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Check the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator

Note: A likely cause of failure may be that the incorrect iSCSI port IP address is added. You may also be pinging an
IP address that is not assigned to an iSCSI port. To verify that you are trying to connect to the correct iSCSI port,
disconnect the storage system iSCSI ports from the LAN and try to ping them from the server. If the ping receives a
reply, you are not you are not pinging the storage system to which you want to connect.

Check the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator as follows:

1. Verify that the version of the Microsoft Initiator matches supported versions listed in the Host Connectivity Guide
for your server and storage system. If the installed version of the Microsoft Initiator is not supported, remove it
and install the correct version. Reboot the server if you installed a new version of the Microsoft Initiator.

Note You can generate the Host Connectivity Guide from the E-Lab Interoperability Navigator on the EMC
Powerlink website, http://powerlink.emc.com.

2. Remove the data ports and persistent targets from the Microsoft Initiator user interface.

3. Start the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator and remove any problematic storage system iSCSI data ports and storage
systems targets as follows:

a. Select Start > Programs > Microsoft iSCSI Initiator.
b. Click the Persistent Targets tab and delete any targets in the Targets window.
c. Click the Targets tab and delete all targets in the targets window.
d. Click OK to apply changes and close the Microsoft Initiator user interface.

4. As a last resort, remove the initiator and reboot the server.

5. Start the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator and do the following:

a. On the Discovery tab, add the target portals (storage system iSCSI ports).

b. On the Target Portals tab, add the iSCSI data port IP addresses (not names) that you want the server to
connect.

c. On the Available Targets tab, click Log on to connect to the iSCSI data port.
Check the iSCSI Initiator Logon Status
For QLogic iSCSI HBAs, verify that the HBA has logged into the storage system iSCSI ports as described in the
HBA documentation.
For a Microsoft Initiator, verify that the initiator has logged into the storage system's iSCSI ports as follows:

1. Double click the Microsoft Initiator to open it and select the Available Targets tab.
2. Verify that there is a target listed for each SP port on the storage system and that the status column next to
each entry says Logged on.
Connecting to a Storage System using the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator
Connect the server to the storage system using the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator as follows:

1. Start the Microsoft iSCSI Initiator program.
2. Remove discovered targets from the Initiator user interface (Discovery, Targets, Peristent Targets tabs).
3. If not already done, on the Discovery tab, add the target portals (storage system iSCSI ports).
4. If not already done, on the Target Portals tab, add the iSCSI data port IP addresses (not names) that you want
the server to connect.
5. On the Available Targets tab, click Log on to connect to the iSCSI data port.
Connecting to a Storage System using the Navisphere Server Utility
On the server, connect to the storage system using the Navisphere Server Utility as follows:

1. Open the Navisphere Server Utility and select Configure iSCSI Connections .
2. Select a method by which to discover the iSCSI data ports (targets on the storage system).
3. Select the targets that belong to the storage system to which you want the server to connect.
4. Verify that Also logon to peer iSCSI target for High Availability is selected.
5. Click Logon.
Disabling CHAP on the Storage System
Note CHAP (Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol) prevents unauthorized iSCSI servers from connecting
to the storage system. Using CHAP provides no benefit if the server and storage system's iSCSI ports are direct
connect (no network) or are not connected to a public network.
Caution Disabling CHAP on the storage system may disrupt connections and I/O from other servers connected to
the storage system.

To disable CHAP on the storage system:

1. In Navisphere Manager, right-click the storage system and select iSCSI > CHAP Management.
2. Select any entries for this server and click Delete for each.
The ping Command
The ping command is used to verify that you can access a target node on a network and that the node is alive.

For example, to verify that you can reach storage system port at 10.241.167.14 and that the port is alive, you would
enter the following command:

ping 10.241.167.14

If the port is connected and alive, it will reply to the ping with a response such as:

Pinging 10.241.167.14 with 32 bytes of data:
Reply from 10.241.167.14: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
Reply from 10.241.167.14: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from 10.241.167.14: bytes=32 time<1ms TTL=64
Reply from 10.241.167.14: bytes=32 time=1ms TTL=64
Ping statistics for 10.241.167.14:
Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 1ms, Average = 0ms
Reinstall the Navisphere Server Utility
You may have the incorrect version of the Navisphere Server Utility on your server, or you may not have installed the
Server Utility with the iSCSI option selected.
To install the correct version of the Navisphere Server Utility:

1. Uninstall the version that is currently installed on your server.
2. Obtain the latest version of the Navisphere Server Utility. The revision should be equal-to or greater-than the
storage system FLARE version. You can download the file from the EMC Powerlink website:
http://powerlink.emc.com.

3. Install the Navisphere Server Utility.

Note: If you are installing the Server Utility, select the iSCSI storage system check box and reboot the
server. If you do not select this when you first install the utility, the server will not be able to connect to the
storage system.

4. On the server, try to connect to the storage system SP targets using the Navisphere Server Utility.
Verify IP Parameters on the Server and the Storage System iSCSI Ports
Record and verify network settings in your server and storage system as follows. We recommend referring to your
planning guide for comparison.

1. At the server’s command prompt, enter the ipconfig command and record IP addresses and subnet masks
for the server iSCSI NICs.
2. In Navisphere Manager, obtain the IP address, subnet mask, and gateway for each iSCSI port and record this
information. To find this information in Navisphere Manager, right click the storage system and select iSCSI
> Port Management.
3. Verify that the IP addresses of the server NICs and the storage system iSCSI ports they will connect to are
on the same subnet (e.g.) or are on routable subnets:

Server NIC 1 Storage system iSCSI port SPA0
IP address 10.241.167.145 10.241.167.144
subnet mask 255.255.255.192 255.255.255.192

4. Using the information that you recorded from Navisphere Manager, ensure that the Target IP address you
entered in the Navisphere Server Utility is one of the storage system iSCSI ports.

Note: A possible cause of failing to connect could be that you are adding the incorrect iSCSI data port IP
address (i.e., one your server is not cabled to; you may also be pinging an IP address that is not assigned to
an iSCSI data port). To verify that you are trying to connect to the correct iSCSI data port, disconnect storage
system iSCSI data ports from the LAN and attempt to ping them from the server. If the ping returns a
response, you are not pinging the array to which you are trying to connect.
Verify that the iSCSI Ports on the Storage System and Server are
Working Properly

Connect the iSCSI port on the storage system directly to the server NIC with an Ethernet cable and verify that you
can ping from each to the other, as follows:

a. Connect the server NIC to the iSCSI data port with Cat5e or better (not cross-over) cable.
b. Assign the following IP addresses so that the NIC and storage system iSCSI port are on the same subnet:

Assign to the storage system iSCSI port:
IP 10.0.0.1
subnet mask 255.0.0.0
gateway 0.0.0.0

Assign to the server NIC port:
IP 10.0.0.2
subnet mask 255.0.0.0
gateway 0.0.0.0

c. Using Navisphere Manager, ping the server NIC.
d. On the Microsoft Windows server, open the Windows Command Prompt and ping the storage system. You
should receive responses from each target port that you ping.
Verify Network Connectivity to the Storage System using telnet
Open a command prompt and enter the telnet command:
telnet SP_IP_address 3260
where:

• SP_IP_address is the IP address of the storage system iSCSI port

• 3260 is the iSCSI TCP listening port on the storage system's data ports.

If the screen goes blank with no response, the server is able to telnet to the storage system, which indicates that
the server is able to reach the storage system.
Verify that the iSCSI NICs are Working Properly
Verify that the iSCSI NICs are working properly, as follows:

1. In the Microsoft Windows Device Manager, make sure that all of the appropriate iSCSI NICs are enabled.
2. Using the NIC diagnostics, test the server’s iSCSI NICs.

Note: If a NIC fails, replace it with a working NIC and repeat steps 1 and 2.

3. Start the Windows Command Prompt. At the Command prompt, ping the loopback address 127.0.0.1. You
should receive responses from the target port.

Note: If the loopback ping fails, contact technical support for your operating system.

4. At the Windows Command Prompt, ping the IP addresses of all NICs in the server. You should receive
responses from each target port that you ping.

Note: A failure indicates that the NIC driver is corrupt, there is a duplicate IP on the network, or the ARP
cache is corrupt. You can clear the ARP cache by entering the arp –d command at the Windows Command
Prompt. Contact your network administrator for more information.
Verifying that an HBA or NIC is Registered
To verify that an HBA or NIC is registered with the storage system:

1. In Navisphere Manager, right-click the storage system and click Connectivity Status.
2. If an HBA or NIC is registered, you will see the HBA/NIC WorldWide Name (WWN) in the Initiator Name
column and you will see Yes under the Registered column.

For example:
Verify that the iSCSI Ports on the Storage System SPs are Working
Connect the storage system SPs together and verify that the iSCSI ports are working as follows:

CAUTION Perform this procedure only if none of your servers are sending I/O to these ports. If you are testing an
existing working storage system and you disconnect a path that is being used to transfer data between the storage
system and another server, the transfer will be interrupted and you may lose data.

1. On the storage system, connect the SP A ports to the SP B ports using known-working network cables (Cat 5e
or Cat 6).
2. Temporarily assign the following IP addresses to the iSCSI data ports on SP A and SP B so that they are on the
same subnet :

a. Set the SP A iSCSI port parameters:

IP 10.0.0.1
subnet mask 255.0.0.0
gateway 0.0.0.0

b. Set the SP B iSCSI port parameters:

IP 10.0.0.2
subnet mask 255.0.0.0
gateway 0.0.0.0

3. Using Navisphere Manager, ping SP A from SP B, and then ping SP B from SP A. You should receive
responses from each target port that you ping.
How to Verify that the Host can See the HBA
This page describes how to verify that your operating system can see the Fibre Channel HBA installed in the host.

For a Windows 2000 or Windows 2003 host:

1. From the Windows task bar, select Start > Programs > Administrative Tools > Computer Management.
2. In the left pane of the Computer Management window, click Device Manager.
3. Verify that the HBA is listed under SCSI and RAID Controllers. If it is, the host operating system detected the
HBA.

Note: If Windows Plug & Play does not detect your HBA, it is listed as Unknown or as Fibre Channel Controller
under Other Devices.
Note: Windows 2000 configurations with Service Pack 1 or higher and Windows Server 2003 configurations
automatically detect HBAs . If the HBA is detected, it will be listed under SCSI Devices.

For a Solaris host:
You can use the getdev command to list all installed devices. See the Solaris Administrator command manpages
for this command.
For a Solaris host with Emulex HBAs :
For Emulex HBAs , you can use the lputil command to list the installed Emulex HBAs. To start lputil:

1. Change to the /usr/sbin/lpfc directory.
2. Enter the lputil command:

# ./lputil

For an HP-UX host:
Scan for the HBAs using the ioscan command:
# ioscan -fnC fc
Class I H/ W Path Driver S/W State H/W Type Description
=================================================================
fc 0 0/2/0/0 td CLAIMED INTERFACE HP Tachyon XL2 Fibre Channel Mass Storage
Adapter
/dev/td0
fc 1 0/4/0/0 td CLAIMED INTERFACE HP Tachyon XL2 Fibre Channel Mass Storage
Adapter
/dev/td1

The scan returns /dev/tdx device names.