Date: May 2007  Client: Galway County Council  Project code: NGB05         

N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2.  Final  Report  on  archaeological  investigations  at  Site  E2063,  modern brick kilns at Brusk, Co.  Galway 
        By: Brendon Wilkins & Amy Bunce with a contribution by Auli Tourenen  Ministerial Direction no.: A024/24  Excavation no.: E2063  Director: Brendon Wilkins  Chainage: 20900‐21150  NGR: 154875/224784                     

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

    CONTENTS                    1  Summary                  2  Introduction                  3  Site description and location              4  Aims and methodology               5  Results                    Kiln 1                    Kiln 2                    Kiln 3                    6  Discussion                  7  Archive                   8   References                  List of Figures    Figure 1  E2063 Location of excavation area  Figure 2  E2063 Location of excavation area and RMP extract  Figure 3  E2063 Topographic Survey  Figure 4  Plan of Kiln 1 & 3  Figure 5  Plan of Kiln 2  Figure 6  East‐facing sections of Kiln 1  Figure 7  South‐ and east‐facing sections of Kiln 3      List of Plates    Plate 1    Pre‐excavation of Kiln 1, north‐facing  Plate 2    North‐facing elevation of bricks in Kiln 1  Plate 3    Bricks in south‐east corner of Kiln 1, north‐west facing  Plate 4    Post‐excavation of south end of Kiln 1, south‐west facing  Plate 5    South‐east facing section of north‐east corner of Kiln 1  Plate 6    Post‐excavation of Kiln 1, north‐facing  Plate 7    Mid‐excavation of Kiln 2, north‐facing  Plate 8    Mid‐excavation of north end of Kiln 2, north‐west facing  Plate 9    Post‐excavation of south end of Kiln 2, north‐west facing  Plate 10   Bricks at north‐west end of Kiln 2, south‐west facing  Plate 11   Post‐excavation of east side of Kiln 3, south‐east facing  Plate 12   Post‐excavation of west side of Kiln 3, south‐east facing      Appendices 

          PAGE                        3  3  4  4  4  5  7  7  8  10  10 

1 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  Appendix 1  Appendix 2  Appendix 3  Appendix 4  Appendix 5  Appendix 6  Appendix 7 

Context register  Finds register  Sample register   Photograph register  Drawing register  Site matrix  Faunal remains report 

2 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  1 Summary    This report presents the results of archaeological investigations carried out on behalf of  Galway County Council prior to the commencement of construction on the N6 Galway to  Ballinasloe Scheme. The work was undertaken under Ministerial Direction number A024/24,  registration number E2063, in the townland of Brusk, Co. Galway. The Minister for the  Environment, Heritage & Local Government, following consultation with the National  Museum of Ireland, directed that Brendon Wilkins of Headland Archaeology Ltd should  proceed with Phase II Excavation.    Contract 2 pre‐construction testing on this site in 2005 was alerted to the possible high  archaeological potential of the location by an archaeological geophysical survey carried out  (ArchaeoPhysica 2004). Testing was able to confirm the presence of three brick kilns, a  potential well and an area of in situ burning.    Full archaeological excavation was conducted on this site during May 2006. The three brick  kilns were exposed, excavated and identified as clamp kilns, single‐use structures often  constructed close to both the raw material and the building for which they were intended.  The clamp kilns may reflect relatively small‐scale use of the site. It is suggested that the kilns  were not fired on the same occasion owing to a development in the construction techniques  observable between the three kilns. Other potential features, including the possible well and  the in‐situ burning were investigated and found to be a natural feature and the result of recent  field clearance activity respectively.        2 Introduction    Works are being carried out along the route of the proposed N6 Galway to East of Ballinasloe  national road scheme, between the townlands of Doughiska in County Galway and Beagh in  County Roscommon.  The proposed road will consist of approximately 56 km of dual  carriageway, a 7km link road from Carrowkeel to Loughrea and approximately 23km of side  roads. There will be four grade‐separated junctions, 36 bridges and a toll plaza located at  Cappataggle.    The area of proposed archaeological investigation was divided into four contracts, based on  four sectors of approximately equal extent. The work described here was undertaken under  Archaeological Investigations Contract 2. This covered a stretch of road development of  approximately 13.2km of dual carriageway and 7km of single carriageway, and passed to the  south of Athenry and Kiltullagh in a generally east/west direction. The project was funded by  the Irish Government and the European Union under the National Development Plan 2000– 2006. Headland Archaeology Ltd was commissioned by Galway County Council to undertake  the works. Arch Consultancy undertook an archaeological survey as part of an  Environmental Impact Survey of the route compiled by RPS‐MCOS Engineering in 2005. The  kilns were not identified by Arch Consultancy although there were upstanding remains to be  seen. An aerial survey was also undertaken, as was a geophysical survey (Archaeophysica  2004). Archaeological test excavations were carried out by M. Jones (03E1874, Galway County  Council, National Roads Design Office). On the basis of findings from this work Contract 2  Investigations commenced in September 2005.   

3 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  3  Site description and location    The site was within the townland of Brusk, approximately 4.5km south‐east of Athenry. It  was located at NGR 154875/224784 and between chainage 20900–21150. It was situated in  relatively flat, low lying pasture land bordered on all four sides by limestone drystone walls  and bounded to the south by the main Athenry to Kiltullagh road. The site was poorly  drained and adjacent to an active watercourse prone to flooding. The unmodified natural  subsoil was a glacially derived till composed of fine clay with gravel inclusions, which would  have provided an excellent raw material for industrial brick manufacture.       4  Aims and methodology    The objective of the work was the preservation by record of any archaeological features or  deposits in advance of the proposed road construction.    Four excavation areas were opened under direct archaeological supervision, and the presence  of three kilns confirmed. The areas were stripped by machine at which point the kilns were  clearly identified as red square features bordered by burnt soil and surrounded by a bank of  redeposited natural material. The kilns were numbered 1, 2 & 3 in order of excavation. All  three kilns were numbered with the same context numbers, as their composition was  extremely similar. The only difference between the kilns was in the layout of the bricks and  benches.    The resulting surface was cleaned and all potential features investigated by hand.  Archaeological contexts were recorded by photograph and on standardised recording sheets.  Plans and sections were drawn at an appropriate scale. Ordnance Datum levels and feature  locations were recorded using penmap and an EDM. Environmental samples were taken on  any deposits suitable for analysis or dating. Contexts, finds, samples, drawings and photo  registers from the site are provided in the Appendices.      5  Results    The kilns were characterised as single fired ‘clamper’ kilns. These kilns use unfired bricks to  form their structure, and are then dismantled following firing. Kiln 3 was slightly different in  construction from kilns 1 & 2 and was possibly the first kiln on site. No areas of possible brick  working, brick storage and drying or on‐site accommodation for workers or kiln minders  were discovered. There were no areas of clay quarrying within the limits of the excavation  but a large, irregular, elongated depression was identified in the underlying topography to  the  25 m to the west of the site which was likely to have been the remnants of a backfilled  clay pit.     The topsoil deposit (1000) covered the entire site and was a light to mid brown silty clay with  a few stone inclusions and a loose compaction. It was 0.20m in depth, and lay directly above  unmodified natural subsoil (1003), which consisted of a light brown silty clay with occasional  limestone inclusions and a fairly solid compaction.    A potential well (1002) was identified in testing. It was approximately 2.3m in diameter and  comprised a circular concave depression of 0.27m depth. It had a singular fill (1001) of mid 

4 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

orange‐brown fine silty clay with occasional pebbles and a soft compaction. It was interpreted  as a pond. It was too shallow to have functioned as a well and was probably agricultural, not  associated with the kilns. The area of in situ burning was exposed and cleaned by hand. There  were no negative cut features associated with the charcoal and no finds were recovered. The  deposit was shallow and poorly sorted; it was judged to have been of recent origin likely to  have been the result of modern agricultural activity.    Kiln 1    Kiln 1 measured 11m north/south and 6.5m east/west. The traces of 12 rows of bricks running  east/west could be identified in plan. Rows of bricks are termed ‘benches’ and specific  arrangements can be diagnostic of kiln typology. The ten benches within the centre of kiln 1  were of double‐brick thickness. In the central benches the bricks were arranged so a header  (width facing side) of each brick was exposed to the fire in the spaces between the benches.  The two edge benches at either end of the kiln were only single brick thickness. The bricks at  the end benches were laid with both headers on the faces of the bench.    The bricks that occasionally remained at the unfired bottom of the benches were laid on edge  (narrow face down). Instead of being laid alternately, with the header and stretcher in the  courses of the benches, the courses at Brusk were laid just slightly skewed from the previous  course. This differed from the pattern recognised at a recently excavated Newrath, Co.  Kilkenny (Wilkins 2006; Hammond 1977). The lower courses of poorly fired bricks were  ridged by the course of bricks laid diagonally on top of them, indicating why these were left  in situ. The bottom bricks would have still been fairly wet once laid and the weight of the  upper courses damaged them beyond use.    The ends of the benches frequently had bricks laid on edge (narrow face down) and a few laid  on bed (wide face down), preserved in the patterns they were stacked in for firing. It is  assumed that these bricks were considered not well enough fired to be functional, probably  due to being located at the edge of the kiln. They were left in place, occasionally to a depth of  three courses. The patterns at the ends of the benches included bricks laid with their stretcher  face on the benches face, and this pattern differed on each course. The pattern of brick laying  at the edges of the kiln was intended to stabilise the ends of the benches. The bricks suffering  from a combination of being at the end of the benches, at the extremity of the kiln and in the  bottom courses of the benches were so poorly fired that they had fused together.    There was evidence of a different style of bricks being placed in the centre of the kiln,  possibly because they required a higher firing temperature for their ultimate end purpose.  These bricks were a light yellow colour and different to the mid orange red colour of other  bricks fired in the kiln. The differentiation was a consequence of the hotter firing  temperatures found in the centre of the kiln in addition to reduced oxygen levels, creating a  harder, but more brittle end product. Yellow bricks were found in the middle of the central  benches in Kiln 1. The benches of yellow bricks were the only central benches to be left  behind, being too poorly fired to warrant retrieval. There was one red brick amongst them,  which was probably accidentally incorporated as all unfired clay looking very similar. This  brick was very well fired whereas the yellow bricks were occasionally soft in the middle of  the benches. The ends of the yellow benches were constructed of red bricks, further evidence  that the yellow bricks were harder to fire and were not wasted at the edges where the red  bricks had less opportunity to fire. The bottom course of yellow bricks was very heavily  ridged by the upper courses, suggesting that the yellow bricks may have been softer when  unfired than their red counterparts. 

5 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  The pile of brick rubble (1004) covering the remains of the benches was composed of broken  bricks or poorly fired bricks that were probably discarded as being unsuitable while the kiln  was being dismantled. This rubble was generally a red colour but also had elements of  yellow, light orange and dark red due to the broken bricks and brick dust within. It had a  moderate to very loose compaction due to its composition of pieces of brick up to about half a  brick in size (but on average quarter of a brick in size), with areas of more compacted brick  dust and occasional silts.  This rubble was 0.1m to 0.15m thick and covered the entire extent  of kiln 1. The interfaces were very clear and the brick rubble [1004] was also to be found  between the remnants of the bottom two courses of the benches as well as on top of them.     Some of the discarded bricks in dump layer (1011) were not dropped where they were  discovered to be faulty but were deliberately flung away from the kiln and became  incorporated into the banked natural (1008) probably as a result of trampling.    A layer of gritty yellow sand (005) was recorded beneath the benches and across most of the  base of the kiln. It was shallow, measuring only 0.02m, but was high quality coarse sand and  was unlikely to have been resourced from the adjacent stream. In places it had become  disturbed and mixed with the rubble (1004) and was hard to discern in all sections. It was  compacted but easily loosened and had no inclusions within it. In other places it was not  present between the benches; this was likely to be a result of heavy raking out of ashes that  would have been required before the retrieval of the finished bricks. This deposit sheds light  on the construction techniques of the brick clamp kilns at Brusk. It was originally present  across the whole of the base of the kiln. It would also have protected the quality of the bottom  course of bricks in the benches by creating a barrier between them and the potentially damp  soil below, as well as preventing the adherence of soil and silts. The use of sand at the base of  the kiln suggests that the builders were hopeful all the bricks would fire well and were not  resigned to the failure of the lower courses.    A discoloured soil layer (1006) below and around the kiln was also recorded. It was caused by  direct heat applied to the unmodified natural subsoil (1003). It was a black silty clay of loose  compaction. A few roots had penetrated the layer. There were also a few burnt roots of  charcoal, present within the soil at the time of firing. This soil layer (1006) was a maximum of  0.06m thick but the thickness of all reduced soils was up to 0.15m thick. Layer (1010) was a  mid brown or purple coloured silty clay of loose compaction, 0.1m deep with evidence of in  situ burning and was directly below the soil layer below and around the kiln (1006). In some  places the differentiation between the soil layer surrounding the kiln (1006) and the soil layer  directly beneath it (1010) was unclear and diffuse. The soil layer surrounding the kiln (1006)  was very disturbed in places probably as a result of trampling and disturbance during  deconstruction of the kilns that would have included raking out of the ashes.     This partial raking out of the layer around the kiln (1006) in some places was observed when  the rubble (1004) between the benches extended deeper than the bottom course of the  benches. A lens (1007) within the rubble (1004] was discovered towards the north of kiln 1.  The lens was 0.02m thick and 0.35m in length. It was a light yellow to white gritty sand of  firm compaction. It is possible that this was incorporated into the rubble (1004) as the kiln  was dismantled. This had an ashy colour and texture. It may have appeared as a lens in kiln 1  as a result of disturbance. Ash would have accumulated between the benches and would  have needed to be raked out of the fired kiln before the bricks were removed, a potential side  product utilised as a soil improver.   

6 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

Topsoil and subsoil would have been banked around the kilns as they fired. Layer (1008) was  redeposited natural, a brown silty clay that appeared identical to the unmodified natural  layer (1003), except that it included broken bricks. The horizon between the redeposited  natural (1008) and the unmodified natural layer (1003) was not easily determined although on  Kiln 3 a layer of possibly burnt sod (1012) could have formed the interface between the  redeposited natural (1008) and the natural layer (1003). Where the redeposited natural layer  (1008) was banked against the sides of the kiln it lensed into the layer of soil surrounding the  kiln (1006).  The redeposited natural (1008) would have been removed as the kiln was  dismantled and discarded bricks (1011) of about half a brick in size became incorporated with  the redeposited natural [1008], mostly in isolated dumps approximately 2m from the edge of  the kiln. A series of possible stoke‐holes at the ends of the spaces between the benches were  identified below the redeposited layer of natural (1008), with an area of disturbed material  (1009) within the redeposited natural bank (1008). It was a mix of the rubble (1004; 1011) and  reduced soil (1006). The bank of soil constructed around the kiln may have been to control air  flow, insulate the kiln and regulate the internal temperature. It was possibly also to help in  the stacking of the bricks in the higher courses of the benches, especially the benches at the  edges that were only single‐brick thickness (on Kilns 1 & 2) and may have needed extra  support.      Kiln 2    Kiln 2 measured approximately 11m SW/NE to NW/SE and 6.50m NW/SE, and the benches  were mostly recorded as surface burn marks on the ground with only a few bricks remaining  at the ends of the benches. These benches extended north/west to south/east and, like Kiln 1  there were ten benches of double‐brick thickness and two benches of single‐brick thickness at  the sides of the kiln. Similar to Kiln 1, the spaces between the benches were approximately  0.5m and the bricks themselves measured 0.24m by 0.1m and 0.05m ‐ 0.07m in depth.     Fewer bricks remained in situ in Kiln 2 and less rubble (1004) was recorded, possibly due to a  more successful firing than Kiln 1. Stoke‐holes at the ends of the spaces between the benches  were observed on Kiln 2, probably related to the raking out of the kilns or the fuelling of the  firing. Partial colour differences in the remaining marks of brick benches on the surface of  Kiln 2 may have been due to the almost complete removal of the bricks, disturbance and  trampling.           Kiln 3    Kiln 3 measured 10.20m SW/NE and 6.15m NW/SE. The benches ran NW/SE. It differed in its  construction from Kilns 1 and 2 by the fact that there were 11 benches of double thickness and  the spaces between the ends of the benches incorporated some form of brick blocking of the  stoke‐holes. The rudimentary nature of Kiln 3 was possibly because this was the first kiln  fired on this site. As the double thickness of benches on the edges of the kiln had not fired  well, this construction fault was possibly remedied in the later kiln construction of Kiln 1 and  2. The blocking off of the stoke‐holes was not observed on the other kilns either, and it may  have been an unsuccessful or unnecessary attempt to control the firing. Kiln 3 had been badly  damaged by tree roots in the north and as a result only the edges of the kiln were excavated;  this revealed that in fact the rest of the kiln would have survived fairly well. 

7 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  Deposit layer (1012) was a black‐red silty clay of loose compaction with organic inclusions  and a depth of 0.05m. It was directly above the natural subsoil and was a mixed, burnt  deposit resulting from the firing of the kiln and its fuel source.       6  Discussion    The manufacture and use of brick in Ireland appears to have mainly been absent before the  early modern period. There is no archaeological evidence for the use of this building material  prior to the 16th century, when it was used in buildings such as the Ormond manor house at  Carrick‐on‐Suir, Co. Tipperary and Bunratty Castle, Co. Clare (Rynne 2006, 166). Over the  following centuries brick production and use grew from a small, limited, and exclusive  industry to a widely employed building material with large‐scale production. This  development was greatly aided by the industrial revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries  which resulted in brick production becoming mechanised, thus increasing the quality and  output of the product.      Most pre‐industrial brick kilns in Ireland took the form of ‘brick clamps’. These were  temporary rectangular structures which were constructed from unfired bricks. They were  located near a source of suitable clay which was often found near rivers. This also facilitated  the transport of the finished product. After extracting the clay it was processed by removing  all stones and worked to a suitable consistency by adding water and trampling under foot  (Rynne 2006, 167). Bricks were then formed to set sizes; these sizes differed slightly  depending upon locality. Once the bricks had been allowed to dry the brick clamps were  constructed. This was done by stacking unfired bricks in rows (known as benches) with  alternate header and stretcher layers built up. In many cases the clamps were up to 5m high  (Hull 2005, 31). The gaps between the bottom rows of bricks were filled with fuel, including  peat and wood, and ignited. The clamps were often covered with peat and allowed to burn  for a number of days or weeks resulting in the finished product (Hull 2005, 31).    On small brick clamps such as those found at Brusk, the production of the bricks was a  singular, small scale activity, undertaken for the benefit of the local community (Rynne 2006,  166). With the Industrial Revolution came new mechanised methods of producing bricks  which allowed the industry to increase in size and production output. By the 1880s machine‐ made bricks were the norm in Ireland (Rynne 2006, 169). Bricks which were machine made  tended to be of better quality and of a standard size in comparison with those produced by  hand, from brick clamps. This mechanisation led to the construction of large brick kilns, of  which there were two basic types – the intermittent kiln and the continuous kiln. An example  of an intermittent kiln can be found at Coalisland, Co. Tyrone. In the continuous kilns the  drying and firing of the bricks became an uninterrupted process. An example of this kind of  kiln can be found at Youghal, Co. Cork (Rynne 2006, 170), and one was also excavated by  Headland Archaeology Ltd. in Newrath, Co. Kilkenny (Wilkins 2006). The use of sand, the  placement of the more desirable and harder to fire bricks within the centre of a kiln and often  towards the top of the kiln, and the differing methods of setting for each successive course  has been recognised in other kilns (Hammond 1977, 180).    Brusk would have been a temporary site used for three separate, sequential kiln firings.  Evidence for this is based on the assumption that the design of Kilns 1 and 2 were adapted  following the firing of Kiln 3, and that their close positioning would make simultaneous use  unlikely. The bricks were of the same size in each kiln and it could be suggested that the kilns 

8 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

were directly supplying the construction of a nearby building. No building could be  identified in the immediate vicinity using building matching the dimensions of the kiln  product, but bricks of a similar composition were used in the buildings constructed to service  the Loughrea to Athlone branch railway line (Geddes 2006). The yellow bricks produced at  Brusk may have been intended for decorative architectural features such as window arches,  but the higher temperature these bricks were fired at would also have made them suitable for  fireplace surrounds where direct contact with heat was likely. The kilns were estimated to  have been able to fire 20,000 bricks at once, requiring 24m³ of clay.    No archaeological finds were recovered from the site, and the singular faunal element from  Brusk was analysed by Auli Tourunen of Headland Archaeology Ltd. and was identified as a  horse molar tooth. It derived from the pile of brick rubble (1004) in Kiln 2 and was interpreted  on site as having been incorporated within the material that was subsequently burnt. The  osteological analysis confirmed that the tooth, which had since fragmented into six pieces,  was likely to be unrelated to the activity at the brick kilns (Tourunen 2007).          7  Archive    The site archive is comprised of the following materials:  Item  Quantities Context sheets  18  Sample sheets  0  Context, Photo and Sample Registers  8  Photos  122  Plans  0  Sections  8    The archive material is contained within one box.    The archive is currently stored in the offices of Headland Archaeology, Unit 1, Wallingstown  Business Park, Little Island, Cork. It is proposed that following completion of post‐excavation  the archive will be deposited with Galway County Council.        8  References  ArchaeoPhysica Ltd 2004 Archaeological Geophsical Survey Report. Published report submitted  to Galway County Council   Geddes, G 2006. N6 Galway to Ballinalsoe National Road Scheme: Loughrea and Attymon Light  Railway (1890‐ 1975). Unpublished report for Headland Archaeology Ltd    Hull, G. 2005. Brick Kilns. Archaeology Ireland 19: 4 Issue 74    Hammond, M. 1977. Brick Kilns: An Illustrated Survey. Industrial Archaeological Review 1:171‐ 192 

9 _____________________________________________________________________

Headland Archaeology Ltd. N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Contract 2. E2063 Final Report _____________________________________________________________________________________________

  Jones, M 2004 Archaeological test excavations on a ringfort site (GA96:089) in Farranablake East, Co.  Galway, on the route of the proposed N6 Galway to East Ballinasloe road scheme. Published report  submitted to Galway County Council    OS 1837 Ordnance Survey of Co. Galway, first edition, sheet 96, scale 1:10560    OS 1897–1913  Ordnance Survey of Co. Galway, second edition sheet 96, scale 1:10560    RPS‐MCOS 2004 N6 Galway to East Ballinasloe Environmental Impact Statement. Published  report submitted to Galway County Council    Rynne, C. 2006. Industrial Ireland 1750‐1930: An Archaeology. Cork: The Collins Press.     Tourunen, A. 2007. Final report on the faunal remains from Brusk, Co. Galway. Unpublished  report for Headland Archaeology Ltd.     Wilkins, B. 2006. N25 Waterford Bypass, Contract 3. Preliminary report on archaeological  investigations at Site 34 in the townland of Newrath, Co. Kilkenny. Unpublished report for  Headland Archaeology Ltd.    

10 _____________________________________________________________________

= CPO

Athenry

E2063

Galway

Reproduced from 2002 Ordnance Survey of Ireland 1:50,000 Discovery Series no 46, C Ordnance Survey of Ireland, Government of Ireland. Licence No. EN 0008105 C Ordnance Survey of Ireland and Government of Ireland. Licence No. EN 0008105

extent of backfilled clay pits

N

0

100 m

Figure 1 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Location of excavation area

Reproduced from 1933 Ordnance Survey of Ireland, Second Edition, Six Inch to One Mile map, Galway Sheet 96 C Ordnance Survey of Ireland and Government of Ireland. Licence No. EN 0008105

= CPO = Excavated Area

N

0

250 m

Figure 2 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Location of excavation area and RMP extract

N 50 m

0

Figure 3 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Topographical Survey

Kiln 2 tree damage Kiln 3 Kiln 3 tree damage Kiln 1 Plate 4 brick

2 pits

Possible well

N
Plate 1

0

100 m

Kiln 1

brick Plate 1- Post-ex detail of brick shadows Plate 2- Post-excavation of Kiln 1

N
Plate 2 Plate 3

Plate 3- Relationship between kilns 1 and 2

Plate 4- Kiln 3 Post-excavation East side

0

10 m

Figure 4 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Site plan of Kiln 1 and 3

Kiln 2

2 pits

Kiln 3

Kiln Kiln 1 1

Plate 2

Possible well

N

0

100 m

Plate 1

brick brick shadow Plate 1- Kiln 2 Mid- excavation overall Plate 2- Kiln 2, 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end

N

0

10 m

Figure 5 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Site plan of Kiln 2

S
1008 1003

Bricks

1004 1006

Bricks 1006 1004 1006 1010 1010 1006

N

1003

S

1004 1007 1005 1010 and 1006 1008

N

1m gap between sections

0

1.25 m

Kiln 1

N

0

4m

= Location of sections (triangles point to face of section)

Figure 6 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 East facing sections of Kiln 1

W

E

1007 1005 1006 1010

1011 1012 1008 1003 1003

South facing section of Kiln 3

S
1008 1003 1011 East facing section of Kiln 3 1011 Brick Brick

N
1006 1010

0

1m

tree damage Kiln 3

tree damage

N

0

4m

= Location of sections (triangles point to face of section)

Figure 7 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 South and East facing sections of Kiln 3

E2063:1000:001

0

5 cm

Figure 8 - N6 Galway to Ballinasloe Scheme, Co. Galway, Contract 2: Brusk E2063 Copper alloy fragment from kiln 2

Plate 1 - Pre-excavation view of kiln 1, facing N

Plate 2 - North facing elevation of bricks, kiln 1

Plate 3 - View of brick rows in southeast corner of kiln 1, facing NW

Plate 4 - Post-excavation view of southern end of kiln 1, facing SW

Plate 5 - Southeast facing section of northeast corner, kiln 1

Plate 6 - Post-excavation view of kiln 1, facing N

Plate 7 - Mid-excavation view of kiln 2, facing N

Plate 8 - Mid-excavation view of northern end of kiln 2, facing NW

Plate 9 - Post-excavation view of southern end of kiln 2, facing NW

Plate 10 - Post-excavation detail of bricks at northwestern end of kiln 2, facing SW

Appendix 1: Context register  FILL  OF:  n/a  FILLED  BY:  n/a  Length  (m)  n/a  Width  (m)  n/a  Depth  (m)  0.2 

CONTEXT  1000 

TYPE  Deposit 

1002  n/a  n/a 

1001  1002  1003 

Deposit  Cut  Deposit 

n/a  1001  n/a 

2.4  2.4  n/a 

2.2  2.2  n/a 

0.27  0.27  n/a 

n/a 

1004 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.1‐0.15 

n/a 

1005 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.02 

n/a 

1006 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.06 

n/a 

1007 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.02 

Description  Light to mid brown silty clay,  few stones, loose compaction.  Mid orange‐brown fine silty clay,  occasional pebbles, soft  compaction.  Circular in plan, shallow sides,  concave base, filled by (1001).  Light brown silty clay, very  occasional limestone.  Brick‐red rubble amongst  remaining brick stacks,  comprised of broken bricks, brick  dust or unfired bricks within silty  clay, moderate compaction.  Yellow gritty sand beneath the  stacked bricks, loose compaction.  Probably laid before the unfired  bricks.  Black silty clay under and  around the kiln, loos compaction.  Either originally natural (1003) or  redeposited natural (1008) that  has been heat affected and  reduced.  White gritty sand. Probably ash  that was raked out of the kiln  before the bricks were removed. 

Interpretation  Topsoil 

Singular fill of dew hole (1002)  Cut of dew hole  Natural 

Rubble layer of discarded  bricks 

Sand layer beneath kiln. 

Reduced soil layer under and  around kiln. 

Ash layer remaining in the kiln. 

n/a 

1008 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

1009 

Deposit 

n/a 

1.1 

n/a 

0.1 

n/a 

1010 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.2 

n/a 

1011 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

1012 

Deposit 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

0.05‐0.06 

Brown silty clay, loose  compaction. Redeposited natural  (1003) banked against the kiln  sides and taken down after firing  leading to incorporation of bricks  (1011).  Orange and black mix of brick  rubble (1004) and reduced soil  (1006), loose compaction.  Probably an area disturbed after  firing.  Brown (aubergine) silty clay,  loose compaction. Lightly heat  affected and probably a fading  out of (1006).  Discarded bricks within [1008]  probably incorporated as the  bank was taken down and spread  out.  Black‐red silty clay, loose  compaction. Burnt organics  within 1008). 

Redeposited natural banked  against the kiln. 

Lens of disturbed contexts. 

Less reduced layer under and  around kiln. 

Discarded bricks. 

Burnt sod layer. 

Appendix 2: Finds register    Find no.  Kiln  Material  Description  E2063:1000:001  2  Cu alloy  Copper‐alloy grooved fragment, 0.13m x 0.05m  E2063:1004:001  2  Tooth  Burnt tooth within kiln      Appendix 3: Sample register    Sample no.  Context Description  E2063:001  (1004)  Kiln 1: Bricks amongst the rubble.  E2063:002  Stacks  Kiln 1: Bricks from brick stacks.  E2063:003  (1004)  Kiln 2: Bricks amongst the rubble.  E2063:004  Stacks  Kiln 2: Bricks from brick stacks.  E2063:005  (1004)  Kiln 3: Bricks amongst the rubble.  E2063:006  Stacks  Kiln 3: Bricks from brick stacks.  E2063:007  Clay  Natural clay in vicinity of kilns.      Appendix 4: Photo register    Shot no.  Dir.  Description  63  N  Kiln 1: Working shot  64  N  Kiln 1: The rows of bricks at south/east corner  65  N  Kiln 1: The rows of bricks at south/west corner  66  N  Kiln 1: A nice row of bricks (yellow) at east side  67  N  Kiln 1: The end of a stack of bricks at east side  68  S  Kiln 1: N‐facing pile of bricks at north/east corner  69  N  Kiln 1: Working shot  70  N  Shot showing all three kilns  71  N  Shot showing relationship between kilns  72  N  Pre‐excavation shot of mound/kiln 1  73  ‐  Working shot  74  S  Working shot  75  S  [1002], quarter section of dew hole  76  N  Working shot  77  W  Resting shot  78  E  Kiln 1: North end: West‐facing section (1)  79  E  Kiln 1: North end: West‐facing section (2)  80  E  Kiln 1: North end: West‐facing section (3)  81  W  Kiln 1: North end: East‐facing section (1)  82  W  Kiln 1: North end: East‐facing section (2)  83  W  Kiln 1: North end: East‐facing section (3)  84  N  Kiln 1: West end: South‐facing section (1)  85  S  Kiln 1: West end: North‐facing section (1) 

Quantity  1  1 broken tooth in 1 bag 

Quantity  10 bricks  10 bricks  9  5  6  7  2 bags 

Date  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BC 10‐05‐06  BW 11‐05‐06  BC 11‐05‐06  BC 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06 

86  87  88  89  90  91  92  93  94  95  96  97  98  99  100  101  102  103  104  105  106  107  108  109  110  111  112        1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13 

W  W  E  E  E  W  W  W  W  E  E  N  N  N  N  S  S  S  W  S  N  N  N  N  N  N  N        W  W  W  E  W  NE  NW  W  NW  SW  W  W  NW 

Kiln 1: South end: East‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: South end: East‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: South end: West‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: South end: West‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: Post‐excavation of south/east corner  Kiln 1: Post‐excavation of south end  Kiln 1: Post‐excavation of north end  Kiln 1: South end: East‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: South end: East‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: South end: West‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: South end: West‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: East side: South‐facing section & post‐ excavation  Kiln 1: East side: South‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: East side: South‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: East side: South‐facing section (3)  Kiln 1: East side: North‐facing section (1)  Kiln 1: East side: North‐facing section (2)  Kiln 1: East side: North‐facing section (3)  Kiln 1: Post‐excavation detail of brick shadows  Kiln 1: Post‐excavation detail of brick shadows  Kiln 1: Large scale post‐excavation  Kiln 1: South/east quadrant post‐excavation  Kiln 1: South/west quadrant post‐excavation  Kiln 1: North/west quadrant post‐excavation  Kiln 1: North/east quadrant post‐excavation  Kiln 1: Large scale post‐excavation  Kiln 1: Large scale post‐excavation shows relation to  1 & 2    NEW CARD    Kiln 2: Pre‐excavation  Kiln 2: Pre‐excavation  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation overall  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation north/east end 

SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  SOD 11‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06  BC 12‐05‐06        BC 16‐05‐06  BC 16‐05‐06  BC 16‐05‐06  BC 16‐05‐06  BC 17‐05‐06  BC 18‐05‐06  BC 18‐05‐06  BC 18‐05‐06  BC 18‐05‐06  BC 18‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06 

14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  52  53  54  55  56  57  58 

NW  NW  NW  N  NE  SW  NE  NE  NE  NE  NE  NE  NE  NE  SW  NW  NW  NW  NW  NW  NW  N  E  E  E  W  W  S  S  S  S  W  W  W  E  E  N  S  S  N  E  S  S  S  N 

Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation NE centre  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation SW centre  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation SW end  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation south corner damage  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation east corner detail  Kiln 2: Mid/Post‐excavation NW side detail  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, NW end moving to SE end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, SE end  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, bricks at NW end  Kiln 2: 3rd row from NE, bricks at NW end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, bricks at NW end  Kiln 2: 2nd & 3rd rows from NE, taken from ground  Kiln 2: 3rd row from NE, bricks at NW end  Kiln 2: 2nd row from NE, bricks at NW end  Kiln 2: Working shot  Kiln 2: Section at NE of kiln  Kiln 2: Section at NE of kiln  Kiln 2: Section at NE of kiln  Kiln 2: Section at NE of kiln  Kiln 2: Section at NE of kiln  Kiln 2: N‐facing section at NW of kiln  Kiln 2: N‐facing section at NW of kiln  Kiln 2: N‐facing section at NW of kiln  Kiln 2: N‐facing section at NW of kiln  Kiln 3: South end  Kiln 3: South/east corner  Kiln 3: South/east corner  Kiln 3: South end  Kiln 3: South end  Kiln 3: West side  Kiln 3: West side  Kiln 3: West side  Kiln 3: Detail of brick stacks on west side  Kiln 3: Detail of brick stacks on west side  Kiln 3: East side  Kiln 3: North‐facing section at east side of kiln  Kiln 3: North‐facing section at east side of kiln  Kiln 3: South‐facing section at east side of kiln 

BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  BC 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  MH 19‐05‐06  NK 25‐05‐06  NK 25‐05‐06  NK 25‐05‐06  NK 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06  BC 25‐05‐06 

59  N  Kiln 3: South‐facing section at east side of kiln  BC 25‐05‐06  60  N  Kiln 3: South‐facing section at east side of kiln  BC 25‐05‐06  61  N  Kiln 3: East side  BC 25‐05‐06  62  N  Kiln 3: East side  BC 25‐05‐06  63  N  Kiln 3: East side, North end damage  BC 25‐05‐06  64  N  Kiln 3: East side  BC 25‐05‐06  65  S  Kiln 3: Detail of brick stacks on east side  BC 25‐05‐06  66  S  Kiln 3: Post‐excavation on west side  BC 25‐05‐06  67  SE  Kiln 3: Post‐excavation on east side  BC 25‐05‐06  68  W  Kiln 3: Post‐excavation  on north side with tree  BC 25‐05‐06  69  N  Kiln 3: Post‐excavation on west side with tree  BC 25‐05‐06  70  W  Kiln 3: East‐facing section of south slot  BC 25‐05‐06  71  W  Kiln 3: East‐facing section of south slot  BC 25‐05‐06  72  NW  Kiln 3: East‐facing section of south slot  BC 25‐05‐06            Appendix 5: Drawing register    Date Drwg.  Sect.  Plan Description  1  1:20    Kiln 1: E‐facing section of N end of kiln  AB 11‐05‐06  2  1:20    Kiln 1: E‐facing section of S end of kiln  NK 12‐05‐06  3  1:20    Kiln 1: N‐facing section of W end of kiln  MH 15‐05‐06  4  1:20    Kiln 1: S‐facing section of W end of kiln  MH 15‐05‐06  5  1:20    Kiln 2: W‐facing section of N end of kiln  MH 15‐05‐06  6  1:20    Kiln 2: N‐facing section of E end of kiln  NK  7  1:20    Kiln 3: S‐facing section of E end of kiln  LC  8  1:20    Kiln 3: E‐facing section of S end of kiln  NK   

Appendix 6: Site Matrix

Appendix 7: Faunal Remains Report 
    Full  archaeological  resolution  was  conducted  on  Brusk,  Co.  Galway  (E2063)  during  May  2006.  Three brick kilns were exposed and excavated. Total of six fragments of burnt horse tooth were  recovered from the rubble layer of discarded bricks (1004).    Due to the small size of the material, no detailed analysis was possible. It is likely that the teeth  fragments do not relate to brick burning activities but derive from a horse buried or slaughtered  nearby.        NISP Context  Species  Element  1004  Horse  Molar tooth  6    Table 1. Species and anatomical representation of sample (NISP). 

 
   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful