847.
Season Announcement coming right
up!—We’re puting the fnishing touches
on the 2013 season, in preparation for
our announcement on the evening of
Wednesday, April 3. Members get the
frst crack at tickets with our member
pre-sale, which runs April 11-May 15.
That is just one of many reasons to
support Brit by becoming a member.
J’Ville Invades Mexico
The February 'Review'
traveled to the coastal
town of San Miguel de
Allende along with good
friends from J’Ville who
took some time-of to relax
in the sun together!
From l-r, John Dodero,
Mollie Davies, Anne
Brooke, Ron Danko,
Aurelie Danko, Kathy
Dodero and Mike Davies.
April Movie Night at Old City Hall
April is when many of us turn our
atention to what used to be called our
national pastime… baseball. So, what
beter time to run Take Me Out to the
Ballgame, a delightful musical comedy
starring Frank Sinatra, Gene Kelly, Esther
Williams, and Edward Arnold. The flm’s
plot is a stretch, but with that cast… who
cares? Photographed in some of the best
Technicolor ever seen, the flm’s story is set
in 1906 and it glows with absolute joy. MGM
grossed an astounding four million dollars
(in 1949 money) on this flm so it easily
ranks as one of the most popular “baseball”
flms ever made. One reviewer wrote, “The
American pastime was never more fun.”
That certainly describes watching the duo
Sinatra and Kelly dance routines. Add Jules
Munshin and Bety Garret for comedy and
Take Me Out to the Ballgame becomes a fun-
flled romp for the whole family.
Show time is scheduled for Friday,
April 19th, at 7:00pm. Doors open at
6:30pm. See you at the movies!
View Lots For Sale
Only 5 Lots Left!
1/2 mile to downtown Jacksonville
Prices Starting at $130,000
.40 to .61 Acre Lots
City Services
For more information please visit...
Take California St S. Oregon Applegate Granite Ridge
Jeanne Freel • 541-821-2938 • Ste. 200, 691 Murphy Rd. Medford, OR
www.Old Stage Real Estate.com
GRANITE RIDGE
Freel November 2012:Freel November 2/21/13 8:43 AM Page 1
Comments or questions for Brit Festivals?
Email Donna at ed@britfest.org.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 11 April 2013
Chamber Chat
by The J acksonville Chamber of Commerce
T
he Chamber is excited to start
a new year with a new Board
of Directors comprised of four
ofcers: President – Arlis Duncan, Page
One Productions, Vice President – Tim
Balfour, TouVelle House B&B, Secretary
– Ginger Casto, Rural Development
Initiative, Treasurer – Linda Graham,
Schefel’s Toys and four additional
Directors: Jack Berger, Century Link, Teri
Gieg, Jo Parker, WillowCreek Gifts and
Tom Piet, AFLAC.
Chinese New Year wrap-up:
Congratulations to the Southern Oregon
Chinese Cultural Association (SOCCA)
for an incredible Chinese New Year
celebration. Chamber liaison Teri Gieg
assisted SOCCA in coordinating lodging
for the dance teams, arranging the
parade and facilities for educational
sessions. Linda Graham coordinated
the installation of the lanterns with the
invaluable assistance of the Jacksonville
Boosters Club. The Chamber would
like to thank the Boosters for hanging
the lanterns, TouVelle House Bed &
Breakfast, Jacksonville’s Magnolia Inn,
Wine Country Inn and Jacksonville
Inn for providing lodging at very deep
discounts, and Art Presence for providing
a location for breakfast for the dance
teams on Saturday.
Taste of Summer Preview: The
Chamber is working with Brit Festivals
and JOBA (Jacksonville Oregon Business
Association) on the annual kick-of to
the Brit season and summer. This year’s
event is Saturday, June 8 in downtown
with activities centered around music
with stages and food vendors set-up on
3rd Street, wine tasting at 13 locations
around town and activities for families
on the Courthouse lawn. We will also be
hosting a beer garden again this year as a
Chamber fundraiser.
Website: We are fnalizing the new
website, with Arlis Duncan as the lead
person for this initiative. The new
website will allow us to easily update
information, both text and photos, so
these changes will be made by end users,
not developers, on an as-needed basis.
Look for our email announcing the new
site within the next month.
Trolley Storage: We are looking for a
new storage facility for the trolley. The
facility needs to be dry, free of pigeons
or any livestock and accessible year-
round and daily during the season and
must be able to accommodate the trolley
measuring 31’ long, 9’ wide and 12’ high
with room to maneuver. Anyone with a
possible solution please email chamber@
jacksonvilleoregon.org or call 541-899-8118.
More than just Great Coffee . . .
Come experience why Pony Espresso is Jacksonville’s
favorite coffeehouse! Keeping it local . . .
• Jacksonville’s only drive thru window! Call ahead for
quick pick-up.
• Wonderful and Plentiful deck seating
• Bike Friendly: Most bicycle parking in town.
• Coffee, Breakfast, and Lunch Catering for your party
or event
• Organic Salads, Scratch Soups, Panini, Wraps.
• Local Draft beer and Wine menu.
• Excellent selection of baked goods.
Like us on Facebook today for all the news, specials,
and updates.
The Complete Coffeehouse
Celebrating 18 Years!
545 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville www.ponyespressojville.com
Open everyday until 6pm
541-899-3757
What does it take to change the world?
Rotary’s 1.2 million members believe it starts
with a commitment to Service Above Self.
Rotary is an extremely diverse and
welcoming service organization, perhaps
the most efective charitable and fraternal
organization on earth. Rotary is non-
political, non-religious, and open to all
women and men working in, or retired
from business or the professions. Rotary’s
six primary areas of focus are Peace and
Confict Prevention and Resolution,
Disease Prevention and Treatment, Water
and Sanitation, Maternal and Child
Health, Basic Education and Literacy, and
Economic and Community Development.
Every day, Rotarians are working hard to
improve lives and build communities.
Maintaining a steady and consistent
efort is serious work, and individual
Rotary clubs are the “boots on the
ground,” the primary agents of Rotary’s
mission worldwide. All clubs support
Rotary’s mission with contributions
to The Rotary Foundation, which
redistributes funds via grants for specifc
projects around the world. In addition,
clubs are free to implement their own
service projects or partner with other
clubs either within the community or
globally. To continue to be relevant and
efective, each club must occasionally
review its goals and internal organization.
To this end, on April 11 the Jacksonville-
Applegate Rotary Club will conduct its
annual strategic planning session.
Rotary clubs also sponsor weekly
programs to inform, motivate, and
educate members on current issues
facing their communities, the nation,
and societies around the world. The
Jacksonville-Applegate Rotary Club
membership was recently educated and
inspired by speaker Jim Maddux, who
was closely involved with the repatriation
of Vietnam War P.O.W.s. A military
intelligence ofcer himself, a long-time
Rotarian, and now a professional fnancial
advisor, Jim spoke at length about the
psychological and physical damage
done to our military personnel held in
captivity, some for over eight years, by
the North Vietnamese. The message,
however, is not only about the strength,
dignity, and bravery of these ofcers and
men, but also their recovery to normal
and productive lives after returning
to their families and friends. Few if
any of them harbor ill-will toward the
Vietnamese people, a testimony to their
resilience and humanity. In fact, most
have reported a heightened zest for life.
None of us should ever forget the
sacrifce of our military in fghting
an unpopular war with courage and
dignity – least of all the P.O.W.s trapped
in a cycle of physical and psychological
torture. We also should maintain respect
for the people of former enemy nations.
After all, as Charles Dickens so famously
declared, "mankind is our business." This
is certainly the guiding ideal of Rotary.
Dom Campanella,
Jacksonville-Applegate Rotary Club
The Real Rotary
16219 Lower Harbor Road • Brookings, Oregon
www.portsidecrest.com
541 - 661 - 3148
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Jacksonville Review Page 12 April 2013
David Jesser – History Can Be
the Story of Today
by Carolyn Kingsnorth
Third in a series of interviews with J acksonville
City Council members:
A
s a Jacksonville resident and
business owner, David Jesser
brings a unique perspective
to his position as Jacksonville City
Councilor. And for Jesser, Jacksonville’s
history is integral to all three roles.
“The old Chinese mining trail starts
at the front door of our house,” he
points out. “The Jacksonville Mercantile
building was built in 1861—it’s one of the
oldest brick buildings in town. And now
Jacksonville has taken on management of
fve historic buildings (the 1883 Jackson
County Courthouse and 1911 Jail, the
1873 Beekman House, the 1863 Beekman
Bank, and the 1868 Catholic Rectory). I
want us to have a vision moving forward
that actually protects all these historic
structures with a plan.”
Jesser notes that many elements of a
plan are already in place. “The Economic
Element is one of the few chapters of the
City’s Comprehensive Plan revisions that
has been fnished. It’s about enhancing and
promoting the vibrancy of our economy
while protecting our small town quality
of life. It’s the basis for Jacksonville’s
Municipal Code. But some of the
conversations that we have at City Council
and other places can give the impression
that not everyone is on board with that
element of the Comprehensive Plan.”
He explains, “I think some people fear
that talk about progress—about what the
City needs and what the City should be
doing—takes away from the reasons we
came here and from the historical. They
may not realize that confict, that tension,
is what protects both our landmarks and
our quality of life.”
Jesser cites the Bigham Knoll historic
restoration project. “I look at the biggest
private project in Jacksonville and how
it afected the neighborhood while it
was changing. And I also see the most
successful and largest piece of historic
preservation that has been done here.
With a litle more encouragement,
we could really have our historic
buildings shining. We could be telling
the stories of our history, and also
have them be the stories of today.”
He points out that Jacksonville
lacks the critical mass that would
allow it to depend on tourism. “There
are only 88 recognized rooms in town
that bring in lodging dollars. And the
only mechanism that allows the City
to beneft from most of the businesses
in town is the $80 a year business license.
The Jacksonville Lodging Association and
Brit Festivals are the only ones that bring
additional dollars into the City cofers.
I’m not a proponent of added taxation; it’s
just the reality of the situation.
“So do we continue to stay a small
bedroom community or do we support
the Comprehensive Plan’s Economic
Element and create the vibrancy? Are
we willing to allow someone to come in
and make some changes to some existing
structures?”
Jesser believes that Jacksonville is in a
geographically unique position. “We’re
in the center of everything. We could
be leaders in southern Oregon through
partnerships—particularly economic
partnerships—working to promote the
atractions of local industries such as food
and wine while bringing our historic
buildings back to their highest and best
uses. I want to see these buildings be as
alive as they were when Jacksonville was
a merchant center.
He proposes judicious use of
Jacksonville’s Urban Renewal funds as a
step towards realizing that vision. “I’m
not a proponent of added taxation—these
are taxes that we are already paying.
Urban Renewal allows us determine
their use. I think Urban Renewal was
created to insure that communities could
take care not only of blight but also
under-utilized resources. Jacksonville’s
Urban Renewal documents specifcally
address both infrastructure and historic
preservation. We could keep these monies
here rather than have them go back to the
County. We could be using them to fx the
Courthouse, to bring it alive again. And
by that time we may have hashed through
many of the ideas being put forth and
determined its highest and best use.”
175 E. California Street • Historic Jacksonville
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 13 April 2013
O
kay, if
you’re still
with me
then I have your
atention. Good!
Because I’m going to write about a subject
that has been kicked around long enough.
It’s time to resolve it. “IT” is the proposal
for a senior/community center… or a
senior center… or a community center.
Call it what you will, the question of
building one has been foating for more
years than it took Columbus to convince
Queen Isabella to fund an expedition to
a place no one knew existed. Beset with
questions never answered, a suitable
location never determined, design
concept never setled upon, and funding
never put into place, the idea of building
such an atraction has never even goten
past the starting gate. But like the
swallows forever returning to Capistrano,
the thought of actually building the thing
is constantly resurrected.
There are actually two separate and
distinct groups who have been active in
voicing what they see as a need for such
a center. These are the seniors and their
organization, and the community center
board. Both of these have many common
goals in the design of any center, both can
help with initial funding, and both have
strong feelings about where it should be
located… right in the heart of town…
more specifcally where the Sampson
house now sits.
Frankly, in my tenure as your
mayor, I had always hoped to see a
community center on 5th Street, a
gateway from the Valley to the historic
core. A wooden exterior dressed-up with
wooden historical
interpretive panels; it
would have atracted
the atention of every
traveler driving
through. Designed
in such a unique
and bold fashion it
would have stood
out from all the other
architectural cookie-
cuter buildings one
sees rising out of
the ground these
days. However, this idea has grown
more impractical in my mind with each
passing season… and for one reason -
no land is available for such a center. I
had been hoping this might change…
but it now has become apparent that to
continue hoping somehow Jerusalem on
the hill might appear is like waiting in
the rain for the bus that never comes. It’s
time to move on. So… let’s examine the
suggested alternative - the Sampson site.
Upon frst examination it would appear
that, even after removing the current non-
historic structure, there just isn’t enough
land upon which to build such a center.
There are more users for such a facility
than was frst imagined… and many of
these require diferent features. A dance
studio is obviously diferent from a
lecture hall or room. An assembly room
is diferent from a game room… and so
on. Any community center must be able
to accommodate citizens for these and
other activities. The building must also
house ofces for operational staf and
associated record keeping. This includes
a marketing director, an essential activity
for insuring that the center pays for
itself. So where does fate enter into all of
this? Why with the recent acquisition of
the Courthouse of course!
After much thought, I believe the
Courthouse is the ideal location for our
city ofces. Any romanticized sense that
the Miller house is perfect as presently
constituted for city operations is ignoring
the fact that the building is in fact a
nightmare for efciency in operations. It
is woefully short for storing the records
needed to serve the public… in planning,
record keeping, customer service, and
ofce management it is defcient.
There is an alternative solution.
MOVE THE OFFICES TO THE
COURTHOUSE!
What a natural ft. The Courthouse
is the soul of the city. The city ofces
are the heartbeat of the city. Let’s not
ignore fate. Let’s bring them together.
By making this move we can solve
the problems inherent with the Miller
house… but we will also open the
door to expanding the design of the
community center because now it can
encompass the entire block.
A Few Minutes with the Mayor
by Paul Becker
Don’t Read This If You Hate Change
•Jewelry
•Unique Gifts
•Home Décor
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Miller House Sampson House
POLICE BLOTTER
Jacksonville Police Department
A consolidated report based on type of calls & number of incidences
February 19, 2013 to March 20, 2013
Abandoned Vehicle - 2
Alarm - 6
Animal Complaint - 2
Assist - Medical - 8
Assist - Other Government Agency - 10
Assist - Other Law Enforcement
Agencies - 11
Assist Public - 18
City Ordinance - 7
Civil - 3
Custody Detox - 1
Disorderly Conduct - 1
Disturbance/Noise - 1
Domestic Disturbance - 2
Fraud - 2
Larceny/Theft - 3
Motor Vehicle Crash - 3
Property Found - 2
Property Lost - 1
Public Safety - 1
Threat of Suicide - 1
Suspicious - 8
Trafc/Roads All - 4
Unauthorized Use of Motor Vehicle - 1
Call Type - Total Calls
CITY OFFICE
Monday - Friday
8:30am - 4:00pm
(541) 899-1231
MUNICIPAL COURT CLERK
Monday - Friday: 9am - 4pm

PLANNING DEPARTMENT HOURS
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
& Friday 8:30am - 2pm
Wednesday:
Closed to Public
Direct #: 541-899-6873
JACKSONVILLE OFFICE HOURS
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, April 2, 6:00pm (OCH)
PLANNING COMMISSION: Wednesday, April 10, 6:00pm (OCH)
CITY COUNCIL: Tuesday, April 16, 6:00pm (OCH)
HARC HEARING OFFICER: Wednesday, April 17, 10:00am (OCH)
HARC: Wednesday, April 24, 6pm (OCH)
City Offces 541-899-1231
www.jacksonvilleor.us
LOCATION KEY: CH - Old City Hall (S. Oregon & Main) CC - Community
Center (160 E. Main Street) NVR - Naversen Room (Jacksonville Library)
FH - Fire Hall(180 N. 3rd St. @ C) EOC - Emergency Ops Center at Police Station
JACKSONVILLE CITY SCHEDULE
Neither the Miller house nor the
Sampson house is listed as “signifcant”
on the National Historic Landmark
District Register. The Miller house might
have been, but once there was a fre
and the second story was removed, that
designation was irretrievably lost. This
loss is the community center’s gain.
Consolidating the tax lots into one
single parcel dramatically alters the
possibility for the footprint of any
proposed structure. The Sampson house
could be removed and the Miller house
could remain and be used for ofces and
storage needs of the center. This would
allow the new center design the option of
removing similar space, thereby allowing
other rooms to be expanded. With a
single tax lot, the new structure can even
be joined to the Miller house so that it
becomes part of the design.
What I am proposing here does not
involve any city money or expense. The
city would not operate the center, but
would sell the land or simply lease it for a
nominal price on a ffty-year lease… say a
dollar a year. The lease would be of value
to the community center board when
seeking grants to build the center. Either
way it reduces the land and buildings
inventory the city now fnds itself with.
Site maintenance and management would
be transferred to the lease-holder thereby
reducing city expenses.
It’s win-win for all parties. But it
goes far beyond that. Its real value is in
bringing together all the many elements
in Jacksonville that would be using the
center… and it brings more visitors into
the city, precisely the reason cities build
community centers.
It’s a bold plan but there will never be
a beter time to move forward. The cards
are dealt. Why not play the hand?
Jacksonville Review Page 14 April 2013
Free
Delivery minimum of $ 25.00 from sun - wed
( 5 pm - 8 pm) in Jacksonville (available in some areas.)
Thai House
Serving fresh, authentic Thai food.
www.thaihousejville.com
City Snapshot
Jacksonville Fire Department Community Class Schedule
April – What Is CERT and How It Works
May – When to Go - When to Stay
No Class June thru September Fire Season
October – Fire Prevention Open House
November – Home Safety for Winter
December – Avoiding Cold Weather Injuries
Classes are held at the fre station on the 3rd Thursday of the month at 6:30pm
(except during fre season). For more information, please call 541-899-7246.
City Council, March 5, 2013—A two
hour Public Hearing was held on an appeal
fled over construction of a single family
home at 360 Miners Way. The appellant,
former City Councilor and former HARC
Commissioner Christina Duane, asserted
HARC erred by allowing construction
to proceed as HARC had unanimously
deemed appropriate. In earlier sessions,
HARC had deliberated on the home
design, scale, view-shed and directional
features and had reached agreement with
the owner and builder and issued a “green
light.” The building lot borders the lower,
northern boundary of the cemetery in an
area far away from the most historically-
signifcant grave sites. Every HARC
member ruled on the mater in favor of
allowing the buyer to proceed. Every
HARC member had also toured the site to
prepare themselves to make that decision.
Conversely, only 2 voting city councilors
bothered to make a site visit. Despite
being less prepared and informed, Council
overruled HARC on 3 design aspects,
forcing the project back to the drawing
board while creating a construction
delay and increasing costs for the owner.
Councilors David Jesser and Criss Garcia
had advocated to uphold HARC but found
themselves in the minority when the votes
were cast. Councilor Jim Lewis recused
himself from the hearing because he is
the HARC Council Liaison and a HARC
voting member with prior involvement in
the mater.
Editorial note: The Review applauds
Councilor Lewis for appropriately recusing
himself from the hearing but has questioned
staf as to why Councilor Dan Winterburn did
not do the same. Councilor Winterburn is a
voting member of the Cemetery Commission,
a commission that heard prior testimony on
the mater and expressed its opposition to the
building project. In the Review’s
opinion, a confict of interest existed
that directly impacted the outcome
of the hearing. The Review believes
commission members in such maters
should be ineligible to participate due
to such bias. In this case, not only did
Councilor Winterburn remain seated
for the public hearing, he made all 3
motions to overrule HARC. Although
the Review did not receive a formal
response from staf, it is confdent
there will be a concerted efort to avoid
recusal mishaps like this in the future.
And…an opinion on site visits and
proper research: On March 13, the Planning
Commission held hearings on a Conditional
Use Permit for the Beekman House and an
update of rules for outdoor music for South
Stage Cellars. On the Beekman mater, 5 of
7 members did not visit the site while none
reported visiting the South Stage Cellars
site. While the Review appreciates citizen-
volunteers, it believes that to represent the best
interests of the citizenry and applicants, site
visits should be mandatory.
UGB Study Session—City Planner
Amy Stevenson led an hour-long
study session for Council and Planning
Commission members to lay more
groundwork for an upcoming Urban
Growth Boundary (UGB) update. The
meeting was held in the former Peter Brit
room at the Courthouse on March 12 as
part of a follow-up to previous meetings
on the subject.
The refresher included a review that
Jacksonville’s Comprehensive Plan must
include a matching inventory list of
available land supply for when growth
eventually occurs. Current studies
on “elements” include economic and
housing growth needs as well as studies
identifying potential growth areas in and
out of the existing town boundary.
During the session, questions were
posed about the need to provide more land
inventory for afordable housing, park
acreage, light industrial commercial space,
single-family residential development and
more uses. Stevenson noted that in order
to add a parcel of land and annex it into
the city, certain criteria must be proved,
including proving the need to expand and
that doing so is a multi-year process with
extensive state mandates.
Of interest, a 2009 economic study cites
a shortage of buildable land for single
family residential homes. However,
changing economic conditions now make
such conclusions questionable, making it
likely that the city will move forward with
updating its comprehensive plan to more
accurately refect current conditions.
City Council, March 19—City
Welcomes New Police Ofcer
City Recorder Jan Garcia issued the
Oath of Ofce to Marc Slagle, the city’s
new police ofcer who was hired to
replace Gary Rose. Slagle, who started
work on March 20,
was hired from a
pool of 38 applicants.
Slagle, 37, was a Coast
Guard ofcer for four
years and served three
oversees tours prior to
being a police ofcer
for three years in St.
Petersburg, Florida.
During the brief
ceremony, Marc’s wife,
Marlene was by his side
and pinned his ofcer’s
shield to his uniform.
In other Council news, an updated
Safety Manual for employees was
approved as part of the city’s increasing
emphasis on risk management and
dedication to keeping insurance costs as
low as possible.
Michael Cavallaro was on-hand and
presented his annual report from the
Rogue Valley Council of Governments, a
copy of which is available on the city and
RVCOG website.
Ofcer Marc Slagle
Jackson County Recycling Partnership
is hosting its frst Spring Plastic Round-up
on Friday & Saturday, April 5-6, 9:00am-
4:00pm. The event will take place at Jackson
County Expo, Gate 1 in Central Point.
The popular recycling event accepts
numerous types of plastic not accepted
in local curbside programs, including
bags of all sizes, baling twine, buckets,
bubble wrap, nursery pots, irrigation
components, tarps, tapes, cassetes, discs,
toys, kiddie pools and much more.
A list of acceptable items is posted at
www.jcrecycle.org. Participants must pre-
sort clean plastic into 3 categories: soft
plastic, hard plastic and nursery plastic.
Items NOT accepted include vinyl, metal
parts, rubber and Styrofoam. Recycling
fees are: $5.00 per household, businesses
and large loads are $5.00 per yard.
See ad on page 23.
Spring Plastic Round-up on April 5 & 6
The
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165 E. California St.
Jacksonville
541-899-9060
Inspiring Gifts,
For Moms
and
Grads.
Mention this ad and get a FREE tote bag with purchase.
Custom Designs Expert Repair Cash for Gold
. .
*While supplies last.
April Birthstone
Diamond!
Estate Jewelry
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 15 April 2013
Jacksonville Lions Club will be
awarding $750 scholarships to two local
graduating high school seniors who will
be atending college full-time, for the
2013/2014 school year. Please note that this
is a GIFT, not a loan and the money can be
used to defray the cost of tuition, purchase
text books or other college expenses.
Applications from eligible students
will be reviewed by members of the
Jacksonville Lions Club and the awards
will be made on the basis of academic
improvement, participation in school
and community activities and fnancial
need. Priority will be given to any
students who have signifcant sight or
hearing impairment.
Full details of the program and the
application procedure will be available
at local high schools or from Lions' Jack
Pfeifer at 541-857-8576 or Nick Nichols at
541-779-2980.
The deadline for submiting
applications is April 30th, 2013.
Notice To Parents Of Graduating Seniors
$750 Scholarship Award
Let's Talk Real Estate
by Graham Farran, Expert Properties
Tax Tips You Can Use
by Kathleen Crawford
& Angela Clague, Enrolled Agents
Extensions of Time to File
I
f you cannot fle your tax return by
April 15th you should defnitely
consider fling an extension. Stif
penalties can be imposed for “Failure to
File” by both Oregon (up to 20% of the
unpaid tax), and the Federal Government
(up to 25% of the unpaid tax).
Filing an automatic 6-month
extension is fairly easy to do,
and can be done electronically
by your tax preparer, or by filing
Form 4868 for Federal, and Form
40-EXT for Oregon. Oregon will accept
the Federal automatic extension, but
if you owe tax to Oregon you should
still file the Form 40-EXT. This form
doubles as a payment voucher.
One thing to remember however, is
that AN EXTENSION OF TIME TO FILE
DOES NOT MEAN AN EXTENSION
OF TIME TO PAY. Additional penalties
can still be imposed for late payment
of taxes even if you fle an extension.
(1/2 of 1% of the unpaid tax per month
for Federal, and up to 5% of the unpaid
tax for Oregon). You can avoid late
payment penalties by paying at least
90% of your tax liability by April 15th.
If you don’t pay all the tax due by April
15th, you will also owe interest on the
unpaid balance, from April 15th until the
date it is paid in full.
To sum up, both the IRS and
the State of Oregon may impose
Failure to File, Failure to Pay,
and Interest on unpaid taxes. The
moral of the story: try to fle on
time, but failing that, ALWAYS
fle an extension, and pay as much of
your liability as you can by April 15th.
After all, do you really want any more
of your money going to the Government
than they already have? Happy Filing.
The Jacksonville Tax Lady is located in
beautiful, historic Jacksonville at 610 N.
Fifth Street across from the Pony Espresso.
Kathleen and Angela can be reached at 541-
899-7926. See ad this page.
The fne print: This article is for
information only. Please see your tax
professional for questions about your
individual tax situation.
Representation & Tax Preparation
Personal Income Taxes • Trusts • Business Taxes
We take the Fear out of Taxes!
541-899-7926
610 N. Fifth Street • Jacksonville, Oregon
www.jvilletaxlady.com · Oregon OBTB #B13695
Kathleen Crawford & Angela Clague
Enrolled Agents
Minuteman Press - Express Ads
$20
.00
OFF
New Client
Mention this Ad!
The
Jacksonville
Tax Lady,LLC
Representation & Tax Preparation
Personal Taxes • Trust Taxes • Business Taxes
We take the fear out of taxes!
Accepting new clients.
Angela Clague &
Kathleen Crawford
Enrolled Agents
541-899-7926
610 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR
www.jvilletaxlady.com • Oregon OBTB #B13695
CUSTOM HOMES
CCB#162572
At Ark Built, we pride ourselves in providing high performance, energy effcient
building and renovation services with a common sense approach. DESIGN•BUILD
C ONS T R UC T I ON S E R V I C E S
541.951.3617 ARKBUILTENERGY.COM
Ark Built is proud to have been the exclusive
builder for the new Red Lilly Vineyards winery
(pictured) and the 200th house built for
Extreme Makeover: Home Edition in 2011
CUSTOM HOMES • HOME RENOVATIONS
COMMERCIAL BUILDING • OUTDOOR LIVING SPACES
I
n 2012, we
ended the year
with a nice
8.4% increase in
existing home prices in Jackson County.
However, this is just the beginning of the
story. In the last three months
we have seen the median price
of homes in Jackson County
climb by 32.1%. Median prices
have gone from their low of
$140,000 to $185,000. On top of
this price increase, the inventory
of houses available for sales has
declined 30.5%. Today we only
have 823 homes on the market
compared to over 2500 at the
botom of the market.
This does not mean that
everyone’s home has gone up
32.1% as median prices rise due
to a combination of factors. In
our market, we have seen major recovery
in both the entry-level and high-end
home markets. It means there are few
lower priced homes on the market and
the higher priced houses are selling again.
The take away here is our real estate
market has botomed-out and we are on
our way up. We are now growing faster
than the national average!
It is surprising that our once dead
market of homes over $500,000
increased 40% since January 2012. Even
more encouraging, there are more
homes over ($500,000) that are now
pending than sold in the last 90 days.
This illustrates that the high-end market
is experiencing a nice rebound and this
patern is likely to continue.
Distressed properties, which have
dominated the market since the
fnancial crash, have decreased to less
than 13% of the inventory. This is from
their previous high which exceeded 50%
of the inventory. We are still seeing a
number of homes going into default—
but, they are dwindling. As prices
climb, fewer homes are under-water
which in turn is decreasing the number
of homeowners walking
away from their home.
Thanks to the Federal
Reserve, mortgage interest
rates remain at an all time
low. This has resulted in
mortgage payments being
less than tenants' rent and
has allowed investors to
secure properties with
returns exceeding 10%.
So what does the future
hold? Who knows, it’s
a world economy but
with our stock market
reaching an all-time high,
employment increasing and our real
estate values soaring again, I think the
future looks bright!
Statistics on Existing Home Sales in
Jackson County*
December 2012 – February 2013:
• Median price per home: Up 32.1% to
$185,000
• Average days on the market: 62 days
• Number of homes for sale: Down
30.5% to 823
• Interest rate: 3.58% (30 year fxed, per
Bankrate.com)
*Statistics are from the Southern Oregon
Multiple Listing Service.
Graham Farran is a broker with Expert
Properties, located at 620 N. 5th Street in
Jacksonville (across from Pony Espresso.)
Please see their ad on cover back page and
contact them at 541-899-2030 or online at
www.expertprops.com.
Real Estate Values Up 32.1 Percent!
Like us on Facebook
www.facebook.com/JacksonvilleReview
Jacksonville Review Page 16 April 2013
D a n c e
Project
nW
An
evening
with
It’s more than entertainment.
It’s life. Don’t miss it.
SM
Craterian
Performances
is a 501(c)(3)
non-proft
organization.
Friday, April 5, 7:30pm
Tickets: $52, $58, $64
Wednesday, April 17, 7:30pm
Tickets: $42, $45, $48
NO
An Acoustic Evening with
Mary Chapin Carpenter
& Shawn Covin
On Stage
Togeter!
BOX OFFICE: 16 S. Bartlett, Medford
541-779-3000 • www.craterian.org
Tuesday, April 9, 7:30pm
$22, $25, $28, Youth (0-18) $15, $18, $21
sponsored by NewsWatch 12 & Avista sponsored by CarterWorks Graphic Design
sponsored by Umpqua Bank & Umpqua Investments
Monday, April 1, 7:30pm
Tickets: $48, $54, $60, $66
Sizzling
Guitar
Virtuoso!
Sunday, April 21, 7pm
Admission is FREE!
Saturday, April 13, 7:30pm
$24, $27, $30, Youth (0-18) $17, $20, $23
Stars on Stage:
Celebrating State SoloiStS
Speaking of Antiquing
with Gwen Nelson, Pickety Place Antiques
Glassware,
Jewelry, Fine
Antiques, etc.
130 N. 4th St.,
Jacksonville
Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Beautiful pieces of silver will dress-up
any home or table and is something I’ve
been collecting since I was 16 years old. I
started my collection with the pieces my
mother left me and over the years have
watched it grow. When I spot a good
piece, I just buy it…can’t help it.
You can feel the diference in good
silver pieces
although Sterling
silver has some
more heft than
silver plate.
However, silver
plating has a base
metal such as
brass or copper
sandwiched with
silver, generally with ornamentation at
the border and can fool you.
Sometimes even an experienced silver
buyer gets fooled and doesn’t know
it until they polish of the top layer,
revealing brass! To prevent this error,
simply test silver pieces with a magnet
which will not stick to silver. Remember,
reproduction silver is cheap-looking, is
light and dings easily and you can tell
something about it is just not ‘right.’
What I look for when buying silver
are unusual pieces you don’t fnd
everywhere. Here at the shop, lots of
people come in looking for a replacement
piece for their set of silverware like a
cocktail fork, salt spoon, or an old soup
spoon. I have noticed that the more ornate
pieces are what really sell here at Pickety
Place, such as the grape designs which
remain very popular to this day.
And, many local artists come in looking
for silverware to craft into unique jewelry
spoon rings, bracelets, earrings or key rings.
When shopping for my own silver,
my favorite pieces are unusual or odd,
because the more common items are a
dime a dozen.
For instance, hammered silver is hand-
fnished, beautiful and usually worth a bit
more—buter knives, grapefruit spoons,
soup spoons, meat forks and
cocktail forks tend to be the best
sellers.
To protect your investment,
polish pieces often, especially
ones kept in the sun which will
tarnish faster than those kept
in the dark. For assistance with
identifying, preserving, buying
or selling your valued silver
pieces, please visit us here at Pickety
Place. See ad this page.
Silver: A Timeless Delight
150 S. Oregon, Jacksonville, Oregon 97530 541-702-2224
Under La Fiesta Restaurant in the Historic Orth Building
From turn of the century
to mid-century,
antiques and collectibles
for your shopping pleasure
Open 7 Days A Week
Painting by Jhenna Quinn Lewis
J. Mark Madge ~ P. Joelle Graves proprietors
Joelle Graves and Mark Madge of
Sterling Creek Antiques are celebrating
their six-month anniversary of being
open by ofering free antique appraisals
on April 30. To show their appreciation
to the community, they are staying open
late on Tuesday, April 30 and hosting
this appraisal event. Starting at 5:00pm,
you are invited to bring in a photograph
of a piece of furniture or hand-carry that
vase you inherited and receive an idea
of its value. If you have a set of dishes
and are wondering about the entire
set’s value, bring in ONE piece and an
inventory list of the set and they’ll let
you know the value. If you have items
too large to carry, don’t worry, just
bring-in a picture and they’ll be able to
help. Even if you don’t have an item
to be appraised, drop-in anyway, take
a look around their wonderful shop
and enjoy a complimentary glass of
wine and appetizers! It’s their way of
saying thanks for the warm welcome
to Jacksonville. Mark and Joelle have
spent years in the antique business
and will be available to share their
knowledge with you. Stay in-touch
with them via their Facebook page and
fnd out what’s new in the store and
what specials they’re ofering.
See ad this page.
Free Appraisal Day at Sterling Creek Antiques
130 N. 5th, Jacksonville
541-899-2977
Open Tues - Sun, 7am - 2pm
Breakfast Served All Day Sunday
Spring-in to
discover new
favorites!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 17 April 2013 Page 17
115 Hangman Way,
Jacksonville
Stunning contemporary home with
vaulted ceilings, wonderful windows,
cozy gas fireplace, hardwood floors in
living room, kitchen and dining area.
Romantic master suite. Oversized 2 car
garage, patios, easy care landscaping.
$289,000
135 S. Oregon,
Jacksonville
$1/sf. for this incredible location in
the heart of Historic Jacksonville's
business dist. Adjacent to the Good
Bean. Street level space in the Ma-
sonic Lodge. 11” ceilings, wood
floors, commercial kitchen, 2 spa-
cious restrooms, 2 storage rooms.
555 Coachman Drive,
Jacksonville
Incredible Coachman Hills home
with views. 4 bedrooms plus an office
and 31/2 baths, formal entry, formal
dining room, gas fireplace, 2 master
suites, one master on the main level.
Hardwood, slate, granite, custom
cabinetry. Level .94 acre lot.
$749,000
Upper Applegate Road
5 acres
Close to Applegate Lake.
Includes fractional interest in
recreational lot on the river.
Wonderful Views!
$149,900
3275 Old Military
Jacksonville Area
A natural wooded setting w/ plenty of
sunshine. Well-built custom home,
easy tri-level floor plan on 1.9 acres
north of Jacksonville. 3 BR, 2.5 BA,
large lower area w/ office & add’l living
space, darkroom, larger 2 car garage,
large patio & detached studio
$289,900
245 Deer Trail,
Jacksonville
Built in 2000 with approx. 2542 sq.ft.
plus a bonus room, this beautiful
home has room for everyone.
Oak, travertine and granite in
the kitchen and great room, a
breakfast nook, fireplace, formal
dining room, and family room.
$429,000
435 S. Fifth Street,
Jacksonville
Privacy and views from this 1790 sq.ft.
retreat. Nestled in the trees with
vaulted ceilings, a dining room, an is-
land kitchen, a new roof and 3 decks
and good off street parking.
$269,000
610 Hueners Lane,
Unit A & B,
Jacksonville
Rare Jacksonville Duplex.
2 BR 1 BA units each
w/garage & a nice fenced
yard. Laundry hook ups in
the garages. Close to every-
thing & always rented.
$254,900
570 N. Oregon,
Jacksonville
Make your own history on
this beautiful .34 acre home
site. Lovely setting with
mature trees. Gas, water,
and sewer to the property.
$152,500
Livingston Road
2.69 acres
Just outside Jacksonville.
Rare opportunity to own a
level, view lot with this
address.
Jacksonville Elementary
$249,900
1100 and 1104 S.
Third St.,
Jacksonville
Beautiful 1.06 acre in city
limits. Includes 2 separate
tax lots with utilities.
Get both lots for...
$159,900
Placer Hill Drive
5 acres -
Jacksonville
Nestled above Jacksonville
in Vista Wood Ranch.
Underground utilities,
paved road, fabulous
mountain and city views.
$299,000
335 West Oak St - Lot
Jacksonville
Lovely setting.
Near Britt.
$95,000
W
Van Vleet, Jacksonville
505 N. 5th St, Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-2000
3390 Ross Lane,
Old Stage Road Area
Incredible vintage home built in 1925
on 5.3 acres overlooking the Rogue
Valley. Just outside Jacksonville with
3.3 irrigated acres. Formal DR, 4 BR
& office. Beautiful wood floors. Lawns,
oak trees, gardens, pastures, stable,
chicken coop & other outbuildings.
$429,000
L
E
A
S
E
D
Kathy H MAR 2013.qxd:Kathy H FEB 2013 3/21/13 5:56 PM Page 1
Rebecca DeGeorge
La Boheme

& Gift Boutique
175 West California
Clothing
541 899 1010
Mon - Sat 10:30 - 5:30
Sun - 11:00 - 4:00
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
No one wants to pay for
unnecessary extras and with my
help, you won’t have to. I’ll help
make sure you understand your
options, and that you have the
best coverage at the best price.
Like a good neighbor,
State Farm is there.
®

CALL ME TODAY.
Need
someone
that speaks
fluent
insurance?
I’m your agent for that.
1001183.1 State Farm, Home Ofce, Bloomington, IL
Judi Johnson, Agent
645 N 5th Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
Bus: 541-899-1875
judi.johnson.cmld@statefarm.com
Escape to Extraordinary
Life slows a pace or two in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. 17 small wineries with big wines can be found
all along the meandering roads and rivers. Come meet
our grape growers, step into their vineyards and share
a glass of wine. Enjoy the scenic drive on Highway
238 just 8 miles west of Jacksonville.
“Wine Country the way it should be.”
– Sunset Magazine
Plan your trip online at:
www.applegatewinetrail.com
Spring wines
are here!
M
a
y
1
9
t
h


There’s no better time to tour the
Trail in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. Meander through scenic
mountain roads, meet the
winemakers, sample a range
of new releases and varietals.
“Wine Country the way
it should be”- Sunset Magazine
The Spring W
ine Event
you don’t w
ant to m
iss!

8 miles
9 miles
Only 8 miles from
Jacksonville
Spring wines
are here!
M
a
y
1
9
t
h


There’s no better time to tour the
Trail in the picturesque Applegate
Valley. Meander through scenic
mountain roads, meet the
winemakers, sample a range
of new releases and varietals.
“Wine Country the way
it should be”- Sunset Magazine
The Spring W
ine Event
you don’t w
ant to m
iss!

Update
Tasting Room
4554 South Stage Road
(one mile east of downtown Jacksonville)
www.dancinvineyards.com
541-245-1133
Tasting Room
Spring Hours
Thursday
through Sunday
12 to 7

Corporate and Group Rates
541-899-2050 | 830 5th St Bistro • Wine Bar
www.dejavubistrowinebar.com
Déjà Vu
Tour 14 Local Wineries with our
Exclusive Wine Package
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
W I N E C O U N T R Y I N N
The McCully House Inn
240 E. California St. | 541.899.2050
A Part of Country House Inns Jacksonville | www.countryhouseinnsjacksonville.com
Home of:
Jacksonville Review Page 20 April 2013
|Saturdays, 4:00-8:00pm, through April: 'RISING
STARS' COMPETITION. South Stage Cellars.
See ad on page 11.
|Friday & Saturday, April 5 & 6, 9:00am-4:00pm:
SPRING PLASTIC ROUND-UP, Jackson
County Expo at Gate 1, Central Point.
See article on page 14 and ad on page 23.
|Thursday, April 11, 8:30am: CHAMBER
MONTHLY GENERAL MEETING, always
the second Thursday each month, Old City Hall.
See 'Chamber Chat' on page 11.
|Saturday, April 13, 10:00am-3:00pm: kIDS DAY
AT CRATER ROCk MUSEUM. Classes start
hourly. See article next page..
|Sunday, April 14, 3:00-4:00pm: LAURA PELON
“MUSIC FROM THE BACkYARD &
FRONT PORCH,” Jacksonville Branch Library.
See article next page.
|Thursday, April 18, 6:30-8:30pm: J'vILLE FIRE
DEPARTMENT COMMUNITY CLASSES,
"What is CERT and How it Works."
See schedule on page 14.
|Friday, April 19, 7:00pm: MOvIE NIGHT
AT OLD CITY HALL, Take Me Out to the
Ballgame. See article on page 10.
|Friday & Saturday, April 19-20: ROGUE
vALLEY WINE & FOOD FESTIvAL.
See article and ad next page.
|Saturday, April 20, 9:00am-Noon: FOJHC
CEMETERY MARkER CLEANING
WORkSHOP, Jacksonville Historic Cemetery.
See article on page 10.
|Saturday, April 20, 9:30am Registration:
JACkSONvILLE WOODLANDS
ASSOCIATION 20TH ANNUAL HIkE-A-
THON. Courthouse Grounds. See article on page 4.
EVENTS CALENDAR | APRIL 2013
J a c k s o n v i l l e A r t E v e n t s
A p r i l 2 0 1 3
April 5 - 28 “The Fine Art of Pastels”
Member Show at Art Presence Art Center
Saturday, April 6 from 2 - 3pm
Member artist Linda Evans will present
Glowing Pastel Painting, a demonstration
of pastel technique.
Friday, April 12 from 5 - 7pm
Artists Reception - meet the creators of the
beautiful art in our gallery!
Saturday, April 20 Woodlands Hike-A-Thon! We will
have walking sticks specially made by member artists for
sale, and woodland and wildflower paintings will be
featured in the gallery.
April 1 - May 20: When visiting the Jacksonville Library,
don’t miss an exhibit of watercolors byAnne Brooke in the
Naverson Room and a philatelic display from the Rogue
Valley Stamp Club inside the main entrance!
Art Presence Art Center is open every Fri - Sun
from 11am - 5pm. We are located at 206 N. 5th St.
Visit us online at www.art-presence.org
April 1 - 30 New Images
by Adam Bickel
GoodBean Coffee
We welcome photographer
Adam Bickel, who shares a collection of recently captured
photographic landscapes around the Rogue Valley. Enjoy!
April 9 is National Arts Advocacy Day!
"Celebrating Local Farms and Farmworkers"
Betty Laduke at South Stage Cellars
Meet this renowned artist/activist at a reception on
Sunday, April 7th from 1-3pm. Featuring prints of scenes
from a variety of local farms, including La Mera Gardens,
Fry Family Farms, and SSC’s own Quail Run Vineyard,
this!show continues through May 8th. Sales benefit La
Clinica and The Rising Stars. www.bettyladuke.com/
Art Around the Valley
“A Taste of Ashland” April 27 - 28, Noon - 4pm
In its twenty-fourth year, Ashland Gallery
Association presents an annual walking tour of
17 galleries, pairing 17 local restaurants and 17
regional wineries to create Ashland’s most
delicious art experience. For tickets and info:
www.tasteofashland.com or call 541-292-2302.
Classes & Workshops
Click on Events at soartists.com or Classes & Workshops
at Art Matters! for more art education opportunities.
Computer Skills for Artists
Hannah West offers workshops designed to
help artists with computer skills they need
to promote their work in the 21st century.
For more info and to sign up, email
soar@soartists.com or call 541-899-2012.
FREE Family Saturday!
April 13, Noon - 2pm
Drink & Draw: Art à la Carte!
Cost: $35 Members/$45 Public
Includes materials and wine!
• Friday, April 12, 6 - 9pm: Printmaking with Amy
Godard Navickas.
• Friday, April 26, 6 - 9pm: Mixed-Media Canvas with
Brooke Nuckles Gentekos.
More at roguegallery.org - 541-772-8118
www.soartists.com ~ soar@soartists.com
Art Event Calendar provided by
Hannah West Design, LLC ~ 541.899.2012
Jacksonville Friends of the Library will sponsor
a Book Sale May 4-5. Saturday hours will be
members pre-sale, 9:00-10:00am, 10:00am-4pm,
open to the public. Sunday open hours will be
12noon-3:30pm. Please bring donations to the library
during open hours. Help us continue to raise money
to keep the library open on Saturday.
Spring Book Sale
voices of the Applegate, a 25-member community
choir, presents its Spring concert series on Friday, April
12 at 7:30pm at the historic Jacksonville Presbyterian
Church, and again on Sunday, April 14 at 3:00pm
at the Applegate River Ranch House in Applegate.
Included in the program will be four wonderfully
ethereal madrigals from the 1500's, songs you might
hear at the Green Show before a Shakespeare play. "Ale
Brider" (All Brothers) is one of two Jewish folks songs,
sung in Yiddish, that add contrast and fun. A mystically
beautiful "23rd Psalm" by Bobby McFerrin provides
wonderful contrast between dissonance and resolution.
Finally, a set from the Mamas and Papas including
"California Dreamin'" will fll the concert hall with
rockin' nostalgia!
'Voices of the Applegate' Spring Concert Series
Ruch Branch
7919 Highway 238
541-899-7438
Storytime - Tuesday: 11:30am
Hours Open
Tuesday : 11-5
Thursday: 1–7
Saturday: Noon-4
Jacksonville Branch
340 W. “C” Street
541-899-1665
Storytime - Wednesday: 11am
Hours Open
Monday: Noon-5
Wednesday: 10-5
Thursday: 2-6
Saturday:10-2
For more library information, please visit www.jcls.org
Applegate Branch
18485 N. Applegate Rd.
541-846-7346
Hours Open
Tuesday: 2-6
Friday: 2-6
Saturday: 10-2
P U B L I C L I B R A R Y H O U R S & L O C A T I O N S
{541}8998000
245westmainstreet
jacksonville,or
(oneblocktobritt)
elanguestsuites.com
purepanache!
élanguestsuites&gallery
Tickets $20–$44
Limited $10 seats in
Medford and Grants Pass
Students $5
all concerts all season
Free concert talk with
Martin Majkut one hour
before each concert
Tickets Online
rvsymphony.org
Phone 541-552-6398
Martin
Majkut
Music Director
Alive and gorgeous —
the sound of
symphony
7:30pm Friday, April 19
SOU Music Recital Hall, Ashland
7:30pm Saturday, April 20
Craterian Theater, Medford
3:00pm Sunday, April 21
GP Performing Arts Center,
Grants Pass
Tchaikovsky
Symphony No. 6
“Pathétique”
Yoshimatsu
Cyber-bird
Concerto
Rhett Bender, SAXOPHONE
Alexander Tutunov, Piano &
Terry Longshore, Percussion
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 21 April 2013
A Cup of Conversation by
Michael Kell of GoodBean Coffee
Fraternity of Suffering
Under the title, “Music from
the Backyard & Front Porch,”
internationally-acclaimed musician
Lauren Pelon will appear
in a unique concert at
the Jacksonville Branch
Library on Sunday, April
14, 2013 from 3:00-4:00pm.
Pelon will perform on
approximately twenty
ancient and modern
wind, string and free-reed
instruments and voice.
This program of
American music features
the music of America's
indigenous peoples, as
well as the songs and
instruments of America's
many immigrants and
Pelon's own compositions.
Among the instruments
she will be using are Dakota courting
fute, concertina, pennywhistle, ocarina,
eagle bone fute, guitar, recorder and
psalmodikon, all prominent in the history
of Midwest culture. Other instruments
include guitar-lute, archlute, bowed
psaltery, lyre, hurdy-
gurdy, gemshorns,
cornamuse, krummhorn,
schreierpfeife, shawm,
electric wind instrument
and pedalboard.
Lauren Pelon has
performed throughout
the U.S. and in China,
Canada, England,
Ireland, Scotland, Russia,
Kazakhstan, Australia,
and New Zealand.
Presented by Jacksonville
Friends of the Library, a
donation of $5 would be
appreciated to help fund
Saturday hours at the
Jacksonville Library.
For more information, please contact the
Jacksonville Branch Library at 541-899-1665
or Annete McGregor at 541-899-1088.
Lauren Pelon Returning to Jacksonville
for Unique Musical Program
The second Saturday of every month
Crater Rock Museum ofers special
events, just for Kids! Saturday, April 13,
go on a ThunderEGG hunt! Following
a presentation about our Oregon State
Rock, the Thunderegg, explore the
inside of an egg, your own egg and see
what treasure is inside! Maybe Casper
the Friendly Ghost? Or, how about
Mickey Mouse? One never knows with
Thundereggs and Geodes. Or, as Forest
Gump's mom would say, it's, "...like a
box of chocolates, you never know what
you'll get!" And don't forget to visit our
Rock Yard! Just like a real rock hound,
dig through our treasure trove of rocks!
Children, classes & materials, are FREE;
Adults - $4.00; Seniors - $2.00; classes are
every hour, 10:00am-3:00pm. 2002 Scenic
Avenue, Central Point.
Contact Kids Day coordinator, Karen Rogers
at krogers1952@me.com or call 541-664-6081.
Kids Day at Crater Rock Museum on April 13!
David Katski and his son are happy campers
after fnding just what they wanted in the
museum’s rock yard.
Oregon’s Favorite Coffee
2013
165 S Oregon St., Jacksonville
F
or the last
few years
I’ve been
tracking the struggle of some around me
in the hurricane of health. The reality of
sufering is never real until its gnarled
knuckles rap hard on your own door.
Sufering has many harsh faces and I
know the profles of some only too well.
Life is not unlike a chair with three
legs. Family, livelihood, and health all
provide a fundamental foundation to
our earthly well-being. With three sturdy
legs underneath, things are reasonably
balanced and predictable. Lose the
integrity of just one and life gets very
challenging but still manageable. Lose
two and pretend for a while, but you’re
going down. Lose the third and life itself
becomes the afiction.
Knowing deep sufering is an
intellectual exercise until it touches your
skin. Even Job, a blameless man in God’s
eyes took the news of great loss prety
well. This wealthiest and most respected
of men frst loses everything material then
his beloved sons in just the next breath.
Two legs of the foundation gone but still
upright with faith to say it is God who
gives and God who takes away. Yet it
was the third leg, health, which sent him
to the ash heap. When left with only a
defeated, bereaved spouse inciting him to
curse God and die did he start asking the
hard questions. There’s a test.
About fve years ago, I was struck by
a strange illness which just about was
the end of me, certainly life as I knew it.
Losing sixty pounds in no time and the
strength to go with it without answers
from the doctors pushed life into the red
zone for man and family. Sick without
answers is an entirely diferent dynamic
complete with guessing doctors and
unsolicited opinions from those who
know it all except when to keep silent. By
the time a diagnosis came almost a full
year later just a shell of a man remained
worth more dead than alive, at least
according to the life insurance policy.
Truth be told, I was fne with the frst
option. A toxin in the gut and then in the
brain rendered me useless, frighteningly
weak. It was another few years before
I was out of the red zone but with no
surety of ever seeing good health again.
The damage from this personal storm is
incalculable. Not being able to work for
years strung together doesn’t mesh for
a man with a business to run, payroll
to meet, vendors to pay and bankers to
satisfy. And that’s the least of it. There are
no words for what marriage and family
endured. Our daughter was thirteen
when her dad went down and by the time
he got back up she was graduated. Ask
me what I’d give to have those years back.
It’s unconscionably difcult for a
man to lose his strength before his time.
Men generally won’t speak of such
things choosing instead a quiet, private
desperation. I still don’t know what’s
worse for a man, being fragile or have
others see him as fragile. I remember
staring into my wife’s frightened eyes
early in the storm trying to describe what
was going on in my soul. For a man to
lose his strength is akin to a woman losing
her beauty both inward and outward.
Imagine her waking one morning looking
deep into the mirror knowing she was
forever repugnant to herself and the rest
of the world?
I’ll soon be over the six-hundred words
alloted me here and haven’t begun to
sound the depths of misery in chronic
illness or the unbridled joy of healing. For
me it’s a spiritual journey. I walk it daily
with my faithful Lord but it’s mostly
a pilgrimage made alone even when
surrounded by those who care. There
is something unspeakably priceless on
the other side of great sufering but only
to those almost through. Someone once
said in our greatest weakness we fnd our
greatest strength. Hmm…how painfully,
poignantly true.
michael@goodbean.com
Come celebrate local food,
wine and beer at the 2013 Rogue
valley Wine & Food Festival
held at the Medford Armory on
April 19 & 20. The event kicks-of
Spring by exploring the culinary
talents, delicious wine and tasty
beers of Southern Oregon while
ofering one-stop shopping,
classes and lots of live music in
a “buy local” atmosphere. The
event runs Friday, April 19th
from 6:00pm to 10:00pm and Saturday,
April 20th from 12:00noon to 6:00pm. For
wine enthusiasts, don’t miss the Friday
night soiree, featuring live music in a
date night theme. On Saturday,
enjoy a full day of family fun
with more live music, classes,
delicious samples and activities
for the whole family! All
proceeds beneft Sacred Heart
Catholic School and a scholarship
program with the Southern
Oregon Wine Institute for a
local youth. Featured partners
include: Valley View Winery,
Serra Vineyards, Kriselle Cellars,
Ledger David Cellars, Full Sail Brewery,
Figgy's Food Truck, Wine Hopper Tours
of Southern Oregon, Vintner Kitchen,
Eola Hills Winery and many more.
Rogue Valley Wine & Food Festival
Jacksonville Review Page 22 April 2013
My Neighbor's Garden
by Kay Faught
...behind the BLUEDOOR
541.899.3242 • 155 north 3rd street • jacksonville
HURRY IN!
NEW shipments are in...and
great new GARDEN PIECES
MADE IN OREGON!
Get your garden READY...
SPRING IS HERE!
OBELISKS...TRELLISES...
STAKES...Oh my!
T
his month,
I visited
Leslie Vidal’s
garden at her new
“old” Jacksonville
home. Leslie left the busy Portland life
and moved here just over a year ago,
purchasing the historic 1867 Turner
House on 5th Street. Many locals are
familiar with Leslie’s large, back lot
between her home on 5th Street and the
Historic Presbyterian Church and just
how long the lot has been barren.
After moving in, her frst task was
converting the backyard which was all
astro-turf into a lovely patio and garden
retreat as many of us curious locals
watched the changes with excitement!
Although Leslie had a full plan in mind,
she was aware of the restrictions she
faced prior to any of it coming to fruition.
An interesting set of issues afected her
goals including the property backing to
Daisy Creek and having her yard bisected
by a 25 foot creek side “riparian zone.”
As such, she enlisted a local landscaper
to help with layout and planting that
conformed to city and historic restrictions.
She also met with
the Oregon Fish and
Wildlife Department
to determine the
planting and permits
needed for the zone
and creek area. She
speaks highly of
how easily it went,
and even received a
water conservation grant from the Fish
and Wildlife Department for the creek
side restoration. With all that in place, and
permission from the landowners of the
area on the other side of the creek, Leslie
then planted more trees.
As I strolled her new “retreat,” I fell in
love with the features she has added as
we talked about the fun of starting out
a garden with blank land. Of the back
patio, large stepping stones lead you to
the side of the home where they bridge a
large “rain garden” fed by
rain runof. You can tell it
is one of her favorite spots, and I too was
excited at seeing new shrubbery and the
potential of that shaded area. At the time,
nubs of daylilies were showing as well
as new Oregon grape plants and a lone
Rhododendron starting its journey!
My favorite feature in the yard is a
beautiful new “people pond” which is
only 2 feet deep that converts the back area
to a very special space, with Leslie’s own
fare. The pool ofers a cooling space for
her friends, but due to the 2' depth, there
are no “pool” guidelines! Massive square
stones create the pool while a raised
cascading waterfall creates a natural sound
and sight barrier from the street.
Gravel walkways meander through the
back area alongside new grasses, shrubs,
and the deep colored twigs of red twig
dogwood bushes. As we walked and
talked more, Leslie pointed out the new
raised garden beds awaiting veggies and
pots awaiting new summer annuals. With
the addition of heathers, rosemary, and
more drought-tolerant plants, she is really
excited about the new plant-scape!
What fun adventure
and gardening joy lies
ahead, and anticipation
and excitement over
the relaxing summer
evenings watching her
new garden. As new as it
all is, Leslie already has
a favorite time of day—
early morning out on the
patio with her cofee in-hand watching
birds create new homes in her garden!
Enjoy it Leslie and THANK YOU for
jumping through hoops to create your
new yard and allowing us to join you in
the journey at the same time!
Kay is the owner of Blue Door Garden
Store, located at 155 N Third St. Specializing
in paraphernalia for the home gardener; she
carries garden gifts, decor, and a wide variety
of pots, tools, gloves, and organic product.
See ad this page.
more
online
3223 Taylor Road • Central Point • 541.840.6453
ENTER TO WIN our
Spruce Up Your Yard
Contest and get your
garden transformation
started right.
Send us your before photo of your
yard and we will choose one to
receive a free landscape design
and consult.*
Photos can be emailed or posted
to our Facebook page. Visit
www.roguevalleynursery.com.
Winner will be announced May 10, 2013.
*Includes design and consult only, not installation
or plants.
Need help
figuring out how to prune?
Register for our Saturday classes at
www.roguevalleynursery.com/class
SHOOTING STAR
NURSERY
wholesale • retail • design & consultation
Win a free
landscape
consultation
15095 Hwy 238, Applegate, OR
541-846-6659
Stay at a real country farm
on the Applegate River!
13291 Hwy 238, Applegate, OR
Call for information and reservations: 541-941-0000
Weekend or nightly, rustic bunkhouse-style country home
away from home sleeps up to fve. One bedroom with
king-size bed, one queen & twin bunk, kitchen & large
bathroom, gas freplace, TV, movies & board games.
Store • Cafe • Gas • ATM
Espresso • Deli • Beer & Wine
Open 7days a week!
Applegate Store & Cafe
Horsefeather Farms Ranchette
Bring the kids! Pet friendly!
Saturday Mornings
at Shooting Star Nursery
Shooting Star Nursery is ofering a
wide array of Saturday morning classes
on caring for your plants and trees.
Unless otherwise noted, all classes begin
at 10:00am and will be held at the nursery.
For parents, there are some age-appropriate
classes and there will be a sandbox, treasure
hunt, and some kid-friendly activities and
refreshments available.
•April 6th, Pruning Woody Perennials—
Confused on when and how to prune back
lavenders and other woody perennials?
This is the safe time of year to prune and
we’ll show you how far to prune and why.
Registration $5, plus receive a 10% of gift
certifcate. Bring gloves and pruners.
•April 13th, 9:00am-11:00am Landscape
Professionals Open House—Join us
for cofee and refreshments and take
a leisurely stroll around our nursery
and learn about new varieties we have
this year and what’s being grown and
planned for the rest of the season.
Please RSVP- this class is for landscape
professionals and contractors only.
•April 20th, Deer resistant plants—
Tired of the deer chewing all of your
beautiful plants and ruining your hard
work? Think that Juniper is the only thing
that is deer-proof? Let us show you some
of the more deer resistant plants based
on our extensive experience in the Rogue
Valley—many of which you may not
have seen before! Registration fee-$5, plus
receive a 10% of gift certifcate.
•April 27th, Spruce-up Your Yard
Event— In coordination with the City
of Central Point, we’re ofering 15% of
all trees to anyone sprucing-up their
yard this Arbor Day weekend! Enter our
Spruce-up Your Yard contest to win a
free landscape consultation. Send us a
“before” photo of your yard and we’ll
choose one winner who will receive a free
landscape design and consult. Get free
advice on how to give your yard a mini
makeover. Please bring photos and/or
measurements. Photos can be emailed or
posted to our Facebook page. Winner will
be announced May 10th.
•May 4th and 5th, Master Gardener
Spring Fair at the Expo Center—come see
us at the fair! We will have many unusual
plants, edibles, and poted arrangements
that you may not have seen at the nursery.
For the entire schedule of classes for May
and June, please see our website at www.
roguevalleynursery.com. See ad this page.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 23 April 2013
artisanlandscapesinc.com
Love Your Landscape by Adam Haynes
Create Your Own Adventure
Adam Haynes is the owner of Artisan Landscapes, Inc.
Contact him at 541-292-3285, adam@artisanlandscapesinc.
com, or visit his website at www.artisanlandscapesinc.com.
See ad this page.
The Weed Wrangler by Bob Budesa
W
hile the last few
months may not
have been the most
opportune for building outdoors
or planting, they provided time
to think about my work and all
its implications. My job has a defnite practical side with
the construction projects I complete, but there is also so
much creativity and design involved in the way I spend
my time. That’s what I love most
about my work: creating, designing,
and seeing the dramatic changes
that can afect the overall look and
feel of a property. It’s what keeps me
interested in the whole process of
landscape design and construction.
Looking back on the work I’ve
done over the last decade or so,
I’d have to say one of my favorite
projects was a two-level fagstone
patio. This particular project stood
out because of a number of elements.
First, I loved the proportion of the entire design—there
was a small upper pool that cascaded into a lower pool,
over a large fat fagstone, creating a sheer sheet of water
falling into the pool below. This two-tier water feature was
the focal point of the outdoor living area. The transition
from the upper patio to the lower patio was built with
large stone steps that had a slight spiral efect. The upper
fagstone patio was also equipped with an outdoor gas
grill. This project was also special because of the overall
feel the components created together—an inviting space
that provided a great location to relax alone and/or
entertain guests.
If you are among the many homeowners who have a
desire to spend more time outside and enjoy the benefts
of nature even more than you are now, don’t’ be afraid to
start. Even smaller backyard landscapes can be dramatically
changed with subtle design changes and atention to key
elements. I know how much enjoyment a homeowner
can derive from an outdoor living area and how much
enjoyment one can receive from a beautiful landscape. The
quality of life a great landscape can add is priceless.
When it comes to landscaping design and the changes
we can make to improve our quality of life, there are a
few things that are important to
remember. While it sounds like a
paradox, any outdoor living area
should start with the style of the
inside of the home. The feel of the
landscape design and style should
fow from the inside of the home to
the outside. Outdoor rooms should
provide a seamless feel with the
interior of the home.
Regardless of budget, or existing
outdoor elements, any outdoor
space can be upgraded with some
strategic changes. In my experience, I’ve found a handful
of components that always seem to make an outdoor
living area complete. And when planning a landscape
design, I would consider any or all of the following
elements: water, outdoor heat, fre pits or freplaces,
varieties of plantings, several specimen trees and shrubs
that add interest and appeal, outdoor lighting, outdoor
rooms and pathways, and of course, a swimming pool.
When all these elements come together, what results is
not just a landscape, it’s an adventure…
U
h-oh! They’re heeeere.
The weather is warming
up, and that means
weeds are sprouting. The weeds
we should be most concerned
about are noxious weeds—those
that, by defnition, cause economic loss, and harm
the environment. Noxious weeds choke-out crops,
destroy range and pasture lands, clog waterways,
afect human and animal health, decrease property
values, and threaten native plant communities.
Most of Oregon’s least desirable noxious weeds
are of European, Mediterranean, and Asian origin.
The weeds on your property are, of course, your
business. As a temporary property owner, (that’s
right, nobody gets out of this life alive) it’s your
duty and obligation to take care of your property
to the best of your ability! This should not come as a
surprise! And, what you don’t do with your property
(weed control) is just as important as what you do and
can adversely afect your neighbors, so be considerate
and control your weeds!
The one weed we’re most familiar with around here is
Yellow Starthistle (Centaurea solsticialis). A tap-rooted,
winter annual, it loves warm, south-facing slopes, but
given the chance, will occupy almost any un-shaded
piece of ground. Seed output can be as high at 30,000
seeds per square meter, with about 95% of the seed being
viable soon after dispersal. Most seeds germinate within
a year of dispersal, but some can remain viable in the soil
for many years.
This is not a difcult weed to kill, but one has to be
persistent if one expects to get rid of it. If you’ve got
starthistle on your property, you can bet there’s seed in
the soil that will germinate either later this year, or next
year, or the year after that, so you’ve got to be persistent.
Don’t give up.
Annual weeds, like starthistle, will succumb to a
variety of treatments, from shovels and hoes, mowing
and burning, to herbicides, goats, and insects. Five
species of insects, or biological controls, have been
released for over 20 years in Oregon, so don’t invest too
much time or energy in that method. Besides, insects are
prety much a last-ditch efort. You’ve
got other tools, with more immediate
results, at your disposal. Pull, dig,
mow, chop, disk, burn, or spray—
they’re all viable tools to control this
annual weed. Just do it before yellow
fowers appear (because seeds will
be produced shortly thereafter). If
you start treating plants after fower
production, cut the fowers of, and
bag them for disposal later. By doing
this, you’ve prevented production of seed, and you can
kill the remaining plant at your leisure. Remember,
if you decide to spray, READ AND FOLLOW THE
PRODUCT LABEL COMPLETELY.
As mentioned in last month’s article, the best time
to treat weeds is prior to seed production, which for
starthistle is as early as late June. That doesn’t mean you
have to wait until June —get busy as soon as you fnd it!
To learn more (since I don’t have a lot of space here), go
to htp://oregon.gov/ODA/PLANT/WEEDS/. This website is
one of the best, but if you’re armed with a computer, you
already know how to search for information, don’t you?
Next month, Puncturevine!
If you have any questions, please feel free to call me at 541-
326-2549, or email me at bob_budesa@yahoo.com.
Bob Budesa moved to Jacksonville 20 years ago, retired
from BLM after 38 years where he oversaw the noxious weed
program with Medford District BLM (850,000 acres) for 20
years, worked in Wild Horse Program in 1970’s and was a
member of JWA for 2 years.
Jackson County Expo-Fairgrounds
1 Peninger Road, Central Point
Fall 2013 Location TBA
$5.00 FEE
per household
*Businesses & large loads:
$5.00 per yard
pedicures
541-899-5611 for men
190 E. California Street - Jacksonville www.daisycreeknailspa.net
DaisyCreek
Nail Spa and Waxing Boutique
women
&
facial tech Catherine Bileau,
Welcome
541 941 0694
IonCleanse Foot Detox tech Kathy Gee,
541 621 8785
facials
manicures
&
Where style meets elegance.
155 West California Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillecompany.com
Jacksonville Company
Jacksonville Review Page 24 April 2013
“I’ve been drinking this water for
years, and it hasn’t killed me yet!” Here
at Quality Water Systems, we wish we
had a nickel for every time we’ve heard
that line over the past 20 years. Last year,
a client told us her water WAS killing her
after living on the same well for a long
time. Over the past year, she had become
sicker with multiple trips to many doctors.
Finally, her doctors discovered that her
body was full of arsenic. After testing her
well, we discovered that she had been
consuming high levels of arsenic. Because
arsenic has no odor or taste she was
unaware that it was in her water.
Arsenic is a potential concern to those
in Southern Oregon who are not on
municipally-treated water since our area
has a high level of natural arsenic deposits.
Arsenic is tasteless, odorless, and invisible.
Unlike E-coli bacterium which makes you
sick right away, the health efects from
arsenic are not immediate.
The health impact from arsenic depends
on its chemical form, how much is
consumed, and for how long. Long-term
exposure may cause a number of harmful
efects on the human body, including
nervous system efects, skin changes,
and several circulatory diseases. For our
client, the symptoms crept-up slowly and
were constantly geting worse.
To be sure your water is arsenic-free,
the best approach is to have it tested by
our local, certifed lab here in the Rogue
Valley—Neilson Research in Medford.
Quality Water Systems can come out and
conduct a site survey and draw a sample
for you. We fnd arsenic at various levels
throughout all of Southern Oregon: in
2005 the EPA changed its allowable limit
from .050 MG/L to .010 MG/L. We have
found levels ranging from .010MG/L to
.400MG/L in the area.
If you fnd arsenic in your water,
selecting a removal system can be very
confusing and expensive – it’s important
to look at all options when considering a
treatment plan. In the case cited above, we
removed the arsenic from the well water
and our client is now feeling much beter
and her health is improving every day.
For more information about this article,
or other water topics, please contact David
Funderburk at 541-245-7470 or davidqws@
hotmail.com. See ad this page.
Troubled Waters: The Poison in Your Well
by David Funderburk of Quality Water Systems
Now in its 34th year, the Spring
Garden Fair is the largest event of its
kind between San Francisco and Portland.
More than 7,000 gardeners atended last
year’s event. This year, the fair is on
Saturday, May 5 from 9:00am-5:00pm and
Sunday, May 6 from 10:00am-4:00pm at
the Jackson County
Expo Center.
You’ll discover an
astonishing array of
healthy plants, quality
products and priceless
expert advice. You’ll
also feel the buzz
as hundreds of
like-minded garden-
lovers, families and
friends converge at the
Jackson County Fairgrounds for two full
days of education, fact-fnding and fun.
Here’s some of what you’ll fnd this year:
• More than 150 vendors, growers
and exhibitors—the fnest, most
authoritative garden experts plus
many local vendors you won’t see at
other area venues.
• Free classes on hot new topics,
including changing weather paterns
in Southern Oregon, how to avoid
aches and pains from working in
the garden, how to participate in
Community Gardens throughout the
Rogue Valley, and Permaculture with
Tom Ward: The smart way to build
beter soil and save water.
• Locally-handcrafted textiles. By
popular demand, this new category
features beautiful, functional items
designed and created by local artisans.
• Great prices on new hybrid plants as
well as old favorites—all acclimatized
to thrive in Rogue Valley gardens.
• Free plant clinic with expert advice from
Master Gardeners for growing beter
plants and safely eliminating pests.
• More helpful demonstrations
than ever, including how to make
perfect compost at home, growing
great tomatoes, controlling weeds,
managing pests and more.
• Landscape and garden exhibits
designed and built by local
contractors and nurseries.
• Free well water testing for nitrates
(bring a sample)—plus tips on how
to keep your septic tank at peak
performance.
• Discount prices on Rogue Valley
Garden Guides—the “must-have”
resource for local gardens, writen
and compiled by local Master
Gardeners.
Admission is $3.00. Kids under 15 are
free with plenty of free parking, too.
See ad this page.
Master Gardener's
2013 Spring Garden Fair is May 5 & 6
Spring Garden Fair
34th Annual
Best Garden Show & Plant Sale between Portland & San Francisco

This event is produced by the Master Gardener
tm
Association of Jackson County in collaboration
with and support of the Oregon State University
Extension Master Gardener Program.
Compton Arena
Jackson County Expo
Saturday, May 4 9am - 5pm
Sunday, May 5 10am - 4pm
Admission $3
Children 15 and under free
Free Parking
Over 150 Exhibitors and vendors
Free gardening classes both days
The Master Gardener Association
TM
of Jackson County
Meet Your Farmer – Rock Field Farms
by Linda Davis
T
ired of city life in Medford, kreg
and Angie Boudro found 10 acres
of land with an
old farmhouse out in the
hills of Eagle Point. Angie
was raised on a farm, and
has degrees in Animal
Science and Agricultural
Communications. Kreg
grew up in a farming
community. Starting a farm
on their new property was
a natural, but rocky ft—the
farm had terrible soil, was
loaded with rocks, did
not have much water, and
had very litle fat land for
traditional farming.
So, the Boudros got
creative, using a variety of
innovative methods to make Rock Field
Farm produce beautiful, delicious organic
produce. They turned to aquaponics
which is a completely sustainable method
of farming. Rock Field Farm was the frst
commercial farm in Jackson County to use
aquaponic methods for farming.
Kreg and Angie’s farming is facilitated
by fsh! They maintain approximately
900 tilapia in a covered 9’ by 8’ by 4’ tank
on an uphill slope of their farm. The fsh
are fed 4 times per day and their waste
provides the nutrients for the plants. This
water from the fsh tank fows through
the farms many vegetable gardens where
the fsh waste is broken down by helpful
bacteria in the water. The plants use these
by-products as fertilizer. The cleansed
water is recirculated back to the fsh.
Another innovative water saving
farming method is the use of wicking
beds. Plastic lined reservoirs are placed
below raised beds and then flled with
water that naturally rises to water the
plants. The plants are heavily mulched to
minimize water evaporation. This results
in watering every 7 to 10 days instead of
every day. Mulching also helps keep the
weeds down.
The Boudros have also introduced
hugelkultur beds as another of their
permaculture techniques. With this
methodology, soil is
piled on wood, which
holds substantial
amounts of water as
it decomposes. The
Boudros planted
tomatoes in their
hugelkultur beds last
year. The tomatoes
growing in these
hugelkulfur beds need
watering only 3 times
a year.
The Boudros
produce organic
produce all year long.
In the winter they use
hoophouse hut styled
plastic coverings over their vegetable
beds. When the weather gets warmer,
they change out the plastic for shadecloth.
Rock Field Farms produces many
diferent types of vegetables including 4
to 5 types of kale, 5-10 varieties of letuce,
collard greens, mustard greens, lemon
spinach, vitamin greens, dandelion
greens, garlic chives, Jerusalem artichokes,
claytonia, pack choy, mizuna, hot mustard,
watercress, and tomatoes. Kreg also keeps
bees; the honey is available in season on a
frst-come, frst served basis! You can fnd
these wonderful veggies at the Ashland
Tuesday Farmer’s Market, and the Medford
Thursday Farmer’s Market. At the market,
Angie hands out recipes on how to prepare
all of this wonderful produce. You can also
buy tilapia by contacting the farm at kreg@
rockfeldfarms.net.
As an interesting aside, Kreg and Angie
have planted “no mow” grass which uses
¼ of the water of other grasses. They mow
it once in the spring and once in the fall.
Kreg and Angie believe in sustainability
and buying local. They have chickens
and ducks which produce eggs and meat;
they grow most of their own vegetables;
and they buy additional meat from local
ranchers. They are passionate about
having high quality produce.
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 25 April 2013
Books for kigutu, a small Medford
charity working to bring books to
children in Burundi, East Africa hosted
a fun-flled evening at Frau Kemmling
Schoolhaus Brewhaus on February 16.
Over 218 books were donated to celebrate
International Book Giving Day.
"We want to thank the staf at Frau
Kemmling for their warm welcome and
support," Books for Kigutu founder
Katherine Leppek, said.
The group has an ongoing need
for books and donations. For more
information visit www.booksforkigutu.com or
contact Katherine Leppek at 541-944-2082.
Book Drive for Kigutu a Success
S
torytelling is an art that has always
been a way to share personal or
meaningful experiences. Today,
there is a growing interest in Life Story
writing as discussed in recent articles
in The Wall Street Journal and The New
York Times, urging us to record our life
lessons and values just like we choose to
write a will and pass along our valuables
to those we love.
Since early childhood, I’ve been
fascinated by listening to my parents and
grandparents share their stories which
always included some crossroads or serious
dilemma looming in the background. I felt
that many stories gave me another glimpse
into the real woman my grandmother was
and not just this older woman in front of me
who’d grown tired and weary.
As I grew into adulthood, it was natural
for me to draw out stories from strangers
who would often tell
me, “I’ve never told
anyone that before.”
My passion and
interest in listening to
people tell their story
has continued—since
2002 I have conducted
“Write Your Life Story”
workshops, working
with individuals to record their stories.
Since writing an entire life history can be
overwhelming, I specialize in helping others
write specifc stories, not necessarily a long
history from birth to present day.
We all desire to be understood. By
telling our own story we have a chance
to have the ‘last word’ so to speak—an
opportunity to share your values, dreams
and lessons learned. You may not be
rich or famous but you still want to be
remembered and recording your stories
can be an important means to that end.
Sample Snippets of Life Stories:
• Grandma was an interesting
woman who didn’t openly share
her supernatural beliefs and earlier
practices of palm reading. As her
grandchildren grew older, they
uncovered writings of grandma
predicting future events for citizens
in their small town that actually came
true. How fun it was to discover this
secret about grandma and her gifts.
• Sally walked out on her husband and
small children and moved to California
searching for a beter life. Her life was
a story of heartbreak that eventually
ended in suicide. Remaining family
members didn’t understand Sally’s
actions until her sister was interviewed
and shed light on the painful details
of losing both of their parents and
being left to care for remaining
siblings. Knowing more about Sally’s
pain helped family members beter
understand her and to forgive.
• A story of courage and bravery
comes full circle when a man jumps
from a train into icy water to save a
drowning boy in the same river he
played as a child. Fifty years later,
the boy who was saved writes a leter
about this experience to be shared at
his hero’s funeral.
Check the upcoming
editions of the Jacksonville
Review to read more about
these Life Stories and for
tips on how you can begin
recording your own stories
for future generations.
Michele is an inspirational
lecturer and workshop
facilitator; she has been a published author,
magazine editor and corporate trainer.
She most enjoys her work as a Life Story
workshop facilitator and memoir writer.
For more information about Life Story
workshops and writing services please
contact Michele at 541-899-3205 or email
micheleruthbrown@gmail.com or visit her
blog at Tellmeyourstorynow.wordpress.com.
Tell Me Your Story
by Michele Brown, Writer and Workshop Facilitator
Christian Hamilton, Principal Broker
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Jacksonville Review Page 26 April 2013
Kiwanis Honors February
Student of the Month
Achievement
Rebecca Naumes | Director of Admission | rnaumes@smschool.us | 541.414.1206
www.smschool.us
Your Child’s Future
Your Best Investment
Purposeful Learning
SAT Scores 250+ points higher
than the Oregon average.
Open House for Prospective Families
Wednesday, April 17 at 6:30pm
Grades 6–12
FIND OUT WHY.
St. Mary's School, located today in east
Medford, was founded in Jacksonville
during the gold rush days of 1865 by the
Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and
Mary. Originally housed on California
Street, the school, known then as St.
Mary's Academy, graduated its frst
student in 1871.
The pioneering spirit continues in the
school to this day, even after the 1908
move to Medford and the shift in 1920
to a coeducational
school. Today
St. Mary’s ofers
southern Oregon
outstanding
academics through
an AP-focused
college preparatory
program. The St.
Mary’s curriculum
is the strongest
and broadest in the
region, and it all begins in middle school
where students receive the foundation
of their St. Mary’s education in the best
traditions of Catholic education, morality,
and social service. Middle School students
study the ancient world, the Middle Ages,
and American History in addition to
foreign languages, mathematics, physical
education, art, religion, music, and science.
Upper School students read classic
works of literature, including The
Odyssey, The Inferno, Beowulf, and works
by Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne,
Poe, and many others. Seniors are able
to prepare for the AP Literature and
Composition exam by taking courses like
English Victorian Literature, Twentieth
Century Irish Literature, Literature of
the First World War, and Literature of
the Grotesque. The Mathematics and
Science Departments ofer a very strong
curriculum, with multiple Advanced
Placement courses such as Calculus,
Chemistry, Biology, Physics, and
Environmental
Science.
With 20 AP
Courses, a 100%
graduation
rate, 99% of the
graduates atending
institutions of
higher education,
and last year’s
seniors receiving
over $6.1 million
in grants and scholarships, St. Mary’s
School is the pioneer of education in
southern Oregon. Perhaps that’s why so
many modern-day Jacksonville pioneers
send their children to St. Mary’s.
To fnd out more about St. Mary's
School, please join us at our Open House
for Prospective Families on Wednesday,
April 17th at 6:30pm. See ad below.
For more information, please visit our
website at www.smschool.us or contact
Director of Admission, Rebecca Naumes at
rnaumes@smschool.us or 541-414-1206.
St. Mary’s School Founded in Jacksonville
M
arch was a short month of
school days due to Spring
Break, but the Pioneers
were not short on fun school activities
to partake in! We started of the month
with our frst ever Pioneer Bingo/Auction
night. PTO parent, Emily Johnson,
spearheaded this efort with help from
many. It was a huge success and tons
of fun! We hope to do another Bingo
night next year. The excitement in March
continued as
we held our 9th
annual student art
show on March
21st. This year's
show titled "For
the Love of Art"
was another big
success! Many
thanks to all
of our artists,
parent volunteers,
teachers,
community sponsors, Art Program
Director Jessicca Haynes and Art Show
Co-Directors Christin Sherbourne and
Jessicca Haynes. Great job everyone!
Our Writer's Workshop &
Festival planning is in full swing.
This month, the PTO-sponsored
Jacksonville Elementary
Publishing House will publish
the school’s 2012-2013 Student
Anthology. This hardback, professionally
bound book will be presented to our
principal, Mr. Snyder, at the Jacksonville
Elementary third annual Writers'
Festival. Copies also will be given to the
school library and to each classroom.
Every student at Jacksonville Elementary
is a published author!
The 3rd Annual Jacksonville
Elementary School’s Writers’ Festival
will be held on Thursday, May 2 from
6:00-8:00pm in the school gymnasium.
Author and Illustrator, Kurt Cyrus, will
be the event’s keynote speaker. Mr. Cyrus
is the author and illustrator of numerous
children’s books, including The Voyage
of Turtle Rex, Tadpole Rex, and Hotel
Deep. He has also illustrated a number
of books such as Hibernation Station and
Mammoths on the Move. The Writers’
Festival is a school-wide event, featuring
the work of every student at Jacksonville
Elementary. During the festival, students
meet in small groups with local authors,
journalists, educators and other writing
enthusiasts who serve as mentors and
facilitate a discussion of each student’s
writing. If you are interested in serving
as a small-group mentor, please contact
event coordinator, Amy Kranenburg, at
amy.kranenburg@gmail.com. Thank you for
supporting and
celebrating our
young authors!
On another
note, did you
know that our
school can earn
$.10 for every Box
Top we turn in?
Don't know what
a "Box Top" is? A
Box Top is a litle
label that you can
fnd on many everyday items you already
purchase. They can be found on Kleenex
boxes, granola bars, cereal boxes, Ziploc
baggy boxes, etc... They are everywhere!
We would love for
the community to
get involved and
clip box tops for
us. Our students
already bring them
in throughout the year, but think how
much money we could raise for the school
if the community clipped them for us,
too? You may drop of envelopes of them
(please label envelope with "Community
Box Tops") throughout the year at our
front desk. Thank you for your support of
Jacksonville Elementary School!
Madrone Trail Public Charter School
invites everyone to join them for the 6th-
annual May Faire, a joyous occasion and
celebration of the school on Saturday,
May 4 from 11:00am–4:00pm. The school
is located just outside Jacksonville at 3070
Ross Lane in Central Point.
The day will ofer Maypole dancing,
music, food and festivities, as well as activity
booths and vendors. Come and make a May
crown or magic wand and get your face
painted. Make a fairy house or bird feeder,
or atempt to get a treasure from the Sleeping
Giant. Just as Mother Nature dresses up in
white blossoms in the spring, come dressed
in your white fnery for the occasion.
The Maypole celebration features the
faculty singing, a community welcome,
waking of the May Queen with fowers
and a song and then her walk to the
throne with singing, fute playing and
dancing by the children. At the dance’s
end, Principal Frodsham and the May
Queen will tie May pole ribbons.
Admission to the event is free. Tickets
will be sold on-site for activity booths,
food and drinks. Food for sale includes
burgers, hot dogs, hummus wraps, chips
and pickles and baked goods. Locally-
made items will be sold by vendors. All
proceeds will support Madrone Trail
Public Charter School.
For more information about the event,
details about becoming a vendor or to learn
more about Madrone Trail Public Charter
School and our Waldorf Insprired Eduction
please visit our website: www.madronetrail.org.
See ad this page.
Celebrate May Faire at Madrone Trail School
Triston Brooks, a senior at South
Medford High School, was honored as
Student of the Month for February by the
Kiwanis Club of Jacksonville.
Triston is the son of Jason Brooks of
Jacksonville, and carries a 3.8 grade point
average. Besides the usual basic academic
courses, he has studied Psychology, Law,
French, Graphic Design, Engineering and
Drafting, and Metal Fabrication.
His artistic capabilities led him to
be selected to present a sculpture of a
saxophone as the representative for Metal
Fabrication at a recent school assembly.
His immediate goal is to establish
residency in California and earn money
to atend college there, possibly in
Berkeley. He would like to eventually
create his own business, one that would
allow him to travel.
People who have infuenced him
besides his father, are N. Tyson for
his dedication to spreading scientifc
literacy, and Richard Branson for his
entrepreneurial genius.
He sees himself as a very laid-back
individual who tends to be somewhat
unique in his point of view, and often
times likes to debate people just to
stimulate thought and conversation.
The Kiwanis were pleased to have
Triston and his father, Jason, in
atendance at their March 13th meeting.
For further information, contact Dave Wilson
at 541- 899-1934, e-mail: elkhntr@charter.net.
Triston Brooks and Kiwanis' Dave Wilson
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 27 April 2013
Family Views
by Michelle Hensman
Scared Celibate
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On Thursday, February 21st,
Jacksonville Cub Scout Pack 17 held their
Blue & Gold Dinner. This was a potluck
with all the Cub Scout families atending
for an evening of constructive fun and
awards. Three members of the Kiwanis
Club of Jacksonville were there to present
a new Cub Scout fag with stand to the
Pack. The Kiwanis has been supporting
the local Cub Scouts and Boy Scouts for
several years as one of their programs to
help the children of the community. The
Kiwanis moto is to help one child and one
community at a time. With Kiwanis, it’s all
about puting a smile on a kid’s face!
For more information, please contact Dave
Wilson at 541-899-1934 or elkhntr@charter.net.
Kiwanis Club Presents New Flag To Cub Scouts
From l-r, Dale Templeman-Kiwanis'
Scouting Program Chair, Terry Hugen-Pack
17 Pack Leader, and Kiwanian Dave Wilson.
A
t my
sons last
physical,
his pediatrician
suggested a few
vaccinations; which came as no surprise
since I had reviewed his shot records and
was aware he was due. However, this
year they were recommending something
new, an HPV vaccination. (Human
Papiloma Virus.) While I'm delighted
with the advance in medicine, I can't
help but naively think, “My son doesn't
need this now....does he?” So I ask the
doctor, “At 12 years old…?” He explained
that studies have determined this age
to be the best time frame for the body
to assimilate the vaccine, before
they’re naturally introduced
to it. I interrupted, “Naturally
introduced? YOU MEAN.....???”
Yes parents, like it or not,
that’s exactly what it means.
Does that make you
uncomfortable? So what are
we going to do about that?
A world population over 7
billion indicates we're not
going to stop it; clearly
that's not the answer
anyway. The answer is
education; not at school,
not on the street, not from their friends,
but at home—from you!
Does it make you uncomfortable
because it’s not an easy topic to discuss
with your child? Let me remind you
that he/she is no longer a child but an
adolescent, going through a very normal
process. Or maybe you fear discussing
it will send the message that it’s OK for
them to act in a manner that goes against
your family’s belief system? Well, consider
that for any other subject knowledge is
power and without it we are rendered
ignorant; unless we have the insight to
ask for assistance. Parents, if we truly
want to protect our adolescents we cannot
encourage independence while they
remain ignorant. We must explain how we
expect them to behave based on our beliefs
and why said beliefs are important to our
family and we need to be wise enough to
realize they may not take heed.
Instead of having THE talk, we have
several conversations about the facts of
life. The frst one is about how their body
will start changing and they might feel
emotional or angry for no real reason
and includes a very basic introduction
to where babies come from; a couple of
years later this is followed-up with a more
in-depth explanation. Along the way
there are several smaller conversations
about gender sensitivity, understanding
the diference between loving and
liking someone and cultivating positive
relationships. And fnally, the most
intense conversation of all: the scared
celibate conversation!
After that doctors visit, I decided
it was time! We sat down in front
of the computer, recapped the facts
and reviewed our family beliefs and
expectations. I assured him that
I’m fully aware of what he’s going
through and even thinking/feeling
these days, which is all normal. I
proceeded to explain that he should
think very carefully before acting
on thoughts/feelings, because
there are risks to all levels
of ‘sharing’—that’s when
I switched the computer
screen on to the CDC website,
htp://www.cdc.gov/std/
training/picturecards-warning.
htm, with a choice image in
place for dramatic impact!
We scrolled through the information,
even the photo album of STI/D's, (that’s
the critical scary part!), and discussed all
the avenues for transmission. Parents,
unfortunately this is where adolescents
are most ignorant; don’t chicken out here
and only cover the road most commonly
traveled. Stay strong, keep to the facts and
be very clear!
After all this your adolescent will
most likely look horrifed and defated,
(excellent!), and may ask, "So, like,
what am I supposed to do? How will I
ever know if I'm going to be safe?" To
which you could reply, "You wait." Then
tenderly smile, tussle the hair on their
head and say, "Wait until you know you
have found the right person you can
share anything with and trust with your
life. Someone who will love you as much
as I do, or someone who won't mind that
you require a copy of their last physical
examination and a blood test before
'hooking-up'!"
Hopefully, Ruch students got plenty
of rest over spring break because when
they return to school on April 9 , they
need to be ready for a month that’s
action-packed! Throughout the month of
April, Ruch students and local volunteers
prepare seeds, soil and infrastructure for
the Ruch Community Garden and 7th
and 8th graders continue their weekly
environmental stewardship program
with Sanctuary One. On April 10, the top
spellers will represent Ruch School in
the 2013 District Spelling Bee. Cougars
continue to kick-up dust around the track
as they compete with local schools and
participate in the Pear Festival Mayors
Cup on Saturday
April 13th. 4th-6th
grade students
explore Crater Lake
on April 18th and
on April 25th K-6th
grade students
visit Wild Life
Images Rehabilitation and Education
Center. Finally, on April 26th the Ruch
gymnasium shines bright with local stars!
Please join us at 6:00pm for an exciting
evening of entertainment as student
dazzle our senses at the 2013 Talent Show.
It’s a great time to be a cougar!
²
 RUCH COUNTRY STORE
²
R
U
C
H
C
O
UNTR
Y
S
T
O
R
E
Located at the "Gateway to the Applegate Valley," our unique country
store has everything to make your day of wine tasting or picnicking the
best. We carry a wide variety of organic and specialty foods along with
conventional items. Our Deli is one-of-a-kind with fresh healthy salads
to sandwiches made your way. Everything is made in our from-scratch
kitchen. We also carry a large selection of LOCAL wines. Stop by and see us!
7350 Hwy 238, Jacksonville • 541-899-8571
DELI
Discover our GROCERY STORE and incredible
DELI on your next Applegate adventure!
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COTTAGE
c. 1865
Overnight Guest
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Ask about our Family or
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Reservations: airbnb.com or 541-414-7787
P
L
YMAL
E
Jacksonville Review Page 28 April 2013
Julie D. Danielson, O.D.
541-899-2020
950 N 5th Street • Jacksonville
www.jacksonvillevisionclinic.com
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SightSeeing by J ulie D. Danielson, O.D.
Eye on the Ball
Julie Danielson, an optometric physician, is available by
appointment at 541-899-2020. See ad this page.
Learning a Medical Art
by Rodney Pray, MD, Asante Physician Partners (APP)
W
hy don’t athletes protect
their eyes? We all know
how seriously a coach,
an Athletic Director and a school
system view their responsibility
to protect an athlete. They wear
(depending on the sport) helmets, elbow pads, shin pads,
shoulder pads and appropriate footwear. However,
even though 90% of sports-related eye injuries are
preventable, we do not have a policy to protect eyes.
There are
estimates of over
600,000 sports
related eye injuries
per year and
approximately
40,000 require trips
to the emergency
room. That means
every thirteen
minutes an emergency room treats another preventable
sports eye injury.
Young people are at the greatest risk of sports
eye injury—66% of all sports eye injuries occur in
participants between the ages of 5 and 24. The majority
of recreational eye injuries occur in organized team
sports—baseball, basketball, football, soccer, hockey,
volleyball and other ball sports are responsible for
almost 55% of all sports eye injuries.
The following is a list of risk information by sport:
Baseball
• Approximately 1 in 50 Litle League players will
sustain an eye injury that requires atention.
• Estimated over 2,000 baseball players blinded by
sports eye injuries.
• 57.3% of all eye injuries occur in children under age 14.
• Injury from a bated ball is 361% more likely than a
pitched ball.
Basketball
• Basketball runs the greatest risk of eye injury
requiring ER visits.
• One in 10 college basketball players sufer an eye
injury each season.
• Over an 8 year career 1 in 13 male players will sufer
serious and/or debilitating eye injury.
• One in 20 NBA injuries involve the eye.
Soccer
• Leading cause of eye injury in Europe.
• 80% of all eye injuries caused by ball (blunt trauma)
• 55.4% of injuries occur in 6-14 year olds.
• Approximately 1 in 50 soccer players will sufer an
eye injury in the course of an eight year career.
Protective eyewear like sports goggles can be either
prescription or non-prescription, and should be made of
non-breakable materials. In addition, protective eyewear
can block out harmful ultraviolet radiation for outdoor
sports. Visit your optometrist for help in selecting the
best protective eyewear for the sport being played.
“Suturing is an art, the successful
practice of which depends on a
surgeon’s individual skill acquired
through years of study, observation,
and experience…”
The time—1962. The place—my
back yard. Mike Lower, my friend
from across Putnam Drive, and I were
digging a hole with shovels. We sought
a wooden chest of gold coins as in the
pirate stories. I stood up. Mike inadvertently hit me in the
right eyebrow with the edge of his tool. Instantly, blood was
fowing down and I was crying.
My mother pressed a washcloth, damped with cold
water, to stanch the hemorrhage, and we started the car
ride across town to Dr. Mayo Smith’s ofce. A forbidding,
iron-gray presence, Dr. Smith was calm and precise as
he dripped numbing medicine from his syringe into my
wound’s raw edges before painlessly injecting deeper.
In short order I was repaired with bold black sutures at
precise intervals. My hysteria was quieted.
Years went by. I became a medical student.
Remembering the sensation of leaving status post (after
treatment) from a physician’s professional wound repair;
I coveted the skill of suturing. I practiced on banana
skins and orange peels. I spent hours in operating suites
watching the dexterous fngers of surgeons—general,
trauma, neuro, vascular, and cardiothoracic—approximate
tissue edges with various suture materials. Knots had to
hold. First learned was the instrument tie; then the two-
hand knot; and fnally the fashy, one-hand knot done
with either hand after some focused application.
The art of medicine is taught in unique classrooms. As
a resident, up against a wall in an emergency room in
Portland, I watched an open cardiac massage following an
egregious MVA (motor vehicle accident). The atending
surgeon pronounced the patient dead. The heart had
sustained blunt trauma that it could not overcome. The
atending surgeon pointed to me and said, “Get over
there and learn to sew.” I closed the chest incision with
thick nylon suture on a long curved needle in continuous
running fashion and secured it with a double square knot.
Anatomical order was restored. My practice had paid of.
Though the patient felt no relief, his family had a beter
feeling when they came in to view him a few minutes later.
I’ve closed hundred of incisions and lacerations over
the past 20 years. I am grateful each time I can ofer that
service to my patients.
Dr. Pray is a board-certifed family physician with Asante
Physician Partners and practices the medical arts in Medford. A
former Naval physician, he earned his medical degree from Oregon
Health Sciences University School of Medicine and completed
an internship in general surgery at Wilford Hall Medical Center
in San Antonio, Texas. As a Navy physician, Dr. Pray provided
top-level care to deployed soldiers in Kuwait and Afghanistan and
oversaw medical operations for a team of Navy clinicians. Ad pg. 5.
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JacksonvilleReview.com Page 29 April 2013
Joyfull Living
by Louise Lavergne
Living Life With J oy
G
enerally
speaking, to
have a joy
full life, we need to
feel a connection to what we do, and what
we do is not as important as how we feel
about doing it. My moto is “Do what you
love and if you don’t love what you do,
bring your love to it.” Sometimes the love
of geting it over with, (like taxes), is all
we have to hold on to. How we frame our
experience of each moment in our day,
can add up to create a deep sense of well-
being and true inner peace.
Start with being in the moment and
accepting what is, without resisting or
blaming. It’s sometimes easier to focus on
what we don’t like about a job or a chore
and that feeds the negative emotions
that will take
you down a dark
alley of feeling
sorry for yourself.
Simple daily
chores that feel
like drudgery can
become sources
of purpose and
joy if we shift
our atitude and
re-frame the
situation. For
example, doing
the laundry isn’t
necessarily the most fun event, but doing
it with purpose and focusing on the
pleasure of creating clean, fresh clothes
to wear, can be a good practice. When
you fnd yourself being dragged down
by a task, ask yourself: “What is my
purpose here?” It’s like taking out the
trash so you can enjoy having a clean
living space. That’s a worthwhile goal.
Use daily tasks such as washing dishes,
folding clothes, taking a shower, etc…as
relaxation exercises by being “present”
with what you are doing. Focus on your
breath and be present with that task. Let
go of thinking about what you would
rather be doing, or what you need to get
done next. Let go of your resistance to
being present…you might be surprised
by the joy behind the peaceful feeling
that emerges.
Even doing jobs we dislike can ofer the
opportunity to do something else that we
do want to do…. At the start of any day
tell yourself: “I am opening myself to the
highest and best opportunity of this day.
I am grateful.” Repeat this as often as you
need when negative thoughts come in,
and allow your life to shift. When you’re
required to do something that doesn’t
ft your long-term goals, be open to the
possibility that it may reveal new things
that will help you be clear about what you
really do want. Take time to ask yourself
what gives meaning to your life right
now? What is your purpose? Keep your
thoughts aligned with what you want in
your life. Your thoughts are magnetic, so
be careful that what you focus on is what
you want to manifest. I love helping my
clients re-frame their life situation and
see the magic unfold in their lives. It’s
springtime—time to be in alignment with
what makes your heart sing.
The answers are not outside
ourselves—we must look within. We
can create deeper connections within
ourselves and
with the world
around us
through yoga,
meditation and
by practicing
focused, deep
breathing during
moments of
mindfulness.
These activities
renew the sense
of purpose and
meaning in our
lives. Staying
“in the now” can move us from feeling
overwhelmed into a peaceful place where
we can feel empowered.
And that empowerment emerges
through the simple, individual choices we
make all day, every day.
On Mondays, April 8 and 22 at JoyFull
Yoga, we will have Sound Healing
Gatherings where I take you on a
journey of self-healing with breathing
and guided relaxation, to assist in leting
go of mental and physical stress. It is an
opportunity to learn to go deeper within
yourself and awaken your passion so
you can feel more connected to your
life’s purpose and meaning.
Breathe in Gratitude- Live in Joy.
© Louise Lavergne 2001-2013
Louise is an international inspirational
speaker, coach, author, creator of JoyFull Yoga
and JoyFull living coaching. She owns JoyFull
Yoga LLC in Jacksonville where she ofers
private sessions and group classes. Email
questions to louise@joyfull-living.com. www.
JoyFull-yoga.com;www.JoyFull-living.com
541-899-0707. See ad this page.
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Jacksonville Review Page 30 April 2013
The two most revolutionary words one can
say are I’m staying ~ Gary Snyder, poet
Can you recall the moment you declared
those words “I’m staying,” when you
decided to call this place home? Both
those who were born here and those who
choose to move here have commited
to staying because of our region’s
enchanting natural beauty. But did
you know this is also one of the most
biodiverse areas on the continent? The
Siskiyou Field Institute in Selma (in the
Illinois Valley) invites you to explore this
Klamath-Siskiyous home through our
nature-learning classes.
Each year SFI’s feld classes introduce
adults and kids to our wonder-flled
backyard. SFI participants study the
bioregion’s myriad features, from
the majestic to the
microscopic. They examine
Josephine ophiolite rock
that tells how a layered
and complex geology
emerged from sea foor to
form our mountains. They
learn to identify our native
dragonfies, buterfies,
and other insects, many of
them rare. They investigate
our curious serpentine fens that include
strange species such as the Litle Shop of
Horrors carnivorous cobra lily. SFI classes
are fascinating, mysterious—and fun, too!
A 1993 proclamation by the World
Conservation Union named the Klamath-
Siskiyou bioregion one of seven North
American continental areas of global
botanical signifcance. Natural scientists from
all over the world come here to step back
in time. A living natural history museum
lies within the knoted, folding arms of the
Klamath-Siskiyou mountain range.
Surviving species, now extinct elsewhere,
thrive in the bioregion’s nutrient-poor
serpentine soil, wild rivers and misty
coniferous forests. This land challenges and
protects survivors and cradles evolving
forms because its isolated geography and
relatively stable climate paterns over
centuries have created a refugia. Refuge
applies not only to animals and plants it
shelters, but also to its human inhabitants.
Almost 300 plant species of the 3,500
hosted here are unique. Thirty-six conifer
species—including the rare Port Orford
cedar and Brewers Spruce—dwell within
KS forests, more than in any other temperate
forest in the world. Two rare salamanders,
the Scot Bars and Siskiyou Mountain, live
here. And the endangered Northern Spoted
Owl and Marbled Murrelet both nest in our
old-growth forests.
Siskiyou Field Institute began ofering
classes in 1998 in the aftermath of
a scientifc conference that studied
and celebrated Klamath-Siskiyou
biodiversity. Forty-seven adult education
classes and numerous youth education
programs and wilderness trips highlight
this season’s menu for the curious
and adventurous. Classes take place
throughout the bioregion’s “mosaics”
or ecosystems, from Crater Lake and
Lava Beds National Monument to the
east, California’s Seiad Valley to the
south, Redwood National Park and the
Del Norte coast to the west and points
between. Many of our adult classes are
also open to kids 12 years and older.
Consider Siskiyou Field Institute’s
headquarters at Deer Creek also as a place
to lodge or retreat.
If you’re traveling
from the Rogue
Valley to the coast
or simply want to
explore the Illinois
Valley’s vineyards
and trails, stay with
us. Our ranch house
features spectacular
views, three private
bedrooms, including one frequented by
John Wayne, a small dorm with bunk beds,
two yurts and creekside campsites. We’re
open all year and our class calendar runs
from late March until mid November.
Find out more about your bioregion:
Siskiyou Field Institute, www.thesf.org,
The Klamath Knot by David Rains Wallace
(Sierra Club Books, 1983), KS Wildlands
website: www.kswild.org/ksregion, Southern
Oregon University Hannon Library Digital
Collection (htp://soda.sou.edu/bioregion.html).
For schedule of classes and more
information about Siskiyou Field Institute,
please visit our website at www.thesf.org or
call 541-597-8530. See ad this page.
Photos: A sunrise view looking south
towards the Klamath-Siskiyous, one of the few
east- to- west ranges in North America. Photo
by Dasja Dolan.
A student among the cobra lilies
(Darlingtonia) in the Deer Creek Center.
Don’t Make Me Laugh, Run, Sneeze or Cough!
Urinary incontinence (UI) is an
embarrassing condition of involuntary
leakage or loss of bladder control that
afects an estimated 13 million people in
the United States and is more prevalent
in women than in men. UI—also known
as pelvic foor disorders—can happen
unexpectedly with a sneeze or cough.
It can happen when breaking out in
laughter at a joke, going out for a
morning run, or simply bending over to
pick up a child or object.
“It is really a tough experience for
a woman, making her feel inadequate
and just unable to talk about such an
embarrassing personal
issue,” Glenda Higinbotham
said. “I know. I’ve been
there myself and now I help
women get through their
own UI issues.”
Higinbotham is a medical
assistant at the Providence
Urogynecology Center that
is part of Providence Medical
Group OB-Gyn Health
Center in Medford.
“I tried to retire in 2009,
but that lasted only a year
and a half,” she said. “I need
to be involved and helping
people, especially women. I just feel that’s
what I am meant to do.”
Higinbotham was diagnosed with UI
several years ago and has experience with
many of the diagnostic and treatment
options available to regain bladder
control. Now she helps patients as they
undergo similar treatments.
“I work closely with the PMG
physicians and nurse practitioners and
am able to hold a woman’s hand and
tell her ‘I’ve been in your shoes and I
understand what you must be feeling,’”
Higinbotham explained. “It helps ease
the patient’s way, knowing that I have
had a urodynamics study, and had a
sling, and experienced mesh, and use
coaptite. These words are foreign to most
women and may sound intimidating and
technical. As the physician explains a
procedure, I am there to give the personal
perspective. Each patient is unique and
has individual results, but at least I can
provide comfort through knowledge and
experience.”
Pregnancy, childbirth and menopause
are some of the main causes of UI; that
is why it is twice as common in women
as in men. Other causes include brain
injury, birth defects, stroke, diabetes,
multiple sclerosis, and physical changes
associated with aging.
Providence Medical Group OB-Gyn
Health Center has patients ranging in age
from 20 to 94, according to Higinbotham.
“It just goes to show that you are never
too young to be afected and never too
old to do something positive about it,”
she said. “Even if you feel shy about it,
take the frst step and talk with your
doctor. Keep a bladder diary by writing
down when you leak or have an urge and
include what may have caused it, such
as a sneeze or laughter or even that it
happened while you were asleep. It may
take some time to fnd the appropriate
treatment for you, but at least you will
be taking the frst step toward fnding a
solution and some peace of mind.”
The Providence
Urogynecology
Center hosted a free
urinary incontinence
discussion on March
7 in Grants Pass.
More than 83 women
atended the event to
have a conversation
with specialists Lanita
Wit, M.D., Timothy
Hutchings, M.D., Nicole
Brooks, D.O., and Nancy
Spector, WHCNP.
Atendees learned about
the common causes,
symptoms and many treatment options
available to help regain bladder control.
The free discussion in Grants Pass was so
successful that we had to turn away more
than 20 women due to space constraints
at the event site, so we have added the
following free event: June 27, 6:00-7:30pm,
Urinary Incontinence Discussion Presented
by Providence Urogynecology Center,
Ashland Library. For free registration,
please call 541-732-6237.
For more information on urinary
incontinence issues, please visit www.
providenceorgegon.org/so/women.
See Providence ad on page 3.
What are the types of UI?
There are several types of urinary
incontinence, but the following are most
common for women.
• Stress incontinence – Leakage
happens with coughing, sneezing,
exercising, laughing, lifting heavy
items, and other movements put
pressure on the bladder.
• Urge incontinence – Also known
as “overactive bladder.” Leakage
usually happens after a strong,
unexpected and sudden urge to
urinate.
• Mixed incontinence – Two or more
types, such as stress and urge
incontinence, that occur at the same
time.
Indulge Your State of Wonder in Siskiyou
Field Institute Classes
Learn with us in the 51st state,
the State Of Wonder
Welcome to
Siskiyou Field Institute
in the State of Jeferson,
a magical kingdom of
serpentine fens and
savannas, wild and
scenic rivers and
relict species.
Siskiyou Field Institute
Nature learning in and about the Klamath-Siskiyous
Call for our catalog at (541) 597-8530
www.thesf.org
NEW adventure classes for 2013 • learn while you bike •
raft on a river • paddle on a lake • snorkel • snowshoe
Photo by Karen Phillips
167 East Main Street
Ashland, OR
Mavis Marney
Cell: 541.821.9041
Office: 541.488.1311
mavismarney@johnlscott.com
www.JohnLScott.com/MavisMarney
Your Agent for Results
Back Home Again!
John L. Scott Real Estate is pleased to an-
nounce that MAVIS MARNEY, Broker, has
moved back to her Jacksonville home on South
3rd Street after living in Phoenix for the past 5
years. She looks forward to continuing serv-
ing Jacksonville with the most personalized and
professional real estate services available.
Mavis July 2012:Mavis July 1/22/13 1:36 PM Page 1
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 31 April 2013
Soul Matters by Kate Ingram, M.A.
katherine
ingram, m.a.
I
n my last column (“Soul
Maters”) I discussed
the importance of Soul.
As a reminder, Soul is our
unique manifestation of Spirit,
the “is-ness” which, when we
connect with it, creates a life that feels purposeful and
meaningful because it connects us not only to our true
self, but to back to our source, which is universal love.
The question is, how do we revive Soul--a subtle
internal entity--living in a noisy, gadget-flled society
that constantly pulls our atention away from our inner
life? And the answer is something I’m calling Soul Energy
Optimization. (I’m trademarking this, so don’t get any
ideas!) This new SEO is my spin on “search engine
optimization,” the process by which other people can
easily fnd you on the internet. My SEO utilizes the
same principle, but rather than helping others fnd you,
this technology optimizes your ability to fnd yourself.
It’s user friendly, free, and it will change your life;
optimizing your soul energy will bring you greater
peace, creativity, balance, presence and joy. And here it
is in a nutshell.
SLOW DOWN—For a litle while each day, ten
minutes to start, sit somewhere comfortable where you
can be alone and quiet--no phone, no music, no yoga,
no book, no food--and don’t do anything. That’s it. Just
you and quiet and the desire to connect with something
deep within.
SET AN INTENTION—Here’s an extremely powerful,
valuable way to open to Soul: speak your intention
aloud. “May I open to my Soul’s deepest desire,” “May I
fully inhabit the life I came to live,” or my favorite, “I am
open and willing to receive,” are powerful afrmations,
and they work.
LISTEN DEEPLY—The language of Soul is symbols,
and its energies connect with ours through emotion Pay
atention to what you hear, see, and feel throughout
the day and week. The messages are usually subtle, so pay
atention to everything, even and perhaps especially to what
you might be tempted to disregard as your “imagination.”
LET GO OF LIMITATIONS—Part of this process of
opening is releasing your preconceived notions about
who you think you are and why you think you’re here.
Pretend that you don’t have a clue, that you’re not
already a lawyer or accountant or “just a housewife.”
Forget how old you are or what the balance is in your
bank account. Soul is not confned by time and space, so
age and circumstances are meaningless. Return to the
bliss of being six years old, where all things are possible
and your dreams were limitless.
BE PATIENTLY PERSISTENT—The more you
practice the technologies above, the clearer the messages
will become. Remember, Soul wants nothing more than
to emerge. The more you respect your internal life, the
more it will speak to you.
RESPECT WHAT YOU RECEIvE—You may hear a
message in a scrap of overheard conversation, or open a
book to a certain sentence or see a patern in the clouds.
Remember, Soul speaks in symbols. Give your inner
skeptic a week of and don’t minimize or disregard your
experience.
FEED YOUR SOUL—Along with quieting and
inviting and listening and respecting, you need to feed
your inner life. Nature, creating something, buying
yourself fowers, or poetry are excellent ways to nurture
the soul.
GET SUPPORT—When difculties or blocks arise,
seek out wise counsel. We’re not meant to journey alone.
Katherine Ingram, M.A., is a therapist, writer and soul
coach. Find out more about her work and writing at www.
katherineingram.com, or follow her @kateingram425.
THE NEW SEO: Soul Energy Optimization
You often buy organic produce
at the grocery store. Can you visit
the J’ville Market on Sundays to
buy from local growers and food
producers, too? You diligently recycle
commingled recycling for curbside
collection. Can you save other types of
plastic for the annual Plastic Round-
up? You choose fair trade cofee. Can you commit to using
your own reusable cofee cup instead of disposables?
Rogue Valley’s annual Earth Day celebration, taking
place at the grounds of ScienceWorks Museum in Ashland,
invites event participants, and our community, to Take the
Next Step toward sustainability. What’s your next step?
On Saturday, April 20, 11:00am- 4:00pm, dozens
of exhibits from regional businesses, nonprofts and
government organizations will present ways to broaden
individual action. From food and farms, to energy and
transportation, to waste prevention and natural resource
protection, event-goers will discover actions small and
large that make a positive diference.
Live entertainment on the Earth Day stage includes
Sonic Kaleidoscope marimbas, performing arts from
Crater Renaissance Academy, Rogue Valley Peace
Choir, Goodwill’s “UPcycle” contest, and Wicked FX
break dancers. Local food vendors will have delicious,
healthful food and beverages for sale.
Admission is free. ScienceWorks is located at 1500 E.
Main Street in Ashland.
For more information, visit www.RogueValleyEarthDay.net or
call 541-482-6767.
Take the Next Step with Rogue Valley Earth Day
by Paige Prewett, RVED13 Event Manager
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Jacksonville Review Page 32 April 2013
the best care
for your best friend
To us, our patients are like family. With
over 25 years of experience, we’ve
seen families through generations of best
friends. We believe in a total wellness
approach to veterinary care which helps our
patients live long, healthy lives. A blend of
compassionate care and the use of the latest
medical technology, all at an affordable
price, makes Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
the best choice for your pet’s care.
937 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville
541.899.1081 | www.jvillevet.com
• Preventitve Care
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Training
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Ask about our online Pet Portal!
Paws for Thought by Dr. Tami Rogers
Dr. Rogers can be reached at the Jacksonville Veterinary Hospital
at 541-899-1081 or jvhospital@qwestofce.net. See ad this page.
DONATE
www.SanctuaryOne.org
©

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Don't forget to donate to SOHS, Sanctuary
One or Friends of the Animal Shelter and tell
them Annie and Marty-the-cat sent you!
Annie’s Antics by Annie Parker
A
s any pet owner knows,
there are thousands of
foods on the shelf to
choose from and all of these
choices can leave people very confused about which food to
take home. One of the most common questions I am asked
is “What food should I feed my dog/cat?” And honestly, the
answer to this can vary greatly depending on the age and
health status of your pet. Here are some botom-line basic
guidelines that I recommend owners follow:
1. Stick with a larger pet food manufacturing company
like Hill’s Pet Nutrition, Royal Canin, Nestle Purina,
or Iams PetCare. When you do, you insure that the
food you are feeding your animal is not outsourced
and quality control is much greater. These companies
control all aspects of development, manufacturing,
and sales and they do a large amount of research on
their foods to make sure they are adequate to feed as
well as research that promotes veterinary medicine
and nutrition. It is extremely rare for companies such
as these to have food recalls due to contamination (ie.
Salmonella, etc).
2. Don’t fall prey to dietary myths. For example—corn
is bad for your pet and allergies related to it are
common. Before assuming that broad claims such as
this are fact, remember that pet food manufacturing
is a big business with a lot of money to be made.
Although I am not certain exactly where these types
of claims originate, I often wonder if they are started
by boutique pet food companies who are looking for
ways to distinguish themselves from bigger, more
established companies. If a company puts ‘no soy’
on the front of a bag of food we instantly wonder
‘What’s wrong with soy?’ I could truly spend
multiple articles debunking dietary myths such as
these so if you have a question regarding a specifc
product in the food you feed to your pets, please ask
your veterinarian.
3. Look past the fancy advertising, prety kibble color,
and expensive price tag and take a look at your pet
and their overall condition. Is your cat vomiting once
a week? Is your dog drinking a lot and urinating a
lot? Do they have chronic diarrhea and/or excess
gas? Is their coat dry and britle? All of these
conditions, and so many more, may be explained by
a poor quality diet or dietary intolerance.
4. Take dietary advice from an educated source (such
as your veterinarian) not from the sales clerk at
the local pet store, the breeder, or the internet!
Ultimately, you should consider the source of
your information before making dietary changes
and alterations for your pet. This is especially true
when feeding pets with a disorder (ie. Diabetes,
hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, etc)!
Choosing the appropriate diet can be confusing
but don’t let it overwhelm you too much. Use your
veterinarian as a resource and they will gladly steer you
in the right direction!
You Feed Your Dog What?
The Laundry Center
Try our
BuLK
LAuNDry
SErVICE!
(clothes, towels, etc.)
• Self-service - or we do laundry for you!
• We do comforters, sleeping bags, and
other large items
• Drop-off/Pick-up for Weldon’s Dry Cleaning
• Children’splayarea
• CableTV&kid’smovies
2408 W. Main Street, Medford
(541) 842-2932
Hours: 7am-10pm
Close to Jacksonville,
next to Albertson’s Center!
$1.10/PouND - CHEAP!
(best price in the valley!)
H
ello Review Readers!
I know I’ve
mentioned how
much I like (need) to have
things in my mouth …well,
I thought I’d give you a litle
more detail. I have a daily
routine which prety much
centers on this.
First in the morning (after I eat breakfast, of course),
I push my way into my mom’s closet to retrieve some
soft goodies. Not sure if I’ve explained that I can open
the doors in our house. If any door is opened just a hair,
whether it is an inside or outside glass slider, I can open
it! Anyway, as I was explaining, I grab the contraband
from Mom’s dirty clothes hamper and quickly scamper
into the living room with it/them. I hang my head
low, quiver from head to toe and make a low, whining
sound. Apparently, I’m prety obvious now, because
Mom always knows when I have her undergarments,
and usually rushes to pry them from my jaws. It’s such
a ritual now that if Dad is still half-asleep and hears
the closet door (even if Mom’s opening it, not me), he’ll
mumble, “Annie…out of the closet…!”
Next up in my daily ritual is going out into the yard to “do
my thing.” I try my best to snif out a tasty morsel to bring
back into the house to eat, chew and shred on the carpet. I’m
sure to be stealthy with a stick, pinecone, or piece of bark,
and am quiet as possible and hide behind the couch or chair.
Then, the drama of my day is created by visitors—or
passersby—or UPS guys—or the neighbors… If I catch
a glimpse of anyone nearing the house (whether by car
or on foot), I immediately go into panic mode. I get very
excited, whine or bark at the top of my doggie lungs and
search frantically for something to carry. I MUST have
something in my mouth! If my bone or dog toy is not
within quick sight, I’ll grab shoes, slippers, socks-
anything to make sure I’m not at the window or door
empty-mouthed. Because I am reluctant to leave the
window (in case I miss something or someone), I get a
litle (okay a lot) freaked out if something to carry isn’t
within eye-shot. So, I make a lot of noise, run back
and forth between the windows, and if some poor soul
manages to get in the door, their hand will generally
be the item of choice for me to carry. Hey—I’m a
Golden Retriever.
At the end of the day, I generally setle down and
bring most of my bones, pull toy, balls and kong-toys
out of my basket and spread them around to chew. My
folks seem okay with this, except when they foolishly
don’t look down and step on one of my sharper bones
with their bare feet. Can I help it if they’re not observant?
Anyway—here’s to having a wonderful Spring in our
Small Town with Big Atmosphere!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 33 April 2013
Farm Tour Season Begins
by Robert Casserly, Executive Director
Sanctuary One at Double Oak Farm
’ '

www. Ho me P e t Ve t . n e t

Dr. Julie Tavares
541-761-6163
It’s what’s inside
that counts...
All our foods contain
NO corn, wheat, soy or
by-products.
(541) 857-5000
In Winco Shopping Center, just behind Jack In The Box
roguevalleypet.com
• Locally owned
• Featuring made in
Oregon & USA
• Raw diets
®
N
ow that spring has sprung, the
Sanctuary has resumed ofering
fun and educational farm tours.
If you've never visited our care farm
before, or if it has been awhile since your
last visit, I cordially invite you to make
an appointment to come see for yourself
what care farming is all about and how
much we've grown over the
last couple of years.
Approximately 2,000
people visited the Sanctuary
last year. This year we
expect even more visitors.
The list of reasons people
visit our care farm includes
therapeutic outings for
military veterans and youth
groups, educational feld
trips, hands-on volunteer
opportunities, adopting a house pet or
farm animal, and our farm tours.
To try and meet the growing demand,
this year we will conduct farm tours for
families, couples, and individuals every
Wednesdays and Saturdays from early
April to early November. The tours start
at 10:30am and typically take about 90
minutes. During the tour, a staf member
or volunteer will guide you around the
farm, show you how a care farm works,
and answer your questions.
The tour also includes a chance to
meet the Sanctuary's herd of rescued and
rehabilitated farm animals and house
pets. Our current roster includes an
assortment of cows, horses, llamas, sheep,
goats, pigs, geese, ducks, chickens, dogs,
and cats. We never coerce any animal to
be handled or photographed if they don't
want to be, but most of the animals enjoy
meeting new people-friends, so chances
are you'll be able to pet lots of friendly
animals and to take pictures of them.
One of our new initiatives this year is to
design and construct a habitat for rabbits.
We would love to be able to add rabbits
to the list of animal species we can take in
from animal shelters, humane societies,
rescue groups, law-enforcement agencies,
and veterinarians who call on us for help
to save an animal's life. (As a general rule
we do not take in animals directly from
private homes.) So depending on when
you visit, you may also have a chance to
meet some rescued
bunnies, too.
There is a
recommended
donation for a farm
tour is $10 per person.
Checks and cash are
the preferred method
of donating. Credit
card donations for
farm tours may be
made via our website,
www.SanctuaryOne.org.
After the tour, we invite guests to take a
look around our farm stand for the chance
to purchase a variety of seasonal farm
goods such as homemade dog cookies;
vegetables, herbs, and fowers from our
organic garden; handcrafted birdhouses;
"llama bean" natural fertilizer; fresh eggs
laid by happy chickens; and more.
Group tours and service-learning feld
trips for schools, businesses, churches,
retirement homes, community-service
clubs, and the like are welcome. Bus and
handicapped parking is available. These
tours and feld trips may be scheduled for
any day of the week and may last from an
hour to several hours, depending on the
group's interests. Please contact us if you
are interested in scheduling a group tour.
For more information, please visit us online
at www.SanctuaryOne.org.
Appointments are required for
a farm tour. Call 541-899-8627 or
email info@SanctuaryOne.org
to make a reservation.
All work and no play? Spring cleaning,
gardens to ready and fower beds to
spruce. Work, work, work. Well it is
time for some fun. The Applegate Trails
Association (ATA) invites you to take
the day of and come play with us on
our frst hike of the year. Grab your best
hiking shoes, a lunch and camera for a
beautiful upland hike on the proposed
route of the East Applegate Ridge Trail
(ART). This side hill, uphill and downhill
6 mile trek has 1,400 feet of elevation
change and is all “of trail.” Rated
“moderate” to “difcult,” our jaunt may
take 6 hours including lunch and the
shutle. Join us at 9am, Saturday, April
20th at the Bunny Meadows Staging
Area (located at the intersection of Forest
Creek and Longanecker Road). From
there we will carpool to the trailhead just
30 minutes away. Our path high above
Bishop Creek will ofer spectacular views
of Ruch and the Applegate Valley from
a totally new perspective. If you need
permission...granted!
Join us on this hike by contacting
the hike leader, David Calahan at 541-
899-1226 or david@applegatetrails.org
for additional information and to sign
in. Please RSVP as space is limited.
Remember your sturdy footwear, water,
lunch, appropriate clothing for the
weather and perhaps a hiking stick for
the uneven terrain and poison oak. Please
leave your pets at home. Check out our
website at www.applegatetrails.org for our
2013 hike schedule and events.
Applegate Trails Association Invites You
to Hike the East ART on April 20th
Jacksonville Review Page 34 April 2013
22nd Annual Dogs for the Deaf
Dog Costume Contest • Cash Prizes • Lunch
Poker Dog Walk • Kids Zone • Dog Agility Demonstrations
Have a great time with your dog while you play poker walking from
shop to shop in historic Jacksonville.
$1,000 top prize
for the best hand
Sponsored by our friends at ROGUE VALLEY PET.
*Must be at least 18 years old to participate in poker walk.
For more information call 541-826-9220 • www.dogsforthedeaf.org
DOG WALK
This years theme is...
Saturday, June 1, 2013 • 9 a.m.- 2 p.m.
Jacksonville Elementary School
Online Registration begins April 8, 2013
Wizard of Dogz Comes to Jacksonville
by Robin Dickson, Pres./CEO, Dogs for the Deaf, Inc.
Follow the Yellow Brick Road to
Jacksonville on Saturday, June 1, for
a tail-wagging day when Dogs for the
Deaf comes to town for its 22st Annual
Dog Walk. This year’s Dog
Walk theme is the Wizard of
DOGZ, where pooches of all
sizes, shapes and colors with
their human partners will be on
hand for absolutely Oz-some
activities from 9am until 2pm. Who knows,
there may even be sightings of Dorothy, Tin
Man, Scarecrow and a witch or two.
Ryan Lane, actor and star of the
popular TV show “Switched at Birth,”
and his dog Zero will be on hand to serve
as the Grand Marshal for Dog Walk and
to participate in the fun.
Activities will begin at Jacksonville
Elementary School at 9am. The walk
itself will be a fun-flled poker walk,
where dogs and their people will go
to seven businesses in Jacksonville
and pick a playing card at each
store. The best poker hand will win
a cash prize of $1,000, donated by
Rogue Valley Pet. There will also be
2nd and 3rd place prizes awarded
for poker hands. Additional prizes
will be awarded for raising the most
donations and for the Wizard of Oz
costume contest. Additional activities
include a complimentary hot dog
lunch, kids’ corner, exhibits and lots
of other OZsome fun.
One of our goals for Dog Walk
is to make it more of a community
annual event. With that in mind we are
inviting other non-proft organizations to
participate by having their own exhibit
tables at Jacksonville Elementary. All
they need to do is bring their
own table, chairs and materials.
Those organizations interested in
participating at Dog Walk need
to contact DFD before the event
to reserve space.
So, mark your calendars, register for
Dog Walk, wave your wand and collect
your donations, and join the fun. There’s
no place like Jacksonville for Dog Walk.
We hope to see you there!
For more information or to register, call
541-826-9220 or go to DogsfortheDeaf.org.
See ad this page.
• Tim Balfour
• Mayor Paul Becker
• Donna Briggs
• Michele Brown
• Bob Budesa
• Dom Campanella
• Susan Casaleggio
• Robert Casserly
• Sara King Cole
• Dr. J ulie Danielson
• Linda Davis
• Robin Dickson
• Paula & Terry
Erdmann
• Cristie Fairbanks
• Graham Farran
• Kay Faught
• David Funderburk
• Randall Grealish
• Adam Haynes
• Dr. Kerri Hecox
• Michelle Hensman
• Tony Hess
• Kate Ingram
• Michael Kell
• Carolyn Kingsnorth
• Lara Knackstedt
• Amy Kranenburg
• Louise Lavergne
• Gwen Nelson
• Dr. Rodney Pray
• Paige Prewett
• Kathy Pyle
• Dr. Tami Rogers
• Dirk Siedlecki
• Kathy Tiller
• Hannah West
• Dave Wilson



• J ym Duane
• J eanena
Whitewilson
THANK YOU
to our Contributors!
Photographers
Have an idea or suggestion for the Review?
For print: Whit at 541-899-9500 or whitman@jacksonvillereview.com.
For website or kiosk: J o at 541-227-8011 or jo@jacksonvillereview.com
As a Community Action Agency (CAA), ACCESS fghts
America’s War on Poverty by helping people help
themselves in achieving self-suffciency.
ACCESS helps children, families, individuals, seniors,
and others throughout Jackson County with food,
housing, energy assistance, weatherization, and
outreach to seniors and people with disabilities.
I am Community Action.
Sherm Olsrud
Longtime ACCESS supporter; Owner,
Sherm’s Thunderbird and Food 4 Less
Since 1967, the community has been good
to us and we just want to give back to the
community.”
I help feed the hungry.
You can help, too.
• Donate • Volunteer
• Become a partner
Do something today.
accesshelps.org • 541.779.6691
170 S. Oregon Street • Jacksonville
(541) 899-9555
T
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COLLECTIBLES
& THRIFT SHOP
Tuesday-Saturday
10:00am-4:00pm
Soup to nut bowls,
shot glasses to platters.
Stemware and coffee cups
and all glass that matters.
Our store has a big assortment
of sets of two, four, six and eight.
We also have a good selection of
unique individual pieces.
Come and browse and sit a spell.
Selected glassware
50% of!
Across from GoodBean Cofee!
APRIL 16th - 30th
Anita’s Alteration Center
541-772-8535 or 541-899-7536
259 E. Barnett Road, Unit B, Medford (In the Win-co Center)
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s
for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
Anita’s specialties include but are not limited to:
•Alterations
•Pressing, hemming, repairs
•Custom sewing projects
•Special-occasion and wedding gown design
•Prom dresses
•Bridal party ensembles
•There are NO hard to ft fgures!
Whatever the need, whatever the occasion, trust Anita’s for the best results in the most welcoming atmosphere!
JacksonvilleReview.com Page 35 April 2013
Little Applegate Country Care
Our Adult Foster Home
offers a warm, family
setting on a beautiful
homestead—with a
view!
Country Lifestyle for those who can’t do it alone due to age or
disability. Inquiries welcome: 541-899-6827
or LittleApplegateCC@gmail.com
The Jacksonville Cleaning Company
homes • ofces • vacation rentals
541-499-1242
Anna Morris, Owner
Lic# 201213-333
• weekly / bi-weekly / monthly
• one-time cleaning
• move in/out
Ask about our discount for
Jacksonville residents!
Visit our expanded
British Shoppe!
3939 W. Main Street
(Just East of Jacksonville)
541-773-8031
www.whitescountryfarm.com
• Beer • Wine • Spirits
Full Service Lottery • Free Pool on Sundays!
125 W. California Street • Jacksonville, OR
Bud & Andy Gough (541) 899-1170
“Try Oregon’s best
Bloody Mary”
H
E
A
L
ING P
O
I
N
T
A
C
U
P
UNCT
U
R
E
L L C
345 North Fifh Street • Jacksonville
Owen Jurling
licensed acupuncturist
Free consultation!
541-899-2055
“Gentle and efective pain relief in historic Jacksonville”
The Cleaning Crew
You Can Count On Us!
Licensed Bonded Insured
Housec l eani ng
Since
1988
• Homes • Offces
• Prepare Homes for Sale
• Rental Move In & Move Out
541-601-6236
Natural Products Used
www.TheCleaningCrewOnLine.com
www.edwardjones.com
Scott Loyd
Financial Advisor
.
260 S Oregon Street
Jacksonville, OR 97530
541-899-1905
The Paw Spa & Boutique
541-899-6811
Dog and Cat Grooming
175 East C Street, Jacksonville
thepawspaandboutique@aol.com
Open Tues-Fri 8:30am-4:00pm
Please call for an appointment
Tarina Hinds
Owner/Grooming
10+ years experience with all
breeds of dogs and cats
Ellee Celler, Broker
RE/MAX Ideal Brokers, Inc.
541-301-7893
“ Business is Booming! ”
BUYING or SELLING
Give us a call today!
Ellee Celler & Max
Max and I will make
it happen for you!
Want to see your AD in the next issue of the REVIEW?
Please RESERVE your ad space by
April 15
th
for the MAY 2013 issue!
For advertising information, please visit our website:
J acksonvilleReview.com/advertise
or contact Whit Parker at 541-899-9500 or
whitman@jacksonvillereview.com
The Jacksonville Tavern was the site
of a memorial service for a close friend
known to all locally as “Rip”
(Roger N. Price 8/22/1932
to 2/8/2013). The tavern
was crowded with people
who wanted to honor Rip,
including my daughter as we
listened to many express how
they were afected by him. Rip
was a regular at the tavern,
most recognizable by his
veterans cap, white mustache
and easy smile. He typically
had the same light beer in
front of him most of his stay.
This memorial was a wonderful way to
celebrate Rip’s life. He had volunteered
and served as a sergeant in the Korean
War and was on the front lines. He was
also a paratrooper. He remained an
active skydiver much of his life after his
military service. Upon retirement from
civilian work in California, he moved to
this area and adopted Jacksonville as his
hometown. Rip was independent
and never wanted to be a
bother or trouble for anyone,
so he was not thrilled about all
the fuss people made once he
became seriously ill. Thankfully,
after only a couple days at the
hospital, we were able to get him
to his home, where he wanted to
be. Loving care was continued
by his two daughters, Jaymie
and Kelly from California and
a hospice arrangement. I was
able to help some and visited
him a few times before he passed away.
Rip departed leaving Jacksonville with
less visible gold, a wealth obviously
appreciated at his memorial. His sense
of humor, refective nature and positive
atitude will be fondly remembered.
Dan Frank, Jacksonville
In Memoriam–"Rip" Price
Anna Morris has recently opened
her own house cleaning business and
is accepting new clients. She and her
husband Tyler relocated to Southern
Oregon in 2011 from California where
she had worked for her father's real
estate company for over 20 years doing
property preservation and housecleaning.
Morris will continue working for Expert
Properties here in Jacksonville as well as
handling her own clients. Her husband
is the sous chef at Frau Kemmling
Schoolhaus Brewhaus, making the dream
of both working and living in Jacksonville
a reality! Morris says, “Unlike a lot of
people, I enjoy cleaning and fnd it very
therapeutic… I am at my best when I can
just listen to some relaxing music and just
get into cleaning.” In addition to working,
Morris is a hobby winemaker, enjoys
gardening, cooking recipes from a vast
collection of foreign country cookbooks
and is a regular volunteer at the Rogue
Book Exchange in downtown Medford.
Anna may be reached at 541-499-1242.
See ad this page.
New Home Cleaning Service in Jacksonville
We wish to thank the many residents
in Jacksonville who already participate
in the Neighborhood Food Project. Every
two months, on the 2nd Saturday of the
even-numbered months, green bags are
put out on doorsteps. Then volunteers
called Neighborhood Coordinators drive
around their neighborhoods and pick up the
donors’ bags. When the bag is picked up, a
new, empty bag is dropped of, so the donor
is ready for the next pick-up, two months
away. It’s easy breezy. If you have seen the
green bags and wondered what they were,
here’s your chance to fnd out more!
Currently, there are a total of 28
Neighborhood Coordinators and a total
of 454 food donors in Jacksonville. There
are two District Coordinators, Faye
Haynes and Jerrine Rowley, who oversee
the project here, spliting the town in
half (Faye has the south side of town
and Jerrine has the north.) They are also
Neighborhood Coordinators and donors
and love their involvement.
As with any efort, in order to sustain it,
you must continue to grow. The need for
food in our valley certainly continues to
grow. Jerrine & Faye are inviting anyone
interested in becoming a Neighborhood
Coordinator or anyone wanting to "fnd
out more" to a meeting at the Jacksonville
Library Community Room on Saturday,
April 20th, 10 am-12 noon. Please stop-
by. There will be bags, sign-up sheets,
handbooks, and refreshments.
If you have any questions, please call
Faye at 541-324-1298 or Jerrine at 541-702-
2223. We hope to see you there!
Food Project Volunteers Needed
Next Medford Food Project
Jacksonville Pickup Day:
Saturday, April 13
th
Please contact Jerrine Rowley at 541-702-2223
or Faye Haynes at 541-324-1298 if you have any
questions or wish to become involved with
the Food Project in Jacksonville!
(Always the 2nd Saturday of even-numbered months.)
Jacksonville Review Page 36 April 2013
Get Ready for SAUSAGE BBQ Season!
GET A CATALOG
OR View Online
Garywest.com
Store Hours:
Mon thru Sat 10-6
690 N. 5th St. | Jacksonville, OR 97530 | Phone: (541) 899-1829
Come in and try
them yourself.
Samples
Every Saturday
through April!
Featuring:
Linguica
Hot dogs
Bratwurst
Polish
FEATURING MASTER SAUSAGE MAkER
FRANk SCARLATA’S OLD-WORLD RECIPES
N
E
W
!
525 Bigham Knoll ∙ Jacksonville, Oregon
PHONE: 541-899-1000 ∙ www.thebrewhaus.com
Located in the Old School House in historic Jacksonville
Q
A
&
Q: Why have we served
over 15,000 Schnitzels?
A: Because they are
so incredibly good!
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
S
CHOOLHAUS REWHAUS
10 11 12 B
f
i
n
e

g
e
r
m
an cuisin
e
&

b
i
e
r
f
r
a
u

k
e
m
m
l
i
n
g
A Quick
10% off all Schnitzels
oer expires April 30, 2013
coupon good for entire party
Come See And Taste For Yourself