Celebrating

37
Years
1
9
7
6
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121 S. Main Street, Pittston
654-0067
Happy Easter
To All My Family, Friends and Clients
Providing Quality Legal Services To The People of Northeast PA
The Law Offices of
Michael I. Butera
HAPPY EASTER!
SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 $1.00 WILKES-BARRE, PA thepittstondispatch.com
Rabbit
season
Two-year-old Madeline Lis, center right, of-
fers an egg with the help of her mom Traci,
both of Pittston, to the Easter Bunny at
Jefferson Park in Pittston last week.
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at noon.
Downtown revnovation.................................... 3
Primary election................................................ 4
PA school board ................................................ 5
Dancing for a cause.......................................... 6
Library award..................................................... 7
Local chatter...................................................... 8
Slovak man of the year...................................10
St. Pat’s parade for city?................................. 11
Editorial Letters................................................14
Maria Heck......................................................... 17
Nutrition............................................................. 17
PA spring concert ........................................... 24
Sports ................................................................. 31
Obituaries ..........................................................41
Faith ...................................................................6B
Vol. 67, NO. 7
Running with Joe Majeski was always
exercise for my mind as well as for my
body.
You think you don’t know Joe Majeski
but you do. For several years he drew the
editorial page cartoons for the Sunday
Dispatch and The Times Leader.
But his talent doesn’t end with his keen
wit and ability to draw. He’s also a classic
guitar player.
And, by the way, a doctor.
Joseph Majeski, M.D., is a dermatolo-
gist with a practice in Clarks Summit. He
and his wife, Diane, a pharmacist, are par-
ents of four lovely, and incredibly bright
and accomplished daughters.
But enough on Majeski. This story isn’t
about him. It’s about something he said
one day while we were running.
Our regular 3 to 5 mile jaunts were a
lot like two friends just getting together
for coffee, except we both were sweating
and sometimes gasping for air. Most of
the time, however, we were conversing,
running along and chatting as though we
were side-by-side at the counter in a donut
shop.
Joe, who seems to be interested in
everything, always had a fresh topic. This
particular day it was the race horse.
He had seen a documentary on TV
describing the race horse as the perfect
running machine and couldn’t wait to tell
me about it. Man, Joe said, will never
be able to run like a horse and it’s not
because the horse has four legs and we
only two. Joe said it all came down to the
horses’s practically perfect lungs and how
they act as a veritable bellows blowing out
carbon dioxide.
Peak athletic performance is all about
utilizing oxygen to its fullest and, Joe
explained, what makes the horse a perfect
runner is not how well it breathes in
oxygen, but how thoroughly it gets rid of
cardon dioxide. See, when those “bel-
lows” expell carbon dioxide so effciently,
it creates a vacuum in the horse’s lungs
which causes oxygen to come rushing
in at an amazing rate. And with all that
oxygen to help burn calories into energy,
the race horse fies.
Not literally, of course, but you know
what I mean.
I, an armchair philosopher if ever there
were one, took that bit of info and, well,
ran with it.
There is something to be learned, I rea-
soned immediately, in blowing out the bad
to make room for the good, and, no, we’re
not talking about breathing any more.
How often do we harbor bad feelings
refusing to let them go? I’ll answer that in
one word: always.
We might forgive — a rare feat in itself
— but do we forget? Not often. In fact,
most of us tend to keep our bad feelings
right in our hip pocket, taking them out
and examining them on a regular basis.
Nuturing them almost, lest they might
disappear.
Well, the lesson to be learned from the
race horse is that such bad feelings, i.e.
grudges, are the carbon dioxide that we
really need to expell, and damn fast, if we
want good to come rushing into our lives.
When all the bad is gone, be it cardon di-
oxide or a 10-year-old grievance, the good
cannot help but roar in and fll the void.
Which leads me to bad clams.
My wife has been an operating room
nurse for more years that she’d want me to
mention. During that time, she has expe-
rienced many occasions when a patient’s
stomach had to be pumped due to food
poisoning. “You’d be surprised,” she’s
said more than once, “how many patients
will say ‘I knew that clam was bad the
minute I put it into my mouth.’ And I will
ask, ‘Then why the heck did you swallow
it?’”
To me, spitting out a bad clam is no
different from exhaling bad air, and is no
different from forgiving and truly forget-
ting.
Out with the bad. In with the good.
It’s simple.
And appropriate on Easter Sunday.
I’ve often said if you can’t believe that
Christ was the son of God, then at least
try to listening to his teachings. Central to
those teaching is forgiveness.
Someone does you wrong? Well, do
yourself a favor and spit out that bad clam
as fast as you can. Swallow it — take it
to heart — and you’re in for a heap of
trouble. Spit it out and it’s like it never
happened.
In doing this you will free up a lot
of space in your heart. Grudges take
up room, not to mention energy. But
once they are gone, just as with the race
horses’s lungs, the vacuum created will
suck in nothing but goodness.
And just like the race horse, it will hap-
pen without you even thinking about it.
And, therefore, just like the race horse,
you too will fy.
Not literally, of course, but you know
what I mean.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
On race horses … and bad clams
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PI TTSTON REVI TAL I ZATI ON
JOE HEALEY/THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
The former Milazzo Hardware Building, commonly called the Lizza Building after a previous owner, which was unoccupied and deteriorating for the past several
years, is set to be renovated.
A
downtown eyesore
may soon be part of
the revitalized Main
Street in Pittston.
The former Milazzo Hard-
ware Building, commonly
called the Lizza Building af-
ter a previous owner, which
was unoccupied and dete-
riorating for the past several
years, is set to be secured,
then renovated.
Plans include street-level
retail or restaurant space and
fve spacious loft-style apart-
ments on the upper foors.
Pittston Redevelopment
Authority member Mike
Lombardo, the city’s for-
mer mayor, walked through
the building last week with
a reporter and discussed the
building’s future. The Pittston
Redevelopment Author-
ity, which currently owns the
property, hopes to soon ac-
quire an adjoining lot.
The frst step, which be-
gan last week, is to clean out
the building and stabilize the
roof.
The building was acquired
by the authority in 2011. The
empty lot next to it was once
a deteriorating building that
had to be demolished. It has a
$70,000 lien fromthe demoli-
tion and the authority is in the
process of acquiring it. Lom-
bardo hopes a building on the
corner, owned by dentist Dr.
Cataldo Alfano, could also be
part of the renovation project.
“Our plan is to link all the
Eyesore
to get new life
Former Milazzo Hardware building
on South Main St. to be renovated
The proposed loft-style apartment design for the former Lizza building.
By JOE HEALEY | jhealey@psdispatch.com
See EYESORE, page 9
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Pittston City mayor’s race is
back on.
The petitions of Eugene M.
Rooney Jr. for mayor and Barb
Zangre for council were challenged
by outgoing councilman Joe Chern-
ouskas. He claimed Rooney and
Zangre did not fle their statement
of fnancial interest with the City of
Pittston before the March 12 dead-
line for the May Primary.
After a hearing on Wednesday
morning, Luzerne County Court
of Common Pleas President Judge
Thomas Burke
ruled in favor
of Rooney and
Zangre.
Rooney will
now face in-
cumbent Mayor
Jason Klush in
the Democratic
primary in May. The winner is ex-
pected to face Republican Don Yat-
ko in the November General Elec-
tion. For the two council seats on
the ballot, Zangre will run against
incumbent Attorney Michael Lom-
bardo and former councilman Ken
Bangs, who are running as a team
with Klush.
Chernouskas, who is complet-
ing his frst term on council, is not
seeking a second term.
“The judge made his ruling and
his decision is fnal,” Chernouskas
said.
An appeal is
not expected.
R o o n e y
dropped off his
required paper-
work to City
Hall on March
21, the day he
was served with the challenge. Zan-
gre also dropped off her paperwork
after the deadline.
Rooney testifed the election
packet he received from the Bureau
of Elections was ambiguous and
there was no mention of fling pa-
perwork with the City of Pittston.
Once he realized the error, he fled
it.
“In good faith, I thought my task
was complete,” Rooney testifed.
Zangre acknowledged she made
the error but believed all her paper-
work was fled properly.
Rooney, owner of Rooney’s Irish
Pub on Main Street in Pittston, said
he’s pleased with the ruling and
now the campaign will begin in
earnest.
“As I’ve said, the fling instruc-
tions were ambiguous and I’m glad
the judge saw that,” he said. “Now,
I’m going to get out in the commu-
nity and get the true concerns of the
citizens.”
Zangre, who works as a server
at several restaurants, said Burke’s
ruling is “fabulous.”
“We now have an election in
Pittston,” Zangre said. “There is
democracy in Pittston.”
Burke used a Latin phrase, “nunc
pro tunc,” which means “now as
of then,” in his ruling. It applies
to acts that are allowed to be done
after the time expired. Burke said
both candidates proved they fled
their statements of fnancial interest
on time with Luzerne County Elec-
tion Bureau and they were publicly
available.
He was convinced instructions
appeared to be “ambiguous at
best.” And when both candidates
learned of the error, they promptly
complied.
The candidates’ efforts to es-
tablish compliance with the state
Ethics Act and Election Code have
been met, Burke ruled.
Rooney to remain on ballot for Pittston mayor
Zangre Rooney
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
Petition challenged in court;
Barb Zangre also allowed to
remain on ballot for council
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Best Wishes For
A Happy Easter!
251 William Street
Pittston, PA
PETER J. ADONIZIO
FUNERAL HOME
654-8683
No Wyoming Area schools will
be closed in the 2013-2014 school
year.
Board member Frank Casarella
made the announcement at the Wy-
oming Area School Board meeting
on March 26.
“We have passed the deadlines
for closing a building,” Casarella
said.
He said one school in the district,
the Sarah J. Dymond Elementary
School on Sutton Creek Road in
Harding, would have been a good
candidate for closure.
“A lot of that was covered last
year,” Casarella said. “We would
have saved almost $300,000 by
closing one or the other. We have
one school that only has 140 kids
and six empty classrooms.”
The John F. Kennedy Elementary
School was also on the chopping
block last year but both schools
stayed open.
“Not that we were going to close
a school this year, but we have to
let state know if we’re considering
it,” Casarella said. “Now, it’s off the
table.”
Wyoming Area Education As-
sociation President Melissa Dol-
man presented the board a petition
of over 600 signatures from local
residents, urging the board to come
to an agreement on a teachers’ con-
tract.
“This is a petition that we have
asked district taxpayers to sign,”
she said.
“What they’re saying is the
teachers have been working for
three years without a contract and
they’re asking you to fnally settle
this contract.”
The next scheduled negotiation is
set for April 17.
“These parents, taxpayers and
neighbors want this board to sit
down, negotiate and award the
teachers a contract,” Dolman said.
The board tabled two requests
to use district facilities by the West
Pittston Rams football team.
Ann Marie Taggert, president of
the West Pittston Rams, asked the
district permission for her organi-
zation’s players and cheerleaders
to use the football facilities, includ-
ing the press box, scoreboard, rest
rooms, practice felds and cafeteria
felds, for practice and games from
June through November. Games are
held on Sundays from Aug. 18 to
Oct. 27.
The Rams asked the board to
waive the $1,000 rental fee and the
$25 per hour fee for custodians.
Taggert also sought to use the
Secondary Center cafeteria and
kitchen for the Rams Awards Ban-
quet fromnoon to 4 p.m. on Sunday,
Nov. 24. A $25-an-hour fee would
be charged to the organization for a
food service worker’s services.
Board members discussed draw-
ing up a specifc policy regarding
the use of district facilities.
The board said it is waiting to
fnd out howmuch re-seeding of the
stadium will cost before it waives
any fees there.
Board member Gil Dominick
said there is an expense to operate
the cafeteria and kitchen.
“I would like to get a list of how
many times are outside interests us-
ing our facilities?” Dominick said.
“There’s other places in town, like
fre halls, that have kitchens, that
would be cheaper to run. Every time
you turn around, there’s a function
in the cafeteria and you have to pay
workers, janitors, heat and electric-
ity.
“I know it’s convenient,” Domi-
nick said. “But what’s the total at
the end of the year?”
Board member Mary Louise De-
gnan suggested the board review its
policy for renting district facilities.
“It’s not that I don’t want to do
what is stated, I just want to get
more information.” Degnan said.
In other news:
»Superintendent Ray Bernardi
said that if Governor Corbett’s plan
to privatize the state liquor system
passes, $1 billion will be distributed
to the 500 school districts over four
years through the state’s “Passport
for Learning” block grant program.
The new money would be allot-
ted to districts through a formula us-
ing enrollment as a key factor.
Wyoming Area School District
stands to gain $1,635,045 over four
years and $327,009 the frst year.
The cash will be used to boost
four different aspects of education:
security, early education, custom-
ized curriculumfor students to learn
at their own pace and classes in the
“STEM” felds, Science, Technolo-
gy, Engineering and Math, in grades
six through 12.
» Students Greg Cajka, Stormy
Ruiz, Lisa Guido and Gared Za-
bosky fnished in second place in
the Northeast Pennsylvania High
School Challenge Tournament held
at Mountain View High School in
Kingsley on March 16.
These students will appear on
the Scholastic Scrimmage show on
WVIA-TV at 7 p.m. today, March
31.
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wyomi ng area school board
WA schools safe for 2013-3014
State deadline has passed to give notice for any closures
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
The next West Pittston Cherry
Blossom Festival committee
meeting is at 7 p.m., Sunday
April 7 at the Corpus Christi
school building, 605 Luzerne
Avenue, West Pittston. The
Grand Marshal will be selected.
Applications are being ac-
cepted for the Little Miss Cherry
Blossom Contest and the Cherry
Blossom Idol. Both events are
Saturday, May 4.
The Miss Cherry Blossom
contest is open to girls ages 4-8
from the Greater Pittston area.
The frst 15 applicants will be
accepted to compete in the con-
test.
Each girl will be judged on
talent, stage presence, interview
and overall participation. Ap-
plications must include a 4x6
photo and a brief biography.
Deadline is April 15.
The Third Annual Cherry
Blossom Idol is open to three
age groups: 10 and under, 11 to
13 and 14 and up. Cash prizes
will be awarded. For more in-
formation, call Gina Malsky at
332-7817 or email lmalsky@
aol.com.
West Pittston’s
Cherry Blossom
festival meeting,
call for contestants
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The Afliate Hospitals of CommonwealthHealth: Berwick Hospital Center • First Hospital • Mid-Valley Hospital • Moses Taylor Hospital
Regional Hospital of Scranton• Special Care Hospital • Tyler Memorial Hospital • Wilkes–Barre General Hospital
445 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston
Member of the Medical Staff at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital
At InterMountain Medical Group, we want our families,
friends and neighbors to have the best possible care
for diabetes, thyroid issues, adrenal disorders and
other metabolic conditions. That’s why we welcome
experienced endocrinologist Recaredo Berbano, M.D.,
to our staf. Board certifed in endocrinology, diabetes
and metabolism, Dr. Berbano focuses on all aspects of
care, including diagnosis, treatment options, education,
and prevention services. And he is dedicated to helping
every patient manage their condition, feel better and
live life fully.
To schedule an appointment, call 570-718-0520.
Nowaccepting newpatients.
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Recaredo
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Endocrinologist
Miranda Warunek is busy
organizing an Irish step
dancing beneft performance
by the Emerald Isle Step
Dancers at Pittston Area
High School at 1:30 p.m.
next Sunday, April 7, for the
Pediatric Center at the Care
and Concern Free Health
Clinic in Pittston.
Tickets are $7 and will be
sold at the door.
The event doubles as a Na-
tional Honor Society service
project for Warunek who is
not just an organizer, but a
step dancer who will dance
in the show.
Two years ago, Warunek’s
sister, Letitia, organized a
similar project for her NHS
senior project. Miranda con-
sidered doing something
different, but as a volunteer
at the clinic, an experienced
step dancer and because her
doctor Michael Imbrogno
also volunteers at the clinic,
she felt the dance project was
a natural for her.
The sisters have been
dancing for a decade with the
Pittston-based Emerald Isle
Step Dancers.
Letitia, now a Wilkes
pharmacy student, will also
dance in the show.
Money raised will help
purchase medicine and med-
ical supplies for the clinic
which is sponsored by the
Ministries of St. John the
Evangelist Parish Commu-
nity and housed in the old
Seton Catholic High School.
The event will also include
25 themed raffe baskets.
The girls’ mother, Pat Wa-
runek, was at a friend’s house
in Mountaintop in 1999
when she sawa business card
for the Emerald Irish Step
Dancers. Proud of her Irish
heritage, which included a
great-grandfather who was
a vaudeville bagpipe player,
she decided to give it a try, as
much for the exercise as for
the Irish component.
Soon Miranda and Letitia
were Emerald Isle students,
too.
The highlight of the year
for the Pittston Emerald Isle
troupe was performing in the
New York City St. Patrick’s
Day parade. Miranda said
they marched and danced
for 40 blocks, the last two
in snow. The Emerald Isle
dancers also performed in
the Scranton parade, where
they were voted most photo-
genic, and the JimThorpe St.
Paddy’s parades.
Miranda, who has been
accepted into the King’s
College physician’s assis-
tant program, also dances in
competitions, called fes. She
and her sister have won fes
medals and trophies for frst,
second and thirds in competi-
tions.
Letitia’s project raised
$7,100 in 2011. Miranda,
who also bagged groceries
Gerrity’s Supermarket and
sold candy bars for the clinic,
hopes to top that.
Emerald Isle Step Dancers
studio is in the Cooper’s Co-
Op building next to Cooper’s
Restaurant. The director is
Jennifer Woss.
NHS senior project is a dance for children’s health
PA senior Miranda Warunek organizing step dance show for pediatric clinic
Looking forward to a performance by the Emerald
Isle Step Dancers to benefit the Pediatric Center at
the Care and Concert Clinic are, from left, Letitia
Warnuek, pediatric clinic volunteer Dr. Michael Im-
brogno and Miranda Warunek.
Miranda Warunek models
her step dancer outfit.
By JACKSMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
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Lessons
Dispatch’s Ackerman honored by library
Optimism abounds in Greater
Pittston.
Just ask EdAckerman, whose col-
umn “Optimist” appears weekly on
Page 2 of the Sunday Dispatch.
Ackerman has been named the re-
cipient of the 2013 JeanYates Award
presented annual by the Pittston
Memorial Library. The award is pre-
sented annually to a person who has
exhibited dedi-
cated service to
the library. It is
named in honor
of the late Jean
Yates, a library
benefactor, vol-
unteer and board
member.
Library board
president Barbara Quinn said Ack-
erman was an obvious choice.
She pointed to his 10-plus years
on the library’s board and his help
in getting the library’s message
out every week in the pages of the
Pittston’s hometown newspaper, the
Sunday Dispatch.
“He’s always helped us out when-
ever we needed him,” she said.
“He’s been a great friend to the li-
brary, year after year.”
She also credited Ackerman’s
leadership in helping bring the mas-
sive collection of Washington, D.C,
insider and Pittston native John P.
Cosgrove to the library and the new
library wing that bears Cosgrove’s
name.
“Eddie drove down to to Wash-
ington, D.C., twice to bring the Cos-
grove Collection to us,” she said.
“That’s dedication if I ever saw it.”
Ackerman began his journalism
career at the Sunday Dispatch as a
17-year-old sports writer in 1967,
the year he graduated valedictorian
from Pittston Area High School.
He remained at the paper for 23
years, rising to the position of man-
aging editor.
After serving as an adjunct pro-
fessor at Wilkes University, he be-
came a full-time professor at Lu-
zerne County Community College
where he is now in his 23rd year of
teaching.
While continuing his career in
the college classroom, Ackerman
returned to the Sunday Dispatch in
2000 to serve as part-time editor.
He resumed writing his weekly
column, “Ed Ackerman, optimist,”
for which he has won a frst place
Keystone Award presented by the
Pennsylvania Newspapers Publish-
ers’ Association.
Quinn said Ackerman humbly
agreed to accept the award.
“Being named to receive this
award may be the most humbling
thing that has ever happened to me,”
Ackerman said.
“Not only to be included with the
former honorees, all outstanding
public servants, but also to be cho-
sen over so many others whom, I
believe, are much more worthy than
I,” Ackerman said.
Past winners of the Jean Yates
Award Ackerman referred to in-
clude Mike Lombardo, Sandy Insa-
laco, TomTigue, Maria Capolarella-
Montante, Friends of the Library,
Eileen Burns, Ellen Mondlak and
Eva Mae Falcone.
Ackerman and his wife, Mary
Kay, an operating room nurse, re-
side in Pittston. He has two children,
Greta, 29, of Los Angeles, Calif.,
and Michael, 26, of Chicago. Both
work in the feld of advertising.
Presentation of the award will be
at the library’s Jean Yates Award
Dinner on Wednesday, April 17, at
St. Joseph Marello Parish Center,
William Street, Pittston. Cocktails
will be served at 6 p.m. with dinner
and program to follow. Tickets are
$60 per person and can be obtained
by stopping at the library, 47 Broad
St., Pittston, or by calling 654-9565.
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
Ackerman
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By His Life, We Are Humbled
Through His Death, We Are Saved
In His Spirit, We Know Everlasting Life
Happy Easter From
Our Family To Yours
Jerry and Kathie Stofko
paid for by the candidate
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LOCAL CHATTER
Linskey inducted into medical honor society
Melissa Linskey was inducted
into the Temple University School
of Medicine Epsilon chapter of Al-
pha Omega Alpha Honor Medical
Society on March 5.
Linskey is the daughter of Rob-
ert and Virginia Linskey, of Inker-
man.
Alpha Omega Alpha Honor
Medical Society, a professional
medical organization, recognizes
and advocates for excellence in
scholarship and the highest ide-
als in the profession of medicine.
Election to the society is based on
leadership, character, community
service, and professionalism.
Linskey will graduate fromTem-
ple University on May 17.
She will begin her residency in
General Surgery at Penn State Mil-
ton S. Hershey Medical Center in
July.
YOZWIAK ON
DEAN’S LIST
Mallory Yozwiak, of Pittston
Twp., has been named to the
dean’s list for the fall semester of
2012 at West Chester University.
A freshman, she is the daughter
of Charles and Melanie Yozwiak,
of Pittston Twp.and the grand-
daughter of Angela Yozwiak, of
Moosic, the late Frank Yozwiak
and Frank and Nancy Jescavage,
of Benton.
BIRTHS AT GEISINGER
The following Greater Pittston
births have been recorded at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley Medical
Center:
Michelle and Justin Adams,
Wyoming, March 12, a girl
Jennnifer Miller, Pittston, a girl,
March 16
Michelle and Dave Opiela, a girl,
Dupont
JOPLING PLAYS
LORD STANLEY
Jarid Jopling, of West Pittston,
will play Lord Stanley in the King’s
College Theatre Department’s per-
formance of William Shakespeare’s
historic tragedy “Richard III” at
7:30 p.m. April 11-13 and 15 at
7:30 p.m. and at 2 p.m. on April 14
in the George P. Maffei II Theatre,
in the Administration Building on
North River Street.
Admission to the fnal produc-
tion of the academic year is free. To
reserve tickets, call 208-5825 or e-
mail boxoff@kings.edu.
HAPPYBIRTHDAY
Birthday wishes go to Victoria
Doman, of Larksville, who cel-
ebrates on April 1 and Joanie Nau-
gle, of Pittston Township, celebrat-
ing on April 2.
Free application of “Foot Miracle”
therapeutic dry skin cream, available upon request
Complimentary Whirlpool Session
with all routine nailcare
Dr. Nicole M. Branning
CryoPen
Advanced
Treatment
for
Plantar Warts.
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Dr. David A. Scalzo
• Foot & Ankle Surgery
• Diabetic Foot Care/Shoes
• Heel Pain
• Bunion Repair
• Hammer Toe Correction
• Arthritic Foot Care
• Plantar Warts
• Ingrown Nails
• Corns & Calluses
• Reconstructive Procedures
• Ankle Arthroscopy
• Sports Related Injury
Onsite Ultrasound used for diagnosing multiple
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• Endoscopic Heel Surgery
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Certifed by the American
Board of Podiatric Surgery
We Make
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Day And Evening Appointments Available
Melissa Linskey
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PENN-LEE FOOTWEAR
163 E. Main St. (Miners-Mills Section) of Wilkes-Barre
Just One Mile Down The Street From The Side Entrance To Mohegan Sun/Pocono Downs
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Just One Mile Down The Street From The Side Entrance To Mohegan Sun/Pocono Downs
The Old Fashioned Shoe Store
Open Mon. to Fri. 9-8 • Sat 9-5 • Sunday 12-5 • 825-5346
WWII Vet Onda is Slovak Man of the Year
Frank Onda, of Exeter, was
chosen Slovak Man of the Year
for 2013 by the Slovak League of
America Branch 4474.
Onda was born to Slovak immi-
grant parents, Michael and Susan,
along with siblings Judy, Margaret,
Joseph, and Steve.
He was educated at St. John the
Baptist Slovak School in Pittston
where he served as an altar boy. He
later transferred to Exeter in sev-
enth grade where he played foot-
ball. He left Exeter High School to
enlist in the Navy in 1944 where he
served on the USS Eldorado.
The Eldorado anchored a mile
off the coast of Iwo Jima during
World War II when the Marines
captured Mount Suribachi where
a small fag was placed. When El-
dorado Admiral Turner saw that the
fag was small, he ordered a larger
fag to replace it in honor of Ameri-
ca and its fghting men.
Two Marines boarded the Eldo-
rado where Onda escorted the men
below decks to the supply room to
secure a larger fag. Onda recalls
one of the Marines saying, “The
fag would be fying very soon on
Mount Suribachi.” The rest is his-
tory.
After leaving Iwo Jima, the Eldo-
rado set sail for Okinawa where the
ship was under heavy fre from ka-
mikaze planes diving into the ship.
The Eldorado shot down many en-
emy planes during the battle.
Onda received a medal for par-
ticipating in the Pacifc Theatre for
amphibious assault and occupation
of Okinawa Gunto. He attained the
rank of Yeoman 3
rd
Class. After
completing his tour of duty, he was
honorably discharged.
“Twitch,” as he is known, re-
turned home and married Madelyn
Ghidula, of Taylor. Together they
had four children, Frank, Jr., Kath-
leen David, and Margaret.
He was the owner of the Susque-
hanna Bar and Grill for 35-years.
Onda is a life-long member of the
Slovak League of America Branch
4474. He is also a member of St.
John the Baptist Church, Pittston,
which is now the Parish Commu-
nity of St. John the Evangelist.
Paid For By Bobbouine For District Judge Committee
Wishing You A
Happy and Blessed
Easter Season
The Slovak League of America, Kingston Branch #474 officers are sworn in by Luzerne Country Judge Fred Pierontoni. From left,
first row, George Nisky, secretary/treasurer; David Ciotola, trustee; Robert M. Chmarney, president; Eugene McKeweon, trustee;
Judge Pierantoni, trustee. Second row, Mark Manganaro, chaplin; Andrew J. Barilla, vice president; Benard Novabilski, trustee;
Joseph Severnak, sgt-at-arms.
Frank Onda, left,
was chosen ‘Man
of the Year’ by
Slovak League
of America,
Kingston Branch
#474. Present-
ing the plaque
is the Slovak
League’s presi-
dent Robert M.
Chmarney, right.
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After more than a half century, a
St. Patrick’s Day parade will march
down South Main Street again.
A group of 20 Pittston City off-
cials and volunteers, who met Tues-
day night at City Hall, tentatively
set the Greater Pittston St. Patrick’s
Day Parade and Festival for 3 p.m.
on Sunday, March 16.
The celebration will be family-
focused, and could include a large,
heated tent on the Tomato Festival
Lot. Inside would be a Irish cel-
ebration with crafts and wares for
sale, face painting, entertaintment,
food, music and dancing. Attendees
would also be encouraged to enjoy
the offerings of the downtown res-
taurants and bars and other busi-
nesses.
“We have a chance to do some-
thing unique in Pittston,” said Paul
Reedy, one of the organizers.
Neighboring towns Wilkes-Barre
and Scranton hold elaborate yearly
parades, but Pittston hasn’t had the
marching of the green down Main
Street since the 1950s. Former Pres-
ident Harry S. Truman attended the
city’s parade in 1956.
“It’s not about being Irish,”
Reedy said. “It’s not about residing
in Pittston. It’s about having com-
munity pride and spirit and showing
off the downtown. That’s what it
should be about.”
Former Mayor Mike Lombardo,
who sits on the city’s Redevelop-
ment Authority, urged tacking on a
city celebration after the parade.
“How do we not compete with
Wilkes-Barre and Scranton, how
do we make it unique,” Lombardo
asked. “How do we make it our
own? How do we make this event a
little bit different from what every-
one else is doing?”
Lombardo said the plan was to
create four signature events down-
town: The Tomato Festival; Ok-
toberfest, which the city hopes to
grow; a Christmas event; and now
the St. Patrick’s Day parade and
event.
Pittston has no problem hosting
a large parade. The yearly Tomato
Festival Parade draws tens of thou-
sands of people to the downtown
each year at the end of August.
Jim Deice, the chairman of the
Tomato Festival Parade, told the
group planning is key to a good pa-
rade.
Any group or organization inter-
ested in participating in the inau-
gural Greater Pittston St. Patrick’s
Day Parade and Festvial should
contact Pittston’s Coordinator of
Special Events Sarah E. Donahue at
654-0513, ex. 200, or email at sara-
helizabeth0730@gmail.com.
A second meeting is scheduled
for 6:30 p.m. on Wedneswday, April
3, in the frst
foor conference room in Pittston
City Hall. Anyone interested in
helping plan the parade is urged to
attend.
Pittston St. Paddy’s Day parade, celebration set for 2014
D & A
Auto Service
S
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7
3
Additional 10% Discount to All Veterans
25 Lambert St., Pittston • 655-8081
www.dnaautoservice.com
There is a difference
STATE INSPECTION and
EMISSIONS SAFETY CHECK
plus OIL CHANGE
and FILTER
(includes up to 5 qts oil, synthetic oil extra)
Expires April 6, 2013
$
49
95
Plus Tax
Must have an appointment and coupon.
MARCH, APRIL and MAY
Group of 20 officials, supporters
are planning downtown event
Edward Bar-
rett was the
Grand Marshal
of Pittston’s St.
Patrick’s Day
Parade in 1908.
A group of 20
Pittston City of-
ficials and volun-
teers, who met
Tuesday night at
City Hall, ten-
tatively set the
Greater Pittston
St. Patrick’s
Day Parade and
Festival for 3
p.m. on Sunday,
March 16. This
will be the first
such parade the
city in more
than a half cen-
tury.
By JOE HEALEY
jhealey@psdispatch.com
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Wally’s Barber Shop
10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY
(570) 457-3577
630 McAlpine Street • Avoca
STO
P
IN
HAPPY
EASTER
ThankYou… I am truly grateful to be
serving the community and my clients
for the past 10 years. I look forward
to many more.
Attorney
John J. Terrana
400 Tird Avenue, Kingston
283.2990
Inheritance Taxes
A tax is levied against assets
owned by a person after their
death. This tax is commonly
known as an inheritance tax.
All assets passing to parents,
children, or grandchildren are
taxed at the rate of 4.5%, or
$4.50 on every $100 inherited.
Assets passing to brothers,
sisters, nieces, and nephews are
taxed at the rate of 12%. Assets
passing to any others, except
charities, are taxed at 15%.
Taxes are not paid on assets
passing from one spouse to
another.
The federal government levies
an inheritance tax on any assets
passing to those other than a
spouse, if the decedent’s estate
has a value of $5 million or more.
The tax rate in this instance
ranges from 38% to 55%.
Call me today, if you have any
questions regarding inheritance
taxes.
Market Street Pub
29 Market St., Jenkins Twp.
570-655-8091
Owen Street Pub
245 Owen St., Swoyersville
570-287-6074
Many giveaways
& specials
at Owen St.
Location Only
Church puts on living stations
Above, Mary (Maria Marianac-
ci) reaches out to Jesus as He
carries the cross. Below, Jesus
(Jared Saporito) carries the
cross ahead of Roman guards
during the Thursday night pre-
sentation of ‘The Living Way of
the Cross’ at St. Monica Parish
in West Wyoming.
BILL TARUTIS PHOTOS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Jesus (Jared Saporito) cries out ‘Father, into your hands I commit my spirit!’
St. Monica Parish youth perform
‘The Living Way of the Cross’
Above, the
women of
Jerusalem
gather around
the body of
Jesus after
He dies on
the cross. At
left, the Risen
Jesus (Jared
Saporito)
walks out of
the tomb.
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William St. • Pittston
Duchessoutlet.com
DUCHESS OUTLET
Madame Alexander Dolls
Thousands of
Men’s/Ladies’ Raincoats
654-3851
HEARING LOSS?
We Accept: GEISINGER GOLD
75 William Street., Pittston
Professional Hearing Aid • 45th Year
655-3078
REPAIRS • ALL MAKES
Gardening workshop set
The Master Gardeners Annual
Spring Into Gardening Workshop
will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Saturday, April 27, con-
ducted at Penn State Wilkes-Barre
Campus, Lehman.
A fea market will also be held,
along with sessions on turf man-
agement, trees for your landscape,
expressing personality in the gar-
den, soil, water features in gar-
dens, shade gardens, gardening for
four seasons and vegetable gar-
dening in unusual weather.
Vincent J. Cotrone, Regional
Extension Urban Forester, will be
the keynote speaker, discussing
“Trees and Shrubs in a Changing
Landscape.” Master Gardeners
will be available at the informa-
tion table to answer personal gar-
dening questions.
Seating is limited. Register ear-
ly to reserve your place.
For more information, contact
Penn State Extension, Luzerne
County, at 825-1701.
May the truth of Easter,
the joy of Easter,
and the blessings of Easter
be with you this day and all days.
Happy Easter
from your candidates
John Bolin &
John Marianacci
for Wyoming Area School Board
Paid for by candidates
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Call Samantha at 655-3238
Helen Bubul, Master Gardener, Penn State Extension,
Luzerne County, arranges plants for the plant sale to be
held at the Master Gardeners Annual Spring Into Gardening
Workshop on Saturday, April 27 at Penn State Wilkes-Barre
The Duryea Borough Sewer Au-
thority invoices will be mailed the
frst week of April and payment is
due by April 30.
Amount due is $25 a quarter or
$100 for the year. The maintenance
fee of $50 was rescinded at the Au-
thority meeting on March 4.
Refunds will be sent to residents
who paid the fee in advance. After
April 30, a 10% penalty for a late
payment will be applied and every
quarter after that, also, 1 1/2% will
be compiled on the total charge
each month until the bill is paid in
full.
Sewer Authority offce hours
are 8:30 to 11:30 a.m. and noon
to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Residents who have not received a
bill by April 5 are asked to call the
Authority at 457-0122.
The next meeting of the Duryea
Borough Sewer Authority is at 7
p.m. on April 1 at the municipal
building.
Duryea Authority says
sewer bills are mailed
Robert F. Connors, tax collec-
tor for West Wyoming Borough,
reminds residents that the rebate
period for county/municipal taxes
will end on Monday, April 1. The
tax offce will be open from 6 to 8
p.m. on Mondays.
When paying taxes, residents
are asked to bring the entire bill.
The bar coded copy is returned to
the Luzerne County Courthouse.
Residents paying by mail and in
need of a receipt must send a self-
addressed/stamped envelope. Resi-
dents who have not received a tax
bill are asked to contact Connors
at 693-0130 after 4 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP.
654-1112
SUPPORT LOCAL
BANDS & CLUBS
EVERY WED.
LINE DANCE
EVERY THURS.
TONES
FRI., APRIL 5TH
STEALING NEIL
SAT. APRIL 6TH
GROOVE TRAIN
Tax collector announces
West Wyoming taxes due
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OUROPINION
Don’t be afraid
of Easter
Hey, today is the day the “Spring Bunny”
comes bringing those colorful spheres.
Pssst: That means it’s Easter Sunday, but
don’t say it out loud. Somebody might be
offended.
So what, we’ll say it: IT’S EASTER
SUNDAY, the day when hundreds of
millions of Christians around the world
celebrate the Resurrection of their Lord and
Savior, Jesus Christ.
Let’s not be afraid to acknowledge that
and to wish the Christians among us a
Happy Easter.
Locally Christians built our towns, soci-
ety and culture.
Granted they divided themselves by
denomination and ethnicity into enclaves of
Polish, Irish and Italian, etc. and Catholics
and English-Welsh Protestants, in what
might be said to be an unChristian-like way
to live.
But at the same time by conducting their
lives with Christian values like self-reli-
ance, family devotion, hard work, educa-
tion and patriotism they laid the ground-
work for better lives for the generations to
come.
After all, it is on the shoulders of those
Christian soldiers that we stand today.
Worldwide and here in the United States
the history of Christianity is rife with inci-
dents of intolerance and violence.
Yes, it was Christians who sold and
owned slaves in this country, but it also was
they who wrote the laws and fought the war
to end slavery.
Some 600,000 died in that war, virtually
all of them Christians.
Yes, it was Christians who were the
aggressors in the Medieval Crusades, but
it was also Christians who stopped the
holocaust of Jews and ended the reign of
the Nazis in Europe.
Yes, it was Christians who participated
in the conquest of indigenous peoples
around the world, but it was also Christians
who established missions in such places
to spread, not only the word of their God,
but to spread food, medicine, and basic
education.
Christians aren’t perfect, as they will
acknowledge, but the best of them strive
to be. Christianity maybe on the wane in
America, but, given the impact of its his-
tory on our lives and culture, come on, let’s
not be afraid to speak its name.
We have freedom of religion here, but
we remind the haters of Christianity there
is no constitutional guarantee of freedom
from religion. Many Christians feel, and
with justifcation, we believe, that they are
the only group that it is still permissible to
ridicule, or worse. All others are off limits
in the name of tolerance.
But that’s okay. Christians can take it.
YOUR SPACE
Life-long NewYork Yankees fan Mike Saia, Sr. of West Pittston attended two Yankees spring training games at George M. Steinbrenner
Field in Tampa, Florida with his son and daughter-in-law Mike and Danielle Saia who reside in Charleston, S.C. They also enjoyed a Yan-
kees game at Hammond Stadium in Fort Myers and attended the Sony Open tennis tournament in Miami.
Lifelong Yankee fan takes us along
The Dispatch welcomes submissions to the Your Space section. Drop off or mail to The Sunday Dispatch, 109 New St., Pittston, PA, 18640
or email to sd@pdispatch.com.
YOUROPINION
I remember times of Easter past
Following past seasons of Lent
Which are times of fast
I remember the family seated around the table
Keeping our prayers and
Our alms givings stable
My mother would dress us so nicely
We would dress in our Sunday best,
Then we would go to church
And Jesus would take care of the rest.
Yes, I remember since I was a little boy
How Easter brought the family
Times of togetherness and joy
My parents would hide our Easter baskets
They would fll them with presents and candy
Yes our Easter morning was defnitely dandy
The day before Easter my sister and I
Would color our Easter eggs
Until the day passed us by
My grandma would help us.
She would do her best
And with the other eggs, well, again,
Jesus took care of the rest.
My mother’s Easter pizza of ham and cheese is
Also another of mom’s ways to please
Yes, praying, going in your Sunday best
Coloring eggs, hiding Easter baskets,
Family joy through and through
is my family’s Easter wish
“Our Easter Wish For You”
Michael J. English
Pittston Township
An Easter wish for you from local poet
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• Soft Serve • Slushies • Gelatos • Shakes • Floats • Sundaes • Blitzes and More!
A warm, deep chocolate cake with a center of dark molten chocolate
topped with vanilla or coffee ice cream, hot fudge or hot caramel,
whipped cream and a cherry.
Now Featuring:
CHOCOLATE MOLTEN CAKE!!
OPEN DAILY TIL 10 PM • TABLE SERVICE AVAILABLE
EVENTS, MEETI NGS, BRI EFS
Pizza sale Friday at First United Methodist, WP
DUPONTVFWMEETING
VFWPost 4909 will meet at 7:30
p.m. on Monday, April 1 at the post
home.
COLLECTIONS DELAYED
The Duryea Borough Street De-
partment will be closed on Easter
Monday, April 1. Garbage will be
collected one day late. The yard
waste collection will begin Friday,
April 5.
VFWAUXILIARYMEETS
Przybytek-Kundlas Auxiliary to
the VFW Post Number 4909, Du-
pont, will meet at 7 p.m. on April 2
in the downstairs meeting room of
the Post Home, 401-403 Main St.,
Dupont.
Nomination and election of of-
fcers will be held. Auxiliary Presi-
dent Elaine Healey will preside.
Hostesses will be Mayklou Calwell
and Emily Denerdi.
HOSE COMPANYTOMEET
Excelsior Hose Co No. 2 will
hold its regular monthly meeting at
7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 3.
PIZZASALE
The First United Methodist
Church of West Pittston will hold a
pizza sale on Friday, April 4. Pizzas
can be ordered baked or unbaked
with or without onions. Cost for a
tray is $11. Toppings of sweet red
peppers, pepperoni or sausage can
be added for $2 each. Specialty piz-
zas, broccoli or tomato and garlic
are $14 per tray. Vegetable pizza is
$13 and includes tomatoes, onions,
broccoli, red peppers and much-
rooms, no cheese. Call the church
offce at 655-1083 to place an order
or walk in. Delivery is available for
lunch orders.
WATERSHED
ASSOCIATION
The Abrahams Creek Watershed
Association will meet at 7 p.m. on
April 4 in West Wyoming Borough
Hall. Upcoming projects will be
discussed.
BIGBAND SOCIETY
The Big Band Society of North-
eastern Pennsvlvania will have a
dinner dance on Friday, April 5 at
Genetti’s Hotel and Convention
Center Wilkes Barre. This event is
for members only.
Doors will open at 5:45 p.m.
with dinner at 6:30 p.m. Music is
provided by the 17-piece band
“Moonlight in the Poconos.”
For reservations, call Herman
at 654-6454.
SOUPAND SALAD
SUPPER
The Mount Zion United
Methodist Church on Mount
Zion road in Harding is holding
an all-you-can-eat soup and salad
supper on Saturday, April 6 from
4:30 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. A variety
of soups, chili, salads, breads, des-
serts and beverages will be served.
Cost for adults is $7.00 and $5 for
children.
PITTSTONAMERICAN
LEGION MEETING
American Legion Auxiliary Post
#477 will hold there monthly meet-
ing April 6 at 5:30 p.m. at the Post
Home, 203 Vine Street Pittston.
HOURS: Mon. - Thurs. 10am - 7pm
Fri. - Sat. 10am - 6pm • Sun. 10am - 1pm
20 West Oak Street, Pittston
655-3260 • www.zonepets.com
“One Stop Shopping For ALL Your Pet Needs!”
SALTWATER FISH
CORALS & AQUARIUM SUPPLIES
THE PET ZONE
www.zonepets.com
FRESH & SALT WATER FISH, REPTILES, DOG AND CAT SUPPLIES
$
10 OFF
SALTWATER FISH
Spend $50 on Saltwater Fish
Receive $10 off
Limit 1 Coupon per customer (or family) per visit.
Excludes sale items.
Expiration 03/31/2013 SD
See BRIEFS page 23
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OAK ST • PITTSTON TWP.
654-1112
BLACK SABBATH TRIBUTE BAND
SUPPORT LOCAL BANDS
& CLUBS
EVERY WED.
LINE DANCE
EVERY THURS.
TONES
FRI. APRIL 5TH
STEALING
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SAT. APRIL 6TH
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TRAIN
FRI. APRIL 12TH
GROUP
Du JOUR
FRI. APRIL 19TH
ALL
MIXED UP
SAT. APRIL 13TH
IDOL KINGS
JOURNEY,
MELLENCAMP TRIBUTE
SAT. APRIL 20TH
3 IMAGINARY
BOYS
SAT. APRIL 27TH
TONES
FRI. MAY 3RD
CHATTER
FRI. APRIL 26TH
PARANOID
Now Accepting
Windows to fit all shapes &
sizes, as well as your budget!
$pecial March &April pricing
on all Windows & Doors!!
(570) 655-2088
Celebrating 35 Years in Business
Since 1978
FLEXIBLE MOBILITY Inc.
1325 River Road, Plains Tuft Tex Complex 824-6620 • 1-800-214-9566
DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT • PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS
WHEEL CHAIRS • POWER CHAIRS • LIFT CHAIRS • SCOOTERS • STAIR GLIDES • HOSPITAL BEDS • RAMPS
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Grab Bars
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DIABETIC
SHOES
Repairs to stairglides, scooters and power chairs
www.fortyfortlube.com
Like us
on Facebook
1097 Wyoming Ave
Forty Fort • 718-1501
Mon-Fri 7:30-6 • Sat 8-1
300 Pierce St.
Kingston • 283-1504
Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-1
EMISSION/SAFETY
INSPECTION
Includes all state fees. Emission 30 day
free re-test, safety, pass or fail. Exp. 4/10/13
$
35
00
+ TAX
Regular
$
47.90
An egg-ceptional good time
The annual Easter egg hunt for children of Pittston City was held on Saturday, March 16, at Jefferson
Park, Pittston. In keeping with tradition, the Easter Bunny arrived by fire truck.
Micky Sperazza, 22 months, reaches for an Easter egg as his
parents Eric and Jenny, all of Hughestown, watch from behind
at the Pittston City egg hunt at Jefferson Park in Pittston on
Saturday morning, March 16.
Children of all ages rush to see the Easter Bunny after he arrives
by fire truck at Jefferson Park in Pittston on Saturday morning,
March 16.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
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Pinnacle
Rehabilitation
Associates
Kevin M. Barno, MPT • K. Bridget Barno, PT
Sharon Marranca, MPT • Hal Glatz, MPT
Maria Hall, PTA • William Montross, MPT
520 Third Ave.
Kingston • 714-6460
Two Convenient Locations
www.pinnaclerehabilitation.net
201 S. Main St.
Pittston • 602-1933
Feel Better, Hit It Further
and Win Your Match!
• Treatment for all golf injuries or any
injury that is affecting your game
• Golf specific flexibility and
strengthening programs available
• Most insurances do not require a referral
for physical therapy
MOTHER’ S DAZE
The carousel
Every few heartbeats life can
throw you lemons. And you know
what you make? Lemon Jell-O
shooters, that’s what you make.
Screw the lemonade. Lemonade is
for rookies.
And, with that in mind, allow me
to regale you, with yet another Sun-
day session of the saga: “How the
Boob Turns.” In my case, literally.
Oh, poor Dr. Bruno. Every time
he sees me, which is more than
my own husband, his inner brain
probably mutters: “Oh, crap. You
again?” But his outer, more profes-
sional, non-litigious voice asks, ”So
what can we do for you today?”
I look down, then up, then down
again and up. He gets my point. He
knows what’s broken. I just don’t
know what he would do if I came
to see him for another body part
realignment, I really don’t. I think
l’ll mess with his head next time
and ask for a Brazilian butt lift.
That should be fun. Also, he needs
to consider setting me up with an
in-offce guest suite and mini-bar.
It would save us both copious
amounts of time. And I would leave
on a merrier note. Win-win.
Well, to shorten what I would
love to make a very long, drawn-out
story, let’s just say I’m not meant
to have a double package. Two
Krimpets to a package are good;
tires in sets are also good. Two
feet? Perfect, even if they’re both
left. Doubles in tennis? Of course.
Jack Daniels…make it a double?
Natch. But my breasts ? Not in this
lifetime, apparently. Due to all sorts
of complications you don’t want to
read about with your Sunday coffee
and glazed donut, let’s just say I am
one man down and it may have to
stay that way.
So, when you see me, don’t
comment on the dichotomy of my
body. That is: half of me looks like
a 10 year-old boy, the other half like
a pre-pubescent 12 year-old girl. I
am crooked, off kilter. I am Mrs.
Potato Head who forgot to attach
her spud-rack. And, frankly, I don’t
think I’m bothered by it in the least.
For me, I just feel lucky to be here
tapping out this stupid, repetitive
story yet again and not in that shiny
urn on the library mantle. (Remem-
ber– that’s where I’ll be in 50 years.
Don’t forget to visit.) Maybe then
I will fnally fnd the balance I’m
now missing.
Life is a carnival and we are
prone on an endlessly moving
merry-go-round. Once you feel
settled, it’s time to change ponies
or hop off entirely. Sometimes
you’re disoriented and confused
and debate leaping back on…or you
could change course entirely and
secure a seat on the more sedate,
less dramatic Ferris wheel. That’s
no fun.
(Me? I need something between
the roller coaster and the tea cups.)
Once you disembark that merry-
go-round, maybe for a little break,
you’re disoriented and lightheaded.
You may even feel a bit surreal, like
you’ve stepped into an alternate
universe called Crazytown.
I visited Crazytown this week,
with a rest stop in DizzyFalls, PA.
I woke up two weeks after sur-
gery, got out of bed and immedi-
ately hit the foor.
Huh. How unusual when I’m
sober.
I scraped myself back up, fondled
the wall like Ray Charles and went
to awaken my children. And then, I
fell into the door. I washed my face
and hit my head on the sink. I had
become a cartoon character and I
wasn’t even drawn cute.
Odd.
This went on all day. Diagnosis:
vertigo.
If you’ve been
keeping abreast
of current library
activities, you
know we’re celebrating Women’s
History Month with 30 cut-out dis-
plays of famous women in history.
As I stumbled into work that day,
I thought if I just propped myself
behind the desk, next to a radioac-
tive, one-dimensional Madame
Curie and pretended to work, as I
do every day, no would notice that I
had the spins.
Alas, I had to move. Upside?
How many of us can say we fell
head-frst into Marie Antoinette and
her ridiculous hairdo? (Though she
does have two boobs, lucky minx).
Who among us has knocked Amelia
Earhart to the foor, between
juvenile fction and the bathroom?
She wasn’t even in her plane and
she went down. I also fell into poor
little Rosa Parks, Annie Oakley
and Mother Theresa, who was not
amused but forgave me anyway.
It’s how she rolls, cardboard or
otherwise.
Astrange few weeks it has been,
dear readers. It also happens to be
Holy Week and I will tell you that
my Monsignor Sempa’s chat on
Palm Saturday truly hit home. He
pointed out that every single one of
us has met with some type of mis-
fortune in our lives. Job loss, death,
body part misplacement, mental
illness….check, check and check
- he was speaking right to me. His
point was this: You take it, you let
it percolate a few days and you deal
with it. You build a bridge and get
over it. If for no other week than
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Maria Jiunta Heck
NUTRI TI ON CORNER
Ham it up!
This weekend is a high volume
weekend for grocery stores to
sell hams. Ham is a traditional
springtime food and, in years
past, cured hams would be ready
to eat in the spring and summer
months.
Today, there are a wide variety
of hams found on store shelves.
According to USDA, hams may
be fresh, cured, or cured and
smoked. Ham is the cured leg of
pork. Fresh ham is an uncured leg
of pork. Fresh ham will bear the
term “fresh” as part of the prod-
uct name and is an indication that
the product is not cured. “Turkey”
ham is a ready-to-eat product
made from cured thigh meat of
turkey. The term “turkey ham” is
always followed by the statement
“cured turkey thigh meat.”
The usual color for cured ham
is deep rose or pink; fresh ham
(which is not cured) has the pale
pink or beige color of a fresh
pork roast; country hams and
prosciutto (which are dry cured)
range from pink to a mahogany
color.
Here are some of the meanings
of terms you might fnd on hams
in the grocery store:
FULLYCOOKED or
COOKED: Needs no further
cooking because it is fully cooked
at the establishment where it was
produced and packaged. Product
can be eaten right out of the pack-
age or reheated. Fully cooked is
synonymous with cooked.
HAM - WATERADDED:
The product is
at least 17.0%
protein with
10% added
solution.
HAM with NATURALJUIC-
ES: The product is at least 18.5%
protein.
Both whole or half, cooked,
vacuum-packaged hams pack-
aged in federally-inspected plants
and canned hams can be eaten
cold, right out of the package.
However, if you want to reheat
these cooked hams, set the oven
no lower than 325 °F and heat to
an internal temperature of 140 °F
as measured with a food ther-
mometer.
Remember, reheat cooked
hams packaged in USDA-
inspected plants to 140 °F and all
others to 165 °F. Read the label
to fnd out if your ham was pack-
aged in a USDA-inspected plant.
Most purchased from a grocery
store are packaged in a USDA
plant.
Most leftover ham slices can
be stored in the refrigerator
for 3–5 days or frozen for 1-2
months according to USDA. If
you have a lot of leftover ham,
slice and freeze it for enjoyment a
month or two from now.
To read more about hams,
visit http://www.fsis.usda.gov/
Fact_Sheets/Ham.
Here are two recipes for ham
leftovers. The ham and sweet po-
tato skillet calls for canned sweet
potatoes, but you can substitute
fresh. The ham and navy bean
Th e Villa Foglia
Restau ran tan d C aterin g
“ Fea tu ring Th e Bes tin Ita lia n/Am erica n Cu is ine”
Prou dly Serving th e W yom ing Va lley For Over 40 Yea rs
H ou rs :M onda y-Sa tu rda y from 4:30 p.m .til ?
1 1 33W yo m in gAven u e,Exeter•654-1 20 6
Ca ll for Berea vem entL u nch eon info.
FUL L D INNE R M E NU
Pa s ta • Ch icken • Vea l
Sea food • Stea ks
& M ore!
Tu es da y D inner Specia l:
EGGPLA NT ROLLA NTINI
W ednes da y D inner Specia l:
BEEF & REEF
NY Strip A nd Sh rim p Scam pi
Th u rs da y D inner Specia l:
Risotto
E very Frida y Specia l:
12 Cu tsRed orW h itePizza
Eat-In orTak e-Ou t
Mary R. Ehret, MS, RD, LDN
Penn State Cooperative Extension
See HECK page 20
See NUTRITION page 20
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To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Jill Andes • 970-7188 Steve Morris • 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTH’S
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
• CAFE OLIVIA
• COOPER’S WATERFRONT
• DENTE’S CATERING
• FIRE & ICE
• GYRO’S RESTAURANT
• NARDONE’S RESTAURANT
• SAVO’S PIZZA & RESTAURANT
• THOMAS’ BARBEQUE & RETRO RESTAURANT
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertiser’s Weekly Ads
DECEMBER
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
GERTRUDE MALECKI
of Exeter
Dente’s Catering
Dente’s Tent & Rental Co.
655-0801
www.dentescatering.com
Wishing All Our Clients and Friends A Happy Easter!
May The Blessings Of The Risen Christ Fall Upon Us All.
50th Anniversary
Celebrating Our
Tis Week’s Dining Guide Feature:
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SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
“The Best Breakfast Around”
• Overstuffed Omelets • Huge Frittatas
• Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes • Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted “Best Value”...”Most Affordable”... and Favorite Restaurant” by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals • Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
Check Out Our Breakfast Specials:
• Mon. - Fri. only
$
3.99 incl. FREE COFFEE
• Sat. & Sun. Reg. FREE COFFEE with breakfast special
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
204 Broad Street • Pittston • 299-7814
Rob Musto, chef & proprietor
Tuesday thru Saturday 4:30 p.m. til close
SERVING DINNER
Featuring Veal, Steaks, Chops,
Homemade Pastas & Fresh Fish
BUCK A SHUCK OYSTERS DAILY 5 TO 7
304 KENNEDY BLVD.
PITTSTON - 654-6883
Steamed Maine Clams - $1 a Dozen
¼ lb. Split Maine Lobster Tail - $5.99
¼ lb. split Maine Lobster Tail - $5.99
Martinis - $4.99 from our martini menu
½ pound Lobster Tail Dinner - $17.99
Martinis - $4.99 from our martini menu
½ pound Lobster Tail Dinner - $17.99
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-9
NEW MENU ITEMS
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 4/30/13
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
• Buffalo Bites • Garlic Parm Wings
• Cheesesteak Pizza • Cobb Salad
CLOSED TODAY
HAPPY EASTER!
All First Responders
And Service Connected
Personnel In Uniform
Will Receive A
15
%
Discount
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
Eat-In Only
www.savospizza.com
49th Anniversary
Coupon Special
Buy 24 Cuts Of Pizza (Baked Or Unbaked)
At Our Regular Price
Get 12 Cuts Of Pizza (Baked Or Unbaked)
For Our 1964 Price Of
ONLY $1.00
YOU MAY MIX & MATCH THE BAKED & UNBAKED
EAT IN • PICK UP • DELIVERY
Expires 4/30/13
These pizza specials do not include White Pizza, Broccoli Pizza or Fresh Tomato & Garlic Pizza.
Steve Morris
970-7290
To Advertise In The
Please Contact
NowAccepting Mother’s Day Reservations
Serving A Special Menu 11:30 to 6
On and Off Premise Catering For Any Occasion
We are excited to announce our new SPRING HOURS and EVENTS!
Now Open For Lunch and Dinner Wed. - Fri. 12 noon - 8 pm • Sat. 4 pm - 8 pm
We Deliver!
Like us on Facebook, Print Your Post and Get 10% Off exclusions apply
NOW THAT LENT IS OVER...
THOMAS’ LUNCH OR DINNER FEATURING
Slow Roasted Pulled Pork n Brisket, Baby Back Ribs, The Memphis Burger
Pilled High With Pulled Pork or The Mixed Grill; BBQ’d Pork Chop,
Generous Portion of Slow Cooked Brisket and BBQ’d Chicken!!
DAILY LUNCH & DINNER SPECIALS:
Wed. 2 can dine for $10.99 | Thurs: Party Wing Night
Friday & Saturday are Rib Nights!
Since 1929 • Now 3rd Generation
www.thomasbbq.vpweb.com
4810 Birney Ave., Moosic, PA 18507 - 457-5720
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GI Joe: Retaliation RealD 3D / DBox
Motion Code Seating - PG13 - 105 min.
(1:30), (3:50), 7:10, 9:30
***GI Joe: Retaliation RealD 3D - PG13 -
105 min.
(1:30), (3:50), 7:10, 9:30
*GI Joe: Retaliation RealD 3D - PG13 -
105 min.
(1:10), (2:00), (3:30), (4:30), 7:00, 7:30, 9:15,
9:50
*The Host - PG13 - 135 min.
(1:00), (3:50), 7:15, 10:00
*Tyler Perry’s Temptation: Confessions of
a Marriage Counselor - PG13 - 120 min.
(1:40), (4:15), 7:20, 10:00
*Spring Breakers - R - 100 min.
(1:15), (4:05), 7:05, 9:40
*Olympus Has Fallen - R - 130 min.
(1:45), (4:40), 7:30, 10:10
*Admission - PG-13 - 115 min.
(2:10), (4:40), 7:20, 9:50
***The Croods RealD 3D - PG - 110 min.
(2:00), (4:30), 7:30, 10:00
*The Croods - PG - 110 min.
(1:10), (3:40), 7:00, 9:30
*The Incredible Burt Wonderstone -
PG13 - 110 min.
(2:00), (4:30), 7:30, 10:00
**The Call - R - 105 min. -
(2:15), (4:30), 7:10, 9:30
***Oz: The Great and Powerful RealD 3D -
PG - 140 min.
(1:20), (4:20), 7:20, 10:10
*Oz: The Great and Powerful 2D - PG -
140 min.
(1:00), (4:00), 7:00, 9:50
Don’t just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 • rctheatres.com
• 3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
•Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.50 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
HOURS: Mon. thru Fri. 8-6 • Sat. 8-5 • Fax Us Your Order 654-0901
PRICES EFFECTIVE 4/2/13 - 4-6/13 • NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
Accepting Mastercard...Visa...Discover...American Express
SABATELLE’S
An Authentic Italian
MEAT MARKET &
FINE FOOD STORE
114-116 S. MAIN ST., PITTSTON • 654-4616 - 654-4617
We Deliver – WE ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS — HOME OF BELLA BASKETS
HOT FOODS TO GO
SYMPATHY PLATTERS • CATERING
“The Best All Year”
CLOSED MONDAY, RE-OPENING TUESDAY, 8 AM
N.Y. STRIP
STEAK
BEEF CUBES FOR
STEWMEAT
THE ORIGINAL
SINCE 1978
“ONLY AT
SABATELLE’S”
$
3.69LB.
$
8.99LB.
DELMONICO
STEAK
$
4.49LB.
PORK LOIN
PORKETTA
$
3.69LB.
$
2.29LB.
$
12.99LB.
$
7.99LB.
CHICKETTA
ROAST
CHICKEN
BREAST
WHOLE OR
SPLIT
$
1.69LB.
Homemade Deli Hot Foods To Go
GROUND
SIRLOIN
$
2.79LB.
10 LB.
BAG
ITALIAN
SAUSAGE
$
3.39LB.
HOT SWEET
&GARLIC
We have a large variety of Italian Goods, Pasta Bowls to Expresso Pots, etc. The best variety
of Italian Specialty Food in the Northeast: Panatone, Torrone Pizzeles, Homemade Cookies,
Prosciutto, Sopresatta, Homemade Lonza Dried Sausage, Salami, Super Chubs. We have Fresh
Baked Bread and Rolls, Italian Cheese, Imported Pasta, Homemade Ravioli, Gnocchi and Pasta,
Farm Fresh Produce, Fresh Made Salads Daily!
GROUND
ROUND
$
3.69LB.
3 LBS.
OR MORE
$
3.59LB.
RUMP ROAST OR
BONELESS CHUCK ROAST
$
3.99LB.
TENDER CUT
BEEF ROAST
BEEF TENDERLOIN
PEELEDBUTT
CENTER CUT PORK
CHOPS OR ROAST
BREADED CHICKEN TENDERS
TUNA MELT HOAGIE
BAKED LASAGNA
LARGE STROMBOLI
FRIED FISH DURING LENT
COLE SLAW
$7.99 LB.
$5.99 EA.
$5.99 CUT
$14.99 EA.
$3.29 LB.
ROAST BEEF
HAM OFF THE BONE
ROASTED CHICKETTA
ROASTED PORKETTA
HAM OFF THE BONE
AMERICAN CHEESE
$6.99 LB.
$4.99 LB.
$7.99 LB.
$7.99 LB.
$4.99 LB.
$3.99 LB.
CHICKEN
BREAST
BONELESS
&
SKINLESS
$
1.99LB.
CHICKEN
TENDERS
BONELESS
&
SKINLESS
$
1.99LB.
PORK FOR
SAUCE
$
2.39LB.
OUR OWN
KIELBASI
$
5.89LB.
PORK BUTT
PORKETTA
$
2.99LB.
PORTERHOUSE OR
T-BONE STEAK
$
7.99LB.
BONELESS
BONELESS
SIRLOINSTEAK
$
6.99LB.
CUT FREE
than for this week. And then, you
simply carry on, my friends. You
carry on.
Life is full of ick. Everyone has
something they need to excavate.
Every. One. But be assured, only
you can dig out and fnd your own
little nugget of happiness. Just
you.
You aren’t going to fnd it in
a bar, in a pharmacy or at Dr.
Bruno’s offce. Well actually, you
might fnd it in Dr. Bruno’s offce
depending on the assignment.
Botox might warm the labori-
ous wrinkles of my own soul, for
example.
But listen to me: True happi-
ness is a sustainable delight in the
beautiful moments of ordinary
life. It’s right there. Grab it and
run. Try the merry-go-round, try
the tea cups, but seize it. Delight
in the ordinary life.
And, don’t forget to snatch the
lemon Jell-o shooters on your way
out.
soup is a great way to use the ham
bone and boost your fber with its
beans. Enjoy!
Ham and Sweet Potato Skillet
¼ cup chopped onion
4 tablespoons olive or canola oil
2 tablespoons all-purpose four
1 (15.5-ounce) can pineapple
chunks in natural juices,
drained, reserve juice
1/3 cup water
1/3 cup brown sugar, frmly
packed
2 (15.5-ounce) cans sweet pota-
toes, drained
and sliced or 5-6 medium sweet
potatoes boiled, peeled and sliced
1 cup (8 ounces) cooked ham,
diced
Cook onion in oil for 2-3
minutes; stir in four. Add reserved
pineapple juice and water. Cook,
stirring constantly, until thickened.
Stir in pineapple and brown sugar;
top with potatoes and ham pieces.
Cover and simmer for 20-25 min-
utes. Makes 4 Servings
Taken from and edited USDA
commodity foods
Ham and Navy Bean Soup
8 ounces dried navy beans
6 cups water
1 ham bone
1 yellow onion, chopped
2 stalks celery, fnely chopped
2 cups of chopped and peeled
fresh carrots
2 bay leaves
1 ½ teaspoons dried tarragon
leaves
¼ teaspoon black pepper
This is a two day recipe. Place
beans in large bowl; cover com-
pletely with water. Soak overnight
in the refrigerator.
Drain beans and discard water.
Combine beans, water, ham
bone, onion, carrots, celery, bay
leaves and tarragon leaves in slow
cooker.
Cook on low for 8 hours or on
high for 4 hours. Discard the ham
bone and bay leaves; stir in pep-
per. This serves 6.
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Continued from page 17
HECK
Continued from page 17
NUTRITION
Dupont news and notes
April Recycling Schedule:
April 3, 17 – Comingle, cans,
glass, plastic
April 10, 24 – Mixed Paper, Card-
board
Meeting Schedule:
Compost Commission Meeting –
April 3 at 7 p.m. Dupont Municipal
Bldg.
Council Meeting – April 9 at 7
p.m. Dupont Municipal Bldg.
Drug Take Back Program – April
27 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Dur-
yea Borough Building - Residents
of Avoca, Dupont and Duryea are
welcome to drop off expired pre-
scriptions
Crime Watch Meeting – April 30,
at 6:30 in Dupont Municipal Bldg.
Speakers: District Attorney Stepha-
nie Salavantis, Det. Chris Lynch
Monthly Food Distribution:
April 25 from 4-5 p.m. at Sacred
Heart Church Hall
Important Dates:
T-Ball & Girls Softball Opening
Day - April 14 at 1 p.m. Dupont
Field
Avoca/Dupont Little League feld
work session - Saturday, April 6 be-
ginning at 10 a.m. at the upper Av-
oca Little League feld. All offcers,
managers, coaches, parents, and any
volunteers are asked for their help
to start working on the feld to get it
ready for opening day on April 13.
Sewer Billing:
The 2013 sewer bills have been
mailed. Due date is June 30. Cost
is $30 per edu. Water shut off no-
tices will be posted on delinquent
accounts.
Pavilion Rentals – Contact Du-
pont Borough 655-6216
Electronic Recycling – June 15 at
Hanover High School – Drop off ac-
ceptable items at Dupont Borough
Municipal Building on June 14.
Easter Break
Easter break began with an early
dismissal on Wednesday, March 27
at 11 a.m., and classes resume on
Wednesday, April 3.
Limited Openings Available
in Pre-School, Kindergarten
Would you like your child to be
part of our academic, Catholic based
school family? We currently have
limited openings in our pre-school
and kindergarten programs. Please
call us and make an appointment to
visit the pre-school or kindergarten.
You can reach us at 570-457-2553.
We invite you to meet our teachers,
see our classrooms, and check out
the technology we offer as early
as the preschool level. Talk to our
students and fnd out why they love
Holy Rosary School. We offer up to
fve days of pre-school per week,
with prices variable dependent
upon how many days you chose,
and full day kindergarten. Holy
Rosary School also offers an excep-
tional hot lunch program which is
available from pre-school through
eighth grade. We also offer After-
Care to accommodate families
whose needs for child care extend
beyond traditional school hours.
We provide a supportive, safe, and
loving environment with a family
feel and exceptional academics. So
come see what we have to offer. We
might just be the right ft for your
family! All families are welcome to
apply for fnancial aid.
Congratulations to
Our Forensic Team Members
Congratulations to varsity foren-
sic members Megan Conlon, Tyler
Mackell, and Denise Pinto who
competed in the Diocesan Final
Competition on Tuesday, March
19th.
They achieved ffth place. Con-
gratulations and well done!
Congratulations
NHD Students!
Our students participated in Na-
tional History Day at Penn State-
Wilkes-Barre on Saturday, March
23 and brought home top honors
for our school: frst place overall
out of ten participating public and
Catholic Junior Varsity Schools!
Congratulations to all involved
and special thanks to our amazing
moderators Mrs. Jennifer Snyder,
Mrs. Doris Brady, Mrs. Maureen
Conlon, and Mrs. Bonnie Blaskie-
wicz for their incredible generosity
of time, knowledge, guidance, and
dedication.
We are proud of all students
who participated and worked so
diligently. Special thanks to Kevin
Bradigan and Larry Corridoni, and
Amelia Desiderio, Julia Parrick and
Erin Senese for their junior group
exhibit; as well as Michael Skutack,
Michael Mucciolo, and Matt D’Elia
for junior group website.
The following students will be
moving on to compete in the state-
wide competition on May 3 and 4 to
be held at Cumberland Valley High
School, Mechanicsburg, PA: Emily
Mazur, frst place, individual docu-
mentary; Grace Berlew, Jordan
Cicon, and Angelina Falcone, frst
place, group performance; Charlie
Vermac, frst place, individual ex-
hibit; Julie Chropowicki and Brean-
na Taliaterra, frst place, group ex-
hibit; Julie Mazaleski and Elizabeth
Stone, second place, group exhibit;
Christina Heppding and Maggie
Stuccio, second place, group web-
site; Abigail Klink and Rylee Shay,
second place, group documentary;
and Lauren Cawley and Kiearra
Saldi, third place, group website.
We wish them the best of luck as
they move on in the competition.
Race for Education
They Race for Education is one
of the highlights of the year for our
students and their families.
There are many ways in which
you can help make the Race for
Education a success.
Record keepers are needed from
April 4 through May 10 on Tuesday
and Thursday mornings to tabulate
donations. Additionally, approxi-
mately 50 volunteers are needed to
run the race safely and effciently.
It is a great day flled with high
energy and lots of excitement. So
please save the date, Friday, May
10, and come join the fun. In the
past, many of our neighborhood
friends have stood on their porches
to cheer on the children. You don’t
want to miss it.
Father Daughter Dance
This special night will be held on
Friday, April 12. Last year we had
175 girls and their special “dates.”
We are once again working dili-
gently to make this a memorable
occasion for our students and their
fathers, grandfathers, uncles, and
special family friends. Optional
professional photographs will be
offered for a reasonable fee, and
music and fun provided by DJ
Charlie Hayes. Reservations are
due April 2.
Gift Certifcate News
Vouchers sales are held each
Thursday in the basement of Holy
Rosary Church from 8 a.m. to 10
a.m. School families may send in
orders on Wednesday to be flled on
Thursday.
Recycling
In addition to cartridge recycling
we also have CELL PHONE RE-
CYCLING. Select cell phones can
be dropped off in the same location
and recycled for credit.
For more information or for a list
of qualifying cartridges, visit www.
fundingfactory.com or contact Mrs.
Skutack at 457-2553.
Labels & Box Tops
Campbell’s Soup labels and Box
Tops for Education are being col-
lected at Holy Rosary School.
These programs enable us to pro-
vide educational resources that may
be unaffordable through our regular
budget. They offer exciting mer-
chandise like computers, software,
sports equipment, reference materi-
als, science and art items, even mu-
sical instruments.
Please continue your support
of these programs by sending in
your labels to the school offce or
by placing them in the church ves-
tibule. If you have any questions,
please contact the school’s offce.
Also, please check labels for ex-
piration dates. They can be sent in
immediately and processed before
they expire; there is no need to wait
until you accumulate a quantity.
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Your home is whereourheart is.
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Because serving you is who we are.
We will help you make a plan. Guide you
through the process. Answer all your
questions. Take care of your insurance.
And support you in your home with
loving care that lasts a lifetime.
HospiceSacredHeart.org | 706.2400
Loving care that lasts a lifetime.
HOLY ROSARY NEWS
Classes at Holy Rosary School in Duryea resume on Wednesday
Students search end of rainbow
The first-grade class of Holy Rosary School recently cel-
ebrated St. Patrick’s Day by writing stories about what they
think is at the end of a rainbow and setting a leprechaun trap.
Although the leprechaun managed to get away, the class was
able to catch his hat. Holy Rosary first-grade students and
their leprechaun trap are, from left, first row, Derek Heppd-
ing, Noelel Barnak, Rowan Lazevnick, Danilo Giordina, Liam
Lazecki, Nicholas Borgia and Paul Stevenson. Second row, An-
gelina Castaldi, James Mattucci, Coran Twomey, Patrick Cos-
grove, and Matthew Volpitta. Third row, Li-Na Herron, Isabella
Granteed, Abigail Miller, Angelina Corridoni, Emma Gernhardt,
Jacob Carden and John Solomini. Absent at the time of the
photo was Anthony Paglianite.
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timesleader.com
Get news
when
it happens.
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654-3384
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Sunday Dispatchstaffers have
won three state journalism awards
for photography, design and head-
lines.
The Keystone Press Awards are
distributed yearly by the Pennsyl-
vania Newspaper Association.
Photographer Bill Tarutis won a
frst-place award for Photo Story,
which included “Kidding Around”
and “AFair To Remember.”
Staffer Jack Smiles won a sec-
ond-place award for Headlines,
which inlcuded “Fox Hill foursome
still shooting in the 90s,” “The
monster that ate seven towns,” and
“The Moose is getting long in the
antler.”
Staffer Joe Healey won a sec-
ond -place award for Page Design,
which included “A league of their
own” centerpiece, “Pledging their
allegiance” and “Along family
lines.”
Dispatch Editor Ed Ackerman
said it is gratifying to have the Dis-
patch and members of its staff rec-
ognized on a statewide level.
“We are very proud of the work
we do and service we render to our
readers and it is a satisfying feeling
to know this work is deemed wor-
thy of such prestigious awards,”
Ackerman said.
Winners will be honored at the
Pennsylvania Press Conference
May 18 in Harrisburg.
The Dispatch’s parent company,
Impressions Media, and its publi-
cations, won 24 other awards. The
Times Leader garnered 11 awards,
The Abington Journal won 12
awards and The Dallas Post won
one award. The Abington Journal
also was named the “sweepstakes
winner” for its division.
“Once again, the staff at all of
our publications showed why they
are considered the best in North-
eastern Pennsylvania,” said Joe
Butkiewicz, vice president and ex-
ecutive editor of the Times Leader.
Over 4,400 enteries were re-
ceived from 138 Pennsylvania
Newspaper Association newspa-
pers in this year’s contest. Entries
were judges by peers from the Il-
linois Press Association.
Dispatch wins three state journalism awards
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PACLASS OF ‘63 MEETS
The Pittston Area Class of 1963
will meet at 4 p.m. on Saturday,
April 6 at Tony’s Pizzeria, Pittston.
Plans for a 50th anniverary re-
union will be discussed.
DANCEAJIG FOR
PEDIATRIC CLINIC
Miranda Warunek, a senior at
Pittston Area High School and a
member of Our Lady of the Eu-
charist Parish is sponsoring a fun-
draiser for the Pediatric Health
Clinic, housed in the former Seton
Catholic High School building
and sponsored by the Care and
Concern Ministries of St. John the
Evangelist Parish.
Featuring the Emerald Isle Step
Dancers, the event will be held at
1:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 7 at the
Pittston Area High School audito-
rium. Donation is $7 and tickets
are available for purchase after all
weekend Masses during the month
of March and at the parish offce
during the week.
The event is in honor of Our
Lady of Eucharist parishioner Col-
leen Shea.
LADIES AUX. POST #8335
The Ladies Auxiliary to V.F.W.
Post 8335 will meet Monday, April
8 in the post home, 915 Main St.
Following the regular meeting, of-
fcers will be elected for the 2013-
2014 term.
President June Fitzgerald will
preside over the meeting. Mary
Orluk and Mary Starinsky will be
hostesses for the evening.
SPRING RUMMAGE SALE
The Confraternity of Catholic
Women of St. Elizabeth Ann Se-
ton Parish of Holy Trinity Church,
Hughest Street, Swoyersville will
hold its annual Spring Rummage
Sale from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. April 8,
9, 10 and 13 with additional hours
from 6 to 8 p.m. on Monday, April
8.
Clothing, toys, books, maga-
zines, jewelry, small appliances
and household items and much
more iwll be offered for sale.
NARFE MEETING
Greater Pittston NARFE Chap-
ter 1723, President John Ryan has
announced the meeting day has
been changed from the second
Thursday to the second Wednes-
day of every month. The next
meeting will be held at 1 p.m. on
Wednesday, April 10.
SPRING CRAFT
& FLEAMARKET
Wyoming United Methodist
Church is holding a Spring Craft
and Flea Market on Saturday,
April 13 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at
376, Wyoming Avenue. Lunch
menu is available.
DRAMACLUB PRESENTS
‘SEUSSICAL’
The WyomingArea Drama Club
will present “Seussical,” a musical
based on the stories of Dr. Seuss
from a book by Lynn Ahrens and
Stephen Flaherty, with lyrics by
Lynn Ahrens at 7 p.m. on Friday,
April 12 and Saturday, April 13
and at 2 p.m. on Sunday, April 14
at the WyomingArea High School,
20 Memorial St., Exeter.
Tickets are available at the high
school.
VENDORS WANTED
Vendors are needed for a craft
and fea market set for 9 a.m. to2
p.m. on April 13 at the Wyoming
United Methodist Church. Call
693-1303.
POLISHAMERICAN
CLUB TO MEET
The Polish American Citizens
Club of Elm Street Dupont, will
meet at noon on Sunday, April 14
at the club home. Refreshments
will be served after the meeting.
JLWMOUNTAIN
LAURELBREAKFAST
The JLW Mountain Laurel
Club is hosting an all you can eat
breakfast buffet on April 14 from
8 a.m. until 1 p.m. The event will
be held at the West Wyoming Fire
Dept. banquet roomon Shoemaker
Ave. West Wyoming. The buffet
will consist of scrambled eggs,
sausage, ham, pancakes, potatoes,
coffee, tea, juice and muffns.
As always, all proceeds from the
event will be donated back to the
community. Tickets are available
$7 adults, $5 for children at the
door or in advance. For info call
Karen at 885-1650.
ITALIANAMERICAN
ASSOCIATION DINNER
The April, Dinner Meeting of
the Italian American Association
of Luzerne County is Thursday
April 18, at Genetti’s Hotel and
Convention Center. Arrival time
is 6:00 p.m. with dinner served at
6:30.
Price is $25 per person. Mu-
sic for dancing by Danny Argo
& Friends with dancing to 10:15.
Reservation deadline is Friday,
April 12.
For reservations and member-
ship information, please call Judy
Deice at 654-7600 or Louise Cas-
tellani 654-6454. President, James
Deice will preside.
ROAST CHICKEN DINNER
A roast chicken dinner will be
held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Saturday,
April 20 at the United Methodist
Church Pittston (corner Broad and
Church Streets). Takeouts begin at
4:30 p.m.
The menu includes a half roast
chicken, family style mashed po-
taotes, gravy, green beans, pepper
hash, cranberry sauce, dessert and
beverage.
Cost is $9 for adults and $5 for
children under 10 years of age.
For tickets, call 603-1915.
WSCC REUNION
West Side Central Catholic High
School Class of 1971 will hold a
60th birthday partyfrom1 to 7 p.m.
on Sunday, Sept. 1 at the Grove at
Checkerboard Inn on Carverton
Road, Trucksville. Formal invita-
tions will be forthcoming when all
addresses are fnalized.
For more information, contact
Kate Bustin Taroli atKBTaroli@
gmail.com.
FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Offices of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
On Election Day 2012 voters in Colorado and
Washington state approved measures that legalize
the recreational use of marijuana. A similar
measure failed in Oregon. Seventeen states and
Washington, DC have passed laws allowing
smoked marijuana to be used for a variety of
medical conditions, including most recently,
Connecticut. However marijuana is still classifed
as a Schedule I controlled substance under the
Controlled Substances Act (CSA): “Any individual
who knowingly possesses a controlled substance
in a personal-use amount shall be liable to the
United States for a civil penalty in an amount not
to exceed $10,000 for each such violation.”
***
The 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld
the dismissal of a doctor’s lawsuit against a Tulsa
hospital that suspended his medical privileges
following a pair of surgeries in June 2003 on
patients who had been diagnosed with lung
cancer. One patient died a week after the surgery
and the other was permanently disfgured.
***
Massachusetts has a new law requiring
automakers to provide independent repair
shops as well as dealers with easy access to the
computer codes needed to diagnose complex car
problems.
***
The Montana Supreme Court has ruled that a
ban on a medical marijuana sales does not violate
the constitutional rights of registered users or
provider.
Continued from page 15
BRIEFS
SENI OR CI TI ZENS
Pittston Seniors going to Hollywood Casino Wednesday
Cosmopolitan Seniors
The next meeting of the Cosmo-
politan Seniors will be at 1 p.m. on
Tuesday, April 2 in St. Anthony’s
Center in Exeter. Hosts/hostesses
are Mary Dirhan, Frank Fountain,
Marcella Fountain, Bernie Serbin
and Dorohy Serbin.
The previous meeting was at-
tended by 51 members. After
President Vic called the meeting to
order, Vice President Joe Kleback
led the group in prayer, Pledge of
Allegiance and a patriotic song.
Secretary Terri Mislan read the
minutes of the previous meet-
ing. Treasurer Amy Alpaugh gave
her report.Afterwards, the group
enjoyed refreshments while Bill
Kull on the organ and a duet of
Ron McAdarra and Joe Kleback
did the vocalizing. Later, everyone
played Bingo. Fifty/ffty winners
were Rosemary Golenski, Vic Ma-
linowski, Cheryl Pipher, Frances
Poluske and Betsie Williams. Jo-
hanna Malinowski won the special
Bingo and Marcella Fountain the
jackpot winner.
A trip to Mount Airy Casino is
scheduled for Wednesday, April
10 with pickups in Exeter and
Pittston. Non-members are wel-
come Details can be obtained from
Johanna at 655-2720.
WWWSeniors
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Seniors met recently at St. Mon-
ica’s meeting rooms. Servers for
the April 2 meeting are Irene Za-
linski and Angie Zagursky.
Jackpot winner was San De-
Salvo and the 50/50 winners were
Helen Ostrowski andAngie Zagur-
sky.
The guest speaker for the next
meeting is Eileen Cipriani from
Rep. Phyllis Mundy’s offce. Her
topic will be about all the ben-
efts to which seniors citizens are
entitled. Members are reminded
to bring canned items and non-
perishables. Refreshments will be
served after a short business meet-
ing and Bingo will be played.
Arrangements are being made
for the 37th anniversary dinner to
be held on May 7. Anyone wish-
ing to join the club should contact
Angie Mastruzzo, membership
chairperson, at 693-1104.
Pittston Senior Center
Two seats are available for a
day trip to the Hollywood Casino
on Wednesday, April 3, for further
information call the center. Co-
lette Check of Visiting Angels will
speak on emergency preparedness
at 11:15 a.m. on Thursday, April 4.
Property Tax and Rent Rebate
Forms can be obtained at the cen-
ter. Call the center to make an ap-
pointment.
Afewopenings remain for a pro-
gram entitled Dining with Diabe-
tes. The programis offered through
Penn State Cooperative Extension.
Four classes will be held from
12:30 to 2 p.m. on April 11 and
18 and May 2 and 16. Each class
will offer food demonstrations and
tastings, physical activity, ideas to
take home and discussions regard-
ing managing Diabetes. Medicare
recipients receive free registration.
Pre-registration is necessary.
A summer golf league is form-
ing. For further information, call
the center.
Reservations are open for a day
trip to Woodlock Pines on Sunday
July 28. Those attending will re-
ceive complimentary coffee and
baked good upon arrival, a smor-
gasbord at noon, boat ride or bus
tour of the property, Festivals of
the World show and one hour of
bingo before departing.
To make reservations for trips
and to get more information on any
of the above, call the Connie An-
drews at the Center at 655-5561.
Falls Senior Center
The Falls Senior Center spon-
sored by the Area Agency on Ag-
ing for Luzerne/Wyoming coun-
ties invites anyone 55+ to the
following activites;
Monday: 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wii
bowling with Tunkhannock SC
(alternating sites); from 1 to 2 p.m.
the Crocheting Club meets (all lev-
els welcome)
Tues and Fri.: 11:15 to 11:45
a.m. “Healthy Steps” exercise pro-
gram is offered.This program is
designed to improve balance and
strengthen muscles to help with
fall prevention.
Wed. April 3: 11:30 a.m. Chris-
topher Davis from Hospice of the
Sacred Heart will discuss their vol-
unteer program called ” PATH’.
Fri. April 5 from 11 a.m.to 7
p.m. there will be a stroke screen-
ing. Cost is $30. There will be
blood pressure screening from
noon to 2 p.m.
Anyone 60+ is welcome to join
the group for a hot meal at noon for
a suggested donation of $2. RSVP
to Twila at 388-2623 by 12:30 p.m.
the day before. The center is locat-
ed on State Route 92 in Falls and is
open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
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Pi ttston AreA i ntermedi Ate Center/
Six-grader Hannah Gadomski sings ‘Crocodile Rock’ with the
Middle School Chorus.
Seventh-grader McKinzie Moran plays the saxophone in ‘The
Lion Sleeps Tonight’ during the Pittston Area Intermediate
Center performance.
Third-graders Gianna Neishman, left, Kiera Langon, and Kayla Mease perform the ‘Addams Family
Theme’ with the Intermediate Center Chorus.
Fourth-grader David Stoshick, left, and third-graders Bethanie Yashkus and Savanna McCluskey
sing with the Intermediate Center Chorus.
Director Eric Sperazza plays the keyboard during the concert.
Sixth-grader Kelsey Gallagher
dances during the finale.
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Pittston Area senior high honor roll listed
John Haas, principal, Pittston
Area Senior High School, recently
announced those students who
have qualified for the Honor Roll
for the 2013 second quarter.
Grade 12
Honors with Distinction
Katlyn Arena, Nicole Baker, Alex
Bauman, Kyle Berlinski, Aaron
Black, Nicholas Bolka, Maria Capi-
tano, Anthony Capozucca, Matthew
Carroll, Kimberly Chesniak, An-
thony Cotto, Jamie Coyne, Jordan
Cumbo, Sara Czerniakowski, Kevin
Dolman, Sarah Driscoll, Austin
Elko, Kristen Fereck, Carmella
Gagliardi, Alaina Garubba, Michael
Harding, Jeremy Homschek, Karina
Hoover, Mianna Hopkins, Lisa Karp,
John Kielbasa, Austin Kostelansky,
Kyle Kostelansky, Joseph Koytek,
Kaitlynn Kuchta, Olivia Lanza,
Catherine Lombardo, Jamie Lom-
bardo, Kristen Lombardo, Angelo
Lussi, Katrina Lutecki, Christopher
Lynch, Justin Martinelli, Nicholas
Maruska, Felix Mascelli, Michael
McGlynn, Kaitlyn McGuire, Robert
Meranti, Elizabeth Mikitish, John
Minich, Connor Mitchell, Kelly
Mitchell, Nicholas Montini, James
Musto, Santino Musto, Cassandra
Nocito, Calvin O’Boyle, Karlee Pat-
ton, Matthew Pierantoni, Gabrielle
Poplarchick, Mark Prebish, Suraj
Pursnani, Shelby Rinaldi, Bryan
Russo, Antonette Scialpi, Zachary
Seeley, Marina Sell, Alexandria
Serafin, Matthew Shamnoski, Julia
Shandra, Amy Silinskie, Jillian Sta-
rinsky, Joseph Starinsky, Stephen
Starinsky, Brian Stonikinis, Taylor
Stull, Carissa Suhockey, Cory
Tobin, James Tobish, Jonathan
Tonte, Ryan Tracy, Shannon Turner,
Michael Twardowski, Miranda
Warunek, Kansas White, Ariele Wil-
liams, Kaitlynn Wolfram, Matthew
Yatison, Lisa Yeager.
First Honors
Alyssa Adkins, Mary Theresa
Anderson, Frank Ardo, James Ar-
doline, Alexandra Cawley, Michael
Chisdock, Joseph Chiumento,
Alicia Chopyak, Justin Coe, Chris-
tian Curtis, Ronald D’Eliseo, Bruce
Edwards, Samuel Falcone, Jenna
Galli, Christopher Gilbert, Haley
Kline, James Lizza, Cody McLean,
Angelina Reed, Samantha Resi-
lavage, Joshua Rugletic, Kristen
Santey, Emily Seaman, Michael
Sell, Chelsea Smith, Tiana Stull,
Jonathan Sulkoski, Gary Thomas,
Sharece Tillman, Ian Tracy.
Second Honors
Timothy Allen, Alexandra An-
astasi, Dillon Chapman, Christo-
pher Evans, Santo Giambra, Ryan
Hawksley, Samantha Hoban, Abby
Joyce, Kristopher Littleton, Reann
Loftus, Stephanie Martinez, Brian
Mlodzienski, Joshua Reynolds, Da-
kota Rowan, Bradley Rush, Tiffany
Smith, Blasé Twardowski, Marisa
Vogel, Sierra Williams, Ryan Young-
blood, Hannah Zondlo.
Grade 11
Honors with Distinction
Michael Antal, Eastin Ashby, Tay-
lor Balasavage, Anthony Baldiga,
Jason Bandru, Kevin Boone, Ali
Brady, Laura Brady, Terry Briggs,
Christie Cadwalder, Nicole Chaiko,
Joseph Champi, Robert Costello,
Anthony D’Eliseo, Alexa Danko,
Lori DeFazio, Dominique DelPriore,
Megan Dougherty, James Emmett,
Brandon Ferrance, Kayle Forkin,
Marie Terese Fox, Lea Garibaldi,
Alia Gestl, Mason Gross, Michael
Harth, Emily Herron, Zachary Hoff-
mann, Kenneth Hoover, Brittany
Hypolite, Katie Jobson, Samantha
Kachinsky, Allison Kizer, Adrian
Langan, Rachel Lazevnick, Steven
Lee, Sierra Lieback, Carmen Lo-
Brutto, Rachel Longo, Maria Lussi,
Irene Magdon, Cameron Marotto,
Jennifer Mataloni, Dana Maurizi,
Nicole Mayerski, Patrick McGinty,
Zachary McKitish, Kallie Miller,
Mark Miscavage, Mark Modlesky,
Tyler Mooney, Samantha Moska,
Matthew Mott, Cales Owens,
Leanne Para, Justin Peterson,
Michael Pieszala, Troy Platukus,
Charles Poli, Taylor Powers, Whit-
ney Prescott, Jacqueline Rabender,
Joshua Razvillas, Taylor Roberts,
Justin Roche, Alyssa Rodzinak,
Sara Ruby, Michael Schwab, Rachel
Simansky, Kaitlyn Simyan, Ciara
Smith, Martin Snyder, Tyler Spurlin,
Bridget Starinsky, Alyssa Talerico,
Kayla Vogue, Carly Walker, Richard
Weinstock, Ryan Witman, Trent
Woodruff, Tyler Woodruff, James
Wychock, Meredith Yozwiak, An-
drew Yuhas, Jean Luc Yurchak.
First Honors
Rhiannon Avvisato, John Butera,
Michael Carey, Amber Clarkson,
Brielle Culp, Christopher Cum-
mings, Nicole Dale, Casey Deaton,
Tyler Demich, Adam Ginocchetti,
Candido Green, Robert Koprowski,
Kaycee Langan, Tyler Lutecki, Jes-
sica Maleta, David Mancini, Mariah
Mattioli, Jennifer Meck, Matthew
Miller, Brittni Morrell, Tyler Mul-
len, Jenna Mundenar, Taya Oliver,
Courtney Osiecki, Michael Parrs,
Desiree Piotrowski, Rosemary
Ritsick, Alexander Roper, Eric
Scatena, Sarah Smith, Andrea Ste-
phenson, Tatiana Supinski, Marissa
Williams.
Second Honors
Antoinette Antonacci, Samantha
Baldwin, Christine Briggs, Nicholas
Coleman, Enrico Connors, Jordan
Consagra, Julie Kalinas, Patrick
Lynch, Hassan Maxwell, Michael
Mazur, Summer McLaughlin,
Breana Miller, Samantha Piazza,
Alleysha Reynolds, Robert Ryzner,
Ian Satkowski, Scott Sayer, Megan
Schuster, Antonia Timonte.
Grade 10
Honors with Distinction
Angelo Aita, Harlow Alexander,
Elizabeth Baiera, Robert Bamrick,
Allison Barber, Rebecca Battista,
Desirae Bellas, Jacob Boedeker,
Keith Boone, Shannen Brady,
Elizabeth Brandt, Kristen Capitano,
Elizabeth Cappelloni, Madison
Cardinale, Christian Charney,
Eric Curtis, Bryan Davis, Michael
Delaney, Theresa Domarasky,
Lauren Dragon, John Fagotti,
Carly Filipski, Jordan Fritz, Kyle
Gattuso, Olivia Giambra, Gina
Grossbauer, Michelle Grossbauer,
Michael Gutowski, Michael Havrilla,
Rachel Hoover, Christopher Huf-
ford, Joshua John, Jade Jones,
Caycee Karpinski, Megan Karuzie,
Katie Kelly, Robert Kelly, Christo-
pher Konsavage, Joshua Kramer,
Kayla Kruchinsky, Nia Lombardo,
Brandon Lukachko, Tyler McGarry,
Elaina Menichelli, Rhonda Miller,
Michael Minich, Madeline Moss,
Virginia Myrkalo, Mikayla Nardone,
Rachel Naylor, Kristen Nerbecki,
Callie O’Donovan, David Pacovsky,
Nicole Psaila, Katelyn Pugliese,
Amanda Radginski, Dylan Ratzin,
Kristen Richards, Anamarie Rog-
ers, Cassandra Ross, Nuncio Savoy,
Elizabeth Scialpi, Claudia Shandra,
Eric Sklanka, Katherine Stonikinis,
Robert Swartz, Aryana Thompson,
Kyle Tiffany, Mitchell Tomaszewski,
Sarah Velehoski, Kevin Walsh,
Nicole Walters, Brandon Winn,
Brandon Winters, Stephen Yuhas,
Brandon Zaffuto, David Zydko.
First Honors
Jeffrey Allen, Hunter Antal,
Michael Bunney, Mackenzie Carroll,
Devon Dante, Emily Earlley, Taylor
Eichler, Jasmine Gage, Paula Goss,
Cristian Hansen, Cody Holl, Patrick
Joyce, Matthew Klein, Kaitlin Lof-
tus, Lyndsey Lombardo, Julianna
Lyback, Marina Maida, Eann Mc-
Cloe, Christopher McGlynn, Jared
Melochick, Katrina Mikitish, Luke
Morrison, Mark Naples, Tiffany
Newell, Cheyanne Overby, Britney
Pintha, Megan Ruda, Lauren Sen-
ese, Brandon Shamnoski, Chyanne
Sherman, Jamie Smicherko, Jacob
Vaxmonsky, Elizabeth Waleski.
Second Honors
Michael Barney, Shivon Bellas,
Leah Cavello, John DeBoard,
Courtney Dougal, Marissa Fac-
ciponti, Ludwig Fleming, Adriana
Franco, Harlee Fyock, James
Galonis, Braulio Garcia, Kristen
Gregorio, Ryan Gruttadauria,
Brandon MacRae, Christine Maira,
Vance Maslowski, Jasmine Mc-
Grade, John Meck, Mikhaela Moher,
Meghan Murtha, Brittany Myers,
Tynaisa Robertson, Jamie Rosen-
crans, Christen Shetler, Brandon
Strelecki, Rebecca Tomko, Katie
Wynn, Rebecca Zielinski.
Grade 9
Honors with Distinction
Andrew Adkins, Nicholas Al-
lardyce, Henry Augenstein, Jeffrey
Bachman, Taylor Baloga, Paul
Brady, Alyssa Bukevicz, Jamie
Bukevicz, Mason Callahan, Kathryn
Cebula, David Cherkauskas, Jamie
Chisdock, Erica Colon, Megan
Cummings, John D’Amato, Paige
Danko, James DeBoard, James De-
Gerolamo, Joseph DeMace, Parker
Dorsey, Brianna Falvo, Alexander
Felter, Gabrielle Galonis, Loran Gar-
nett, Joseph Gubbiotti, Adison Ha-
zlet, Kallie Healey, Ronald Herron,
Shelby Hoffmann, Tara Johnson,
Nicole Karuzie, Athena King, Aimee
Kizer, Katherine Kuna, Samuel
Lizza, Camaryn Lokuta, Alyssa
Maskal, Bianca Mattei-Miller, Sa-
mantha Mayers, Anna McDermott,
Alexa Menichelli, Sarah Mihalka,
Marina Miller, Zachary Mlodzienski,
Marissa Morreale, Kate Musto,
Haley Norwillo, Marley O’Brien,
Eric Petroski, Kyle Petroski, Daniel
Pieszala, Alana Platukus, Andrew
Podrasky, Jordan Romanczuk, Mi-
randa Romanofski, Ashleigh Rose,
Jessica Roxby, Ashley Scarantino,
Rachel Schaffner, Vincent Shea,
Abigail Sheerer, Amy Shotwell,
Julie Silinskie, James Smith, Justin
Sonera, Christopher Starinsky,
Julia Stella, Jacob Swartz, Sara
Swartz, Tyler Szumski, Jordan
Tarter, Colin Tracy, Tiffany Tubioli,
Kyle Turonis, Kaleigh Valeski, Bran-
don Walker, Molly Walsh, Edward
Warunek, Kayla Williams.
First Honors
Adriana Andrascavage, Tabytha
Bastek, Jessica Borget, Emma
Brieling, Ryan Davis, Jeffrey Don-
nora, Eric Fritz, Maria Garibaldi,
Meghan Gerrity, Jordan Johnson,
Shannon Langan, Benjamin Lopez,
Juan Martinez, Lucia Menichelli-
Bales, Madison Mimnaugh, Robert
Neishman, Austin O’Reilly, Dylan
Osticco, Matthew Ramos, Christo-
pher Russo, Joseph Warren, Sarah
Wesoloski, Cassandra Wilczewski.
Second Honors
Anthony Adel, Matthew Ambrose,
Dominic Anastasi, Nicholas Bel-
las, Bridgette Brandt, Jade Casella,
Robert D’Eliseo, Bryce DeRoberto,
Michael Felter, Gabrielle Genett,
Tatiana Gianacopoulos, Brandon
Goodlavage, Alyvia Guariglia, Conner
Healey, Taeya Hughes, Taylor Jones,
Michael Lewis, David Lyons, Anthony
Maglio, Alfonso Mangione, Alexis
Masker, Neil Murphy, Kylie Pintha,
Kassity Roche, Chase Shotwell, Chaz
Yager, Dana Zalewski.
PAHonor Society holds Easter egg hunt
An Easter Egg Hunt was held March 23
at the Pittston Area Kindergarten Center
in Dupont. Members of the Pittston Area
National Honor Society sponsored the
event for children who participate in the
Family Center Program. All who attended
received a breakfast snack, juice and candy
bags. The children had a great time with
the Easter Bunny and enjoyed getting their
faces painted, coloring eggs, and hunt-
ing for eggs in the brisk morning air. The
event was a success with approximately
60 children attending. Members of the
Pittston Area National Honor Society are,
from lef,t first row, Kallie Miller, Maria Lussi,
Carly Walker, Cassie Nocito. Second row,
Ms. Inez Kugler, The Easter Bunny (Anthony
Capozucca), Mrs. Blanche Pietras. Third
row, Mark Prebish, Christian Curtis, Jamie
Lombardo, Bryan Russo, Sarah Driscoll,
Jonathan Tonte, Shawn Ruda, Christopher
Lynch and Matthew Pierantoni.
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377 Wyoming Avenue, Wyoming • 570 Market Street, Kingston
1460 Sans Souci Parkway, Hanover Township
46 S. Main Street, Pittston
This week AMVETS volun-
teers are out in force at VA medi-
cal facilities and Veteran Homes
across the country to recognize
and support sick and hospitalized
veterans for AMVETS Because
We Care Day.
AMVETS Post #59 Hanover
Township &AMVETS Post #189
Greater Pittston will conduct their
annual AMVETS Because We
Care Day Ceremony at the W-B
VAMC 2nd foor Liberty Hall on
Wednesday, April 3 at 10 a.m. and
at the Gino Merli Veterans Home,
Scranton General Purpose Room
at 2 p.m.
Commander Bernard J. Mc-
Donald of AMVETS Post #189
said, “Because We Care Day
is our way of saying thanks for
their service and sacrifces made
to keep our country free. Though
AMVETS volunteers can routine-
ly be found at VA facilities and
State Veterans Homes throughout
the year, we take the time each
April to go out in force to demon-
strate our steadfast support to our
sick and hospitalized heroes.”
The Friends of the Pittston Me-
morial Library will meet on Mon-
day, April 1 at 6:30 p.m. in the con-
ference room in the library. Plans
will be made for the ‘Spring Fling”
April 20 at the Susquehanna Brew-
ery from 6 p.m. to 9. A tour of the
brewery, food, refreshments, en-
tertainment and basket raffes are
scheduled. The event is jointly spon-
sored by the Kiwanis Club and the
Friends of the Pittston Library.
Sal Bernardi and Judy Green-
wald, members of the Kiwanis Club,
will be in attendance.
Members are asked to attend this
important meeting so that plans may
be fnalized.
Pittston Library Friends to meet
AMVETS ‘Because We Care Day’ Wednesday
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The circus is coming to the
Pittston Memorial Library
Flow Circus will visit the li-
brary with a show for all ages at
11 a.m. on April 27. No registra-
tion is required.
In celebration of Children’s
Book Week, the library will have
a “Complete the Story” contest.
Children in grade 1-5 are wel-
come to stop by the library to pick
up a story starter. Deadline for
submission is May 6. Prizes will
be awarded during book week for
the winning submissions.
The 2013 Pittston Memorial Li-
brary’s Board of Trustees invites
all to the annual Jean Yates Award
Dinner on April 17 at Mount
Carmel Center, William Street,
Pittston. This year’s honoree is
Sunday Dispatch Editor Ed Ack-
erman. Cocktails will be served at
6 p.m. Cost is $60 per person. For
tickets, call 654-9563 or visit the
library at 47 Broad St.
Summer Reading for KIDS will
begin with Rergistration week on
June 17 and will conclude with
a party on Aug. 5 . There will be
family activities, crafts and prizes.
The event ispen to all children in
the community in frst through
sixth grade.
Friends of the library will have
a Spring Fling from 6 to 9 p.m. on
Saturday, April 20 at the Susque-
hanna Brewing Company. Tickets
are $15 a person. Food, drinks, en-
tertainment and basket raffes will
all be available.
CEOAfterschool Meals
The library will be serving din-
ner to children up to the ages of
18 from 4 to 5 p.m. on Mondays
and Thursdays. We will serve
snacks from 4 to 5 p.m. on Tues-
days, Wednesdays and Fridays.
Everything is free. No registration
required.
Story Time sessions
are ongoing
Toddler Story Time with Miss
Nicole will be at 10 a.m. on Tues-
day.
Preschool Story Time with
Miss Patricia will be at 2 p.m. on
Tuesday and Wednesday. Note the
time change for Preschool Story-
time. Registration is required
Family Story Time is at 10:30
a.m. on Saturdays and is open to
all ages. No registration required.
Call the library at 654-9565 or
email pittstonlibrary@yahoo.com
to sign up. Are you a grandparent
raising your grandchildren? The
library is starting a new program
for you. Let the library know what
concerns and issues you are hav-
ing. Call or stop by the library.
There is a questionnaire to fll out
to help us organize the program.
Lego Club will meet at 4 p.m.
on the second Monday of each
month.
Crochet Club meets at 10 a.m.
on Tuesdays and at 6 p.m. on
Thursdays.
Kids with Adults Craft Club
meet at 6 p.m. on the third Mon-
day of every month. The group is
open to children age 5 to 12. Chil-
dren can meet other crafters and
work together to create fun and
innovative crafts. Learn new tech-
niques, recycle household items
and make new friends.
Kids Science Club meets on the
frst Saturday of every month and
allows children in grades 2 - 5 to
work on experiments and fun sci-
ence projects as a group. Learn
about the world around you, prac-
tice your science skills, and learn
to reuse household items. Free of
charge.
Kids Book Club, Page Turners,
is open to children from third to
ffth grade.
The book club will meet at 4
p.m. on the frst Thursday of each
month. Furry Tails: come read to
specially-trained dogs at 10 a.m.
on the second Saturday of each
month.
Circus on its way to Pittston Library
The Avoca Crime Watch hosted
State Trooper Marty Connors at
their meeting Tuesday. Thirty
members heard Connors speak
about meth labs and how they
harm communities. Avoca Police
Chief Dave Homschek read the
monthly police report. They re-
sponed to 94 calls and made sev-
eral arrests, four for drugs.
Aclean up day inApril was dis-
cussed. Also, abandoned and run
down properties were discussed.
Citations for poorly kept proper-
ties will be issued.
Jim Brogan gave a report on
contributiions received for a new
“Welocme to Avoca” sign ordered
by the watch. The hand-carved
sign will be installed on South
Main Street entering Avoca from
Dupont.
Contributions are still being
accepted for the sign. To donate
send a check to Crime Watch, c/o
Jim Brogan, 708 Hawthorne, Av-
oca or call Jim at 457-8446
Crime Watch hosts trooper
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Dorothy M. Temprine, 77, of Larks-
ville, passed away Tuesday, March 26,
2013, at Wilkes-Barre General Hospi-
tal.
She was born Oct. 3, 1935 in Dur-
yea, and spent her childhood years
growing up in Avoca. Dorothy was a
daughter of the late John Morris and
Lottie Pitcavage Morris. At age 16,
Dorothy was singing and dancing for
an area broadcasting company. She
also made several records of popular
songs. Dorothy attended Sacred Heart
School and graduated from Avoca
High School as the class valedictori-
an. She achieved a bachelor of science
degree from College Misericordia in
education and a master’s degree in
reading from Lehigh University. She
was employed as a reading specialist
by the Wyoming Valley West School
District, Main Street Elementary, re-
tiring after 30 years of teaching.
Dorothy always was actively in-
volved in the lives
of her children and
grandchildren. She
was very family-ori-
ented and shared her
encouraging nature
with those she en-
countered, whether
in an educational setting or as mem-
ber of the community. Dorothy was
very artistic, loved playing the piano
and enjoyed putting together puzzles,
planting flowers and creating culinary
delights.
She was a member of All Saints Par-
ish, Plymouth, and the Altar and Ro-
sary Society of St. Vincent’s Church,
which is currently All Saints Parish,
Plymouth.
Dorothy was preceded in death by
her husband, Mayor John J. Temprine
Sr., with whomshe enjoyed 44 years of
marriage until his passing in 2001. In
addition to her parents, she was pre-
ceded in death by an infant brother.
She is survived by her daughter,
Dorothy Brush and her husband, Ted,
Mountain Top; son, John Temprine Jr.
and his wife, Joanne, Avoca; son, Jim
Temprine, Larksville; daughter, Marie
O’Boyle and her husband, Pat, Moun-
tain Top; grandsons, Joey Temprine,
Patrick O’Boyle, Jason Temprine, Wil-
liamO’Boyle, John O’Boyle, Theodore
Brush and Lonnie O’Boyle; sisters-in-
law, brothers-in-law and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at 9:30
a.m. Tuesday from Kielty-Moran Fu-
neral Home Inc., 87 Washington Ave.,
Plymouth, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 10 a.m. at All Saints Parish,
Willow Street, Plymouth. The Rev.
Robert Kelleher will officiate. Inter-
ment will be in St. Vincent’s Cem-
etery, Larksville. Relatives and friends
may call 5 to 8 p.m. Monday at the
funeral home.
March 26, 2013
Dorothy M. Temprine
Leonard W. Tkaczyk, 77, of Plym-
outh, passed away on Friday, March
29, 2013.
Born Oct. 29, 1935 in Plymouth, he
was a son of the late Stella Tkaczyk.
He was a graduate of Plymouth
High School, class of 1954, where he
excelled in football. He was a member
of All Saints Parish, Plymouth.
Len was a U.S. Navy veteran, serv-
ing during the Korean War. He was
a member of the International Brick
Layers and Allied Craftworker’s Union
and a 3rd Degree member of the
Knights of Columbus.
Throughout his life, he greatly en-
joyed gardening and was an avid hunt-
er and fisherman.
Surviving are his
loving wife, Eliza-
beth; son, Leonard
Tkaczyk, Glen Lyon;
stepchildren, Eliza-
beth Szychowski and
her husband, John, of
Nanticoke, Mary Ann Seashock and
her husband, George, of Dallas, and
Stanley Sadowski and Helen, of Hard-
ing; and step-granddaughters, Megan,
Molly and Sarah.
Len’s family thanks the staff at Geis-
inger Wyoming Valley, P.C.U. and the
staff at Hospice Community Care,
Geisinger South Wilkes Barre, for
their care and compassion.
Private funeral services will be held
on Wednesday at the S.J. Grontkowski
Funeral Home, 530 W. Main St., Plym-
outh. Family and friends are invited to
attend a Mass of Christian Burial on
Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at All Saints
Parish, 66 Willow St., Plymouth.
Private interment will be held at St.
Mary’s Nativity Cemetery, Plymouth
Township. No public calling hours
will be held.
In lieu of flowers, contributions
may be made in Leonard’s memory to
the Veterans Administration Medical
Center Voluntary Service Department
or to the American Cancer Society.
Please visit www.sjgrontkowskifu-
neralhome.com to submit online con-
dolences to Leonard’s family.
March 29, 2013
Leonard W. Tkaczyk
Jean Marie Shimshock, 72, of Plains
Township, passed away on Good Fri-
day, March 29, 2013, at Hospice Com-
munity Care, Geisinger South Wilkes-
Barre, after a lengthy illness.
Jean was born in Plains Township,
a daughter of the late John and Helen
(Falkowski) Kuzminski.
She was a graduate of Sacred Heart
High School, Plains Township, class
of 1958, and Mercy School of Nursing,
Wilkes-Barre.
Jean was employed as a licensed
practical nurse at St. Agnes Hospital,
Baltimore. She was a member of Ss.
Peter &Paul Church,
Plains Township.
Jean was preceded
in death by her hus-
band of 51 years,
Matthew J. Shim-
shock Jr., who passed
away 9½ weeks ago,
on Jan. 21. Although we are saddened
by our mother’s passing, we are com-
forted by her reunion with our dad in
eternal life.
Jean is survived by son, David
Shimshock and his wife, Lisa, Plains
Township; daughter, Donna Shim-
shock, Plains Township; daughter,
Lisa Mimnaugh and husband, Daniel,
Jenkins Township; six grandchildren,
Jade and Matthew Shimshock, Kasey
and McKenzie McDonough, Madi-
son and Grace Mimnaugh; and great-
grandchild, Emily McDonough.
Jean requested that her funeral ser-
vices be private and held at the conve-
nience of her family.
Arrangements by the Corcoran Fu-
neral Home Inc., 20 S. Main St., Plains
Township.
Online condolences may be made at
www.corcoranfuneralhome.com.
March 29, 2013
Jean Marie Shimshock
OBITUARIES
Sheldon G. Cohen, M.D., 94, a research scientist,
physician and medical historian of Chevy Chase, Md.
and formerly of Pennsylvania, died March 26, 2013, in
his home as a result of complications from a stroke.
Born in Pittston on Sept. 21, 1918, he was a son
of Dorothy and Samuel Cohen. Dr. Cohen attended
Pittston schools and was a graduate of Wyoming Semi-
nary, the Ohio State University and the New York Uni-
versity School of Medicine.
He served as a flight surgeon, rising to the rank of
captain, with the U.S. Army Air Force during World
War II. Immediately after the war, Dr. Cohen did post-
doctoral research at the University of Pittsburgh. In
the Wilkes-Barre area, he was associated with the for-
mer Mercy, Wilkes-Barre General and Veterans Affairs
(Administration) hospitals.
Dr. Cohen arrived in Maryland in 1972 from his
private medical practice and an experimental biology
research professorship at Wilkes University. He was in-
vited to join the National Institutes of Health after his
offices in Wilkes-Barre were inundated in the Agnes
Flood of 1972, destroying his extensive patient records
and research.
He was employed by the National Institutes of
Health, National Library of Medicine, where he was
engaged in history of medicine research and writing
for the past 25 years. Prior to that time, Dr. Cohen led
the Immunology, Allergic and Immunologic Diseases
extramural research grant program in the National
Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases. He also
served as a clinician and researcher at NIH.
A recipient of numerous awards, Dr. Cohen was
recognized as a pioneer and dogged advocate for aller-
gic disease and asthma research and treatment. With
his quick wit, kindness and generosity, he was known
to occasionally accept a bushel of tomatoes or sweet
corn as payment from some of his Wilkes-Barre-area
patients.
Dr. Cohen was an inveterate fisherman and a dedi-
cated freshwater sailor during his years in Pennsyl-
vania, though he often joked that the fish enjoyed a
holiday whenever he was on the water. His curiosity
led him to international travel and the exploration of
other cultures with friends and colleagues around the
world. Of late, he enjoyed watching college sports on
television and when his Ohio State teams took to the
field or the court, he would kindly rib his University
of Michigan great-nephew about the ongoing rivalry.
His sister, Bernyce Cohen Epstein, preceded him in
death in 2004.
Dr. Cohen is survived by his nephew, Lee Epstein,
Silver Spring, Md.; niece, Jayne Epstein, Tempe, Ariz.;
and three great-nephews.
Contributions may be made to the National Insti-
tutes of Health, National Library of Medicine Histori-
cal and Rare Book Collection, or to a charity of the
donor’s choice.
Funeral direction is by Danzansky-Goldberg Me-
morial Chapels Inc. of Rockville, Md., with a private
burial.
March 26, 2013
Dr. Sheldon G. Cohen
Divine Mercy celebration next Sunday
The 7th annual Celebration of Divine Mercy Sunday
will be heldApril 7 at St. Maria’s Goretti Church, Lafin
Road, Lafin. The celebration was moved from the Ob-
lates because the congregation has been growing. Cathy
Mack is coordinator and the Cennacle Leader of the Eu-
charistic Apostles. The theme centers on the celebration
of the 75th anniversary of St. Faustina’s entering into
Eternal Life. Itinerary: 1 p.m. - Sacrament of Reconcili-
ation with fve priests; 2 p.m. - Veneration of the Image
followed by Mass; 3 p.m. - Exposition of the Blessed
Sacrament, Chaplet of the Divine Mercy in song, indi-
vidual blessing of the First Class Relic of St. Faustina.
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DELI
201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. • Saturday & Sunday ‘til 5 p.m.
REHOSKI’S MARKET
Hatfield Cooked Ham ........................... $4.99 lb.
Hard Salami .......................................... $4.99 lb.
Clearfield American Cheese.................. $3.99 lb.
Boneless Chuck Roast ........................... $2.99 lb.
Lean Stewing Beef ................................ $2.99 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks........................ $4.99 lb.
Boneless Pork Chops............................. $2.99 lb.
Boneless/Skinless Chicken Breast.......... $1.99 lb.
Smoked Bacon...................................... $4.99 lb.
Fresh & Smoked Kielbasi
Toastmaster Atty. Joseph Saporito, left, talks with
principal speaker Rev. Brian Clarke as St. Joseph
Marello Parish Pastor Rev. Joseph Sibilano looks
on at the head table of the parish smoker on Palm
Sunday night.
Honorary Co-Chairperson Jim Ardoline, left, and
state Rep. Mike Carroll mingle during the social hour
before the St. Joseph Marello Palm Sunday smoker
in Pittston.
Principal speaker, the Rev. Brian Clarke, pastor of
Holy Rosary Parish in Hazleton and chief canonical
counsel to the diocesan bishop, chats with fellow
clergy before the St. Joseph Marello HNS Smoker.
Taking a ‘smoker’ break
Father Brian J. W. Clarke was
principal speaker at the second
annual Holy Name Society of St.
Joseph Marello Parish Smoker
Sunday evening, March 24, at the
parish center.
Fr. Clarke was born in Pittston
and is a son of Elaine (Lucas)
Clarke and the late Patrick
Clarke. He is the eldest of six
children.
His simple message was to en-
courage the members of the au-
dience to use the upcoming Holy
Week to connect to Jesus Christ
through his suffering.
Attorney Joseph F. Saporito,
Jr., a member of the parish,
served as toastmaster. Welcome
was by HNS President Joe Mc-
Cullogh. Jim Murphy, chairman,
introduced the toastmaster as
well as the assistant chairman
Jimmy Ardoline.
Music was provided by Danny
Argo and Frankie “G” Galoardi.
Rev. Joseph Sibilano O.S.J., is
pastor of St. Joseph Marello Par-
ish and Rev. Jackson Pinherio
O.S.J. is assistant pastor.
Attendees of the St. Joseph Marello Parish Palm Sunday Smoker
line up at the buffet table.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Frank Galoardi, left, and Danny Argo pose for a photo between songs.
High school baseball season
is scheduled to open this week.
Pittston Area is in Division 1 with
Coughlin, Hazleton, Berwick, Val-
ley West and Crestwood. Wyoming
Area is in Division 2 with Holy Re-
deemer, Lake-Lehman, Dallas and
Tunkhannock.
Each team plays its division op-
ponents twice and one game with
the opposite division. That gives
WA14 games and PA15.
The teams are scheduled to play
each other on April 16 at Pittston
Area, which will be the Andy Ash-
by game.
The Patriots are scheduled to
open league play Tuesday at home
against Crestwood if feld and
weather conditions permit.
Same deal for the Warriors. They
are scheduled to open at home ver-
sus Tunkhannock on Thursday.
PITTSTONAREA
Pittston Area baseball coach
Paul Zaffuto has high praise for his
team, but also the opposition it will
face in the upcoming season.
The Patriots enter the season
with what Zaffuto describes as one
of the most talented teams in his
14 seasons as head coach and one
he expects to be in contention for a
District 2 Class AAA title. Before
that can happen, however, Pittston
Area will have to compete in the
realigned Division 1 of the Wyo-
ming Valley Conference.
“The problem that we have is
even having the best team we’ve
had in a long time, we’re probably
at the bottom of our division as far
as talent,” Zaffuto said. “We got
placed in what I think is probably
the toughest division in eastern
Pennsylvania.”
Zaffuto sees many players from
around the state during his time in
AAU baseball.
“The conference we’re play-
ing in right now is probably the
toughest I’ve seen in a long time,”
he said. “Every game is going to
be like playing in a championship
game.”
The Patriots will play twice each
against division rivals Hazleton
Area, Coughlin, Berwick, Crest-
wood and Wyoming Valley West
and once each against Division 2
members Wyoming Area, Holy
Redeemer, Tunkhannock, Dallas
and Lake-Lehman.
Hazleton Area edged Pittston
Area and Coughlin by a game for
the WVC Division 1 East title last
season. Wyoming Valley West, the
defending District 2 Class AAAA
champion, and Berwick were 1-2
in the WVC Division 1 West with
better records than any of the East
teams.
A major position change will be
one of the keys as Pittston Area
tries to keep up with the challeng-
ing schedule.
Junior Pat McGinty moves to
catcher.
“We’re moving a possible Divi-
sion I shortstop to play catcher,”
Zaffuto said.
McGinty still needs game ex-
perience at the position, but Zaf-
futo said his
o f f s e a s o n
testing at
the position
after work-
ing at camps
has already
established
him as a ma-
jor prospect
at catcher.
He l p i n g
to make the
move pos-
sible is that
senior Felix
Mascelli has
been a capable backup at short-
stop the past two seasons. While
flling in one game at second base
last season, Mascelli provided the
game-winning hit.
Junior frst baseman Josh Raz-
villas has started since his fresh-
man year and is another player who
remains active in the travel circuit
outside of the high school season.
Senior Jordan Houseman could
be the WVC’s best second base-
man, according to Zaffuto. The re-
turning starter has been working on
preparing for baseball season since
football ended.
Third baseman Dustin Martinel-
li, another senior, is ready to move
into the starting lineup for the frst
time.
The outfeld is also lacking start-
ing experience, but Zaffuto says it
is loaded with potential.
“This outfeld is the quickest
and probably the best all-together
as a unit that I have had in my 14
years,” Zaffuto said.
Michael Delaney, the team’s
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Sports
Time to step up to the plate
HI GH SCHOOL BASEBAL L
See BASEBALL, page 32
By TOM ROBINSON
Sunday Dispatch Correspondent
The Wyoming Area baseball seniors at Meet the Warriors, front row, Jacob Granteed, Jacob
Wysocki, Brian Mapes, Trent Grove, Tyler Wrubel and Michael Carey. Back row, Eric Walkovick,
Bart Chupka, Lorenzo Metroka. Not pictured: Nick O’Brien.
Patriot seniors, left to right, Justin Martinelli, Jordan Houseman, John Kielbasa, Cody Rowan,
Felix Mascelli, Nick Bolka.
‘We got
placed in
what I think
is probably
the toughest
division in
eastern Penn-
sylvania.’
Coach Zaffuto
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Michael Delaney, the team’s fastest
player, made one start last season as
a freshman.
Junior Michael Schwab will
pitch and play the outfeld.
Michael Carey, another junior,
moved into the starting lineup for
three games then was hurt last year.
Cody Roman, a strong-armed
senior, saw some playing time last
season.
Schwab, the team captain, will
be the number-one pitcher. He had
a strong effort in the District 2 Class
AAAquarterfnals last season when
Berwick ended the Patriots’ season,
3-2.
The rest of the pitching rotation
will need to be worked out.
Zaffuto hopes to use junior Matt
Mott in relief as a closer.
Juniors Danny Constantino and
Justin Glasgow and sophomores
Tyler McGarry and John Faggotti
are vying for other starting pitching
assignments.
Seniors Nick Bolka and John
Kielbosa are working at designated
hitter.
WYOMINGAREA
Wyoming Area will fll almost
every position on the baseball feld
with seniors who have experience
as starters.
On the mound, however, the
Warriors will have nothing but new
faces, relying at times on players
who have established themselves
elsewhere.
“We lost our pitching from last
year so pitching is going to be the
question mark,” Warriors coach
Chick Androscavage said.
There are few question marks
elsewhere for the Warriors, who
went 9-5 in WVC Division 1 West
last season, fnishing third of fve
teams, behind Wyoming Valley
West and Berwick but ahead of
Tunkhannock and Dallas.
Wyoming Area, which won
one playoff game before losing to
Coughlin in the District 2 Class
AAA quarterfnals, is in Division 2
after WVC realignment. The other
Division 2 teams are Holy Redeem-
er, Lake-Lehman, Tunkhannock
and Dallas.
“Tunkhannock and Dallas are
always good,” Androscavage said.
“Holy Re-
d e e m e r
gives us a
hard time
every year.
L a k e -
L e h m a n
is new to
our divi-
sion but
they have
a good pro-
gram.”
Ca t c h -
er Trent
G r o v e ,
frst baseman Bart Chupka, second
baseman Michael Carey, shortstop
Jake Granteed and outfelder Erik
Walkowiak are all seniors who
started last year.
Senior third baseman Jordan
Zezza started early last season be-
fore being injured. He is expected
to miss the start of this season with
an injury.
Bucknell football recruit, Nick
O’Brien, another senior, started in
the outfeld in 2011 but did not play
last year.
Sophomores Jake Gavenonis and
Marty Michaels will spend time at
third base until Jordan Zezza re-
turns.
Seniors Tyler Wrubel and Brian
Mates and sophomore Zack Lopat-
ka are newcomers to the outfeld
where additional playing time
could be available depending on
who is pitching.
“Our pitching is going to be flled
with position players like Grant-
eed, Walkowiak and Carey, along
with Jeremy Zezza, Gavenonis
and Lopatka,” Androscavage said.
“We’ll try to fnd somebody out of
that pack.”
If the pitching materializes, Wy-
oming Area should have enough
experience defensively and at the
plate to fnd success.
PASCHEDULE
April 2 vs. Crestwood
April 4 at Coughlin
April 8 vs. Hazleton
April 10 at Berwick
April 12 at Valley West
April 16 vs. Wyoming Area
April 22 vs. Tunkhannock
April 24 at Lake Lehman
April 29 vs. Holy Redeemer
May 1 at Dallas
May 3 vs. Berwick
May 7 at Crestwood
May 9 at Hazleton
May 13 vs. Valley West
May 15 vs. Coughlin
WASCHEDULE
April 4 vs. Tunkhannock
Apirl 8 at Lake Lehman
April 10 vs. Holy Redeemer
April 12 at Dallas
April 16 at Pittston Area
April 18 vs. Crestwood
April 21 vs. Coughlin (PNC)
April 24 vs. Hazleton
April 29 at Valley West
May 1 at Berwick
May 3 at Holy Redeemer
May 9 vs. Lake Lehman
May 13 vs. Dallas
May 15 at Tunkhannock
Continued from page 31
BASEBALL
‘We lost our
pitching from
last year so
pitching is
going to be
the question
mark.’
Coach Andrewscavage
SPORTS BRI EFS
Greater Pittston American Le-
gion baseball will be holding a fnal
tryout for the 2013 developmental
team.
Any player age 12 or 13 before
May 1, interested can tryout on
Monday, April 1, at the Shoemaker
feld in West Wyoming. The tryout
begins at 12 p.m. Any questions
call Ron Silinskie at 955-6564.
Red Devils
The Pittston Red Devils Sports-
men Club will meet Tuesday, April
2 at 7:30 p.m. at Dr. Ruggerio’s
Home. Spring and summer evenst
will be discussed. All members
should attend.
Northeast Freestyle
Greco Roman Wrestling
Sign ups for the Northeast Free-
style Greco Roman Wrestling Club
continue each Tuesday and Thurs-
day in the PittstonArea high school
gym, Stout Street, Yatesville from
5:30 p.m. to 6 prior to the practice
sessions.
Practice session are from 6 to
7:30 p.m.
Registration is $175 payable to
Northeast FS - GR Wrestling Club
and due at the time of registration.
Practice sessions will be each
Tuesday and Thursday from 6 p.m.
to 7:30 in the gym. For more infor-
mation call 654-0251 or 212-1340.
WAsoftball news
The Wyoming Area Softball
Parents Association will meet on
Wednesday, April 3 at 7 p.m. in
room 129 of the Wyoming Area
Secondary Center.
Plans for the ziti dinner-crafts-
how will be discussed. Parents of
players grades 7th thru 12th are en-
couraged to attend.The association
is seeking vendors for the ziti din-
ner and craftshow on Sunday, April
14 from noon to 5 p.m. at the Wyo-
ming Area Secondary Cafeteria.
Interested vendors may contact
Anne at 778-5430 or by e-mail at
goobdoo@verizon.net for more in-
formation.
Emanon Senior Golf
League meeting
The Emanon Senior Golf League
will meet Wednesday, April 3 at the
clubhouse at 10 a.m. Coffee and
donuts will be served. New players
are welcome. The league will open
on April 10 weather permitting.
Hughestown softball signups
Hughestown softball will not
conduct signups today, March 31
due to the holiday.
Signups will resume Wednesday,
at 6:30. With questions call Joanne
at 457-3761 or Amanda at 655-
8193.
WAIce Hockey parents news
The banquet is at Fox Country
Club, in West Pittston on Sunday,
April 7 at 2 p.m.
The parents of the WAIce Hock-
ey team will be working the Pen-
guins games, at the Nacho Express
cart, located near the West gate and
help support our team.
PAfootball boosters meeting
The Pittston Area Football
Booster Club will meet Monday,
April 8, 7:00 p.m. at the Cefalo
Center.
All parents and or guardians
of players going into grades 7-12
grade for the 2013 season are en-
couraged to attend.
For more information of upcom-
ing events or to reach a contact,
please go to: pafootballbooster-
club.com
Reminder: Return candy money
to a club offcer at the Cefalo Cen-
ter on Mondays March 18 and 25
from 5 to 6:30 p.m. By popular
demand, there will be more candy
available to sell.
West Pittston Rams sign ups
The West Pittston Rams registra-
tion are at Sabatini’s April 10, 6-8
p.m.; April 20, 11 a.m.- 1 p.m.
Registration is $110 per player,
$20 each additional child, $40 for
jersey.
Copies of a player’s birth certif-
cate, parent’s driver’s license and
a current utility bill are needed to
register.
Checks and moneyorders are
acepted. Payment is due at the time
of registration, twithout exception.
Emails are on the website at west-
pittstonrams.com.
Flyers are being sent home with
the elementary students.
Duryea Wildcats Jr Football
Duryea Wildcats Jr Football and
Cheerleading sign-ups are April 10,
April 24, May 8 and May 22 at the
feld stand on Kramer St in Duryea
from 5:30 p.m.to 7:00 p.m. for A
(12-14), B (10-11), C (7-9) and D
(5-7). Boys and girls must meet the
age requirement as of Aug 1.
Please bring: copy of birth cer-
tifcate, doctors note (ok to par-
ticipate in football/cheerleading),
photo of player, two forms of proof
of residency.
An early Bird Discount of $10
will be deducted from cash regis-
tration fee (does not apply to lot-
tery ticket option) for all registra-
tions received on or before May 22
sign-up.
WAField Hockey bingo
WA Field Hockey Parents As-
sociation will be conducting a
Mother’s Day Bingo on Sunday
April 21 from 1 to 4 p.m. Pur-
chase your ticket from any player
or offcer. Players’ parent inter-
ested in helping out can contact
an offcer.
A bingo planning meeting will
be held on March 27 at 7 p.m. in
room 164 at the school. The April
monthly meeting will be held
April 24, 7 p.m. at the school.
Final tryout for Legion developmental team Monday
TRI BORO SPORTS
Semenza
Memorial
Softball
Tourney set
The Moosic Old Forge Men’s
Softball League will honor the late
Robert V. Semenza with the inau-
gural Robert V. Semenza Memorial
Men’s Softball Tournament on Sat-
urday, April 20 at 10 a.m. at Pagnotti
Park in Old Forge.
Semenza served as President of
the MOF Men’s Softball League
since its inception in 1986. He
also managed and played on many
teams, and was an intense competi-
tor. He devoted much of his time to
developing the Pagnotti Park Com-
plex in 1988 and spent countless
hours maintaining the men’s softball
feld. Last year the men’s softball
was dedicated by the Borough of
Old Forge in his name as Robert V.
Semenza Field.
In addition to the tournament, or-
ganizers will hold time capsule cer-
emonies at 12:45 p.m., and a Home
Run Derby for both youth and adult
divisions throughout the day, Food
and beverages will also be available
during the event, along with a bake
sale, a 50/50 drawing and a Wheel-
barrow of Cheer Raffe. T-
See, TRIBORO page 35
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DONATI ONS SOUGHT
Avoca hoopsters
rally for teamate
battling cancer
Joey Frushon, 10, is
fighting bone cancer
J
oey Frushon, a 10-year-old
PittstonArea student, was play-
ing basketball for the Bomb-
ers in the Avoca Youth
Basketball League at the
Avoca American Legion.
Carmen Sciandra, the
team’s coach, said he had
a feeling something was
amiss with the boy. “Joey
played in four of our sev-
en games this season and
clearly he was never 100
percent. Some games he
limped up and down the
foor. Occasionally Joe
would fall, and bounce
right back up. Every
time I subbed for him I’d
asked him if he was all
right and Joe would give
me a big smile and say,
‘I’m fne coach.’”
Turns out he wasn’t
fne. He was treated for
a fractured leg and then
diagnosed with bone can-
cer. “Anyone with kids
would just cringe at the thought of
their child being in this position. I
knew we had to do something to
support this courageous kid and his
family,” Sciandra said.
A group of parents and volun-
teers spearheaded by Lori Appnel
Boggetti came through and dedi-
cated last week’s games as a fund
raiser for Joey and his family.
League director Stan Waleski em-
braced the idea and gave
full access to the games.
Waleski also went to the
Avoca Jolly Boys for
support. A signifcant
amount of money was
raised for the Frushon
family.
The Joyce Family and
their Miles for Michael
Foundation sent an en-
velope with a generous
gift card.
The Avoca League
will run themed-basket
raffes and collect dona-
tions again this week on
Saturday, April 6. The
raffe winners will be
announced at the Bomb-
ers game at 6 p.m.
Sciandra said Joey is
a fghter. “This kid has a
wonderful smile, a huge
heart, and he is as tough
as nails. If anyone knows cancer,
you could let it know it is about to
get wiped out by a kid named Joe.
You might want to mention, he is
no ordinary Joe.”
Joey Frushon, front and center, and his Bomber teammates.
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
‘This kid has
a wonderful
smile, a huge
heart, and he
is as tough
as nails. If
anyone knows
cancer, you
could let it
know it is
about to get
wiped out by
a kid named
Joe.’
Carmen Sciandra
Bombers Coach
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Show Mom You Love Her
This Mother's Da
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with her photo in the Sunday Dispatch's Tribute To Mom
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HI GH SCHOOL SOF TBAL L
Weather or not, it’s time to play softball
The Wyoming Valley Confer-
ence softball season opens this
week. The Pittston Area Lady Pa-
triots and the Wyoming Area Lady
Warriors both open on the road. PA
is at Nanticoke Tuesday. WAopens
at Tunkhannock Thursday, weather
permitting.
The home openers are Thursday
for PAversus Coughlin and the fol-
lowing Monday, April 8, for WA
versus Dallas.
PA is in Division 1 with Valley
West, Crestwood, Hazleton, Nanti-
coke and Coughlin
WA is in Division 2 with Ber-
wick, Tunkhannock, Lake Lehman
and Dallas.
Each team plays its division op-
ponents twice and one game with
the opposite division. That gives
WA14 games and PA15.
The teams are scheduled to play
each other on April 22 at Wyoming
Area.
Wyoming Area
Wyoming Area won the WVC
Division I West title last season, the
frst WVC title of any kind for the
program since 1991. They reached
the District 2 AAA championship
game where they lost to Valley
View, which wound up in the state
championship game. The Warriors
fnished 11-5 overall.
Barry Pryzbyla takes over as
head coach. He was the assistant
last season under Stephanie Griffn,
who moved out of the area.
With eight of the frst 10 players
from last season back, the Warriors
have high expectations. Pryzbyla
said after winning the frst WVC ti-
tle in 21 years, the next logical step
is to get back to the District 2 title
game and win it for the frst time in
31 years.
That said, the playoffs are a long
way off and he doesn’t want to
girls to take anything for granted.
“If they play up to their potential
the should be able to do it, but it’s
going to be tough. It’s not going to
be a walk through the park. All the
teams got better. There is no easy
game. I told them, you might be
told you are the team to beat, but
you have to play between the lines.
The other team is not going to roll
the ball on the feld and say ‘you
win.’ The competition is there.”
Pitching, speed and defense
keyed the winning last season, but
scoring was off. They won several
low-scoring games in the late in-
ings and scored only one in the dis-
trict championship game.
“Hitting was a weakness last
year,” Pryzbyla said. “Everybody
knows it. We’re spending more
time on that this year and they’re
doing a good job. But we’re not
forgetting the other things.”
Of course, most of that working
on hitting is being done indoors due
to the weather, but that’s a league-
wide problem.
They have senior leadership in
Alex Holtz, the no. 1 pitcher; Serra
Degnan, a four-year starter at short,
and Kaitlyn Kross.
They should get a full year out
of Pryzbyla’s daughter, Andrienne,
who missed most of last season
with an arm injury. That should
help the lineup.
The have two other capable
Shirts commemorating the tour-
nament will available for $10 on the
day of the event. All proceeds from
the day’s events will be donated in
Can’t Stomach Cancer and the MOF
Men’s Softball League.
For more information, or to or-
der a t-shirt in advance of the event,
contact Bob Semenza Jr. at 570-840-
7313.
MOF Men’s Softball advertising
fundraiser
The Moosic Old Forge Men’s
Softball League is in the process of
selling advertising space on the out-
feld fencing at Robert V. Semenza
Field at Pagnotti Park in Old Forge.
Anyone wishing to purchase a sign
can contact league president Tony
DiMattia at 570-335-5596. Proceeds
will be donated to the Robert V. Se-
menza Fund and the MOF Softball
League.
Tri-Boro Relay For Life to be
held June 1
The inaugural Tri-Boro Relay For
Life will be held June 1-2, begin-
ning with opening ceremonies at 4
p.m., at Old Forge’s Veterans Me-
morial Stadium.
The American Cancer Society
Relay For Life event is as unique
and special as the story that moti-
vates you. If you’ve been affected
by cancer in any way, being part of
the Tri-Boro Relay For Life event
empowers you to make a difference
and fght back. This is your oppor-
tunity to honor cancer survivors, re-
member those you have lost to this
disease, and raise funds and aware-
ness to help end cancer forever.
The event will also have a Tri-
Boro twist as both the Old Forge and
Riverside school districts will com-
pete for a yet-to-be named trophy
that the winning school will get to
display for the next school year. The
school district that raises the most
money will garner the honor.
To register a team, become a team
member, or donate, please visit,
www.relayforlife.org and search
Tri-Boro relay.
For more information, or to reg-
ister off-line, contact Meghan Liv-
ingston at 570-562-9749 or meghan.
livingston@cancer.org.
Continued from PageX
TRIBORO
Members of the
Wyoming Area
softball team.
Kneeling, Lindsay
Carey, Bree Bed-
narski, Kat Sokirka,
Serra Degnan, Sarah
Coolbaugh, Jules
Scappaticci, Lauren
Maloney.
Standing:,Head
Coach Barry Przy-
byla, Adrienne Przy-
byla, Emily Wolf-
gang, Grace Gober,
Heather Nametko,
Alex Holtz, Nicole
Cumbo, Nicole Turn-
er, Kaitlyn Kross,
Assistant Coach
Randy Colarusso
From left are the PA game day captains for opening day, from
left, Antonette Scialpi, Kaitlyn Simyan and Alyssa Talerico.
See SOFTBALL page 36
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pitchers in junior Nicole Cumbo
and sophomore Lauren Maloney.
The rest of the roster includes:
juniors, Drew Bednarski, Lindsay
Carey, Kat Sokirka and Nicole Turn-
er; sophomores, Emily Wolfgang,
Julez DeAngelo and Jules Scap-
patici and freshmen Bree Bednarski,
Sarah Coolbaugh and Grace Gober.
Pittston Area
Head coach Dave Deluca was a
last minute hire after the previous
coach resigned before last season.
The Lady Patriots had problems in a
lot of areas and wound up 1-13.
Not that DeLuca predicts ‘x’
number of ‘ws’, but this year should
be different. “There is excitement
around the program for the frst
time in years,” DeLuca said. “The
girls were very dedicated in the off
season. We’re young with a lot of
freshmen and sophomores, but we
feel we can play with any team in
the league on any given day.”
DeLuca said defense, pitching
and team speed look like strengths.
Youth maybe a weakness now, but
DeLuca believes it will translate to
a strength as they play together over
the next couple seasons. Pitcher
Taylor Baloga though a freshman,
has been training year-round. Junior
Alyssa Talerico can also pitch and
she can catch and play infeld.
The team’s only senior is short
stop, Antoinette Scialpi. The rest of
the roster includes returners junior
Kaitlyn Simyan; sophomores, Lau-
ren Dragon, Julie Lieback, Theresa
Domarasky and frst-year varsity
players, sophomore, Liz Cappelloni
and freshmen, Julie Silinskie, Ad-
dison Hazlet, Marley O’Brien, Kas-
sidy Roche and Mindina Lieback.
PASchedule
April 2 at Nanticoke
April 4 vs. Coughlin
April 9 vs. Hazleton
April 11 at Valley West
April 15 vs. Crestwood
April 17 at Tunkhannock
April 19 vs. Lake Lehman
April 22 at Wyoming Area
April 24 vs. Dallas
April 26 at Berwick
May 1 vs. Nanticoke
May 3 at Coughlin
May 6 at Hazleton
May 9 vs. Valley West
May 13 at Crestwood
WASchedule
April 4 at Tunkhannock
April 8 vs. Dallas
April 12 at Lake Lehman
April 15 at Berwick
April 17 vs. Coughlin
April 19 at Hazleton
April 22 vs. Pittston Area
April 24 at Nanticoke
April 26 vs. Valley West
April 29 at Crestwood
May 1 vs. Lake Lehman
May 3 vs. Tunkhannock
May 6 at Dallas
May 13 vs. Berwick
SOFTBALL
Continued from page 35
SOF TBAL L MI L ESTONE
King’s softball coach Lisa Gigliello, first row, third from left, is surrounded by her team after her
500th win. Pitcher Karissa Kross from Wyoming Area is in the back.
Pittston bred softball coach
has a winning formula
Lisa Gigliello, who got her
500th coaching victory for King’s
College softball on Tuesday, grew
up in the Old Boston section of
Pittston.
Before she played softball she
played hardball with boys in the
Jenkins Township Little League
for her cousin and coach Vince
Struzzeri. After Little League she
switched to softball in Teeners
where her coach was an Old Bos-
ton neighbor Maria O’Donovan.
“They got me started,” Gigliello
said.
In the 1980s at Pittston Area,
where she’s a member of the ath-
letic Hall of Fame, Gigliello was
a Wyoming Valley Conference
all-star short stop. As a senior she
was the MVP of the WVC all-star
game.
From PA she went to Wilkes
where she played for a Mid Atlan-
tic Conference (MAC) champion-
ship team. It was her frst champi-
onship of many.
She started as an assistant coach
at King’s in 1994 and the next year
took over the top spot. Since then
her Lady Monarch teams have
won 11 MAC titles and 10 of the
last 12.
Now in her 20th year the pro-
gram has a .750 MAC winning
percentage in MAC games. Gi-
gliello has been selected MAC
Freedom Coach of the Year three
times. In 2005, the Monarchs won
their sixth straight MAC Freedom
championship and came within
one game of the College World
Series.
Her formula for success is fun-
damentals, staff longevity and
Wyoming Valley and Lackawanna
Conference players. This season’s
team has seven local girls, includ-
ing Karissa Kross, a pitcher from
Wyoming Area.
Over the seasons she’s had a lot
of great players from the Pittston
area including Maria Zangardi and
Marie Roth from Seton Catholic
and Julie Bidwell, Kelly Vax-
monsky and Nikki Kotula from
Pittston Area.
“They’re good leagues,” she
said. “ I hate to see players get
away when we have a good school
and program right here.”
She likes getting local players,
not only because they can play, but
because as a full-time electrical
engineer for UGI she doesn’t have
a lot of time for recruiting. She
does get players from other areas.
8
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9
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Lisa Gigliello
Pittston Area sports Hall of
Famer Lisa Gigliello wins her
500th game
at King’s college
See MILESTONE page 40
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Beautiful 4BR, 2 bath w/large rooms, loads of closet
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13-772
Distinctive design in the NEW Insignia
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MARCIE 714-9267
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Great location with convenient access to
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DIANE 696-0873
13-263
Beautiful 3BR, 4 bath Ranch on over
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SHIRLEY 714-9272
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Need a 5 car garage? Beautiful 3BR, 2 bath
home w/gar in great neighborhood. 5 minutes to
shopping, PA Turnpike & 81. C/A on 1st flr, new electrical
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Move-in ready! 3BR Split-level with HW floors &
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Remodeled 3BR home. Newer roof, gas,
laminate floors, modern kitchen & large yard on a corner
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Immaculate 3BR home with deep private lot.
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DEANNA 696-0894
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Lovely 3BR, 1 bath 2-story home with FR,
formal DR & eat-in kitchen area. Large backyard &
oversized 1 car garage.
TERRY NELSON 714-9248
12-2503
Cozy 3BR, 1 bath home with OSP & lots of
potential.
BETH 696-0879
13-167
Looking to invest in home ownership or real
estate? 1/2 Double with 3BR, 1 full bath, large eat-in
kitchen, wood floors, walk-up attic.
KATHY 696-0870
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Ranch home with open floor plan. 3BRs, HW
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TINA 714-9277
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One of the largest lots in Wyoming! 2-story,
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Enjoy low maintenance living in this
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JULIO 239-6408
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Spacious 4BR, 3 bath home w/modern
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3-4BR 2 story home w/large LR/DR, eat-in
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MATT 714-9229
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DEANNA 696-0894
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eat-in kitchen w/laminate floors, finished lower level, gas
heat, C/A.
ANNIE 714-9241
13-786
Ideal starter home recently remodeled.
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JULIO 239-6408
13-739
Huge kitchen w/pantry! Lots of space in this
charming 4BR home with HW floors, gas heat, 1st floor
bath & private drive.
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13-840
EXETER PARK - Beautiful 3BR, 1.5 bath Bi-Level.
Gas heat, C/A, 2 car garage, deck, fenced yard, above
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NANCY PALUMBO 714-9240
13-1041
Completely remodeled 3BR home with 2 baths,
tile & HW, new windows, private driveway.
TINA 714-9234
13-1045
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HI GH SCHOOL L ACROSSE
Pittston Area captain Sara Ruby, left, battles Delaware Valley during a draw Wednesday afternoon in
Hughestown during the team’s inaugural girls lacrosse game.
Pittston Area’s Emily Herron, right, controls the
ball ahead against Delaware Valley in the team’s
first-ever girls lacrosse game in Hughestown on
Wednesday afternoon.
PA’s Liz Mikitish, right, controls the ball as Dela-
ware Valley’s Dana Hunt pursues.
From kicks to sticks for PAgirls
Sara Ruby scores first goal for new Pittston Area girls lacrosse team
The score was ugly. The game
was beautiful. The Pittston Area
girls lacrosse team lost 18-1 to
Delaware Valley on Tuesday in
Hughestown, but it didn’t matter,
because history was made.
The game was the frst-ever la-
crosse game at PA and it was the
culmination of dream for a lot of
Pittston Area parents and athletes.
Playing in hand-me-down soccer
jerseys and with sticks and pro-
tective goggles they bought them-
selves, the girls were thrilled just be
on the feld.
“I was nervous and excited,”
said Junior Sara Ruby, who scored
that historic frst goal. “The whole
team was nervous and excited. We
calmed down in the second half
and did a better job doing what the
coaches taught us.”
Ruby said the goal was thrilling
for her in two ways. “It’s amazing.
I’ll have the memory of scoring
the frst goal and I had the assist
from my best friend Liz Mikitish.
It couldn’t be any better.”
Ayear ago Ruby, Mikitish, Kate-
lyn Pugliese and Jordan Cumbo
were playing soccer together for
the Lady Patriots. But the PIAA
mandated that soccer move to the
fall and that opened up a spring op-
portunity for the soccer players to
play lacrosse.
Getting out on the feld to play
was meaningful for Ruby, aside
from making history. She tore an
ACL during soccer season and la-
crosse gave her a chance to play
with her teammates again.
While offcially the team is
listed as a club, they are playing
a WVC schedule as one of seven
teams along with Wyoming Sem,
Delaware Valley, Dallas, Coughlin,
Lake Lehman and Crestwood. Like
PA, Crestwood is a frst-year team.
The other teams are established.
It’s no wonder PA lost by a lop-
sided score. Ruby, and most of the
other girls, had never picked up a
lacrosse stick before three weeks
ago.
By JACK SMILES
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Pittston Area’s Katelyn Pugliese, right, puts the defensive
pressure on Delaware Valley’s Dana Hunt.
BILL TARUTIS/FOR THE SUNDAY DISPATCH
Te next Pittston Area
lacrosse team fund raiser
is a “Night Out” at the Red
Mill Tavern on April 13
from 7 p.m. to 10.
F UNDRAI SER
See LACROSSE page 40
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Last season King’s had a player
from Arizona, who Gigliello met
through the player’s uncle who
Gigliello played co-ed ASA ball
with.
That’s a whole other story. Gi-
gliello has played tons of ASA
softball — fast pitch, slo-pitch,
women’s and co-ed – and has been
on 15 state championship teams.
She’s still at it.
This season she’s playing for
Bigsy’s and Flaherty’s.
The Monarchs won their 499th
and 500th games Tuesday in
LaPlume beating Keystone 15-4
and 8-0. The team was 12-2 going
into another double header Thurs-
day.
Gigliello’s top assistant coach at
King’s, Joann Matt, also a Pittston
Area product, has been with her
15 years and Ashley Kowlaski,
pitching coach, and Tiffany Mu-
lally, strength and conditioning,
fve plus.
When they bring new girls in,
they don’t limit them to their high
school positions. “We like to get
the good athlete. We try to teach
everything. We stick to the me-
chanics. We spend a lot of time
teaching them how to do things
right on and off feld.
“We invest in them as players
and students. If they have a prob-
lem they can get help. We want
them to be successful on the feld,
in the classroom and in life when
they leave.”
Continued from page 36
MILESTONE
The idea for the teamcame from
Casey Donahue, the father of PA
assistant soccer coach Sarah Do-
nahue who suggested it at a soccer
game.
The school board gave the team
$4,500.
The girls and their parents are
in the process of raising the rest of
the estimated $8,000 it will take to
run the team this season
The $4,500 covered the coaches
and some of the general expenses.
Emily Foley, who played college
Lacrosse at Misercordia, is the
head coach. Her assistant is Dani-
elle Gross.
Other expenses are $1,500 to
outft two goalies, $1,100 for away
game buses, $140 per game for of-
fcials and $1,500 for nets, balls
and goals.
So far, through fund raisers such
as a pizza sale and sponsor dona-
tions from First Class K9, Lom-
bardo’s Quick Mart and Healey’s
plumbing, the team has raised
about $2,000.
The goal after raising the $8,000
to run this season is to raise money
for jerseys.
Pioneers of Pittston Area la-
crosse are: seniors, Jordan Cumbo,
Carmella Gagliardi, Kaalyn Gir-
man, Liz Mikitish, and Rachel
Simansky; juniors, Emily Herron,
Sara Ruby, Ciara Smith; sopho-
mores, Kristen Capitano, Bianca
Concert, Linko Rebecca, Elaina
Menichelli, Britney Pintha, Kate-
lyn Pugliese, Sydney Ralston,
Nicole Walters; freshman, Kayla
Williams, Dana Zalewski, Bri-
anna Falvo, Kallie Healey, Nicole
Karuzie, Tabytha Bastek, Bianca
Mattei-Miller, Lucia Menichelli-
Bales, Alyssa Neare, Haley Nor-
willo.
PALacrosse Schedule
Thursday April 4 at Dallas
Monday April 8 at Wyoming
Sem
Thurs. April 11 at Coughlin
Monday April 15 at Crestwood
Friday April 19 vs. Lake Lehm-
an
Mon. April 22 at Delaware Val-
ley
Thurs. April 25 vs. Dallas
Monday, April 29 vs. Wyoming
Sem
Thursday May 2 vs. Coughlin
Monday, May 6 vs. Crestwood
Friday, May 10 at Lake Lehm-
anThe idea for the teamcame from
Casey
Continued from page 48
LACROSSE
Warrior green pictured left to right Grace Angelella, Katie Supey, Madison Mulhern, Abby Schw-
erdtman, Jillian Spak. Second row is Coach Courtney, Grace Gober, Gianna Gennets, Christina
Granteed, Lindsay Carey, Abby Thornton, Sally DeLuca and Coach Comiskey.
The Warrior Green Field Hock-
ey won the gold medal at the Win-
ter Keystone State Games in the
unrestricted Varsity division last
month at the Riverfront sports
complex in Scranton.
Warrior green defeated teams
from East Stroudsburg, Lower
Dauphin, Abington Heights,
SUNY Binghamton and Lanco
Premiere. Warriors won the gold in
a 3-on- 3 sudden victory overtime
over SUNY.
Sally DeLuca, Abby Thornton
and Grace Angelella, who scored
the winning goal, made up the the
3-on-3 combo.
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Warrior team cops gold
in Keystone feld hockey
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HI GH SCHOOL TRACK AND F I EL D
Warrior boys, girls drop track openers
The Pittston Area boys and girls
opener scheduled for Wednesday at
Crestwood was postponed.
Boys
Northwest 91
Wyoming Area 50
Slow start for the Warriors on
Tuesday, minus some key runners
with injury and suspension, as they
lost to Northwest 91-50. Borton
won the shot put and discus for the
Warriors and Harding won the 400.
They were the only winners.
Also scoring for WA were Fer-
nandes, Condry, Schmitz, Lanun-
ziata, Yurek, Lumley, Sypniews-
ki, Flynn, Lanunziata, Dimick,
O’Malley, Wall, Vasquez and Da-
vis.
Girls
Northwest 96
Wyoming Area 54
The Rangers took frst in 13
events to knock off the host War-
riors. WyomingArea’s Audrey Hei-
dacavage and Haley Stackhouse
each had a pair of frst-place fnish-
es. Heidacavage won the 1600 and
800 runs. Stackhouse won the 110
hurdles and long jump. Stackhouse
was second in the 300 hurdles.
Also scoring for WA were: Sh-
emanski, Malloy, Brown, Bott, De-
Lucca, Custer, Kelly and Kazmar-
ick.
Warehouse Mixed League
High Scratch Series: Men’s Di-
vision: Bill Casterline, 752; Johm
Golden, 702; John Borgia, 666; Ed
Markovich, 651; Travis Doty, 642.
Pittston Senior Center
High Scratch Series Men’s Di-
vision: Ed Ritledge, 611; Bob Bal-
drica, 597; John Lampman, 582;
David Brodbeck, 553; Jim Fran-
cioso, 533. Women’s Division: Peg
Rutledge, 486; Nita Geneczko, 444;
Betty Yedinak, 421; Audrey Kurz,
410; Cini DiGennari, 400.
Dupont Bowlerettes
High Scratch Series: MaryAnn
Shugdinis, 563; Kim Kishel, 539;
Debbie Stevens, 525; LryLou Fe-
reck, 517; Helen Zapotoski, 483;
Donna Kasa, 481; Ann Alfano, 468;
MaryTheresa Pupa, 468; Rose Mc-
Dadae, 442.
Magic Circle
High Scratch Series: Men’s Di-
vision: Joseph Chmiel, 730; Wally
Zieminski, 695; Don Whiting, 690;
Kyle Wagner, 675; Matt Charney,
646; Michael Rebovich, 609; Rich
Jr. Aston, 608; John Colarusso, 604;
Joe Sr. Wruble, 596; Chris Renfer,
550; Greg Renfer, 550; Ed Wasko,
550. Women’s Division: Mary-
theresa Pupa, 481; Lisa Heck, 436;
Courtney McKitish, 353; Ashley
Fuller, 344; Karen Bogdanski, 215.
Universal
High Scratch Series: Billy Jr.
Elko, 747; WilliamElko, 713; Mark
Prebish, 689; Dale Reese, 674; Da-
vid Titton, 672; Lowell Stoss, 654;
Eric Pramick, 651; Ed Rutledge,
644; Edward Collins, 639; Jim
Lavelle, III, 632.
Pittston Twp VFW
High Scratch Series: Russ Ste-
vens, 698; Jack Casper, 681; Joe Sr.
Walsh, 666; Wally Morre, 664; Ed
Wasko, 653; Joe Jr. Walsh, 629; Joe
Argenio, 623; John Blattner, 591;
Bert Myers, 578; Peter Chodnicki,
562.
Elko’s Bantam/Prep Mixed
High Scratch Series: Boys Divi-
sion: Aiden Hindmarsh, 157; Alek
Chilson, 156; Andrew Adonizio,
153; Bryan Bryk, 141; Zachary
Chilson, 131; Jake Grzech, 130;
Ryan Kane, 126; Gary Vest, 125;
Ryan Peck, 121; Matthew Mesaris,
108. Girls Division: Madison Mes-
aris, 173; Kacie Fisk, 145; Sophia
Gronka, 86.
Elko’s Mixed
High Scratch Series: Boys Di-
vision: Michael Elko, 581; Evan
Elko, 477; Paul Greco, 469; Justin
Coyne, 426; Bryan Shupp, 417;
Anthony Zimmerman, 412; Joey
Jones, 374; Zachary Garbarino,
366; Dylan Kelly, 362; Charles Ku-
lick, 335. Girls Division: Saman-
tha Piechota, 379; Kiena Vest, 254;
Janelle Dudek, 248; Halle Gronka,
241; Loren Gronka, 236; Gina
Kirkpatrick, 223; Alyssa Bulford,
178.
Elko’s Junior/Senior Friday
High Scratch Series: Boy’s Di-
vision: Austin Elko, 713; Spencer
Saxon, 704; Peter Kulick, 636; Sam
Carlen, 613; Zachary McKitish,
599. Girls’ Division: Danielle Zy-
dko, 448; Jordan Cegelka, 413; Erin
Donnelly, 404; Katie Wynn, 390;
Michelle Grossbauer, 387.
Elko’s Prep Boys
High Scratch Series: Zach-
ary Elko, 392; Marc Piechota, 367;
Tyler Granahan, 354; Anthony De-
Pascale, 353; Jemery Lavelle, 350;
Martin Kuna, 345; Tyler Cegelka,
344; Ozzie Dobrowalski, 340;
Charlie Boswell, 334; John Jr. Co-
larusso, 318.
American
High Scratch Series: Jerry Cog-
gons, 726; Mark Kulick, 714; Dave
Kern, 713; Rich Kuligowski, 709;
Gary Jr. Magdon, 687; Edward Col-
lins, 679; Chris Kasa, 659; Al Jr.
Cannarella, 651; Gerry Reilly, 643;
Bruce Rydzy, 621.
National
High Scratch Series: John Pi-
sano, 739; John Kulick, 718; Allyn
Jr. Ferretti, 704; Jerry Coggins, 697;
Keith Weinschenk, 654; Matt Fel-
ter, 650; Dale reese, 649; Edward
Collins, 648; Joe Burns, 611; Carl
Kiwak, 590.
Sunday Night Mixed
High Scratch Series: Men’s
Division: Joe Argenio, 624; Joe Sr.
Wruble, 604; Russ Stevens, 572;
Joe Umbra, 543; Eric McKitish,
541. Women’s Division: Marythe-
resa Pupa, 484; MaryLou Fereck,
464; Gracelynn Williamson, 447;
Debbie Stevens, 428; Courtney
McKitish, 411
Boy’s Division: Zachary McKit-
ish, 740.
MODERN LANES
Lady Birds
Standings: Robins 30.5 - 17.5,
Flamingos 27.5 - 20.5, Blue jays
2-23, Tweety Birds 22-26 Parakeets
20.5 - 27.5, Seagulls 18.5 - 29.5
High series: Lee Lawernce 645,
Mary Kay Stentia 547, Maria Yon-
ki 505, Sandie Toole 499, Cini Di
Gennari 489, Tricia Survilla 489,
Judy Krifka 481, Barbara Granah-
an, Evelyn Marsh 457, Renee Bene-
detti 443.
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Bill Casterline rolls 752 in Warehouse Mixed
BOWL I NG RESULTS
Lady Warrior Haley Stackhouse takes the lead in the 100 hurdles against Northwest. Her win-
ning time was 16.5.
Sharrieff Hale of Wyoming Area
starts off as the lead runner in
the 400 relay.
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OBITUARIES
Daniel L. Sekel, 78, of Forty Fort,
passed from this life early Tuesday
morning in the Wilkes-Barre Gener-
al Hospital, following a brief illness.
Born Oct. 18, 1934 in Kingston,
he was a son to the late John and
Mary (Sabonis) Sekel. Educated
in the Kingston schools, he was
a member of the 1954 graduating
class of the former Kingston High
School.
Mr. Sekel was employed as an
optician with Dr. Brown’s Optom-
etrists of Wilkes-Barre for 44 years,
retiring in 1999.
He was a member of St. Matthew
Evangelical Lutheran Church, North
Wilkes-Barre, where he previously
served as a congregation elder and
was actively involved in planning
the annual church picnics in Nuan-
gola for many years.
He and his wife, the former Carol
J. Minnick, celebrated 48 years of
married life on June 12, 2012.
Dan is remembered as a loving
husband, father and pop-pop to his
beloved family.
Enjoying the out-
doors, he spent
countless hours
proudly tending
to his garden at
home. Over the
years, he made a
number of friends in his neighbor-
hood during his many walks and
would often be seen talking more
than walking.
In addition to his parents, he was
preceded in death by a brother, John
Sekel; and by sisters Marie (Mary)
Hrivnak, Vilma Beky and Betty
Sekel.
Surviving, in addtion to his wife,
Carol, at home, are their children,
Daniel L. Sekel Jr. and his wife,
Gayle, Harding, and Carrie Massa-
ker and her husband, James, Kings-
ton; grandchildren, Danielle and Ol-
ivia Sekel, and Sarah, Erik and Neil
Massaker; sisters Olga Kozlowski,
Edwardsville, and Ellen Marshalla,
Pringle; and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Funeral services for Mr. Sekel
will be conducted on Saturday at
9:30 a.m. from the North Wilkes-
Barre location of the John V. Morris
Family Funeral Homes Inc., 625 N.
Main St., Wilkes-Barre, followed by
services at 10 a.m. in St. Matthew
Evangelical Lutheran Church, with
the Rev. Gary John Scharrer, pastor,
offciating. Interment with commit-
tal will follow in the St. Matthew
Lawn section of Fern Knoll Burial
Park, Midland Avenue, Dallas.
Relatives and friends may join the
Sekel family for visitation and re-
membrances Friday from4 to 7 p.m.
In lieu of foral tributes, memorial
contributions may be made in Dan’s
memory to St. Matthew Evangelical
Lutheran Church, 663 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA18705.
To send Dan’s wife and family
online words of comfort, friendship
and support, please visit the funeral
home’s website at www.johnvmor-
risfuneralhomes.com.
March 26, 2013
Daniel L. Sekel
George “Jerry” Ferenchick, 81,
of Plymouth and a former long-
time resident of Edison Street in
Wilkes-Barre, died Monday at
Mercy Special Care Hospital.
Born Aug. 22, 1931 in Plains,
he was a son of the late George
and Elizabeth Kosek Ferenchick.
George was a graduate of Plains
Memorial High School.
He was a proud veteran of Ko-
rean Confict, having served in the
Navy from 1950-51 and Air Force
from 1951-55.
Before retiring, George worked
for Tenco in New Jersey for sev-
eral years.
He was a member of the Four
Poplars Hunting Club and had
been a coach and umpire for St.
Therese’s Little League Baseball.
George and his wife, Shirley,
celebrated their 59
th
wedding an-
niversary on March 20.
A sister, Bernadine Howe, pre-
ceded him in death.
He will be greatly missed by his
wife, the former Shirley Shock;
daughter, Michele, and her hus-
band, Richard Hivish, of Wilkes-
Barre; sons, George J. and his
wife, Kathleen Ferenchick, of
Dupont; Gary and his wife, Chris-
tine Ferenchick, of Plymouth, and
Keith Ferenchick of Plymouth;
grandchildren, Richard Jr.; Jef-
frey and Jessica Hivish; Matthew,
Rachael and Hannah Ferenchick,
and Tyler and Megan Ferenchick;
great-grandson, Jeffrey Matthew
Hivish Jr.; nieces, nephews, cous-
ins and friends.
George’s entire family is grate-
ful to Dr. Robert Czwalina and
his staff, the nurses and thera-
pists from Commonwealth Home
Health, and nurses and staff at
Mercy Special Care Hospital for
the compassionate care they gave
him.
Celebration of George’s life will
be held Thursday beginning at 9
a.m. at McLaughlin’s – The Fam-
ily Funeral Service, 142 S. Wash-
ington St., Wilkes-Barre, with a
Funeral Liturgy led by Deacon
Peter Smith at 10 a.m. Interment
will be in Oak Lawn Cemetery in
Hanover Township.
Visitation will be held at
McLaughlin’s on Wednesday
from 5 to 8 p.m
Memorial donations are pre-
ferred and may be made to Ameri-
can Cancer Society, 712 S. Keyser
Ave., Taylor, PA18517.
Permanent messages and mem-
ories can be shared with George’s
family at www.celebratehislife.
com.
March 25, 2013
George ‘Jerry’ Ferenchick
Robert F. Gillis, of Lake Street,
Tunkhannock, passed away at
home on Thursday, March 28,
2013.
He was born in Jenkins Town-
ship on June 4, 1934, a son of the
late Edward and Frances Sankus
Gillis. Bob was a graduate of Dur-
yea High School, Class of 1952,
and attended Penn State Univer-
sity. He was a U.S. Navy veteran
of the Korean Confict.
Over the years he had been em-
ployed at RCA, Exxon Research
& Engineering and Jelco, where
he worked as a salesman selling
hospital equipment. Bob retired
from the Pennsylvania Liquor
Control Board with more than 30
years of service as a sales clerk in
several state stores.
He was a member of the West
Side Social Club, National Rife
Association and lifetime member
of VFW Post No. 1277, Duryea
and the American Legion. He also
was a member of Valley Lodge
No. 0499 F&AM, Scottish Rite in
the Valley, the IremTemple Shrine
and other Masonic organizations.
P r e c e d i n g
him in death
were sisters,
Marie Gogel,
Mercedes McG-
lynn and infant
sister Romayne
Gillis; and
brother-in-law, Phil Gogel.
Surviving are his wife of 47
years, Patricia Joyce Novak Gil-
lis; brother-in-law, John McGlynn
Sr., Duryea; and several nieces,
nephews, great-nieces and great-
nephews.
Funeral services will be held
on Tuesday at 11 a.m. from the
Tunkhannock United Methodist
Church, with Pastor Peter F. Ge-
schwindner offciating. Interment
will be in Sunnyside Cemetery,
Tunkhannock. Family will receive
friends at the Sheldon-Kukuchka
Funeral Home Inc., 73 W. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock, on Monday
from 4 to 6 p.m.
Online condolences may be
sent to the family at www.shel-
donkukuchkafuneralhome.com.
March 28, 2013
Robert F. Gillis
Steven Kepics, 93, of Plains
Township, died Wednesday,
March 27, 2013, at Celtic Hospice
in Geisinger South Wilkes-Barre.
He was born Aug. 4, 1919, in
Sharpsville, Pa., a son of the late
John Kepics and Mary Cheresney
Kepics, formerly of Plains Town-
ship.
He is survived by his wife, the
former Genevieve Keris of Plym-
outh, to whom he was married
for 66 wonderful years.
Steven served his country dur-
ingWorldWar II as astaff sergeant
in the U.S. Army in Company B,
704th Tank Destroyer Battalion,
receiving two Purple Hearts for
his service before being honor-
ably discharged in 1945. He was
a member of the Keystone State
Branch of the Disabled American
Veterans and the American Le-
gion Post 558 in Plains Township
for 65 years.
After the war, Steven took a
job at Foster Wheeler Corp. in
Mountain Top as
a rigger and yard
master, where
he worked for
27 years before
retiring in 1982.
Steven found
great joy in be-
ing a Scout leader and was an ex-
cellent bowler. He was a member
of the Polka Dot Club of Dickson
City, and he and his wife enjoyed
many polka weekends around the
region with friends. He was an
avid fisherman and taught the
sport to his children and grand-
children. He also enjoyed travel-
ing, seeing much of the country
with his wife.
Steven was preceded in death
by his brothers, John Kepics,
West Pittston, and infant Frank.
In addition to his wife, Steven
is survived by his three chil-
dren and two grandchildren: his
daughter, Patricia Thiele and her
husband, Karl Thiele, Wapwallo-
pen; sons, William, Plains Town-
ship, and Frank and his wife,
Jane, and their children, Chris-
topher and Rachel Kepics, Eag-
leville, Pa.; sisters-in-law, Edythe
Kepics, West Pittston, and Lillian
Stahurski, Columbus, Ohio.
The family thanks the many
people who provided care, com-
passion and support to Steven,
for without that we would not
have had him with us these many
years. Special thanks to doctors
Maloney, Chittalia and Belikova;
nurses, Joanie, Denise and Char-
lie; Associated Family Care Ser-
vices, Personal Care Services and
especially the 4 East Wing of the
VA Hospital, Wilkes-Barre.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday at 9 a.m. in the Holy As-
sumption of St. Mary’s Byzantine
Catholic Church, 695 N. Main St.,
Wilkes-Barre, with the Very Rev.
James Hayer, pastor, officiating.
Interment will follow in the par-
ish cemetery, Lake Street, Dallas.
March 25, 2013
Steven Kepics
DAVID V. CIOTOLA, 75, of Ex-
eter, passed away Friday, March 29,
2013, at the Wilkes-Barre General
Hospital.
Funeral arrangements are
pending from Bednarski Funeral
Home, 168 Wyoming Ave., Wyo-
ming.
March 29, 2013
David V. Ciotola
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OBITUARIES
Idena “Dena” DeBiasi, 89, of
Duryea, went home to be with the
Lord on Tuesday evening, March
26, 2013, at CMC Hospice, Scran-
ton, surrounded by her loving fam-
ily.
Born in Wetumpka, Ala., on
Sept. 19, 1923, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Foster and Rose Etta
Penton Emfnger.
She enlisted in the Women’s
Army Corps on Oct. 16, 1944 and
completed basic training in Talla-
hassee, Fla., where she worked in
the motor pool. Pvt. Emfnger met
her husband, Sgt. Carmen, while
both were enlisted in the U.S.
Army. They celebrated 65 years of
marriage prior to his death in May
2010.
Dena operated her own business,
Dena’s Lunch, on Main Street,
Duryea, for more than 20 years
and enjoyed serving her customers
great home cooking until 1984.
After retirement, she enjoyed
tending to her vegetables and fow-
ers in the garden. She loved the
numerous trips to family reunions
in her beloved hometown of We-
tumpka.
She was a devoted member of
Nativity of Our Lord Parish and
served with the Holy Name So-
ciety for many years. She often
commented on all the fun she had
preparing food and working at its
yearly picnic.
Dena was a loving sister, wife,
mother, grandmother and great-
grandmother. Her greatest joy was
spending time with her family and
she especially loved the precious
time she spent with her great-grand-
children, Isabella and Jason Jr.
Dena’s warm, Southern hospi-
tality made everyone feel right at
home.
Her outgoing personality and wit
made her the life of the party. She
enjoyed hosting family and friends
around her kitchen table or on the
patio, where she delighted in an
occasional margarita as she remi-
nisced about the good-old days.
She was preceded in death by her
husband, Carmen; sisters, Rosie
Bell, Laura Mae, Thula and Lee
Verna; and brothers, Herman, Ce-
cil, Clarence and Bennett.
She will be missed by her chil-
dren, Jennie, Carmella, Louis, Dar-
lene and Dino; six grandchildren,
Jason, Tori, Autum, Nicolette, Ty-
ler and Madelyn; two great-grand-
children, Isabella and Jason Jr.; and
many dear friends.
The family thanks all of those
who cared for her during her last
years, especially LIFE Geisinger
(Living Inde-
pendently for
Elders) at Mary-
wood Univer-
sity. She spent
almost every
day with the
wonderful staff
who cared for and loved her. Many
thanks to Dr. Eisner and Dr. Collier
who gave her their undivided care
and attention.
Funeral services will be held
Tuesday at 9 a.m. from the Bernard
J. Piontek Funeral Home Inc., 204
Main St., Duryea. AMass of Chris-
tian Burial will follow at 9:30 a.m.
in Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
Duryea, with the Rev. Andrew Sin-
nott offciating. Interment will be
in St. John’s Cemetery, Duryea.
Friends may call Monday from 4 to
8 p.m. at the funeral home.
If desired, memorial contribu-
tions may be made to LIFE Geis-
inger, 2300 Adams Ave., Scranton,
PA 18509, or Nativity of Our Lord
Parish, 127 Stephenson St., Dur-
yea, PA18642. To leave the family
an online condolence or for further
information, please visit the funeral
home’s website, www.piontekfu-
neralhome.com.
March 26, 2013
Idena ‘Dena’ DeBiasi
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Joanne Pauline Lerch, 79, of Har-
veys Lake, passed away Monday,
March 25, 2013, peacefully at home
surrounded by her family.
Mrs. Lerch was born in Harveys
Lake on Feb. 6, 1934, a daughter
of the late William and Margaret
Hammond Lerch. Joanne gradu-
ated from the former Lake-Noxen
High School in 1952 and retired
from Mercy Center in Dallas. She
resided in Harveys Lake for most
of her life. After her retirement, she
enjoyed life to the fullest and espe-
cially loved read-
ing, relaxing and
spending quality
time with her great-
grandchildren.
In addition to
her parents, she
was preceded in death by her sister,
Joyce, and brothers, Richard (Dick)
and John.
Mrs. Lerch is survived by her
sister, Nancy Concert, Ashley;
brothers, Donald Lerch, Lake
Station, Ind., and James Lerch,
Wilkes-Barre; daughter, Linda;
granddaughter, Colleen, and her
husband, Michael, Harveys Lake;
great-grandchildren, Patrick, Ben-
jamin and Khloe; and many nieces
and nephews.
Private funeral services will be
held at the convenience of the fam-
ily. There will be no calling hours.
Arrangements are by the Curtis L.
Swanson Funeral Home Inc., corner
of routes 29 and 118, Pikes Creek.
Online condolences can be made at
www.clswansonfuneralhome.com.
March 25, 2013
Joanne Pauline Lerch
Elizabeth “Betty” Mattina, 90,
formerly of West Wyoming, passed
away on Wednesday, March 27,
2013, at the Briarleaf Nursing
Home, Doylestown.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she was a
daughter of the late Joseph P. and
Emily Mary Quaile Lepore.
Betty was a 1941 graduate of
West Pittston High School and a
member of the former Our Lady of
Sorrows Church, West Wyoming.
Prior to her retirement, she was
employed by the Consolidated Ci-
gar Co., West Pittston.
She was preceded
in death by her hus-
band, Angelo Matti-
na, on Sept. 2, 2008;
brother, Joseph
Lepore, and sisters,
Madeline White,
Theresa Lepore and Mary Lepore.
Surviving are her son, Paul, and
his wife, Sue, Doylestown; grand-
daughter, Wendy; sister Florence,
Exeter; and brother Louis, Chey-
enne, Wyo.
Funeral services will be held
on Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Gub-
biotti Funeral Home, 1030 Wyo-
ming Ave., Exeter, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at 11 a.m. at St.
Monica’s Parish, Our Lady of Sor-
rows Church, Eighth Street, West
Wyoming, with the Rev. James
Alco as celebrant. Interment will
be in Mt. Olivet Cemetery, Carver-
ton. Relatives and friends may call
on Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.
To send the family an expression
of sympathy or an online condo-
lence, please visit www.gubbiot-
tifh.com.
March 27, 2013
Elizabeth ‘Betty’ Mattina
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OBITUARIES
Loretta Musto, of Pittston, passed
away at home on Tuesday, March
19, 2013, two weeks before her
103rd birthday.
She was married to the late Domi-
nic Musto.
Born in Pittston on April 2, 1910,
she was the daughter of the late
Frank and Louise Mancera DeMar-
tino.
She attended Pittston schools
and was a member of Our Lady of
Mount Carmel Church, Pittston;
now St. Joseph Marello Parish.
She worked in the silk mills as
a young girl and then later she and
her husband owned
and operated Loret-
ta’s Pizza on Searle
Street in Pittston.
She was preceded
in death by an infant
twin brother; sis-
ters, Albina (Bena) DeGilio, Edith
Marsetell, Elizabeth Lombardo and
Mary DeMarinto; brothers Michael,
Nicholas and Fred DeMartino.
Surviving are her niece Donna
DeLeo, with whom she resided and
who was her caregiver. Also surviv-
ing are nieces Carol (Lombardo)
Pace, Rosemary Pello, Angela Pel-
lo, Henrietta Siani; nephews, Joseph
and Frank Lombardo; Joseph, Frank
and John DeLeo; numerous other
nieces, nephews, great-nieces and
great-nephews.
Funeral services were Tuesday,
March 26 from the Peter J. Adonizio
Funeral Home, Pittston, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at in St. Joseph
Marello Parish, 237 William St.,
Pittston.
Interment was in St. Rocco’s
Cemetery, Pittston Township.
Online condolences may be made
at www.peterjadoniziofuneralhome.
com.
March 19, 2013
Loretta Musto
John C. Antal, 81, of Pittston
Township, passed away Tuesday
evening at his home.
Born in Pittston Township, a son
of the late John and Frances Leshney
Antal, he was a graduate of Pittston
Township High School. Prior to his
retirement, he was employed by the
former Techneglas, Pittston. He was
a member of Queen of the Apostle’s
Parish, Avoca.
He and his wife, the former Lo-
retta Martin, would have celebrated
their 53rd wedding anniversary in
June.
He was an avid outdoorsman who
loved to hunt and
fsh.
The family thanks
Dr. Martin Mo-
ran and the staff
of Commonwealth
Home, Health and
Hospice of Northeast PA, especial-
ly his nurse’s aide, Cathy, and his
nurse, Donna.
He was preceded in death by
brothers, Ernest, William, Henry,
Chester, Raymond, Gilbert and
Ronald; sisters, Alice Renfer, Jo-
sephine Renfer, Johanna Cislo and
Norma Chmiel; and nephew Kevin
Martin.
Surviving, in addition to his wife,
are nieces, nephews, great-nieces
and great-nephews.
Funeral services were Saturday,
March 30 at the Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., 204 Main St.,
Duryea. The Rev. Phillip J. Sladic-
ka, pastor of Queen of the Apostle’s
Parish, offciated. Interment was in
Marcy Cemetery, Duryea.
To leave the family an online con-
dolence or for further information,
please visit the funeral home’s web-
site at www.piontekfuneralhome.
com.
March 26, 2013
John C. Antal
Charles G. Szura, 93, of Wyo-
ming, passed away Sunday, March
24, 2013 at Highland Manor Nurs-
ing and Convalescent Home in Ex-
eter.
Born in Buffalo, N.Y., on June 3,
1919, he was the son of the late Mi-
chael and Mary Niedwicz Szura.
He was a 1937 graduate of Wyo-
ming Memorial High School.
Charles was a wounded war vet-
eran while serving in Rhineland
during World War II. He attained the
rank of sergeant before being honor-
ably discharged from the U.S. Army
in 1945.
Prior to his retirement, he was a
self-employed mason and was em-
ployed by White
Haven Center in
White Haven.
Charles was a
member of St. Ce-
cilia’s Church of
St. Barbara’s Par-
ish, Exeter. He was an honorary
member of the Wyoming Hose Co.
No. 2, Wyoming, and was the old-
est living member of the VFW Post
396, in Wyoming.
He was preceded in death by his
brothers John, Edward and Walter;
sisters, Pauline Cuba and Stephanie
Savoroski.
Surviving are sisters, Mary By-
theway, Florida; Theresa Bonanni,
Exeter; Dolores Sandroski, Exeter,
and Helen Szura, with whom he
resided; brother Joseph Szura and
his wife, Joan, Wyoming; 22 nieces
and nephews; several grandnieces
and nephews, great-grandnieces and
great-grandnephews.
The funeral was Wednesday,
March 27 from Bednarski Funeral
Home, Wyoming, with a Mass of
Christian Burial at St. Cecilia’s
Church of St. Barbara’s Parish, Ex-
eter. Interment was in St. John the
Baptist Cemetery, Cedar St., Exeter.
Memorial contributions maybe
made to St. Cecilia’s Church of St.
Barbara’s Parish, 28 Memorial Ave.,
Exeter, PA18643.
March 24, 2013
Charles G. Szura
Mrs. Anna Kozloski, 91, of
Duryea, passed away Saturday,
March 23, 2013 at Manor Care,
Kingston.
Born in Old Forge, she was the
daughter of the late Michael and
Susan Resetar Mikovitch. She
was educated the Duryea schools.
Prior to her retirement, she was
employed in the area garment in-
dustry.
She was a member of Nativity
of Our Lord Parish, Duryea.
She was a loving mother, grand-
mother and great grandmother.
She enjoyed crocheting and gar-
dening.
The family would like to thank
Dr. Kevin Carey of Plains for his
expertise and unconditional sup-
port to Anna and her family.
The family would also like to
thank the entire staff of Manor
Care, Kingston; her beloved
roommate, Mildred Hottenstein,
and HCC Celtic Hospice for their
care, concern and support.
She was proceeded in death by
her husband, Peter Kozloski, who
passed away on June 23, 1977, and
two brothers, John and Michael.
Surviving are daughter, Carol
Szymanski, and her husband,
Thomas, of Dur-
yea; son, Paul
Kozloski, and his
wife, Mary Lou, of
Duryea; son Paul
Kozloski and his
wife Mary Lou of
Duryea; granddaughter, Melissa
Bednar and her husband, Richard,
of Harding; grandson, Thomas
Szymanski, of Edgewater, Md.;
granddaughter, Amy Lockett, and
her husband, Kevin Jr., of Pittston
Township; great-granddaughters,
Laura Ann and Emma Ann Bed-
nar of Harding; great-grandsons,
Brandon and Kevin Lockett III,
of Pittston Township; nieces and
nephews.
Funeral was Wednesday, March
27 from the Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home Inc., Duryea, with
Mass of Christian Burial in Sacred
Heart of Jesus Church, Duryea,
with the Rev. Andrew Sinnott of-
fciating.
Interment was in St. John’s
Cemetery, Duryea.
To leave the family an online
condolence or for further infor-
mation, please visit our website,
www.piontekfuneralhome.com.
March 23, 2013
Mrs. Anna Kozloski
Margaret T. Yurish, 98, of Wyo-
ming, passed away Friday, March
22, 2013, at Hospice Community
Care Inpatient Unit of Geisinger
South Wilkes-Barre.
Born July 27, 1914 in West
Wyoming, she was the daughter
of the late Joseph and Magdelene
Ptaszek.
Prior to her retirement, she was
employed by EmKay Manufactur-
ing in West Wyoming.
Margaret was a loving mother,
devoted Catholic and faithful in
her faith.
Although she worked outside
the home, she was able to pass
along her strong love for God to
her children.
Margaret was a member of St.
Monica’s Parish and was one of
the original members of St. Jo-
seph’s Church in Wyoming.
She was preceded in death by
her husband, John; son, John; sis-
ters, Anna and Mary.
Surviving are her daughter,
Leona Prednis and her husband
Leonard, of San Diego, Calif.;
son, Joseph, Wyoming; three
grandchildren, Leona Miller, Lo-
ganville, Ga.; Leonard and Lance
Prednis, San Diego, Calif.; four
great-grandchildren, Patricia and
Valerie Miller and Anika and
Brendan Prednis.
Funeral services were Wednes-
day, March 27 at the Bednarski
Funeral Home, 168 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming, with a Mass of
Christian Burial in St. Joseph’s
Church of St. Monica’s Parish.
Interment was in Mount Olivet
Cemetery, Carverton.
March 22, 2013
Margaret T. Yurish
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Janet Ann Amico, M.D., passed
away on March 23, 2013 after a
courageous three-year battle with
cancer.
Janet was born in Kingston and
grew up in West Pittston. She re-
ceived a B.S. degree from College
Misericordia in Dallas and her M.D.
from the Medical College of Penn-
sylvania (now Drexel University
School of Medicine) in Philadel-
phia.
She has lived in Pittsburgh since
1975, when she arrived to intern in
Internal Medicine at the University
of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
Janet did all of her training in En-
docrinology at Pitt. She had a long
and remarkable career in the School
of Medicine rising to the position
of tenured Professor of Medicine in
1994.
She was granted a secondary ap-
pointment as Professor in the School
of Pharmacy in 1999 and became
Assistant Dean for Medical Student
Research in 2009.
She co-chaired the second year
Endocrinology course for Pitt medi-
cal students from 1995-2010 for
which most graduates of the Pitt
Medical School during the past two
decades remember her.
She was deeply involved in the
training of many of the present prac-
ticing Endocrinologists in the city
of Pittsburgh especially serving as
a role model for women physicians.
She had a distinguished research
career and was an internationally
recognized investigator of the hor-
mone oxytocin.
She authored or co-authored
greater than 100 peer-reviewed orig-
inal articles, the majority in pres-
tigious medical journals, 11 book
chapters and co-edited with her
mentor, Alan Robinson, the book
“Oxytocin, Clinical and Laboratory
Studies” in 1985.
She completed her status as a
“triple threat” by also being a skilled
clinician, especially in pituitary and
thyroid disease, and was selected as
one of the Best Doctors in America
for multiple years.
Janet was the beloved wife of her
devoted husband of 33 years, Joel
A. Spero, M.D. of Pittsburgh and
her adored son Jonathan A. Spero,
presently of Atlanta, Ga.
She was preceded in death by her
brothers, Richard and JosephA., and
her parents, Sylvia (Menn) and Jo-
seph G. Amico, all of the Wyoming
Valley.
Her surviving extended family in
Northeastern Pennsylvania, her hus-
band’s family, her patients and her
many friends and colleagues will all
greatly miss her. She fnally was a
loving mother to her two dogs, Soci
and Jimmy, extending over a 28 year
period.
Janet enjoyed reading good books
and was a knowledgeable and avid
tennis fan.
Despite her rigorous work sched-
ule and family life, she found time to
accompany Jonathan to multiple ju-
nior tennis tournaments over many
years and loved to watch him play
tennis for both Shady Side Academy
and Carnegie Mellon University.
The family also traveled together
to watch professional tennis tourna-
ments across the country and she,
especially, fondly remembered a
family trip to the French Open ten-
nis tournament in Paris, France. She
also became an ardent fan of live
theater in Pittsburgh and attended
multiple subscription series.
Viewing and interment were in
Pittsburgh on Tuesday, March 26.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Greater Pittsburgh
Community Food Bank, 1 Linden
St., Duquesne, PA 15110 and/or the
Animal Rescue League of Western
Pennsylvania, 6620 Hamilton Ave.,
Pittsburgh, PA15206.
March 23, 2013
Dr. Janet Amico
OBITUARIES
Anthony “Tony” Karuzie, 76,
of Avoca, passed away Saturday
March 23, at the VAMedical Center,
Wilkes-Barre. He was born inAvoca
April 8, 1936 and was the son of the
late Anthony and Sophie (Kalander)
Karuzie.
Anthony was a member of Queen
Of the Apostles Parish, Avoca. He
was a 1954 graduate of Avoca High
School.
After high school, he enlisted in
the U.S. Army. He was part of the
82nd Airborne Division, and also
U.S. Army Special Forces.
After his time of service, Anthony
enrolled and graduated from Wil-
kes University. Tony worked many
years as an operations manager for
the Ingersoll Rand Co.
Many refer to Tony as “Mr. Wall-
eye,” since fshing was his greatest
passion.
Over the years he had accumulat-
ed many top awards in the sport of
freshwater fshing. He was a mem-
ber of the VFW Post 8335, Avoca,
and the American Legion Post 607,
Avoca.
Tony is survived by his loving
wife of 52 years, the former Shir-
ley Lovenduski Karuzie; his sis-
ter, Midge Melucci, of Avoca, and
brothers, Leonard, of Old Forge,
and Robert, of Avoca, and his niece
Jeanine Wanalista, who along with
his wife, Shirley, helped care for
Tony during his ill health, and also
several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held
Wednesday, March 27 from
Kiesinger Funeral Services Inc., 255
McAlpine St., Duryea, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at Queen of The
Apostles Parish, Avoca, with Fr.
Phillip Sladicka offciating. Inter-
ment was at Ss. Peter & Paul Cem-
etery, Avoca. The AMVETS Honor
Guard of Dupont will provide mili-
tary honors.
Online condolences may be made
to www.kiesingerfuneralservices.
com.
March 23, 2013
Anthony “Tony” Karuzie
Brian C. Petroziello, 60, of Clay-
ton, Ohio, passed away Monday,
March 25, 2013.
He was born in Pittston on March
15, 1953 to parents Carl and Mary
Teresa (Estock) Petroziello.
Funeral services were at Rog-
ers’ Funeral Home, 110 W. Main St.,
Trotwood, Ohio on Friday, March
29.
Donations may be made in Bri-
an’s memory to the American Dia-
betes Association or the American
Heart Association. Condolences
may be expressed online at www.
rogersfuneralhomes.com.
March 25, 2013
Brian C. Petroziello
Jason C. Folweiler, 27, of
Pittston, passed away Tuesday,
March 26, 2013, at Geisinger
Wyoming Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township, surrounded by
his family.
He was born in Kingston on
Aug. 16, 1985 to Rose (Abate)
Folweiler and Angelo Folweiler
Sr., both of Pittston. He was edu-
cated in the Pittston Area School
District.
Jason was a loving son, brother,
uncle and friend who always lived
every day of his life to the fullest.
He will be missed by all who
knew and loved him.
He was preceded in death by his
maternal grandparents, Charles
and wife, Carmella Oliveri Abate,
Pittston; and paternal grandpar-
ents, Harry and wife, Carmella
Serpe Folweiler, Pittston.
He is survived by brothers, Alan
Folweiler, Pittston; David Folwei-
ler, Pittston; Brian
and wife, Lisa
Folweiler, Dur-
yea; half-brother,
Angelo, and wife,
Crystal; and niec-
es, Hayley, Lili,
Autumn and Jessica Folweiler.
Funeral services have been en-
trusted to Graziano Funeral Home
Inc., Pittston Township.
Viewing hours will be held on
Monday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the
funeral home.
Funeral services will begin at
the funeral home on Tuesday at 9
a.m.
AMass of Christian Burial will
be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday in St.
Joseph Marello Parish, William
Street, Pittston.
Aprivate interment service will
be held at the convenience of the
family.
March 26, 2013
Jason C. Folweiler
Bonnie Faneck Foist passed
away in Miami on Wednesday,
Feb. 20, 2013, surrounded by her
loving family after a courageous
battle with cancer.
She was born Oct. 18, 1959, in
Wilkes-Barre to Mary Pieczynski
Faneck and the late Edward Fa-
neck. She graduated from Meyers
High School and Penn State Uni-
versity.
Bonnie worked with the Na-
tional Park Service for nearly 30
years.
She began her career at Shenan-
doah National Park, Virginia, and
served at San Juan Islands Na-
tional Historic Park; the National
Mall, Washington. D.C.; Biscayne
National Park, Florida, and fnally
Everglades National Park, Florida,
where she was chief ranger.
Bonnie also worked for fve
years in south Florida as a Marine
Enforcement Offcer with the for-
mer U.S. Customs Service, now
the Department of Homeland Se-
curity.
Bonnie enjoyed spending time
with family and camping.
She had an irrepressible sense
of humor, an impeccable character
and frmpersonal convictions. She
was an inspiration to everyone
who knew her.
Bonnie married Drew Foist on
Nov. 29, 1986. Together with their
14-year old daughter, Mary, they
made their home in Homestead,
Fla.
In addition to her husband
and daughter, Bonnie is survived
and will be greatly missed by
her brother, Bob, and his wife,
Jeanne, Shavertown; sisters, Nan-
cy and her husband, Marty (Mc-
Cullough), Denver; Susan and her
husband, Frederick (Maisano),
Pittston; Doreen and her husband,
Terry (Conrad), Syracuse, and
Maryanne Faneck and her fance,
Michael Bratton, Cary, N.C.; and
numerous nieces, nephews, great-
nieces and great-nephews.
A celebration of Bonnie’s life
was held at Everglades National
Park on Saturday, March 16, at-
tended by more than 300 family
and friends.
Per the family’s request, con-
tributions can be made to Ever-
glades National Park or the Police
Offcers Assistance Trust Memo-
rial, www.POAT.org, in Bonnie’s
name.
Feb. 20, 2013
Bonnie Faneck Foist
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Michael Kravitsky III, 81, of
Dallas, fell asleep in the Lord on
Tuesday night in the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital, following a lin-
gering illness.
Born Oct. 7, 1931 in Kingston,
he was the only son of the late
Michael and Kathryn (Drugotch)
Kravitsky Jr.
Educated in the West Side
schools, he was a member of the
1949 graduating class of the for-
mer Edwardsville High School. He
furthered his education by attend-
ing the Wyoming Seminary. Until
retiring and continuing the family
business with his sons, which he
and his wife established in 1964,
he was the owner and operator of
Grasshopper Lawns Inc., Larks-
ville. He was a member of St.
Mary Protection of the Mother of
God Byzantine Catholic Church,
Chestnut Avenue, Kingston, where
he previously served as a cantor
and was a former member of the
parish choir. He also was a charter
member of Council 3987, Knights
of Columbus, Assumpta Council of
Luzerne; a founding member of the
Lawn Care Association of Penn-
sylvania; a member of the Junior
Chamber of Commerce and was
past president of the Party of the
Month Club.
Michael espe-
cially enjoyed trav-
eling with his wife
to various states
and countries.
He is remem-
bered as being an avid Penn State
football fan, in both watching and
attending various games over the
years, and was an advocate of the
Wilkes-Barre YMCA. Enjoying
the outdoors, he was an avid fsher-
man, having taken several fshing
trips to Canada with his family.
He and his wife, the former El-
eanore Poplawski, celebrated 53
years of married life on Oct. 10,
2012. In addition to his wife, Elea-
nore, at home, Michael is survived
by their children, Michele Gorski
and her husband, Vic, of Dallas;
Michael Kravitsky IVand his wife,
Suzanne, of Wyoming; Gregg
Kravitsky and his wife, Kim, of
Hatboro, and Shawn Kravitsky
and his wife, Maryruth, of Dallas;
grandchildren, Kristy Kravitsky,
Melissa Gorski, Michael Kravitsky
V, Savannah Kravitsky, Katie
Kravitsky, Sam Kravitsky and
Olivia Kravitsky; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services with Panachida
will be conducted on Tuesday at 10
a.m. from the Wroblewski Funeral
Home Inc., 1442 Wyoming Ave.,
Forty Fort, followed by Divine
Liturgy with Offce of Christian
Burial at 10:30 a.m. in St. Mary’s
Protection Byzantine Catho-
lic Church, Kingston. The Rev.
Mykhaylo Prodanets, pastor, will
offciate. Interment with Rite of
Committal will follow in Denison
Cemetery, Swoyersville. Relatives
and friends may join the Kravitsky
family Monday for visitation and
remembrances from 4 to 7 p.m. at
the funeral home.
In lieu of foral tributes, memo-
rial contributions are requested in
Michael’s memory to The Michael
J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s
Research, Grand Central Station,
P.O. Box 4777, New York, NY
10163-4777; the Franklin Town-
ship Volunteer Fire andAmbulance
Department, Orange Road, Dallas,
PA 18612; or to St. Mary’s Protec-
tion Byzantine Catholic Church,
321 Chestnut Ave., Kingston, PA
18704. To send Michael’s wife,
children and family online words
of comfort, support and friendship,
please visit the funeral home’s
website at www.johnvmorrisfuner-
alhomes.com.
March 26, 2013
Michael Kravitsky III
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Ha ppy Ea sterin Hea ven
Joh n Anth ony “ Beno” Borzell
3/10/1989-9/3/2011
O u rGu a rdia n An gel
Beno,you arewith
th eLord on h is
greatestday
You will forever
b ein ou rh earts
and love,
W eM issYou and
LoveYou So M u ch ,
M om ,Dad,Ju lianna
& Noel
#17
Doris M. (Hatmaker) Kremitske,
of Pittston Township, passed away
on Monday, March 25, 2013, in
Philadelphia, leaving behind her
beloved husband of 57 years,
Frank B. Kremitske. Born July 13,
1935 in Pittston Township to the
late Sarah Mary (Boles) and Clar-
ence Hatmaker, Doris was a gradu-
ate of Pittston Township High
School, Class of 1953. There, she
was a majorette in the marching
band. Doris was a member of The
61 Club, Suscon. She loved fow-
ers and nature along with sitting on
her front porch. She also enjoyed
family gatherings and cooking for
the family. Doris was a loving and
devoted wife, mother and grand-
mother, and will be greatly missed
by all.
She was preceded in death by
her brother, David Hatmaker;
grandson, David Slezak Jr.; and
sister Ellen Warunek. In addition
to her husband, she is survived by
her sons, Frank Kremitske Jr. and
Mark and wife, Diana Kremitske;
daughters, Laurie and husband,
Bob Kelly, Mary
and husband, Da-
vid Slezak, Donna
and husband, Jerry
Kipp, and Renee
and husband, Dan-
ny Miller; grand-
sons, Bobby and Dylan Kelly;
granddaughters, Ashley and Sa-
mantha Kelly, Devon Slezak, Tay-
lor and Marina Miller, Callie and
Allison Kipp, and Kasey Barbey;
sister Helen Howell, West Pittston;
numerous nieces and nephews.
Funeral services have been en-
trusted to Graziano Funeral Home
Inc., Pittston Township. Viewing
hours are at the funeral home to-
day, Sunday, March 31 from 4 to 8
p.m. Funeral services will begin at
the funeral home at 9:30 a.m. Mon-
day with a Mass of Christian Burial
to followat 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart
of Jesus Roman Catholic Church,
Dupont. Interment will take place
in St. John’s Cemetery, Duryea.
For directions to the funeral
home or to express your condo-
lences to Doris’s family, please vis-
it www.grazianofuneralhome.com.
March 25, 2013
Doris M. (Hatmaker) Kremitske
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Ha ppy Ea ster
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A lwaysin ou rH eart
Love,UncleM ark ,Iaand Nissy
James A. Rostock Jr., 60, passed
away Tuesday in the Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born in Kingston, he was a son
of the late James A. Rostock Sr.
and Louise Hoover Rostock. He
was a graduate of the Wyoming
Area School District. James was
employed through the Carpenters
Union Local 645, Wilkes-Barre.
Surviving are his children, Marla
Rico, Wyoming, and James A. Ros-
tock III, Wyoming; six grandchil-
dren; sister, Mary Lou Kemzura,
Swoyersville; nieces and neph-
ews; aunts and uncles; companion,
Deborah Waznia, West Wyoming;
former wife, Debora
Rostock; and good
friend of 45 years,
Joe Szumski.
Funeral services
will be held Tuesday
at 9 a.m. from the
Metcalfe-Shaver-Kopcza Funeral
Home Inc., 504 Wyoming Ave.,
Wyoming, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. in Our Lady of
Sorrows Church of St. Monica’s
Parish, West Wyoming. Interment
will be in the Memorial Shrine Park,
Carverton.
Friends may call Monday from 5
to 8 p.m.
March 26, 2013
James A. Rostock Jr.
Leonard Podrasky Sr., of the Vil-
lage of Shantytown, passed away on
Monday, March 25, 2013, at home,
where he resided with his wife, Ber-
nice Mudlock Podrasky. Leonard
was a son of the late Stephen and
Mary Offshack Podrasky. He attend-
ed Wilkes-Barre schools and went
on to serve his country with the U.S.
Air Force during the Korean War.
For most of his life, Leonard worked
for Autolift Inc., and after retirement
worked part time for Valley Security
and as a ranger at Wilkes-Barre Mu-
nicipal Golf Course. Leonard was
an avid golfer and a member of St.
Maria Goretti Church, Lafin.
He was preceded in death by his
daughter, Lori Ann, and brothers,
Edmund, Michael, Stephen Jr., Ray-
mond and Robert.
In addition to his wife, he is sur-
vived by his son Leonard Jr. and
wife Karen; son Mark and wife
Louise; daughter Maria Stravinski
and husband Carl B., Pittston; sis-
ter, Dolores Jesikiewicz; grandchil-
dren, Matthew and Anna Podrasky,
Andrew and Jimmy Podrasky and
Carl C., Paula and Steven Stravin-
ski; step-grandchildren, Kellianne
Benner and Elizabeth Dymond; and
several nieces and nephews.
A Mass of Christian Burial was
Thursday, March 28 in St. Maria
Goretti Church, Lafin. Arrange-
ments by Ruane &Mudlock Funeral
Home Inc., 18 Kennedy St., Pittston.
Online condolences may be offered
at www.ruaneandmudlock.com.
March 25, 2013
Leonard Podrasky Sr.
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Daniel Joseph Pace, 71, recently
of Plains Township and formerly of
Wyoming, passed away on Wednes-
day, March 27, 2013, at the Wilkes-
Barre General Hospital, surrounded
by his family.
Born in Exeter, he was a son of
the late William and Lucy Motta
Pace. Dan was a graduate of Wyo-
ming High School, Class of 1959,
and a member of St. Barbara Par-
ish at St. Anthony of Padua Church,
where he was a member of the Holy
Name Society and worked at the
many bazaars.
Dan was employed by Diamond
Vending, a division of Coca-Cola,
for 35 years, retiring in 2004.
After retirement, he enjoyed
spending his time at his children’s
restaurant, where every patron was
sure to see a friendly face when they
entered.
Dan was also a
passoniate Penn
State fan and en-
joyed spending
his Saturdays at
the restaurant with
family, friends and
guests watching
PSU football.
He was a U.S. Navy veteran, hav-
ing served on the USS Des Moines,
and a member of the American Le-
gion Plains Post.
Preceding him in death were his
parents; brother, William Pace; and
father- and mother-in-law, Pasquale
and Victoria Cerroni.
Surviving are his wife of 48
years, the former Patricia Cerroni,
Plains Township; daughter, Leane
Pace, Pittston, and her boyfriend,
Robert Flannery; son, Daniel, and
his wife, Teri Pace, Dallas; grand-
children, Anthony and Daniella
Pace; sisters, MaryLou Pisano and
her husband, Frank, Wyoming, and
Doreen Pavinski, West Wyoming;
several nieces and nephews; and his
loyal companion, Oreo.
Funeral service was Saturday at 9
a.m., March 30 from the Gubbiotti
Funeral Home, 1030 Wyoming
Ave., Exeter, with a blessing service
at St. Anthony of Padua Church, 28
Memorial St., Exeter.
Interment was Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville.
In lieu of fowers, memorial dona-
tions may be made to Johns Hopkins
Pancreatic Cancer Research Center,
401 N. Broadway, Weinberg 2242,
Baltimore, MD 21231.
To send the family an expression
of sympathy or an online condo-
lence, please visit www.gubbiottifh.
com.
March 27, 2013
Daniel Joseph Pace
Norman Dymond, of Schooley
Avenue, Exeter, died Tuesday,
March 26, 2013, in the Kingston
Commons, Kingston.
He was born Feb. 8, 1936, a son of
the late Fred E. and Marion B. Cook
Dymond.
Norman attended Tunkhannock
High School and early in his career
was employed by the Gunite Corp.
He was an accomplished masonry
contractor, and his work can be wit-
nessed in the beautifully laid stone at
the Nativity BVM Catholic Church,
Tunkhannock, the Tunkhannock
High School and numerous other
locations in Wyoming and Luzerne
counties. Norman was a longtime
resident of Vernon. He was a mem-
ber of the Franklin Township Fire
Department.
Norm married El-
eanor L. Ray on Sept.
3, 1955 and later di-
vorced. He married
Beverly Harrison on
June 13, 1985.
Norman will always be remem-
bered for his honesty, kindness,
generosity, patience and sense of
humor.
In addition to his parents, Norman
was preceded in death by a brother,
Fred Dymond Jr., and sister-in-law,
Betty Montross Dymond.
He is survived by his wife, Bever-
ly; children, Patricia (Curtis) Peter-
son, Salt Lake City, Utah; Eleanor
(Dan) Ketcham, Bountiful, Utah;
Bradley (Alison) Dymond, South
Jordan, Utah; Margaret (Layne)
Batty, Payson, Utah; Jeanette Jor-
gensen, Murray, Utah; David (Tra-
cie) Dymond, Moroni, Utah; Timo-
thy (Marianne) Dymond, Edmond,
Okla.; Daniel (Jennifer) Dymond,
Salt Lake City; Benjamin (Jacelyn)
Dymond, Salt Lake City; Don-
ald (Norma) Cooper, Exeter; Gary
(Wendy) Cooper, Exeter; Douglas
(Julie) Cooper, Exeter Township;
Jeffery Cooper, Edwardsville, and
James (Trudy) Cooper, Danville; 48
grandchildren and 45 great-grand-
children.
Funeral services will be held at 1
p.m. Tuesday from the Sheldon-Ku-
kuchka Funeral Home, 73 W. Tioga
St., Tunkhannock. Friends may call
from noon until the time of service.
In lieu of fowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to the Wyo-
ming County Historical Society, cor-
ner of Bridge and Harrison streets,
Tunkhannock, PA18657.
Online condolences may be sent
to the family at www.sheldonkuku-
chkafuneralhome.com.
March 26, 2013
Norman Dymond
Sarah Anne Myers, 76, formerly
of Wyoming and White Haven Cen-
ter, passed away Wednesday in the
Hazleton General Hospital.
Born in Pittston, she was a daugh-
ter of the late Kenneth O. and Isabel
Sax Myers.
Sarah resided at White Haven
Center since 1969.
Sarah is survived by brothers,
Kenneth Myers and his wife, Anne,
Vineland, N.J., and James Myers and
his wife, Barbara, Sun City Center,
Fla.; and nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Satur-
day at 2 p.m. in the Metcalfe-Shaver-
Kopcza Funeral Home Inc., 504 Wy-
oming Ave., Wyoming, with the Rev.
JoAnn Walker, chaplain of White
Haven Center, offciating. Interment
will be in the Carverton Cemetery.
Friends may call Saturday from 1
p.m. until time of service.
In lieu of fowers, memorial con-
tributions may be made to Relatives
& Friends Association of White Ha-
ven Center, 55 Newport St., Glen
Lyon, PA18617.
March 27, 2013
Sarah Anne Myers
Mrs. Mildred T. Levandoski,
85, of Duryea, went to rest in
God’s love on Sunday, March 24,
2013 at Geisinger Wyoming Val-
ley Medical Center, Plains Town-
ship.
She was born on March 27,
1927 to Francis and Beatrice
Yachna Evans, and as daugh-
ter, wife, mother, grandmother,
great grandmother, sister, sister in
law, aunt and friend, flled many
roles with dignity and pride, and
brought smiles to all who knew
her. She was a proud graduate
of Duryea High School, Class of
1945, and treasured her relation-
ships with her friends. Prior to
her retirement, she was employed
in the area garment industry as a
seamstress. Her favorite role while
working as a seamstress was sew-
ing wedding gowns for Alfred An-
gelo. She was a member of Nativ-
ity of Our Lord Parish, Duryea.
Mildred will be greatly missed
by all those whose lives she so
generously and lovingly touched.
There was not a thing she wouldn’t
do to ensure the happiness and
well being of her family.
Though death saddens us, our
faith teaches us that we will one
day be with Mildred and our many
loved ones, and in this we fnd
hope. May she fnd peace with
those who have gone home to be
with our Lord. The family would
like to thank all who cared for her
during this time, but none more
than the staff of the ICU at Geis-
inger Hospital who have cared for
Mildred several times before and
ensured that her fnal hours were
surrounded with love and peace.
Also thank you to Rev. Sinnott
and Msgr. Gramalia for the care
and support that was shown to
Anna and her family.
She was proceeded in death by
her sister, Dorothy (Jim) Evans,
who passed away on March, 3,
2010.
Her marriage of 63 years to
Henry R. Levandoski was one
based on respect and trust, and
upon entering the large Levan-
doski clan, she truly loved every
minute of the fami-
ly and they, in turn,
treated her like a
sister.
In addition to
her husband, Hen-
ry, she is survived
by daughter Pamela Zbylicki and
her husband, Robert, of Pittston;
daughter Ann Levandoski of Dur-
yea; granddaughter Pamela Ann
Field and her husband, Shannon,
of Odenton, Md.; granddaughter
Samantha Garofano and her hus-
band, Andrew, of Stroudsburg;
great-granddaughter, Anna Eliza-
beth Field of Odenton, Md.; niec-
es and nephews.
AMass of Christian Burial was
Wednesday, March 27 in Holy
Rosary Church, Duryea, with the
Rev. Andrew Sinnott and Msgr.
Gramalia offciating. Interment
was in the parish cemetery, Dur-
yea. Memorial contributions may
be made to Holy Rosary School.
To leave the family an online con-
dolence or for further information,
please visit our website, www.pi-
ontekfuneralhome.com.
March 24, 2013
Mrs. Mildred T. Levandoski
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H appyBirth dayin H eaven
Jos eph ine M a ffei
Ba lberch a k
3/27/1934 -3/27/2013
W ewish you wereh eretoday,even
forju stalittlewh ile.
So wecou ld say“H appyBirth day”
and seeyou rb eau tifu l sm ile
Th eonlygiftstodaywill b e
th egiftsyou leftb eh ind.
Th elau gh ter,joyand h appiness,
preciou sm em ories,th eb estk ind
Todaywe’ll sitqu ietlyand
look atyou rpictu re
th ink ing of you with love,
h oping you ’redoing ok ayin H eaven
u p ab ove. M ayth eangelsh old you
closeand sing you ah appysong and
we’ll b esending wish esto you today
and all yearlong!
Deeply L oved a n d Grea tly M issed
You rL ovin g Hu sba n d,Children ,
Gra n dchildren ,Fa m ily a n d Frien ds.
F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
MARK KIESINGER,
FUNERAL DIRECTOR and SUPERVISOR
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SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 PAGE 1B SUNDAY DISPATCH S E C T I O N B
PEOPLE
PEEKING INTO
THE PAST
Marking 49
years since
1964 quake
Question:
In 1964, what oc-
curred in the city of
Anchorage, Alaska
that affected several
Pittston Area families?
1964 – 49 years ago
John Cosgrove traveled from Wash-
ington D.C. to Pittston to attend a din-
ner held by the Friendly Sons of St. Pat-
rick in his honor. Accompanying him
on his trip was Robert F. Kennedy, U.S.
Attorney General and brother of the
late President John F. Kennedy. Cos-
grove noted that he and those on the
trip noticed how much Kennedy had
enjoyed the event as he wished he could
have stayed longer stating, “it seemed
like a grand party, wonderful people.”
Noting that the trip was one of the first
by Kennedy since the assassination of
his brother, Neil Strawser, of CBS News
remarked, “it reminded him of the early
days in 1960 when he was assigned to
JFK.” In 2009, Cosgrove, who spent 70
years working in the media in Washing-
ton, D.C., and in public service, present-
ed to the Pittston Library, a check for
$50,000 along with his life’s collection
of books and memorabilia.
Key Clubs from Exeter, Pittston and
West Pittston announced that Opera-
tion Trees” was underway. Under the
supervision of Pittston Kiwanis Club’s
Agriculture Committee, members
would plant 3,000 seedlings on “silt de-
posits” visible from Slocum Avenue.
West Pittston Junior Women’s Club
presented “The Best of Broadway”
show at the West Pittston High School.
At the time, the Beatles had emerged
with a string of hits, including “Love
Me Do,” “Please, Please Me” and “She
Loves You” which began their journey
into the history books. Four club mem-
bers Shirley McDermott, Marlene Ju-
stick, Rosella Fedor and Patricia Fe-
dor donned wigs and guitars to perform
as the Fab Four in the show. According
to those who watched the rehearsals,
the act promised to be one that would
demand repeat performances.
1974 – 39 years ago
The Fine Arts Department of the
Duryea Women’s Club sponsored the
first Go Fly Your Kite Contest at the
Germania Fire Company grounds. Box,
plain, tailess and flat surface kites were
all deemed acceptable for judging. Mrs.
Joseph Mikiewicz chaired the event.
Plans were finalized for the Fourth
Annual West Pittston Cherry Blossom
Festival. Chairman, Stanley Hanczyc
reported the Pennsylvania State Police
Academy had agreed to have a mount-
ed color guard open the parade. Ned
Levey and Mrs. Drew Smith talked
with Wyoming Area senior high girls
who might be interested in seeking the
Cherry Blossom queen title, dances
were planned for people of all ages and
entertainment was scheduled for the
river bank common.
Mrs. Joseph Talerocki, along with
Mrs. Wayne Fassett, members of the
Wyoming Jr. Woman’s Club had spent
a great deal of time preparing the club’s
log book containing a summary of the
year’s activities. Mrs. Talerocki entered
it into the county level Class CCompeti-
tion and was pleased to announce along
with fellow club members Mrs. Gerald
Ludden Jr., Mrs. Martin Stakley the
log book had taken first place.
The Schooley Avenue Elementary
School held a chess tournament for
fifth and sixth-grade students. More
than 62 students participated in the
contest in which a participant had to
win two out of three matches to ad-
vance. Paul Porfirio defeated Leonard
Valenti and Paul Kolis to capture the
championship. According to the web-
site www.ichessu.com, “Chess is one
of the world’s most popular games; it
has been described not only as a game,
but also as an art, science and sport.
Chess is sometimes seen as an abstract
war-game. Teaching chess has been ad-
vocated as a way of enhancing mental
prowess.”
Using their famous “freeze” strategy,
the St. John High School Johnniettes
took the Scranton Catholic Girls Bas-
ketball League championship opener.
With only a two-point lead at the be-
See PEEKING, Page 2
By JUDY MINSAVAGE
His is a BLACK and WHITE
By JACK SMILES | jsmiles@psdispatch.com
This photo won a juried show in New York City. “The girl is throwing a ball up in the air. I said to myself, ‘I f I can
catch her with the ball out of the frame, she’ll looks like she’s dancing.’ She not only looks like she’s dancing, she
looks like she’s rejoicing. Quite by accident, you see those flags on her fingers. Then, in the foreground, you see that
freedom sign.”
“Something will catch my attention that reminds me of when I was
growing up and I try to capture that in the image.”
Phil Dente
WORLD
See WORLD, Page 5
F
or six years, the trappings of Phil Dente’s life were “a camera, a tripod, a bus ticket and
a change of clothes.” • He traveled around New England, the Mid Atlantic and the Mid-
west, crashing with friends or family or in low-rent rooms. He washed cars, sliced meat
and planted flowers for money to buy film and shot black and white photos for love. •When he
couldn’t afford film, he went out with his camera anyway. “Just to look and compose in the camera
and keep my brain sharp,” he said. • This was a guy with two masters degrees, but only one key
on his ring — for his parents’ house in West Pittston. He grew up there in the 1950s. His uncles,
Paul and Lawrence Argenio, were commercial photographers with a studio on Wyoming Avenue.
While Dente didn’t see commercial
photography as a career path, he devel-
oped a love for it as art. “I was capti-
vated by the magic of the dark room,”
he said. “You put a piece of paper in a
liquid and a picture comes out. It really
seemed like magic to me. Still does.”
Dente’s father, Anthony, worked in
a factory and in his own landscaping
business. His mother, Enez, “was femi-
nist before they invented the word.”
She used her maiden name, Argenio,
hyphenated with Dente, unheard of at
the time.
Dente graduated from the old West
Pittston High School in 1962 where art
teacher Bill Brown was an influence. “I
never forgot the way he treated art so
seriously,” Dente said.
After high school, Dente went to
Bloomsburg for a degree in educa-
tion. He taught mentally challenged
students in New Jersey and worked in
mental hospitals in Lancaster, Elmira
and Massachusetts. He got into com-
munity organizing for Vietnam protest
marches in Washington.
He moved to Michigan at the sug-
gestion of a friend, got a masters de-
gree in education at the University of
Michigan on a scholarship and took
a job with the federal government
“developing drop-in centers for high
school dropouts in inner-cities.”
Along the way, he married and di-
vorced but never divorced himself from
photography. Wherever he went, what-
ever he did, he shot black and white.
In the early 80s, he burned out on
alternative education. “I saw a poster
one day for Maine Photographic Work-
shops. I dropped everything, career,
paycheck and went up to Maine to
study photography.”
For a year, he immersed himself in
photography, taking workshops and
shooting 15 hours a day. That led him
to Ohio University where he got a mas-
ter of fine arts degree in photography.
Then he hit the road.
About 20 years ago, he came back to
West Pittston, in part, “to reclaim my
roots.”
It was then that a theme for his pho-
tography — the social landscape —
came into focus. “Before that, I shot a
lot of stuff, but it was a hodgepodge,
like my life.”
The switch from film to digital,
though inevitable, was sped up by
chance. About eight years ago, Dr.
Charles Scrobola Jr., who had just
bought a new digital camera, took his
old digital to the cigar store where
Dente works. “He plopped it down and
said, ‘Here, do something with this.’”
As it turned out, that was a pivotal
moment. Before he went digital, how-
ever, Dente vowed he would only do it
Dente found this bluegrass player
and his happy dog at a festival in
Benton.
www.timesleader.com SUNDAY DISPATCH PAGE 2 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 P E O P L E
Robert Semyon
Robert James Semyon, son
of Brandy Eggert ,of Kings-
ton, and Robert Semyon,
of Wyoming, celebrated his
11th birthday on March 27.
Grandparents are the late
Albert and Shirley Semyon,
of Wyoming; Ricky Pope,
of Wyoming; and Henry
Eggert, of Lake Harmony.
Great-grandmother is
Betty Knecht, of Tobyhanna.
Robert has a sister, Reese, 4
years old. A party was held in
his honor at Valley Aviation
in Forty Fort.
T
he Belvedere Hotel, Baltimore, MD, was the setting
for the Sept. 29, 2012 wedding of Melissa Decker
and Michael Barone, both of Baltimore, MD.
The bride is the daughter of Jeffrey and Gayle Decker,
of Duryea. Her maternal grandparents are Mr. William
Matthews, of Duryea, and the late Thelma Matthews.
Paternal grandparents are Mrs. Reva Decker, of Duryea,
and the late Robert Decker.
The groom is the son of Ms. Fran Barone, of Norris-
town, and grandson of the late Nado and Ruth Barone,
also of Norristown.
Eric Koehler, of Scottsdale, AZ, a friend of the couple,
officiated the ceremony.
Kathryn Kanzler, of Washington, DC, friend of the
bride, was the maid of honor. Elizabeth Akanowicz,
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was the matron of honor.
Amy Sanguedolce, of Pittston, friend of the bride, was a
bridesmaid. Grace Akanowicz, of Pittsburgh, cousin of
the bride, was a flower girl.
David Barone, of Delran, NJ, brother of the groom,
was the best man. Groomsmen were Colin Anderton, of
Norristown, friend of the groom; and Richard Cosgriff
Jr, of Exton, friend of the groom. Ushers were Jason
Decker, of Hummelstown, and Ryan Decker, of Duryea,
cousins of the bride.
Readings were performed by Mrs. Veronica Decker, of
Duryea, godmother of the bride, and Mrs. Kathy Regan,
of Hauppauge, New York, sister of the groom.
A ceremony and reception were held at the Belvedere
Hotel, Baltimore, MD.
The bride is a graduate of Pittston Area High School,
earned a Bachelor of the Arts in Psychology and a Bach-
elor of Science degree in Gerontology, from King’s Col-
lege. She earned a doctorate in Clinical Psychology from
La Salle University in Philadelphia. She is a licensed
psychologist and Director of Psychology Training at the
VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, MD.
The groom is a graduate of Wissahickon High School,
Ambler, and earned a Bachelor of Science degree in
Physics from Millersville University. He earned a Master
of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Syra-
cuse University and is employed by Lockheed Martin,
Baltimore, MD.
Following their wedding, the couple honeymooned in
Peru and Argentina.
Payge Debrann Pesotini, daughter
of Ronald and Heather Pesotini, of Du-
pont, celebrated her second birthday
on March 28. She is the granddaughter
of Richard and the late Debra Nesgoda,
of Pittston Twp.; Donna Saylor, of
Jenkins Twp.; and Ronald and Dawn
Pesotini, of Duryea. She is the great-
granddaughter of Michael and Irene
Kosik, of Dupont; the late Frank and
Amelia Nesgoda, of Dupont; Ronald
and Claire Pesotini, of Springbrook;
and the late Merle and Marge Saylor,
of Tunkhannock. Her godparents are
Sarah Power, of Pittston Twp.; and
Michael Kosik, of Endicott, NY. Payge
has a sister, Piper.
Jack Douglas White, son
of Ronda and Doug White, of
Pequannock, NJ celebrated
his 11th birthday on March
29. His grandparents are
May Ann and Ron Rinaldi,
of Dupont; Marion White,
of Wanaque, NJ; and the
late George White. Great-
grandmother is Irene Orloski,
of Dupont. Jack has a sister,
Grace, 9 years old and a broth-
er Luke, 5 years old. Jack is in
fifth grade and plays soccer,
basketball and lacrosse.
Caden Pawloski, son
of Glenn and Joelle
Pawloski,of Leesburg, VA
will celebrate his 12th
birthday on April 2. He
is the grandson of Joseph
and Dolores Valvonis, of
Westminster and Florence
Pawloski, of Mountaintop.
He is the great-grandson of
Sophie Valvonis, of Plains
Twp.
Allison Stephanie
Clark, daughter of Audra
Clark, of Hughestown and
Brian Clark, of TTaylor,
celebrated her fourth
birthday on March 30.
Maternal grandparents are
Chester Kaspriski Jr., of
Hughestown and the late
Mrs. Rosemary Kaspriski.
Paternal grandparents are
Mr. Barry Clark, of Illinois
and the late Ms. Nancy
Clark, of Aurora, IL. Ally
has a sister, Abigail, who
is 6 years old.
Brooke Neyman
Jameson Sciandra, daugh-
ter of Salvatore and Barbara
Sciandra, of Laflin, celebrated
her sixth birthday on Tuesday,
March 26. She is the grand-
daughter of Elaine Fisher, of
Pittston, and the late James
P. Fisher and Sam and Hilda
Sciandra, of uscon. Her great-
grandmother is Mary Scian-
dra, of Plains. Jameson has a
brother, Chase, 4 1/2 years old,
and a sister, Cameron, who
will be 1 year old in May. She
celebrated the occasion with
family and friends.
Chase Patrick Valeski will
celebrate his fourth birth-
day on March 31. Zachary
Mark Valeski will celebrate
his ninth birthday on April
10. Chase and Zach are the
children of Mark and Cyndi
Valeski, of Hughestown.
They are the grandchildren
of Linda and Chester Wruble,
of Duryea and the late Mark
and Rose Valeski. They are
the great-grandchildren of
Grace Kemler, of Duryea,
who celebrated her birthday
on March 15.
Emily Dessoye,
daughter of Bill and Kim
Dessoye, of Pittston,
celebrated her eighth
birthday on March 29. She
is the granddaughter of
Anne Thomas, of Hanover
Twp. and the late Betty
and Fran Dessoye. Emily
has two brothers, Tommy,
10, and Billy, 5.
Evan Mark McCoy, son of Jill
and Brian McCoy, of Duryea,
will celebrate his fifth birthday
on Thursday, April 4. He is the
grandson of Jacqueline and
Guy Fasciana, of West Pittston;
Mark McCoy, of Mechanic-
sburg; and Ann and Gordon
Webb, of Middletown. He is
the great-grandson of Betty and
Ralph Lininger, of Shippens-
burg. Evan attends Holy Rosary
pre-kindergarten and will play
t-ball this year for Dureya. He
has a abrother, Aiden, 8 years
old; and a sister Kira, 1 year
old.
Payge Pesotini
Evan McCoy Jameson
Sciandra
Brooke Elizabeth Neyman,
daughter of Sharlene Neyman,
of Hughestown and Doug Ney-
man, will celebrate her 11th
birthday on Tuesday, April 2.
She is the granddaughter of
Shirley and the late George
Cook, of Hughestown. Her
godparents are her aunt, Sha-
ron Cook, Gaithersburg, MD,
and Robert Lettieri, of Avoca.
Brooke takes tap and jazz
lessons at the Moosic Youth
Center and plays soccer for the
Pittston Stoners. She will cel-
ebrate her birthday with family
and friends at Sweet Frog.
Jack White
Caden
Pawloski
Chase and
Zachary Valeski
Emily Dessoye
Allison Clark
HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Barone
Decker-Barone
vows exchanged
Palladino-Selenski
engagement announced
J
anet and William Palladino, of Ridley Park, announce
the engagement of their daughter, Danielle Palladino,
to Stephen Selenski, son of Patricia and Stephen Selen-
ski, of Wyoming.
The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of the late Phyl-
lis and Caradino DiGregorio, of Springfield; Margaret
Palladino, of Philadelphia; and the late Edward Palla-
dino.
She is a 2001 graduate of Ridley High School, a 2005
graduate of Penn State University where she received a
Bachelor of Science degree in Finance and a 2009 gradu-
ate of Drexel Universitywhere she received her Masters
in Business Administration. She is employed by GSI
Commerce.
The prospective groom is the grandson of Jetta
Angelo and the late Leo Angelo, of Wyoming; and the
late Angie and Leonard Selenski, of Wyoming. He is a
2001 graduate of Wyoming Area High School and a 2005
graduate of Villanova University where he received a
Bachelor of Science degree in finance and economics.
He is employed by Goldman Sachs.
Following their December nuptials, the couple will
reside in Philadelphia.
Stephen Selenski and Danielle Palladino
ginning of the third quarter, Ann
Tierney and Kathy Pace played
“catch” with the basketball while
Karen Mikita, Sue Brown and
Kim Walsh weaved in and out of
the key, confusing the Dons of
Bishop Klonowski High School.
It was touted as one of the “best
games every played.” The Johnni-
ettes went on to beat St. Rose at
West Catholic to take the league
championship.
1984 – 29 years ago
“We’ll be back” Sam Mila-
zzo said of his Jenkins Township
company Milazzo Industries after
the business sustained a half mil-
lion dollars in damage during a
devastating fire. Al Savakinas,
assistant fire chief of Jenkins
Township, estimated about 75
firefighters, including those from
Pittston City and Laflin, com-
bined efforts to stop the fire. Mi-
lazzo’s father Joseph started the
business as a coal operation in
1929 and approximately 25 years
later the Milazzos added charcoal
production. The firm manufactur-
ers Qik Joe Ice Melt, among other
products.
Laura Scarantino, Katie
Toole, Charles Albertson, Mi-
chael Harrison, Michael Scian-
dra, Philip Strucke, Kenny Ro-
berto, Tracy Schartzer, Chris
Luke, John Cunius, Larry Chris-
tian and Diane Ridley were Lu-
zerne Avenue Elementary fourth-
grade students who received a
special gift from President Reagan
in response to letters they com-
posed in their reading class. Each
student received a copy of “The
President’s House” containing
items concerning the White House
and the President’s family.
Answer
In 1964, a devastating earth-
quake rocked the city of An-
chorage, Alaska, causing local
residents to worry about family
members living or vacationing
there. According to the web site
www. anchoragemuseum.org, “At
5:36 p.m. on Good Friday, March
27, 1964, Alaska was devastated
by an earthquake that registered
8.4 on the Richter scale, the stron-
gest ever recorded on the North
American continent. One hun-
dred fifteen people lost their lives
during the quake and the ensuing
tsunami or tidal wave, 33 were
swept to sea as they were stand-
ing on the wharf at Valdez. The
earthquake caused property dam-
age of more than $300 million and
was felt as far away as 800 miles
from the epicenter in Prince Wil-
liam Sound.”
“Never miss an opportunity to
make others happy, even if you
have to leave them alone in order
to do it.” - Author unknown
PEEKING
Continued from Page 1
SUNDAY, MARCH 31 2013 Page 3 SUNDAY DISPATCH www.timesleader.com F E A T U R E S
J
ennifer Hanson, DO, and Captain Ryan C. Rusnok,
DO, together with their families, announce their
engagement and upcoming marriage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Forrest and
Elaine Hanson, of Cheshire, CT. She is the grand-
daughter of Olga and Edward Skotnicki of New Brit-
ain, CT and the late Forrest and Margaret Hanson of
Naugatuck, CT.
Dr. Hanson is a 2002 graduate of Cheshire High
School in Cheshire, CT. She attained her Bachelor’s
degree in Biology from Saint Joseph’s University,
Philadelphia, in 2006. She received her Doctor of
Osteopathic Medicine from the Philadelphia College
of Osteopathic Medicine in 2010 and is currently
completing her Residency in Internal Medicine at
Abington Memorial Hospital, Abington.
The prospective groom is the son of Richard and
Cathy Rusnok, of Jenkins Township. He is the grand-
son of the late Frolindo and Pauline Spadi, of Jenkins
Township, and the late John and Theresa Rusnok, of
Dunmore.
Captain Rusnok was graduated from Pittston Area
High School in 1998. He received his Bachelor of
Science Degree in Biology with honors from The
University of Scranton in 2002. At that time, he
was also commissioned as an officer in the United
States Army. He was awarded his Doctor of Osteo-
pathic Medicine degree from the Lake Erie College
of Osteopathic Medicine in 2006. He completed
his surgical residency at Mercy Suburban Hospital,
East Norriton in 2011 where he also served as Chief
Resident from 2009 to 2011. Since completing a tour
in Afghanistan in 2012, Captain Rusnok has been
assigned as a surgeon at the base hospital in Fort
Riley, KS.
The couple will exchange vows on May 25, 2013,
at the Holy Resurrection Orthodox Cathedral in
Wilkes-Barre,. The date will also mark the 73rd wed-
ding anniversary of Dr. Hanson’s maternal grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Skotnicki. The newly-married
couple will then be feted to a wedding reception at
the Westmoreland Club in Wilkes-Barre.
Rusnok-Hanson
engagement announced
Jennifer Hanson, DO and Captain Ryan C. Rusnok, DO
Wyoming Area Catholic School in
Exeter announces the following:
DATES TO REMEMBER
March 28 – April 2, Easter holiday, no
school
April 3, classes resume
April 11, Parent envelopes will be sent
home
GRANDPARENTS MASS
The next mass to honor our grand-
parents for our sixth, seventh and
eighth-grade students will be held on
Friday, April 12. An invitation will be
sent out upon our return from Easter
break.
AUTISM AWARENESS DRESS
DOWN DAY - Students will be able to
dress down on Wednesday, April 3 for
a $2 charge. All money will benefit
Liv with Autism, a local non-profit
organization. Liv with Autism helps
promote Autism Awareness and
enhance the lives of people with Au-
tism. This fundraiser was organized
by sixth grader Elizabeth Kravitz. To
participate, put $2 in an envelope
marked “Autism Dress Down” and
hand it in to your homeroom teacher.
This dress down day is subject to our
normal dress-down day rules, which
are in the student-parent handbook.
RACE FOR COUGARS
Race for Cougars will take place
on Monday, April 8. This is a fun
day for all, but is also an important
fundraiser. There is still time to have
neighbors or relatives to send in
donations. Proceeds will be used for
the technology program.
READ THE MOST FROM COAST TO
COAST
Mrs. Theresa Sabetta, librarian, an-
nounces that on March 1, 58 students
at Wyoming Area Catholic School
engaged in valuable reading prac-
tice and took part in setting a new
national record in “Read The Most
From Coast to Coast.” These students
contributed to a new national record
of 4,409,622 Accelerated Reader
Quizzes passed in one day.
“Read The Most From Coast to Coast”
is a national Renaissance Learning
event that began last school year
and challenges students to break the
record for the number of Accelerated
Reader quizzes taken in one day. As
part of this event, the Web-based
program tracked quizzes passed
nationwide and shared results in real
time with an online quiz counter.
“Read The Most From Coast to Coast”
enabled students to take part in a
shared reading adventure while be-
coming better readers. Seeing a real-
time progress toward the goal was
fun for students and they enjoyed
being part of a national effort. They
were really excited when they topped
last year’s quiz-taking record.
All students who participated in this
nationwide challenge received a Cer-
tificate of Participation and an official
bookmark.
Students who participated are:
Kindergarten: Abigail Butler, Michael
Weiss, Lily Kasa, Katie Morgan, Mi-
chael Oncay, Jennifer Passeri, Mark
Talarico, Emily Davis, Jacob Ivey
Grade 2: Kayla Kovaleski
Grade 3: Molly Moran, Carissa Ben-
deravich, Samantha Casey, Joseph
Kasisky, Andrew Phillips
Grade 4: Gabrielle Morgan, Molly
Blaskiewicz, Shawna Casey, Michael
Tkach, Makaylee Crake, Lynzie
Skoronski, Matthew Sorick, Ethan
Kozden, Walter Smith, Olivia Pavilco,
Leana Lombardo, Christopher Hine,
Emma Anderson, Sarah Murphy,
Vaughn Rudloff, Jacob Van Horn
Grade 5: Ryan J. Reedy, Carl Yast-
remski, Ryan Gardjulis, Richard Mor-
ris, Kyle Potorski, Camryn Cassetori,
Ethan Cegelka, Kristopher Latoski
Grade 6: Emma Ulichney, Rebecca
Lalko, Tyler Mozelski, Danielle Morris,
Christian Holmes, Alex Van Horn,
Bianca Mazzarella, Josh Hartigan, Al-
lyson Laiuvara, Dominic Cirelli, Nicho-
las Prociak, Dylan Burwell, Mackenzie
Crake, Adiya Golden
Grade 7: Charles Kulick, Molly Poray,
Aidan Barney, Emily Kaluzny, John
Morris, Isabel Cherry, Dennis Har-
rison, Stephen Olson, Sarah Miller,
Jocelyn Kosik
Grade 8: Rachael Cochran, Nicolle
Cirelli, Madelyn Pavlico
Wyoming AreA CAtholiC neWs
Pittston Area students will continue
to be on Spring Break Monday, April 1.
School will resume on Tuesday, April 2.
HIGH SCHOOL
Attention juniors and seniors:
The SAT Reasoning Test will be given
at Pittston Area Senior Area High
School on Saturday, May 3. Registra-
tion deadline is Friday, April 5.
Interested juniors/sophomores must
register online at www.collegeboard.
com. Cost is $50. Be sure to mark both
of your High School Code 395417 and
the test center # 39-590, in Pittston,
PA.
Only juniors/sophomores who have
completed at least an Algebra I, Geom-
etry, and/or are currently enrolled in
an Algebra II, Trig, and/or Pre-Calculus
class should take the May SATs.
Juniors only, fee-waivers are available
upon request in the guidance office.
Students receiving free or reduced
lunch plans are eligible for an SAT fee
waiver. Also, paper applications are
available in the guidance office. For
more information, call Mrs. Kayden or
Ms. Alaimo at 654-2415, ext 2112.
Junior Leadership project
PA junior Troy Platukus, who is also
a participant in Junior Leadership,
Wilkes-Barre, has helped to organize
“The Amazing Race for Ruth’s Place
House of Hope.”
Junior Leadership is a program to
create young leaders by helping the
community. All the proceeds from this
event will benefit Ruth’s Place, which is
a shelter for homeless women.
“The Amazing Race” is a scavenger
hunt where teams of two to five people
will compete in various challenges. The
hunt will be held on Saturday, April 16
at Wilkes-Barre’s Public Square. Reg-
istration starts at noon and the cost is
$12 per person.
-Christine Briggs
MIDDLE SCHOOL
Reading and Math PSSA Assess-
ments
The PSSA Reading and Math Assess-
ments will be held from Monday, April
8 through and including Monday, April
15. They will be given to all students in
the sixth, seventh and eighth grades.
It is of extreme importance that all
students attend school on the days of
the test unless excused due to serious
illness. In addition, students should
have a good night’s sleep and a nutri-
tious breakfast on exam days.
»PSSA Science Assessments
The PSSA Science Assessments will be
given to all eighth-grade students on
April 22 and 23.
»Eighth-grade panoramic picture
The eighth-grade panoramic picture
will be taken on Tuesday, April 30. You
can order your picture today at www.
panoramaphoto.com, or by turning
your paperwork into the photographer
on the day of the picture. Don’t forget
to wear your school colors, class T-
shirts or make it a dress up day.
INTERMEDIATE CENTER
Science Fair/Poster Board Sale
Science Fair information has been sent
home to any student in grades 3, 4, or
5 who are interested. All proposals and
information must be turned in to and
proved by April 12. The Science Fair will
take place on May 6 and 7. This fair is
voluntary and students must adhere
to the guidelines provided. If you need
additional information, contact Mr.
Twardowski at the school.
The PTO will sell the poster board
required for students to complete their
science project in the Intermediate
School lobby every Wednesday during
homeroom for $4.
Pittston AreA sChool neWs
Earlier this month, the Wyoming Area Mid-
dle School Science Olympiad Team participat-
ed in the northeast PA regional competition at
Penn State Wilkes-Barre Campus.
The team finished in third place overall out of
a field of 24 teams and medaled in 10 out of 23
individual events. This included one silver medal,
four bronze medals, and five fourth -lace medals.
Congratulations to the following medal win-
ners: second place – Anatomy, Mike Murphy
and Ryan Murphy; third place - Dynamic Planet,
Michael Wall and Leah Moore; third place - For-
estry, Kaleigh Shission and Megan Dillon; third
place - Rocks and Minerals, Justine Buczynski
and Nina Sypniewski; third place - Mousetrap
Vehicle, Morgan Coolbaugh and Tristan So-
kach; fourth place - Science Crime Busters,
Lauren Perry and Krystina Stanczyk; fourth
place - Shock Value, Lauren Perry and Michael
Murphy; fourth place - Write it Do it, Ryan Mur-
phy and Michael Murphy; fourth place - Food
Science, Vicky Remley and Michael Murphy;
fourth place - Reach For the Stars, Leah Moore
and Ryan Murphy.
The entire team will advance to the state
competition to be held at Juniata College on
April 26, 2013.
WA middle school excels at regional science olympiad
Members of the Wyoming Area Middle School Science Olympiad Team who participated in the northeast PA regional competition at Penn
State Wilkes-Barre Campus are, from left, first row, Krystina Stanczyk, Leah Moore, Justine Buczynski, Megan Dillon, Nina Sypnewski,
Vicky Remley, Lauren Perry, Assistant Coach Clarise Bandru. Second row, Head Coach Rosemary Litwin, Michael Murphy, Morgan Cool-
buagh, Michael Wall, Tristan Sokach-Minnick, Kristi Stok, Austin Alder, Kaleigh Shission, Ryan Murphy, Mr. Ed Grivensky.
Pictured in the photo are high school students from Wyoming Area that participated in the annual Science Olympiad competition at Penn
State, Wilkes-Barre
PA students
compete in
olympiad
Pittston Area students re-
cently competed in the Regional
Science Olympiad Tournament.
Students competed in a variety
of science related events against
other school districts. Two stu-
dents, Kate Musto and Molly
Walsh, received first place med-
als in the “Write it/Do it” event.
From left, are Mr. Joe Caprari,
coach; Jasmine Gage, Kristen
Richards, Suraj Pursnani, Ju-
lia Shandra, Lea Garibaldi, Joe
Gubbiotti, Taylor Baloga, Neil
Murphy, Abbie Sheerer, Sarah
Velehoski, Kate Musto, Molly
Walsh, Eric Sklanka, Anna Mc-
Dermott, Virginia, Myrkalo,
Austin Elko, Mr. James Antho-
ny, coach.
Wyoming Area’s Tenth Street El-
ementary School sixth-grade students
recently completed a writing assign-
ment about composer Frederic Chopin
under the direction of music teacher
Miss Narda Sperrazza. The assignment
was part of Wyoming Area’s Writing
Across the Curriculum initiative. The
students’ work is displayed on a bul-
letin board near the music classroom.
From left, are Grace Jeffery, Jeremy
Harman, Jorge Trilla and Miss Narda
Sperrazza.
tenth-grade students
introduced to Chopin
639 Wyoming Avenue, Kingston • 287-9631
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Valentine’s Day was celebrated at Humpty Dumpty Kollege. Students exchanged cards, made bags and enjoyed an ice
cream party with sundaes. Above, members of the AM kindergarten class are, from left, first row, Elianna Lappano, Luca
DePietropaulo, Mark Anthony McNulty, Kimberly Le, Joseph Courtney, Colin Higgins. Second row, Kaitlyn Talipan, Max
Mihalka, Emily Savakinas, Adrianna Bertocki, Bryce Hearct, Gavin Feeney, Maxwel Gordon, Caeleb Shea, Anabele Viglione.
Third row, Jerry Walker, Ella Rosiak, Nicholas Rinaldi, Brian Hankey, Ashton Lepore, Bobby Smith, Brandon Smargiassi,
Camryn Karp, Patrick Zawierucho, R.J. Dolan, Caden Boettger, Julia Long and Madison Smolski. Below, members of the
p.m. Kindergarten class are first rowAvrie Klush, Beau Widdick, Domonick Salvo, Ava Puskar, Madeline Marinello, Chelsea
Akbar, James Serino. Second row, Emily Shovlin, Andy Reap, Amara Musto, Sudney Ratchford, Claire Helring, Kaitlyn Tali-
pan, Abigail Policare, Gianna Martinelli, Elizabeth Howells. Third row, Nico Cielo, Patrick Francis, Anabele Viglione, Lucia
Campenni, Ryleigh McDonnell, Gerianna Fath, Brady Baldricko, Brayden Shotwell, Alex Lewis.
Humpty Dumpty Kollege students celebrate Valentine’s Day
www.timesleader.com SUNDAY DISPATCH PAGE 4 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 F E A T U R E S
Holy Rosary pre-school students
learn about dental hygiene
Mrs. Mary Ma-
jewski, a dental hy-
gienist from Wat-
kins and Medura
in Dallas, visited
Holy Rosary Pre-
School recently to
give a dental pre-
sentation.
The children
learned many
things about their
teeth and how to
keep them healthy.
They also received
a dental goodie
bag, compliments
of Watkins and Me-
dura.
Mrs. Mary Majewski, a dental hygienist from Watkins and Medura, center,
visited Holy Rosary to give a dental presentation. From left, are Alexis
Szydlowski, Majewski and Cole Lisowski.
Chase Sciandra
demonstrates the
proper tooth brush-
ing technique on
Sammy the Snake.
SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 Page 5 TIMES LEADER www.timesleader.com F E A T U R E S
world
Continued from Page 1
A self-portrait of
Phil Dente. To see
more go to phil-
ipdente.com and
click on the gal-
leries called urban
landscapes, found
places, line items,
people and blue-
grass.
A backyard scene in Pittston. Note the West Pittston Methodist Church
across the river in the background.
In black and white, the shrubs by the West Pittston tennis courts look otherworldly.
Dente’s next ex-
hibit opens at the
Something Special
Bakery at 23 Wal-
nut St. in Kingston
(behind Abe’s Hot
Dogs) with an
opening reception
from 5 to 7 p.m.
on Saturday, April
20. The exhibit will
run until May 31.
It’s a joint exhibit
with Mike Burnside.
Called the Pond,
the exhibit is two
photographers’
interpretations of
the same pond.
if You go
Members of the Old Forge High School French Club recently collected and donated items to the Ronald McDonald
House of Scranton. Donated items included Easter baskets and toys as well as everyday items for the House. From left, first
row, are Gabrielle Verespey, Daicia Tompkins, Andrea DeSando, Taylor Marsico and Mary Cosentini. Second row, Ty Beck-
ner, Al;exis Tayoun, Alexis DiGregorio, Meredith Giglio, Erika Licciardone, Alyssa Kosek. Third row, Mrs. Colleen Moulin,
moderator; David Pietryka, Gabriella Monteforte, Cameron Carpenter, president; Melaina Pepsin, Mark Voyack , treasurer;
Kayla Grasso, vice-president; Janelle Jones and Jenna Loeffler.
old Forge students donate to ronald Mcdonald House
The Luzerne County Community College Alumni Association recently held its
23
rd
annual Fall Craft Festival at the college’s campus. The craft festival featured
more than 125 vendors from around the region. The festival also included raffles,
food vendors and children’s activities. Proceeds from the event benefit LCCC stu-
dent programs. Shown at the Craft Festival are, from left, first row, Lisa Owens
‘97, Muhlenburg, vice president, LCCC Alumni Association; Jennifer Pawlowski
‘88, Nanticoke, board member, LCCCAlumni Association; Bonnie Brennan Lauer
‘87, Shavertown, director, alumni relations, LCCC; Alissa Grimes, Bear Creek,
volunteer; and Mary Sullivan, Swoyersville, director, student life and athletics,
LCCC. Second row, Gloria Migatulski ‘88, Pittston, co-chair craft festival com-
mittee and board member, LCCC Alumni Association; Marissa Siepitowski, Nan-
ticoke, volunteer; Joan Siepitowski ‘87, Nanticoke, volunteer; Janet Kaczmarczyk
‘98, Mountain Top, volunteer; and Elaine Flanagan ‘98, Larksville, board member,
LCCC Alumni Association. Third row, Kim Neary ‘09, Huntington Mills, board
member, LCCC Alumni Association; Teddi Janosov, Sheatown, volunteer; Susan
Gilroy-King ‘10, Ashley, co-chair, craft festival committee; and JoAnn Chukunis
‘02, Plains, board member, LCCC Alumni Association. Fourth row, David Pem-
bleton, Jr. ‘95, CEC, CCE, Shickshinny, professor, food production management,
LCCC; Melissa Taney ‘03, Nanticoke, president, LCCC Alumni Association with
Jamison Taney; Melanie Mizenko, Ashley, volunteer; Ann Marie Schraeder ‘79,
Glen Lyon, secretary, LCCCAlumni Association; and Dana Daniels, Warrior Run,
volunteer.
lCCC’s Alumni Association holds Fall Craft Festival
A wee bit ‘o green at
wyoming Area Catholic
In honor of St. Patrick, Wyoming Area Catho-
lic Student Council in Exeter sponsored a col-
lection of $2 per student to allow the students
to enjoy a dress down day. Students were able
to wear jeans and green attire in honor of St.
Patrick. All proceeds went to Catholic Schol
Services. Student council officers are, from left,
first row, Bianca Mazzarella, treasurer; Sarah
Satkowski, president; Erika Serafin, vice presi-
dent; Samantha Yencha, secretary. Second row,
Christopher Tigue, principal; and Ann Marie
Walsh, eighth-grade teacher and Student Coun-
cil moderator.
if he could produce black and white pho-
tos as well as a darkroomcould. “Not only
could I do it as well, but more consistent-
ly and in less time. I have 80,000 images
now and those are just the ones I kept.”
He also vowed to keep the photos pure.
No Photoshop tricks. “That would be de-
ceiving the viewer.”
The move to West Pittston and the
switch to digital helped Dente get no-
ticed. Increasingly, his photographs were
accepted into exhibits where he made
some sales and juried shows, where he
won cash prizes, though he’s never been
motivated by money. “It’s more important
to me that I survived as a fine artist, con-
tent with what I did.”
His photos have been accepted in ex-
hibits at The Center For Fine Art Photog-
raphy, Fort Collins, Colorado; 1650 Gal-
lery in Los Angeles; Endless Mountains
Council for The Arts and the Everhart
Museum in Scranton, among others.
Just in the past couple weeks, two of
his photographs won first prizes in New
York Center for Photographic Arts jur-
ied shows. One of them in the category
“People at work and play” was selected
out of 1,000 entries and the other in the
category “Seasons” was selected from800
entries.
Dente’s favorite themes are urban
landscapes — including stark photos of
backyards and alleys in West Pittston and
Pittston which reflect his youth. “Some-
thing will catch my attention that re-
minds me of when I was growing up and I
try to capture that in the image.”
In this, he succeeds. Many of Dente’s
photos defy time. A photo taken yester-
day can look like a scene from the 1950s.
He also like wires. He cringes when
he hears someone say they are going to
crop telephone wires out of a photo. At
the MAC (Melberger Art Center) Gallery
in Scranton, he hung an exhibit called
“wires.”
The center is supported by West
Pittston resident Micky Melberger, whom
Dente considers a friend and influence.
“Just from being around him I learned
about things like the power of self-confi-
dence, perseverance and commitment.”
Dente’s landscapes reflect, rather than
avoid, man’s intrusion. “I don’t like to be
obvious. I won’t shoot a gas well. I want it
to be more subtle, to showhowwe always
manage to put our stamp on things.”
He’s gone throughMinoltas andNikons.
These days he shoots with an Olympus
OMD. It’s compact and travels well.
“I haven’t left home without a camera
in 25 years. Anything that captures my at-
tention is a subject. The whole world is a
pallet.”
www.timesleader.com SUNDAY DISPATCH PAGE 6 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 F E A T U R E S
Divine Mercy next Sunday
The Seventh Annual Celebration
of Divine Mercy Sunday will be
held April 7 at St. Maria’s Goretti
Church, Laflin Road, Laflin. The
celebration was moved from the
Oblates because the congrega-
tion has been growing.
Cathy Mack is the coordinator
of the feast and the Cennacle
Leader of the Eucharistic Apos-
tles of Divine Mercy. The theme
centers on the celebration of the
75th anniversary of St. Faustina’s
entering into Eternal Life.
Prior to the service, remarks and
excerpts from the Diary of St.
Faustina will be given by Cathy
Mack.
The itinerary includes: 1 p.m. -
Sacrament of Reconciliation with
five priests; 2 p.m. - Veneration
of the Image followed by the Holy
Sacrifice of Mass; 3 p.m. - Exposi-
tion of the Blessed Sacrament,
Chaplet of the Divine Mercy in
song, individual blessing of the
First Class Relic of St. Faustina.
Bethel United Methodist
532Main St., Avoca
457-2566
Pastor Sharon Dietz
282-0104
Sunday – Worship service, 11:15 a.m.
Communion first Sunday of each
month – non perishable food
items will be collected. Mondays
– Bible study, 6 p.m. alternating
each week with Brick UM Church,
Duryea.
First Thursday of each month –
food give-away, 4 to 6 p.m. for the
needy of Avoca and Duryea.
Brick United Methodist
935 Foote Ave., Duryea
457-4424
Pastor Sharon Dietz
282-0104
Sunday worship service, 9:45 a.m.;
Sunday School, 10:15 a.m. during
morning worship services for ages
3-12
Communion first Sunday of each
month – non perishable food items
will be collected.
Mondays – Bible study, 6 p.m. alter-
nating each week with Bethel UM
Church, Avoca; Miracle of Aware-
ness – coffee time, 6 p.m.; meeting,
7 p.m.
Thursday – New beginnings meet-
ing, 7 p.m. third Thursday of each
month – United Methodist Women
– 6:30 p.m.
Christian and
Missionary Alliance
317 Luzerne Ave., West Pittston
Meals have resumed at the Break-
ing Bread Soup Kitchen at the
church.
Christ Community Clothes Closet
will be open from 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Mondays, from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday
and Thursdays and from 6 to 8
p.m. Wednesdays.
First Baptist Church
Water Street, Pittston
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor
Phone: 654-0283
First Congregational UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue, West
Pittston PA
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handcapped acces-
sible.
Sunday, 11 a.m. Easter Sunday
Morning Worship
First Presbyterian Church
14 Broad St., Pittston
Rev. William N. Lukesh
Sunday worship 9:15 a.m.
United Methodist Church
Corner of Broad and Church
Streets, Pittston
Rev. Susan Hardman-Zimmerman
Phone: 655-4340
Sunday Worship Service 9:30 a.m.
Children’s Sunday School: 9:30
a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursday’s at 7
p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women: 2nd
Monday unless told otherwise
Website www.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340 leave message
Saturday, April 20 - Family Style
Roast Chicken Dinner and Bake
Sale - Take outs start at 4:30
p.m. - seating from 5 to 7. Dinner
includes 1/2 roast chicken - Family
Style mashed potatoes and gravy,
green beans, cranberry sauce,
pepper hash, dessert and bever-
age. For tickets call 603-1915 by
Saturday, April 13th - please leave
a message if no answer. Advance
purchase of tickets is recom-
mended - limited number of tick-
ets at the door. Tickets for adults
$9 and children under 10 - $5.
First United Presbyterian
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren, pastor
Phone: 654-812
First United Methodist Church
West Pittston
April 1 - 7 p.m. Administrative
Council
April 3 - 10 a.m., Mommy and Me;
6 p.m., Daisy Scouts; 7 p.m., Choir
April 4 - Spring tea
April 5 - Pizza sale
April 6 - 2 p.m., shower
April 7 - 10 a.m., sorship, Sunday
School, confirmation
Full Gospel Chapel
Avoca
Adult Sunday School, 9:30; Sunday
morning worship, 10:30 a.m.
Glendale Gospel Church
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township Sun-
day service, 10:45 a.m.
Harding Church
of Christ
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services, 10 a.m.; Sunday
School and church service, 11 a.m.
Call 388-6534
Holy Mother of Sorrows PNCC
212 Wyoming Ave., Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, pastor
Easter Sunday, 7 a.m. Resurrec-
tion Mass with Procession; 10:30
a.m. Easter High Mass
Daily Mass, 9 a.m. Monday
through Friday.
Sacrament of Confirmation will
take place on April 14, at 10:30
a.m.
Independent Bible Church
328 Main St., Duryea
451-0346
Inkerman Presbyterian
Main Street, Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 9 a.m.
Langcliffe Presbyterian
1001 Main St., Avoca
Moosic Alliance Church
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: Doug Jensen 457-6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday School
for all ages, 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning worship, 10:45
a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays, 7
p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays, 7:30 p.m.
Nativity Of Our Lord
Stephenson Street, Duryea
Mass Schedule:
Saturday: 4:00 pm Holy Rosary
Church
5:30 pm Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church
Sunday: 8:00 am Holy Rosary
Church
9:30 am Holy Rosary Church
11:00 am Sacred Heart of Jesus
Church
Daily (M-F): 7:00 am Holy Rosary
Church
First Communion students will
be attending a retreat at Fatima
Center in Dalton next Sunday,
April 7, from
10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The bus
will depart Sacred Heart Parking
Lot at 9:30 a.m. and return at
3:30 p.m.
Oblates of St. Joseph
Highway 315, Laflin
Masses are held at 7 a.m. daily
(Monday through Friday) in the
seminary chapel and at 8 a.m. on
Saturday morning. There are no
weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily from 9
a.m. to noon and from 3 to 6 p.m.
Office hours are 9:30 a.m. to
5 p.m. Monday through Friday;
evenings and weekends by ap-
pointment. Office phone number is
654-7542.
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m. every
Wednesday in conjunction with
the Novena to St. Joseph and St.
Joseph Marello.
St. Joseph Marello
William Street, Pittston
Please note: Saturday Masses will
be at 7:OO p.m.
FIRST FRIDAY: Masses at 7:30
a.m. and 11:30 a.m. with devotion
to the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
FIRST SATURDAY: Mass at 8:00
a.m. with prayers to the Blessed
Mother. The First Saturday devo-
tion to the Immaculate Heart of
Mary consists in attending Mass
and receive Holy Communion and
recite the Rosary
Holy Name Society will meet on
Monday, April 7, at 7 p.m. in the
Parish Center. New members are
most welcome.
St. Joseph Marello Altar & Rosary
Society will meet on Thursday,
April 11, at 7 p.m. in Mt. Carmel
Center. All tickets returns and
gifts must be given at this meet-
ing. Hostesses for this meeting
are Donna Delmonte, Kathy
Stella, Arlene Ardoline, Dolores
McGill, Judy Samartzsis, and
Theresa
Ormando. New members are
most welcome.
Altar & Rosary Society of St.
Joseph Marello Parish will be
hosting a spring raffle on Sunday,
April 14 in the Parish Center.
Doors open at 1:30 p.m., the
Raffle will be at 2:00 p.m.. Get
your admission tickets or raffle
tickets from any member, the
rectory 654-6902 or at the door.
Refreshments will be served.
Everyone is invited to attend this
fun filled afternoon.
The Red Cross will be holding a
Blood Drive in Mt. Carmel Center
on Thursday, April 25 from 1:30 to
6:00 p.m.. Give blood.
St. Joseph Marello Annual Golf
Tournament will be held on Sun-
day, June 9th at the Wilkes-Barre
Municipal Golf Course. Shotgun
at 8:00 a.m.. Dinner followed at
Mt. Carmel Center, William St.
Pittston. Registration forms are
at the entrance of the Churches.
**Reservation & Payment if
received by May 25 only $75 per
player or $300 per foursome.
Any Home Bound Parishioner
who would like to receive thwwe
Sacraments call the Rectory at
654-6902 and a priest will visit
them.
Anyone interested in renting our
Parish Banquet Hall or Meeting
Room should call Christine Silin-
skie, Hall Manager at 704-8861
for details and/or a tour of the
facility. Great for wedding recep-
tions, bridal showers, gradua-
tions, bereavements, seminars,
birthday parties, etc. Some 2013
dates are still available. Get yours
now!
Corpus Christi Parish
Immaculate Conception
Holy Redeemer churches
Luzerne Avenue, West Pittston
CORPUS CHRISTI PARISH
Immaculate Conception Church
605 Luzerne Aven. West Pittston
Holy Redeemer Church
Route 92, Harding
Easter Sunday, March 31 - Mass,
7:30 a.m., Immaculate Conception
Church; Mass 9 a.m., Holy Redeem-
er Church; Family Mass, 10:30 a.m.,
youth choir, Immaculate Concep-
tion Church
Our Lady of the Eucharist
535 N. Main St., Pittston
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 and 11 a.m.
Daily Mass: 8 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation (Con-
fessions)
Saturday from 3:30 to 3:45 p.m.
and by appointment
Masses will be celebrated at 8:30
and 11 a.m. on Easter Sunday,
March 31
School of Religious Education
Religious education classes will
resume at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday,
April 7. For more information, call
Sister Mary Ann at 654-0263.
Sacred Heart of Jesus
Lackawanna Avenue, Dupont
This week’s mass schedule is: Mon-
day through Friday at 7:00 a.m.,
Saturday at 4:00 p.m.and Sunday
at 8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m..
The rectory office will be closed
on Monday, April 1 in observance
of the Easter Holiday.
The Women’s Society will meet
on Tuesday, April 2 at 6:30 p.m. in
the church hall.
The Holy Name Society will meet
on Wednesday, April 3 at 6:30
p.m.in the church hall.
The Choir will meet at 6:30 p.m.
on Thursday, April 4, in the choir
loft. The Women’s Society will
hold their annual Bake Sale on
April 13 and 14 following all week-
end Masses. Donations of baked
goods will be accepted in the
church hall starting at 1:00 PM
on Saturday, April 13. Monetary
donations will also be accepted.
All profits will benefit the parish.A
Welcoming Mass will be held
for all the new members of our
parish on Sunday, April 7 at the
7:30 a.m. mass. Refreshments
will be served in the church hall
following the mass. Everyone is
welcome to come and meet our
newest parishioners.
CCD Calendar: April 1 - Easter
Monday - classes cancelled; April
8 - Class and report cards distrib-
uted; April 15 - Class and signed
report cards to be returned.
The Senior Outreach Committee
will hold a Health Fair on Satur-
day and Sunday, April 20 and 21
following all weekend masses. All
are invited to come and speak
with a variety of medical profes-
sionals.
-
Confirmation clarification: All stu-
dents who are currently in sixth,
seventh and ighth grades will
receive Confirmation in the fall.
All must complete their service
hours and have received service
hour logs for the parents to use.
St. John the Evangelist
Parish Community
35 William St., Pittston.
Phone: 654-0053
April 2 – Baptismal instruction
Altar and Rosary Society meeting -
April 8 at 2 p.m.
Holy Name Society meeting -
April 14 at 11 a.m.
Applications for Holy Name schol-
arships are available at the parish
center and must be received by
April 7.
St. John’s Lutheran
7 Wood St., Pittston
655-2505
stjohnspittston@verizon.com
Pastor: John Castellani
Organist: Marcia Colleran
Acolyte: Justin Peterson
Sunday service: 9:30 a.m.
St. John’s P.M. Church
316 Main St., Avoca
Pastor: Rev. Dale E. Pepper 780-
9587
Sunday service, 10 a.m.
Bible Study at 6 p.m. every other
Thursday.
St. Maria Goretti
Laflin Road, Laflin
Pastor: Monsignor Neil Van Loon
42redwood@comcast.net
Celebration of Divine Mercy Sun-
day April 7
The seventh annul celebration is
being relocated from the Oblates
of St. Joseph Seminary, Highway
315 to St. Maria Goretti Parish,
Laflin Road, Laflin. By God’s good
grace the congregation has been
growing and a larger church is
needed. Principal celebrant will be
Rev. Richard Cirba, assistant pastor
of St. John the Evangelist Parish
in Pittston. Cathy Mack is the co-
ordinator of the feast and Cenacle
Leader of the Eucharistic Apostles
of Divine Mercy This year’s theme
centers on the celebration of the
75th anniversary of St. Faustina’s
entering into Eternal Life. Prior to
the service, remarks and excerpts
for the Diary of St. Faustina will
be given by Miss Mack. Jesus
stated in fourteen revelations to
St. Faustina that the Sunday after
Easter be celebrated as the Feast
of Mercy.
1 p.m. Sacrament of Reconciliation;
2 p.m. Veneration of the image
followed by the Holy Sacrifice of
the Mass; 3 p.m. Exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament ,Blessing of the
First Class Relic of St. Faustina
March 31 EASTER SUNDAY -
Masses: 8:30 & 11 a.m.
St. Mary’s Polish National
Catholic Church
200 Stephenson St.
Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock, pastor
Phone 457-2291
Email:padre@saintmaryspncc.org
March 31 - Easter Sunday, 6 p.m.
Procession; 10 a.m., Mass
April 1 - 7 p.m., Mass
St. Monica’s Church
363 W. 8th St., West Wyoming
Office hours - 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday
Phone: 693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
Father Leo McKernan, pastor
Father Joseph Adonizio, visiting
priest
William Jenkins, deacon
Mass Schedule:
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.@ OLOS
;Sunday: 8:30 a.m. @ ST J;
11:00 a.m.@ OLOS
Daily Mass Schedule: Daily Mass
at OLOS – Tues, Wed., Fri. – 7:00
a.m.; Mon. & Thurs. – 7:00 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena – after
Monday Evening Mass. Rosary
and Chaplet of Divine Mercy -
Before Morning & Evening Masses
at OLOS site.
March 31st - Easter Sunday
Masses - 8:30 a.m. at SJ site &
11:00 a.m. at OLOS site.
Divine Mercy Ministry: of St. Moni-
ca’s will be meeting on Sunday
Evenings from 6:00 p.m. - 7:00
p.m. The mission of this youth
group is to lead our young people
into a loving, trusting relationship
with God through the Merciful
Heart of Jesus and His Church.
Coming Events:
Year of Faith: Thursday, April 4th
at 7:30 p.m., Deacon Bill Jenkins
will give a presentation on the
Divine Liturgy from the Second
Vatican Council following the 7:00
p.m. Liturgy.
Youth Meeting: Saturday, April
6th at 11:00 a.m. in the Church
Hall. All Junior High, High School
Students and young Adults are
welcome.
Divine Mercy Sunday: April 7th,
Mass at 11:00 a.m.; from 12 - 2
p.m. break for lunch; at 2:00 p.m.
there will be readings from the
Diary of St. Faustian - Confessions
will be available for this hour; at
3:00 p.m. the Chaplet of Divine
Mercy will be sung, the Bless-
ing of the Divine Mercy Image
- concluding with Veneration of
the Image.
Bishop’s Award: Six young
parishioners of St. Monica’s
have been awarded the Bishop’s
Youth Award. The awards will be
presented by Bishop Bambera in
St. Peter’s Cathedral in Scranton
on Tuesday, April 16th at 7:00
p.m. to Gabrielle Alberigi, Emily
Kneeream, Maria Marianacci,
Jared Saporito, Teresa Toomey, &
Ashley Vikara.
Healing Service: Father Pio Man-
dato and the Capuchin Sisters of
Nazareth will be present at St.
Monica’s for a Healing Service on
Thursday, April 18th at 7:00 p.m.
Spring Sweepstakes: It’s time
again for the Sweepstakes’ Tick-
ets…They are in the mail. This is
an important Fundraiser for the
Parish and we appreciate your
past participation. Tickets may
be available at the Parish Office.
More details will follow.
St. Peter’s Evangelical
Lutheran Church
100 Rock St., Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1008
9 a.m. Sunday School and confir-
mation classes
10 a.m. Worship service
Easter, 9 a.m.
Queen of the Apostles
715 Hawthorne St., Avoce
457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
Daily Masses: 8 a.m. (Wednesday
at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tuesdays
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday at 4
p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30 and 11 a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
Queen of the Apostles Parish’s
Easter Sunday Masses will be cel-
ebrated today, March 31 at 8 and
11 a.m. at the church. The Mass of
the Resurrection Mass will take
place at 9:15 a.m.
The nine-day Divine Mercy
novena will continue through
Sunday, April 7. The novena will
be prayed along with the Divine
Mercy Chaplet in song after the
weekday Masses from April 1-5.
Novena booklets are available at
the side entrance and vestibule
for your use in continuing the
novena at home.
There will be a pig roast planning
meeting Wednesday, April 3 at
7:45 p.m. in the rectory
The pastoral council will meet
Monday, April 8 at 7 p.m. in the
rectory.
The women’s guild will meet
Tuesday, April 9 at 7 p.m. in the
rectory.
The social concerns/respect life
committee will meet Thursday,
April 11 at 7 p.m. in the rectory.
The buildings and grounds com-
mittee will meet Monday, April 29
at 6:30 p.m. in the rectory.
The finance committee will meet
Tuesday, April 30 at 7 p.m. in the
rectory.
The parish will have a pig roast
Sunday, July 21 from noon to 4
p.m. on the ground of St. Mary’s
School, 742 Spring St.
The parish will have the sixth
annual St. Mary’s Classic Golf
Tournament
Sunday, May 5 at the Pine Hills
Country Club, Taylor. Registration
is at noon with a shotgun start at
1 p.m.
The format is captain and crew.
Awards will be given for Circle of
Gold, low score, closest to the pin,
multiple flight winners, longest
drive (men and women) and hole
in one (cash prize). All tourna-
ment registrations must be ac-
companied with payment in order
to ensure a full field.
The parish has exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament and holy hour
prayers every Tuesday at St.
Mary’s Church, 715 Hawthorne
St., following the 8 a.m. Mass.
Throughout the Year of Faith, the
chaplet of Divine Mercy will also
be prayed.
At 7:30 p.m. the rosary is prayed
before benediction and repos-
ing of the Blessed Sacrament.
Anyone who can spend one hour
weekly at adoration on a regular
basis is asked to call Ann Jake at
457-3521 or the parish office.
Second Presbyterian
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
654-141
Sunday, March 31 - 7 a.m. – Easter
Sunrise Service; 11 a.m.- Easter
Morning celebration
Trinity Episcopal
Spring Street and Montgomery
Avenue, West Pittston
Sunday Holy Eucharist: 11 a.m.
every Sunday.
Easter Day, March 31, 11 a.m. Eas-
ter Sunday Holy Eucharist
Youth Program: 10:45 a.m. every
Sunday.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-month-
ly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday.
Music Together classes: Fun and
music for infants and children
through age 5 accompanied by
a parent or caregiver. Spring
semester of Music Together begins
April 9.
For information email musicare-
project@hotmail.com. Dates are
March 11, 18 and 25.
MATTERS of
faith
The Corpus Christi Holy Name Society will hold its 28th
annual Father/Son Communion Breakfast following the 7:30
a.m. mass on Sunday, April 7 in the Immaculate Conception
Church hall. This year’s principal speaker will be Sunday Dis-
patch Editor Ed Ackerman.
Tickets at $10 for adults and $5 for children ages 10 years
and younger are available from the ushers after all masses or
can be purchased by contacting the church rectory.
Officers and members of the Holy Name Society finalizing
plans for the annual Father/Son communion Breakfast are,
fromleft, seated, Bob Williams, committee co-chairman; Mon-
signor John Sempa, pastor and moderator; Tony DeAngelo,
secretary. Standing, erry Yakobitis, president; Joe Gentile,
treasurer; Chas Alfano, committee co-chairman.
Ackerman to speak at Communion Breakfast
The Most Rev. Joseph C. Bambera, D.D., Bishop of Scranton, administered the Sacrament of Confirmation
at Our Lady of the Eucharist Parish Community, Pittston on March 14. Students completed a program of
study under the direction of Rev. Thomas J. Maloney, pastor, and catechists Mr. Patrick Leonard, Mrs. Betty
Yeremsky,and Sister Mary Ann Cody, IHM. From left, first row, are Elana Amelia Clare Clancy, Veronica
Lynn Rizzo, Erika Theresa Anne Stempien, Nicole Melissa Emily Wartella, Rev. Thomas J. Maloney, Most
Rev. Joseph C. Bambera, Sabrina Ryanne Sophie Smitley, Morgan Elizabeth Tomaszewski, Gianna Dorothea
Emma Galli, and Courtney Margaret Faith June. Second row, Christopher Richard Smitley, Michael Chris-
topher Masulis, Kyle Philip Matthew O’Fier, John Paul Timothy Brady,Troyel Wayne Francis Klush, Joseph
Charles June, IV, Justin Ryan Joseph Fitzpatrick, Matthew John Costello, Trevor Thomas Tigue, Tyler John
Boylan, Christian Jacob Patrick Godlewski, Jordan Scott Washko, Joseph Patrick Robert, and Brian Hugh
Miller, Jr. Third row, Jillian Rose Marie Scanlon, Brooke Marie Clare Gorey, Genevieve Marie Grace Fred-
erick, Victoria Margaret Elisabeth McNulty, Mackenzie Nicole Grace Gable, Taryn Drew Andrew Ashby,
Haley Marie Juliana Perrego, Ashton Andie AndrewAshby, Samantha Nichole Gemma Gorto, Vienna Marie
Kathryn Donnelly, and Sarah Elizabeth Mary Robinson.
Confirmation celebrated at Our Lady of the Eucharist
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 PAGE 7
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classified ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classifieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
$
249
$0 Down Payment
$0 Security Deposit
$249 1st Month Payment
$125 Registration Fees
• Automatic
• All Wheel Drive
• 32 MPG Highway
• Bluetooth
• IIHS Top Safety Pick
$374
Total Due at Signing
PER MONTH LEASE
36 MONTHS
30,000TOTAL MILES
570-346-4641
1-800-982-4054
DAB-01
w w w. m i n o o k a s u b a r u . c o m
HOURS: MONDAYTHRUTHURSDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M.
FRIDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY 9:00 A.M. TO 2:00 P.M. • CLOSED SUNDAY
EPA estimated fuel economy for 2013 Legacy 2.5i CVT models. Actual mileage may vary. Tax not included. Financing contingent on lender
approval. Other lease terms available. Call for details.
2013 SUBARU
LEGACY
2.5i
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK
VEHICLES
WANTED!!
ŠCALL ANYTIME
ŠHONEST PRICES
ŠFREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
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570-301-3602
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LOST. Jack Russell
miniature pincher
mix, rusty orange,
resembles Chihua-
hua on W. Division
St., W-B on 3/20/13.
If found, please call
570-266-3432
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that letters of
Administration have
been granted in the
Estate of MADELON
BALAS, late of the
Township of Plains,
who died October
30, 2012. All per-
sons indebted to
said Estate are
requested to make
payment and those
having claims to
present the same,
without delay, to the
Administratrix,
ANNETTE BALAS
and her Attorneys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 N.MAIN ST.
PITTSTON, PA
18640
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PUBLIC NOTICE
PLEASE TAKE
NOTICE that the
Board of School
Directors of the
Pittston Area
School District has
scheduled a public
hearing for
Wednesday, April
10, 2013 at 6:30
p.m., prevailing
time, at the Pittston
Area Primary Cen-
ter, 210 Rock St.,
Hughestown,
Luzerne County,
Pennsylvania for the
purpose of consid-
ering permanently
closing the school
building known as
the Pittston Area
Kindergarten Cen-
ter and also known
as the Ben Franklin
Kindergarten Cen-
ter located at 611
Walnut Street,
Dupont, Luzerne
County, Pennsylva-
nia. The public is
invited to attend.
DEBORAH A.
RACHILLA
Board Secretary
135 Legals/
Public Notices
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Letters
of Administration
have been granted
in the Estate of
Doris Kaspriskie,
late of Dupont,
County of Luzerne,
Commonwealth of
Pennsylvania, who
died on January 24,
2012, to Gary
Kaspriskie, of 208
Smith Street,
Dupont, PA 18641.
All persons indebt-
ed to said estate
are required to
make payment, and
those having claims
or demands, to
present the same
without delay to
Gary Kaspriskie,
Administrator of the
Estate of Doris
Kaspriskie, c/o
Dominick P. Pan-
nunzio, Esquire,
294 Main Street,
Dupont, Pennsylva-
nia 18641
LAW OFFICES OF
DOMINICK P.
PANNUNZIO
294 Main Street
Dupont, Pennsylva-
nia 18641
Collect cash, not dust!
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829-7130!
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby
given that Letters of
Administration have
been granted in the
Estate of KATHER-
INE R. WILLS, A/K/A
KATHERINE WILLS,
late of the City of
Wilkes-Barre, who
died October 12.
2012. All persons
indebted to said
Estate are request-
ed to make payment
and those having
claims to present
the same, without
delay, to the Admin-
istratrix, KATHY
ORR and her Attor-
neys.
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 North Main St.
Pittston, PA 18640
150 Special Notices
STOCK MARKET
INVESTING
Spend one-on-one
time with a
successful 15 year
investor offering
in-home assistance
with:
* Retirement
accounts
* Stock research
* Portfolio
Assessments
570-301-6276
www.Invest-EZ.com
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310 Attorney
Services
DIVORCE No Fault
$295 divorce295.com
Atty. Kurlancheek
800-324-9748 W-B
FREE Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
380 Travel
Black Lake, NY
Come relax & enjoy
great fishing &
tranquility at it’s finest.
Housekeeping
cottages on the water
with all the
amenities of home.
NEED A VACATION?
Call
Now!
(315) 375-8962
daveroll@black
lakemarine.com
www.blacklake4fish.com
409 Autos under
$5000
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
412 Autos for Sale
FORD ‘08 FOCUS SE
Silver, black interior.
4 door sedan.
Power windows
and locks, CD. 104k
highway miles.
Runs excellent.
$7200 negotiable.
570-578-9222
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Find A NewFriend
In The Times Leader Classified
To place an ad call 829-7130
PAGE 8 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
250 General Auction 250 General Auction
566 Sales/Business
Development
548 Medical/Health
566 Sales/Business
Development
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
566 Sales/Business
Development
548 Medical/Health
554 Production/
Operations
Palletized
Bluestone/
Flagstone Auction
(600) Pallets of Cut Stone /
Landscape Stone (600)
Inventory Reduction For:
Johnson Quarries, Inc.
Le Raysville, PA 18829
(Lawton / Wyalusing Area)
Saturday April 6, 2013
9:30 AM
Auction To Be Held At
Johnson Quarries,
15962 Route 467, Stevensville, PA. From
Lawton: Take Route 706 To 467, Go 2
Miles to Auction Site. From Wyalusing:
Take Route 706 To Route 467.
(600) Pallets Of Quality Bluestone,
Pattern Pavers, Landscape Stone, Etc.,
(600)
Including: Thermaled Full Colored & Blue
Pattern, Asst. Dimensions & Thicknesses;
Full Color Patter, Asst. Dimension &Thick-
nesses; Lilac Pattern, Asst. Dimensions &
Thicknesses; Full Color, Blue & Red Colo-
nial; Full Color Irregular; Full Color Irreg-
ular Tumbled; Full Color & Lilac Irregular
/ Standup; Lilac Colonial; Blue Gaged
Colonial; Tumbled & Regular Bluestone
Pavers, 1’ x 1’ & 1’ x 18” & Asst. Sizes;
Blue Treads, 3’ x 12-18”; Creek Stone;
Snapped Colonial; Other Asst. Types &
Varieties; Field Stone Rounds; Natural
Slabs; Steps; Etc.; Palletized Stone To Be
Sold By The Pallet Or By Square Ft. And
Take The Pallet Full. Alike Pallets & Types
Will Be Offered By The Pallet And Buyer
Can Take Multiple Pallets. Selling Arrange-
ments Will Depend On Types, Varieties And
Way Stone Is Palletized. Types, Sizes, Sell-
ing Terms & Other Pertinent Info Will Be
In Detailed Catalog On Our Website By
March 27, 2013 @ www.manasseauc-
tions.com;
Loading Of Stone: Stone Will Be Loaded
For Buyer Free Of Charge For 2 Weeks Fol-
lowing Auction, From Monday – Friday
8:00AM – 3:00PM, By Appointment.
Trucking Available By Contacting Wyalus-
ing Transport, (570) 744-1284 / (570) 744-
0100
Terms & Conditions: 13% Buyers Premi-
um Will Be Charged. Payment In Full Day
Of Auction In Cash, Good Check or Major
Credit Card, 3% Discount For Payments
Made By Cash Or Check. Nothing
Removed Until Settled For.
Auction Preview: Friday, April 5, 2013
From 12PM To 4PM & Day Of Auction
From 8AM Until Auction Start Time.
Auctioneers Note: The Johnson Family
Are Reducing Their Stone Inventory; These
Are All Top Quality Items, Not Seconds;
All Selling Absolute To The Highest Bid-
der, Plan To Attend. Buy Your Spring
Inventory Early In The Season Here &
Homeowners Plan To Buy For Your Spring
Projects!!
Mel & Matt Manasse
PAAuctioneers License
# AU571L & AU3517L
Sales Managers & Auctioneers
Whitney Point, NY
607-692-4540 / 1-800-MANASSE
www.manasseauctions.com
Friendship House is looking for
Mental Health Professionals
to join our School Based Behavioral
Health Teams in Scranton!!
The MHP will provide therapy as a part of a
multi-disciplinary team for children and their families
using individual, group and family therapy.
Qualifications include MSW/LSW/LCSW/NCC or license
in related field required. Clinical experience
with children strongly preferred.
Full Time Positions Currently Available!!
Please reply to: recruiter@friendshiphousePA.Org
Visit us On-Line at www.friendshiphousepa.org
E.O.E/L.E.P
IMMEDIATE POSITIONS IMMEDIATE POSITIONS
AVAILABLE AVAILABLE
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS, INC.,
A LEADING COMMERCIAL MODULAR
MANUFACTURER IS PRESENTLY
TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR THE
FOLLOWING POSITIONS
ALL SKILL LEVELS NEEDED: ALL SKILL LEVELS NEEDED:
• SKILLED TILE SETTER
• SKILLED ROOFERS/SIDERS
• PLUMBERS
• ELECTRICIANS
• SPACKLERS W/TOOL EXPERIENCE/
DRYWALL FINISHERS
• ROUGH AND FINISH CARPENTERS
• MIG WELDERS
• CONCRETE FINISHERS
• UTILITY (MULTIPLE TRADE
SKILLS & EXPERIENCE)
COME JOIN THE DELUXE TEAM! COME JOIN THE DELUXE TEAM!
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT:
YOUR LOCAL CAREER LINK
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS, INC
or 499 WEST THIRD STREET
BERWICK, PA 18603
DELUXE BUILDING SYSTEMS IS A
DRUG FREE FACILITY,
PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG TESTING
WILL BE REQUIRED.
INSIDE SALES ASSOCIATE -
CUSTOMER SERVICE
Full time position created for busy office-
warehouse setting in Scranton.
8am-5pm Mon-Fri. Parking is free.
Person must have the following skill set:
Professional, ability to multi task and take initiative working with
customers and sales team.
-Inbound Call handling – orders, product information,
availability, pricing
-Client proposals – set pricing
- Handling of order changes / returns
- Monitoring of all queues and identification and handling
of all issues related to in-process orders
- Service call and request handling
- Complete administrative support of outside salespersons
- Handling of walk-in and new / unassigned phone clients
- Excellent computer entry MS Office and database.
Other duties will be reviewed. 2-4 years in high level customer
oriented position and Associate Degree in Business is preferred.
Salary is pending experience. Benefits after 90 days with
paid time off after 6 months.
Apply online with application at: www.papaper.com
Application must be completed to be
considered for phone interview.
EOE and Drug Free Workplace
412 Autos for Sale
MERCEDES-BENZ ‘12
C300
4Matic Sport
Sedan 4-Door 3.0L
AWD. Only 7,700
miles. Black
exterior & interior.
Premium 1 pack-
age. Garage kept.
Like new $32,000
570-881-0866
To place your
ad Call Toll Free
1-800-427-8649
TOYOTA ‘04 CELICA GT
112K miles. Blue,
5 speed. Air,
power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sun-
roof, new battery.
Car drives and
has current PA
inspection. Slight
rust on corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
439 Motorcycles
SUZUKI ‘01 VS 800 GL
INTRUDER
Garage kept, no
rust, lots of
chrome, black with
teal green flake.
Includes storage
jack & 2 helmets.
$3600
570-410-1026
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
CHEVROLET `98
SILVERADO 1500
EXTENDED CAB LS
Runs great! 211,000
miles, 4x4, new
windshield, alter-
nator, front wheel
studs, spark plug
wires, ignition mod-
ule, brakes, throttle
body gasket, 3 oxy-
gen sensors, fuel
pump, tank, & filter.
New tires with alloy
rims. New transmis-
sion. $4,000, OBO.
570-793-5593
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
FORD ’95 F150
4x4. 1 Owner.
91K. 4.9 engine,
auto. Runs
great. New
paint, stake
body with
metal floor.
570-675-5046.
Leave message,
will return call.
REDUCED!!!
NOW $3,595
506 Administrative/
Clerical
PAYROLL
Seeking a full time
payroll person
located in
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.
Candidate must
have experienced
payroll administra-
tion using an
inhouse payroll
system to process
payroll, quarterly
reports, yearly tax
returns and annual
W2 forms. Must
maintain a high
level of confiden-
tiality. Please
send resume to:
The Times Leader
BOX 4340
15 N. Main Street
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18711
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509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CARPENTERS
NEEDED
Call 570-654-5775
HARDSCAPE AND
LANDSCAPE
PERSONNEL
Hiring for crew
leader and general
laborers. Please
call 570-760-0458
513 Childcare
TEACHER ASSISTANT
Year-round;
approximately 34
hours/week;
Associate Degree &
experience a plus.
Competitive
salary/no benefits.
Send resume to the
Cookie Corner
272 West 8th Street
West Wyoming
693-3556
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
RESIDENT MANAGER
Upscale apart-
ment community
in Wilkes Barre,
PA seeks resident
manager. Manag-
er is responsible
for overseeing the
entire apartment
operations.
Friendly and
organized. Good
salary and bene-
fits. Please send
resume and salary
requirements to:
agreen@the
manorgroup.com
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
522 Education/
Training
FORTIS INSTITUTE
FORTY FORT
Exciting Teaching
Opportunity
Part time instructor
position in CDL
program. The ideal
candidate will have
3 plus yrs work
experience in the
trucking industry
and a valid CDL.
Teaching experi-
ence a plus, but not
required.
Fax resume to:
570.287.7936
or mail to:
Director of
Education
166 Slocum Street
Forty Fort PA 18704
GIRLS HEAD
BASKETBALL
COACH
Act 34 – Act 151 –
Act 114 Clearances
required and all pre
employment
requirements in
accordance with
district policy
salary as per con-
tractual agreement
applications will be
received in the
office of the
Superintendent
from Monday,
March 25th, to
Wednesday,
April 10th, 2013
Dr. Michael
Garzella,
Superintendent,
Pittston Area
School District
5 Stout Street,
Pittston, PA 18640
Wyoming Area
School District is
accepting
applications for the
following positions:
HEAD GIRLS
VOLLEYBALL COACH
HEAD GIRLS
SOCCER COACH
Please submit a
resume, application,
general application,
up-dated clearance
forms and letters of
recommendation to
the attention of Mr.
Joe Pizano, Athletic
Director, Wyoming
Area School District,
20 Memorial Street,
Exeter, PA., 18643,
by Tuesday, April
9, 2013.
542 Logistics/
Transportation
ASPHALT
PAVING CREW
Experienced
asphalt operators
and laborers. Call
570-825-2688
Drivers:
BOLUS BOLUS
FREIGHT FREIGHT SYSTEMS SYSTEMS
NOW HIRING
CLASS A CDL
DRIVERS
Make up to
$1400 Weekly!
Immediate
openings for:
•Day-Trip/Local
•N.E Regional
•Over-The-Road
•Mon-Fri work
week
•No Touch Freight
•Weekends
Optional
•Spend more time
at home!
Excellent
Mileage Pay
Plus:
•$1200 Safety/
Performance
Bonus
•$6000 Average
Accessorial Pay
•Flexible
Work Schedule
•Part-Time/Week-
end runs also!!
-EOE, Holidays,
Health Packages,
401K, Vacation,
and much more!
Call at:
(570) 342-1903
1-800-444-1497
ext.721
548 Medical/Health
MEDICAL
31 bed Skilled
Nursing Facility
has openings for
Part time Human
Resources/Payroll
Coordinator/
Receptionist and
CNAs for 7am-
3pm and 3pm to
11pm shifts.
Please apply: 245
Old Lake Road
Dallas, PA 18612
(570) 639-1885
E.O.E.
551 Other
CERTIFIED MASSAGE
THERAPIST
Hiring Part-time and
full time. For our
Scranton & Wilkes
Barre locations.
For interview call
570-817-1070.
554 Production/
Operations
EXPERIENCED
FOREMAN AND
EQUIPMENT OPERATOR
A team leader who
can oversee
commecial/residen-
tial projects.Wages
commensurate
with experience.
Available benefits
include 401k plan,
and health & dental
plan. If you are
looking to join a
quality workforce of
a long-standing
landscaping
company in busi-
ness for forty years,
we would like to
meet you.
Please Apply To:
Green Valley
Landscaping, Inc.
52 REESE ST.,
PLAINS, PA. 18702
EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY
EMPLOYER
PRODUCTION
WORKERS
Local window mfg.
Company is seek-
ing experienced
line operators.
Starting rate
depends on experi-
ence. Attendance
and Productivity
Bonus are poten-
tial. Health, Dental,
Vision & 401K Plan
available upon full
time stats. Don’t
miss out on an
opportunity to join
a great team!
Apply in person to:
Interstate Building
Materials, Inc.
Attn: Director of HR
322 Laurel St.
Pittston 18640
557 Project/
Program
Management
LAWN MAINTENANCE
CREW FOREMAN
Experience in all
aspects of lawn
care is preferable.
Full time position
with seasonal
overtime available.
Please Apply To:
Green Valley
Landscaping, Inc.
52 Reese St.,
Plains, Pa. 18702
Equal Opportunity
Employer
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
SALES
Commission shed
sales in Scranton.
Our busy season is
here; need a
self-motivated
commission-driven
salesperson with
experience who is
local. Experience
preferred but will
train the right per-
son. Phone: 570-
725-3439 or Fax:
570-725-3309
or email
ekvs@pcfreemail.com
Find Your Ideal
Employee! Place an
ad and end the
search!
570-829-7130
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
Northeast PA sales
route for sale. Ten
year established
customer base.
147K in sales in
2012. One man
operation. Unlimited
growth potential.
Retiring, priced to
sell. Serious
Inquiries Only.
570-855-5170
630 Money To Loan
“We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED.” Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say they’ve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
It’s a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
ATTENTION VENDORS
Accent items,
ceramics, baskets,
holiday items,
glasses, much
more. ALL EXCEL-
LENT PRICES AND
IN EXCELLENT
CONDITION.
570-675-5046
after 5:30 P.M.
YEARBOOKS.
COUGHLIN (30)
1928-2000. GAR -
(18)) 1937-2006,
MEYERS (15) 1953-
2003, PITTSTON (6)
1967-’75, WVW (12),
1967-2000,
KINGSTON (11)
1932-’52, HAZLE-
TON, (8) 1940-’61,
PLAINS, (3) 1966-
’68, HANOVER 1951-
’74. Prices vary
depending on con-
dition. $20-$40
each. Call for further
details and addition-
al school editions.
570-825-4721
arthurh302@
aol.com
732 Exercise
Equipment
LEG EXTENSION
MACHINE Hammer
Strength ISO-Later-
al. 4 years old, plate
loaded, platinum
frame, navy uphol-
stery. New condi-
tion. $1000. SEATED
L E G C U R L
MACHINE, Ham-
mer Strength ISO-
Lateral. 4 years old,
plate loaded, plat-
inum frame, navy
upholstery, New
condition. $1000.
Call Jim
570-855-9172
744 Furniture &
Accessories
CHAIRS, (2)
Genuine
leather, cus-
tom made
recliners.
Taupe color,
like new. $550
each.
570-675-5046
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
WALL UNITS by
Hooker, 3 solid oak
and lighted with
adjustable shelves.
$550. SOFA, sec-
tional, light brown
leather, recliners on
each end. $445.
570-288-1981
758 Miscellaneous
CLOTHING girls,
various sizes,
pieces and prices.
$7-$37, Call for fur-
ther details. Books,
paperback and
hardcover, $15, a
box, three boxes
total, Sleeping bags,
two person $35,
one person with air
mattress insert,
$30, like new.
Shelving unit, cor-
ner, $20.
570-474-6028
DRYERS (2) SALON.
Chairs attached.
Black, new. 1 never
used other slightly
used. $150 each.
570-655-9877
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
762 Musical
Instruments
GUITAR, Fender,
1983 USA Precision
Bass. Nice condi-
tion. Comes with
original case. Seri-
ous inquiries only,
will consider offers.
$950. 457-4084
Job Seekers are
looking here!
Where's your ad?
570-829-7130 and
ask for an employ-
ment specialist
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV 19” COLOR
With remote and
DVD/VCR combo
player. $25.00 each
or $40.00 for both.
Call 570-814-9574
786 Toys & Games
BICYCLE girl’s 6-
speed Pacific
Jubilee; blue & pur-
ple with 20” wheels;
adjustable seat. $50
Little Tikes chalk-
board, good condi-
tion $10.
Call 570-474-2170
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
WANTED
JEWELRY
WILKES BARREGOLD
( 570) 48GOLD8
( 570) 484- 6538
Highest Cash Pay-
Outs Guaranteed
Open 6 Days
a Week
10am- 6pm
Cl osed Thursdays
1092 Highway 315 Blvd.
( Pl aza 315)
315N, 1/ 2 mi l e
bef ore Mohegan
Sun Casi no
We Pay At Least
80% of the London
Fix Market Price
for All Gold Jewelry
WilkesBarreGold.com
or email us at
wilkesbarregold@
yahoo.com
London PM
Gold Price
March 26 - $1,598.00
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
ENGLISH BULLDOG
AKC Puppy,
female. $2,000.
Call for pictures.
570-839-1917
GOLDEN RETRIEV-
ER. BLOND, male
big boned. 8 months
old. Housebroken,
very well mannered.
AKC reg. $400
570-288-2893
570-852-7064
POMERANIANS. 8
weeks, 1st shots, 1
female 3 males. No
papers. $375 each
570-864-2643
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nation’s con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
DUPONT
REDUCED
$68,500
424 Simpson St.
Good condition
Cape Cod. 3 bed-
room, 1 full bath in
quiet neighborhood.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4357
Brian
Harashinski
570-237-0689
LAFLIN
7 CONCORD DRIVE
$244,900
Two story, 1,800 sq.
ft., in Oakwood
Park. 8 rooms, cozy
kitchen, 3 bed-
rooms, 2.5 baths,
large living room,
family room with
fireplace, dining
room, sunroom with
hardwood floors.
Two car garage,
central air. Lot 100’
x 125’. Move in
Condition. Call Ed at
570-655-4294 for
appointment.
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
362 Susquehanna
Avenue
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths & kitchen,
granite counter-
tops. All cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances & light-
ing. New oil fur-
nace, washer/dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
NOT IN FLOOD
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
JENKINS TWP.
$27,900
151 E. Saylor Ave.
Fixer upper with
great potential in
quiet neighborhood.
3 bedrooms, 1 bath
with off street park-
ing and nice yard.
Directions: Rt 315,
at light turn onto
Laflin Rd to bottom
of hill. Turn right
onto E. Saylor.
atlasrealtyinc.com
MLS 12-3672
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
LAFLIN
$389,900
10 Fairfield Drive
Exceptional & spa-
cious custom built
cedar home with
open floor plan and
all of the amenities
situated on 2 lots in
picturesque setting.
Create memories in
this 5 bedroom, 4
bath home with 18’
ceiling in living
room, gas fireplace,
granite kitchen,
large 2 story foyer,
huge finished lower
level for entertain-
ing with bar/full
kitchen & wine cel-
lar. Inground pool &
hot tub. Directions:
Rt 315 to Laflin Rd.,
right onto Oakwood
Dr., right onto Ford-
ham Rd, left onto
Fairfield Dr., home
is on the right.
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-4063
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
LAFLIN
NEW PRICE
$124,900
111 Laflin Road
Nice 3 bedroom,
1.5 bath Split Level
home with hard-
wood floors, 1 car
garage, large yard
and covered patio
in very convenient
location. Great curb
appeal and plenty
of off street park-
ing. Rt. 315 to light
@ Laflin Rd. Turn
west onto Laflin Rd.
Home is on left.
For more info and
photos visit:
www.atlas
realtyinc.com
MLS 12-2852
Keri Best
570-885-5082
NANTICOKE
1472 S. Hanover St.
Well maintained
bi-level house fea-
tures 2 bedrooms,
1 3/4 baths, recre-
ation room with
propane stove.
3 season porch.
Professionally land-
scaped yard. 1 car
garage, storage
shed, new appli-
ances, ceiling fans.
Close to LCCC.
$153,900.
Call 570-735-7594
or 570-477-2410
906 Homes for Sale
MOOSIC
$99,900
R. 1104 Springbrook
Cape Cod home
with endless possi-
bilities. 3-4 bed-
room, 1 bath, cen-
tral air, plenty of
storage. Enclosed
porch, garage with
carport. Situated on
3 lots. Directions: 1-
81, Exit 180 Moosic
(Rt. 11) L. onto 502,
straight 1/2 mile.
Turn R onto 8th St.,
up hill, turn left,
house 3rd on right.
www.atlasrealty-
inc.com
MLS 13-607
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
PLAINS TWP.
HUDSON SECTION
Two bedroom, 1
bath, living & dining
rooms & pantry.
Gas heat & hot
water. Driveway &
garage. $54,000.
570-407-2703
WYOMING
575 Susquehanna
Avenue
FOR SALE BY
OWNER
NEVER
FLOODED
4 bedroom, 2 full
bath in a great
neighborhood.
New windows
entire home, fin-
ished lower level,
detached garage,
4 season sun-
room. Master
suite has new full
bath and large
walk in closet.
New above
ground pool with
deck. Must see!
PRICED TO
SELL $179,000
570-885-6848
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
HANOVER
Repossessed
Income Property
Out of flood area
5 apartments, 2
buildings on one lot
in excellent condi-
tion. Hardwood
floors. $95,000
570-822-9697
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL
PROPERTY
for lease. Units
ranging from 600-
2700 sq ft. prime
Mountaintop area,
great for busi-
ness!!! High traffic
area for retail or
office space.
Prices ranging
from $500.00/
month for smallest
off street unit to
$2700.00/month
for large 2700
square foot
building. call
Amanda Colonna
570-714-6115
CENTURY 21
SMITH HOURIGAN
GROUP
570-287-1196,
for details and to
view units.
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
S. WILKES-BARRE
$25,000 / 6 bed-
room - 2, 500 sq.
ft. Contractor
Special $5,000.00
down. Owner will
finance balance!
Zoned R-3.
Currently 2 bed-
room apartment on
first floor. 2nd and
3rd floor together
as a 4 bedroom
unit. Needs work. 4
off street paved
parking spaces
included. Close to
Wilkes University.
Call Scott
302-249-4264
912 Lots & Acreage
DALLAS
GREENBRIAR RETIRE-
MENT COMMUNITY
Only eight lots
left. Custom
design you home
the way you want it.
Call 570-675-1300
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
Hughestown Boro
LAND
1/2 acre of land for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 92’ road
frontage & over
300’ deep. Public
sewer, water, &
gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts. on Division
St. $55,000.
17,000 sq. ft. lot for
sale in Hughestown
Boro. 118’ road
frontage x 137’
deep. Back proper-
ty line is 132’ wide.
Public sewer, water,
& gas. Located
behind Grace Luxu-
ry Apts on North
View Drive. $35,000
570-760-7326
LAFLIN
$32,900
Lot#9
Pinewood Dr
Build your new
home in a great
neighborhood. Con-
venient location
near highways, air-
port, casino and
shopping
156 X 110 X 150 X 45
DIRECTIONS Rt 315
to laflin Rd; make
left off Laflin Rd onto
Pinewood Dr. Lot is
on corner of
Pinewood Dr. and
Hickorywood Dr.
MLS 13-23
atlas realtyinc.com
Call Keri Best
570-885-5082
GET THE WORD OUT
with a Classified Ad.
570-829-7130
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 PAGE 9
8
0
9
5
5
0
www.MattBurneHonda.com
2013 Honda
Civic LX Sedan
Open Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday & Saturday 9-5
Thank You To Our Customers
0
.9%
APR FINANCING
NOWAVAILABLE!
*On select models to qualified
buyers for limited term.
2013 PILOT EX 4WD
MPG
17 City
24 HWY
**Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $19,494.00
Per Mo.
Lease
ase 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Per
LLea
* *
• Model #YF4H4DEW • 250-hp (SAE Net),
3.5-Liter, 24-Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
®
V-6 Engine
• Variable Torque Management® 4-Wheel Drive
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• Power Windows/Locks • Fog Lights
• Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • i-MID with
8-inch WQVGA (480x320) Screen, Customizable
Feature Settings and Rearview Camera with
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®
• Tri-Zone Automatic Climate Control System
with Humidity Control and Air Filtration
• Driver’s Seat with 10-Way Power Adjustment,
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• 229-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 7
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Library • Bluetooth
®
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• USB Audio Interface
2013 ACCORD LX SEDAN
MPG
27 City
36 HWY
***Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $14,194.70
• Model #CR2F3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine with Direct Injection •
Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA
®
)
with Traction Control • Continu-
ously Variable Transmission (CVT)
• 16-Inch Alloy Wheels • Dual-Zone
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Camera with Guidelines • Blu-
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• Pandora
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Internet Radio Compatibility • USB
Audio Interface • MP3/Auxiliary
Input Jack • i-MID with 8-inch
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2013 Honda CR-V LX
LEASES BASED ON APPROVED CREDIT TIER 1 THRU AHFC. MILEAGE BASED ON 2012 EPA MILEAGE ESTIMATES. USE FOR COMPARISON PURPOSES ONLY.
DO NOT COMPARE TO MODELS BEFORE 2008. YOUR ACTUAL MILEAGE WILL VARY DEPENDING ON HOW YOU DRIVE AND MAINTAIN YOUR VEHICLE. OFFERS EXPIRE 4/30/2013.
MATT BURNE HONDA PRE-OWNED CENTER
Call: 1-800-NEXTHONDA View Prices at www.mattburnehonda.com
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1-800-NEXT-HONDA
570-341-1400
1.9%
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CIVICS
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 60K ............................NOW $13,250
10 CIVIC EX SDN Gray, 51K.................................NOW $14,750
10 CIVIC LX SDN Red, 31K..................................NOW $14,950
10 CIVIC LX SDN White, 27K................................NOW $15,250
10 CIVIC LX SDN Titanium, 28K ............................NOW $15,250
10 CIVIC LX SDN Silver, 21K................................NOW $15,950
10 CIVIC LX CPE Gray, 18K..................................NOW $15,950
10 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 19K .................................NOW $16,250
11 CIVIC EX CPE Red, 20K..................................NOW $16,950
11 CIVIC LX SDN Gray, 8K ..................................NOW $16,950
12 CIVIC LX SDN Black, 12K................................NOW $17,950
12 CIVIC EXL SDN Gray, 33K..............................NOW $18,500
12 CIVIC EXL Black, 6K..........................................NOW $19,750
CRV 4WD
10 CRV LX Gray, 29K................................................NOW $19,950
11 CRV SE Sage, 29K ...............................................NOW $20,950
11 CRV LX Silver, 24K...............................................NOW $20,950
11 CRV SE White, 25K...............................................NOW $20,950
11 CRV SE Titanium, 15K ...........................................NOW $21,500
10 CRV EXL NAVI Titanium, 49K ...........................NOW $21,500
10 CRV EXL Black, 19K............................................NOW $21,950
11 CRV EX Black, 12K...............................................NOW $22,950
11 CRV EXL Titanium, 21K ........................................NOW $23,950
11 CRV EXL White, 18K............................................NOW $23,950
PILOT 4WD
11 PILOT EX Gray, 40K ...........................................NOW $25,950
11 PILOT EX Black, 36K ..........................................NOW $26,950
10 PILOT EXL DVD Gray, 45K.............................NOW $27,250
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 32K ........................................NOW $28,500
11 PILOT EXL Silver, 31K .......................................NOW $29,500
11 PILOT EXL Red, 25K.........................................NOW $29,950
11 PILOT EXL Gray, 11K.........................................NOW $30,500
12 PILOT TOURING NAV/ROVD White, 18KNOW $36,500
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
1.9%
for 36 mos
2.9%
for 60 mos
MPG
28 City
39 HWY
*Lease 36 Months through AHFC. $0 Down Payment. 1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $12,458.25
Per Mo.
Lease
PPP r Per
LLea
*
• Model #FB2F5DEW • 140-hp (SAE Net), 1.8 Liter, 16 Valve, SOHC i-VTEC
®
4 Cylinder Engine • 5 Speed Automatic Transmission • Air
Conditioning with Air Filtration System • i-MID with 5 inch LCD Screen and Customizable Feature Settings • Rear View Camera with Guide-
lines • Bluetooth
®
HandsFreeLink
®3
• SMS Text Message Function
4
• Power Windows and Door Locks • Vehicle Stability Assist
TM
(VSA
®
) with
Traction Control • Anti-Lock Braking System (ABS) • Cruise Control • Illuminated Steering Wheel Mounted Cruise, Audio, Phone and i-MID
Controls • 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio System with 4 Speakers • Pandora
®
Internet Radio Compatibility
5
• Bluetooth
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Streaming Audio
3

USB Audio Interface
6
• MP3/Auxiliary Input Jack • Exterior Temperature Indicator • Security System with Remote Entry and Trunk Release
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
Per Mo.
Lease
Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* **
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
MPG
22 City
30 HWY
****Lease 36 Months through ahfc. $0 Down Payment.
1st payment and tags due at delivery. Residual $15,920.00
• Model #RM4H3DEW
• 185-hp (SAE Net), 2.4-Liter,
16-Valve, DOHC i-VTEC
®
4-Cylinder
Engine • Automatic Transmission
• Real Time AWD with Intelligent
Control System
TM
• Vehicle Stability
AssistTM (VSA
®
) with Traction
Control • Multi-Angle Rearview
Camera with Guidelines
• Bluetooth
®
HandsFreeLink
• USB Audio Interface
• Remote Entry System
• 160-Watt AM/FM/CD Audio
System with 4 Speakers
• Pandora
®
Radio Compatibility
• Bluetooth
®
Streaming Audio
Per Mo.
Lease
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
*Lease 36 Months through ahfc $0 Down Payment
Per Mo. Per Mo.
LLease
* ***
*Certifed Hondas have 1 yr - 12k, Basic Warranty & 7yr - 100k Powertrain from orig. inservice date.
FIT
10 HONDA FIT SPORT Red, 37K......................NOW $14,950
CRZ HYBRID
11 CRZ EX Frost, 5K.................................................NOW $17,500
ELEMENT 4WD
10 ELEMENT EX Gray, 25K...................................NOW $18,950
$0 DOWN
PAYMENT
ACCORDS
08 ACCORD EX SDN Red, 54K ..........................NOW $14,950
10 ACCORD LX SDN Red, 28K...........................NOW $15,350
09 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 51K..........................NOW $15,500
10 ACCORD LX SDN Black, 25K.........................NOW $16,750
10 ACCORD EXL SDN Red, 41K .......................NOW $17,350
11 ACCORD LXP SDN Gray, 20K.......................NOW $17,950
10 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 20K..........................NOW $17,950
11 ACCORD LX SDN Silver, 31K .........................NOW $17,950
11 ACCORD EX SDN Gray, 17K..........................NOW $19,500
ODYSSEY
10 ODYSSEY TOURING RDVD/NAV Black, 24K.NOW $28,950
‘S Our have
150 Point Inspection
1yr/12,000mi Basic Warranty
7yr/100,000mi Powertrain Warranty*
Gray, 38K, Was $15,750
Now $11,950
10 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GLS SDN
Blue 35K
Now $14,950
09 DODGE JOURNEY
SXT 4WD
00 LEXUS
RX300 AWD
Gold, 103K
Now $8,250
Gray, 85K
Now $12,950
04 TOYOTA
HIGHLANDER 4WD
Red, 92K
Now $7,250
02 HONDA CIVIC
LX SEDAN
Dk. Cherry, 103K
Now $7,500
00 MAZDA MIATA
SE CONV.
Red, 50K
09 SUBARU IMPREZA
AWD SEDAN
Now $14,500
Gray, 29K
Now $18,500
11 SUBARU LEGACY
AWD SDN
Black, 89K
Now $8,950
00 HONDA ACCORD
EX COUPE
YOUR
NICE
TRADE
HERE
06 HONDA CRV EX 4WD
EX Black, 102K
$10,950
SE White, 77K
$14,950
11 TOYOTA COROLLA
S SEDAN
Navy, 11K
Now $16,500
03 HONDA CRV LX 4WD
Brown, 77K
Now $9,750
HONDA ACCORD
00 EX Cpe, Black, 84K
$8,950
03 EXL Sdn, White, 80K
$9,950
07 VP Sdn, Silver, 86K
$10,950
04 EXL V6 Sdn, Gray, 80K
$11,950
06 EXL Sdn, White, 56K
$13,950
07 EXL V6 Sdn, Gold, 32K
$14,950
Silver, 65K, 5 Speed
Now $8,350
09 CHEVY COBALT
LS CPE
White, 35K
Now $11,950
10 CHEVY AVEO
LT 5DR
Red, 68K
Now $11,950
06 HONDA CIVIC
EX SDN
Blue, 40K
10 MAZDA 3i
SPORT SEDAN
Now $13,500
Silver, 58K
10 TOYOTA COROLLA
LE SDN
Now $13,500
White, 33K, 5 Speed
Now $15,950
10 VW JETTA
SEL SDN
Red, 58K
Now $19,750
07 HONDA PILOT EXL
R DVD 4WD
CROSSTOUR 4WD
10 CROSSTOUR EXL V6 White, 42K................NOW $22,500
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
551 Other
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
551 Other
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
551 Other
548 Medical/Health
542 Logistics/
Transportation
551 Other
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
506 Administrative/
Clerical
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
506 Administrative/
Clerical
542 Logistics/
Transportation
542 Logistics/
Transportation
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
506 Administrative/
Clerical
542 Logistics/
Transportation
527 Food Services/
Hospitality
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY
Would you like to deliver newspapers
as an Independent Contractor
under an agreement with
THE TIMES LEADER?
Operate your own business with potential profts of
up to _________ per month.
$900.00
Call Rosemary to make an appointment
at 570-829-7107
Routes Currently Available:
WILKES-BARRE/NORTH
Bowman St. • Chapel St. • Hillard St.
Kidder St. • NewGrant St.
183 Daily Papers • 205 Sunday Papers
$830 Monthly Proft
WILKES-BARRE/PARSONS
Wyoming St. • Brookside St.
E. Chestnut St. • Harry St. • Madison St.
169 Daily Papers • 206 Sunday Papers
$850 Monthly Proft
WAPWALLOPEN MOTOR ROUTE
St. Mary’s Rd. • St. John’s Rd.
Moyers Grove Rd. • Sunset Rd.
94 Daily Papers • 155 Sunday Papers
$800 Monthly Proft
LEE PARK
Alexie Rd. • Betsy Ross Dr.
Constitution Ave. • David Rd. • Lee Park Ave.
252 Daily Papers • 285 Sunday Papers
$1,000 Monthly Proft
MANAGER
TRAINEES
SEND US YOUR RESUME
Expanding Burger King Franchise in the area needs
enthusiastic, aggressive people for Management
Positions. Benefits Include:
• Health Insurance Plan
• 401 (K)
• Dental And Life Insurance Available
• Bonus Plan
• Paid Vacation
• Paid Sick Days
• 45 Hour Work Week
• Competitive Salary
If You Have Pride In Your Own Ability
Send Your Resume To:
Burger King
Attn: Personnel Dept.
185 Ferguson Avenue
Shavertown, Pa 18708
E-Mail: Hr@Pdmco.Net
E.O.E.
We are growing and we are looking for the best Experienced Class A CDL Route
Delivery Drivers. Core-Mark is accepting applications for
FULL TIME 4 DAY WORK WEEK - Guaranteed 40 hours per week.
This is ideal for drivers who want to be able to be home with their families.
We are a national convenience store distribution company seeking full time CLASS
ACDL DRIVERS. Generous benefit package to include Medical/Dental/Vision/STD/
LTDand 401k. $1,500 sign on bonus as well as Attendance/Safety and Performance
Bonus programs available. Annual and merit increases. Designed Route Deliveries.
Company provided uniformand work boots.
Part-time opportunities are
also available for drivers
looking to make some extra
money on their days off.
a
CLASS ACDL DRIVERS
Apply @Core-Mark
100West End Rd.,
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18706
570-823-6865
Or apply online @
http:www.core-mark/
careeropportunities/
careers.aspx
Prior military/ government
civilian contractor
experience welcomed.
FEE BASIS
Internal Medicine/Family Practice Physician
The Wilkes-Barre VA Medical Center is soliciting interest by
established Internal Medicine/Family Practice Physicians to
provide Fee Basis (Fee for Service) Primary Care services to
eligible Veterans at the VA Medical Center Wilkes-Barre and
Tobyhanna Outpatient Clinic. You will be reimbursed at agreed
upon rates according to usual and customary charges similar
to Medicare. Must be certified in BCLS.
Responsibilities will include services such as:
1. Care of acute and chronic illness including routine detection,
management of diseases and medication management.
2. Preventive care such as age appropriate cancer screening,
e.g. colorectal cancer screen.
3. Prevention of osteoporosis and treatment.
4. Immunizations.
5. Smoking Cessation and Weight Management counseling.
6. Alcohol use screen, counseling and referral for treatment.
7. Depression/ PTSD screening, evaluation and referral to
Mental Health Clinic as appropriate.
8. Elective referral to specialty care will be at
Wilkes-Barre - examples include ophthalmology, podiatry,
physical therapy and social work as needed.
9. Gender specific care such as pelvic/breast exam,
contraception counseling, management of menopause related
concerns and initial evaluation and management of gender
specific concerns. No benefits offered.
Interested applicants must submit the following: Application
for Physicians, Dentists, Podiatrists, VA Form 10-2850;
Declaration for Federal Employment, OF-306; Curriculum Vitae,
License Verification, BCLS Certification.
For additional information please call (570) 824-3521,
Extension 7209.
Please mail your complete application package to:
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
VA MEDICAL CENTER
1111 EAST END BOULEVARD
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
ATTN: HUMAN RESOURCES/05
VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN MARCH
from
Noon-4pm
at the
Tunkhannock
Public Library
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Material Logistic Technicians
Operate powered industrial forklift equipment with
attachments to safely perform various assignments.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
Salary commensurate with experience
MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE
Skills Required:
• High School Diploma/GED
• College education preferred
• Computer Skills
• Valid Driver’s License
• Criminal Background Check
• Pass Pre-Employment Drug
Screen & Physical
*Mehoopany Location
* Benefits Available *
$1000 Sign On Bonus
Local - Team Driver Position
Home - Every Day
Teams - Run Local NE Region
Avg Pay $1100/week
Immediate Medical Benefits
877-888-8476
NFITruckingJobs.com
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Charming 2 bed-
room, 2nd floor
apartment, features
a fireplace, built-in
bookcases, large
living room, dining
room, eat-in kitchen,
sun room & much
more! $525 +
utilities. Available
April 1st. Please call
570-714-8568
KINGSTON
EATON TERRACE
317 N. Maple Ave.
2 story 2 bed-
room, 1.5 bath @
$850. + utilities.
Two story 3 bed-
room, 2.5 baths @
$1,110. + utilities.
Central heat & air,
washer/dryer in
unit, on site park-
ing. 1 mo. security
570-262-6947
KINGSTON
Newly remodeled. 2
bedrooms, 1 bath-
room, wall to wall,
off street parking,
washer/dryer hook-
up in the basement.
$510/per month.
Call (570)288-9507
PITTSTON
1 room + bath effi-
ciency. Wall to wall
carpeting, includes
all utilities plus
garbage & sewer.
Stove & refrigerator
included. Security.
No pets. $400/
month. Call
570-655-1606
PITTSTON
Modern 2 bedroom,
2nd floor. Includes
stove & refrigerator.
Laundry hook-up.
Heated garage, off
street parking.
Heat, sewer, water
& garbage included.
$695/month + sec-
urity & lease. No
smoking or pets.
570-430-0123
T
T
A
A
YLOR
YLOR
2nd floor. 5 rooms,
appliances, sewer &
water furnished.
New paint & carpet-
ing. Washer & dryer
hookup. No pets. No
smoking, security
deposit required.
570-457-9446
WEST PITTSTON
1 room apt. 2nd
floor. Full kitchen,
full bath, hardwood,
washer/dryer heat
included, pets neg.
$550.
267-745-8616.
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
WEST PITTSTON
203 Delaware Ave.
. 4 rooms, no pets,
no smoking, off
street parking.
Includes heat,
water, sewer,
fridge, stove, w/d.
High security bldg.
570-655-9711
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
1, 2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
WILKES-BARRE
307-309 South St E.
2 bedroom, avail-
able early April. 1st
floor. New windows
& carpet. Ceramic
tile in kitchen &
bath. 6 x 8 porch.
$650/month. Land-
lord pays heat &
water. No hook ups.
No Pets. 1 month
security & 1 month
rent. Call Manny
718-946-8738 or
917-295-6254
WILKES-BARRE
North Main Street
1 block from
General Hospital, 3
room apartment,
washer/dryer,
stove, refrigerator,
1st & last months
rent + security,
references
required.
Water Paid.
$525/per month
570-706-6487
After 6 p.m.
944 Commercial
Properties
COMMERCIAL RETAIL
PROPERTY FOR RENT:
900 Sq. Ft.
STORE RETAIL
SPACE
Will be vacant
as of
January 1, 2013
200 Spring St.
Wilkes-Barre
Great for a
Barber Shop!
Call Michael at
570-239-7213
DOLPHIN PLAZA
Rte. 315
2,400 Sq. Ft.
1,200 Sq. Ft.
Professional office
space. Will divide
office / retail
Call 570-829-1206
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
947 Garages
WANTED GARAGE
Duryea & surround-
ing area. Wanted
garage to rent for
boat storage. Easy
access.
570-760-1548
950 Half Doubles
NANTICOKE
3 bedrooms, 1.5
baths, stove provid-
ed, washer/dryer
hook up & wall to
wall carpet.
$475/month +
security & utilities.
570-472-2392
950 Half Doubles
WEST PITTSTON
Century home,
great neighbor-
hood, recently ren-
ovated, 3 bed-
rooms, 1 bath,
refrigerator and
stove included. Off-
street parking,
$800+ utilities, one
year lease and
security. No Pets.
Call (570) 283-3086
950 Half Doubles
WEST PITTSTON
5 bedroom, 1.5
baths, living & din-
ing rooms, kitchen
with stove, refriger-
ator & dishwasher.
Gas heat & off
street parking.
$800/month
+ utilities, security
& references.
570-237-5478
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
953Houses for Rent
OLD FORGE
LUXURY
TOWNHOUSE
Built in 2003 this
luxurious 3 bed-
room townhome
features hard-
wood floors on
main floor, fin-
ished basement,
large master
suite, private out-
door deck and
back yard, off
street parking,
granite counter-
tops, stainless
steel appliances,
DirecTV, high-
speed internet,
garbage, sewer,
gas heat with
brand new fur-
nace, central air
conditioning with
brand new com-
pressor, brand
new carpeting on
2nd floor in all
bedrooms, extra
closet space,
large basement
storage room,
wood blinds in
aLL rooms, all
yard maintenance
and snow plowing
included. This is
an end unit with
only one other
unit attached.
Rent is $1,400.
per month &
requires $1,400.
security deposit.
Minimum one
year lease
required. Must fill
out credit applica-
tion.
NO PETS.
570-840-1960
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
It’s a showroom in print!
Classified’s got
the directions!
PENN FORREST TWP.
2,100 sq, ft., 3 bed-
room, 2 baths. Mas-
ter bedroom walk in
closet. Living, fami-
ly & other rooms.
New carpet & paint.
2 car garage. Laun-
dry room, patio,
large yard. One
minute from turn-
pike 2014 slip ramp
on 903. Pool & lake
rights.
$1,450/month.
570-657-0073
953Houses for Rent
PITTSTON
CIRCA 1891
J. Watson
House
Nestled on a knoll
surrounded by
100 year old
pines & laurels is
a piece of history
waiting for you!
This grand Victo-
rian has 3 to 4
bedrooms, 1.5
baths, grand
foyer, large
rooms. New eat
in kitchen with
stainless steel
appliances &
granite counter-
tops. Wash-
er/dryer hook up
on 1st floor, large
fenced yard, 2
car garage &
plenty of storage.
Walking distance
to the new down-
town. Pets con-
sidered. Limited
applications avail-
able. Private
showings can be
scheduled from 6
p.m. to 8 p.m.
Monday through
Friday.
OPEN HOUSE
April 6th , 12-2
p.m.
$1,400/month +
security &
references
570-328-6767
SHAVERTOWN
Good location,
excellent schools.
Modern, 4 bed-
rooms, office, 2 full
baths. Living, dining
rooms. Finished
family room, granite
kitchen with ceram-
ic tile. Large wrap
around deck, out
door Jacuzzi, in
ground heated pool.
Gas heat. Four car
off street parking.
$1,500/month +
utilities, security +
last month deposit.
Includes fridge,
stove, washer/dry-
era, sewer & trash.
Available July 1st.
Pictures available
through e-mail. Call
570-545-6057.
959 Mobile Homes
MOUNTAIN TOP
Crestwood School
District. Great get-
a-way. 2 bedroom
mobile home with
an 18x18 3 season
sunroom. Large
deck, situated on 2+
acres. Quiet setting.
Location conve-
niently close to Jack
Frost, Big Boulder &
White Water Chal-
lengers along with
I-80, I-81 & PA Turn-
pike. Stove, fridge,
washer / dryer,
dishwasher &
microwave included.
Water & sewer by
landlord. Tenant
covers electric &
propane. Pet friend-
ly with landlord
approval (additional
deposit required). 6
month lease
required. $650 +
security. 570-474-
0388 OR 417-8751
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1ST. QUALITY
CONSTRUCTION CO.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-606-8438
1054 Concrete &
Masonry
C&C MASONRY &
CONCRETE
Absolutely Free
Estimates. Masonry
& concrete work.
Specializing in foun-
dations, repairs and
rebuilding. Footers
floors, driveways.
570-840-9913
570-346-4103
PA084504
1057Construction &
Building
GARAGE
DOOR
Sales, service,
installation &
repair.
FULLY
INSURED
HIC# 065008
CALL JOE
570-735-8551
Cell 606-7489
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 PAGE 11
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
TRAVEL
May 7 & 8
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic City’s
Taj Mahal!
TAX PREPARATION
INCOME TAX PREPARATION
PICK UP / DELIVERY
SERVICE AVAILABLE
19 YEARS EXPERIENCE
Bruce Moluski 570-457-1840
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
REMODELING CONTRACTOR
Tile Work • Kitchens
Bathrooms • Windows
Additions • Doors •Storm Doors
NO JOB TOO SMALL!
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
or 881-9899
Quality Work at Affordable Prices
PA008322
1-800-273-7130
for Local Pros
HIC#
PA-005521 655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
• Flat Roofs • Shingles • Siding • Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
Kung Fu & Tai Chi FREE
Kung Fu is a face-paced workout geared
toward self-defense and Tai Chi is a slow-paced
workout for relaxation and stress relief.
• Do you need to Relieve Stress?
• Do you need better strength & flexibility?
• Do you need better balance & muscle tone?
• Does your child need more discipline?
• Does your child need more concentration?
• Does your child need to be more responsible?
Then Try: 2 Free Lessons
Rothrock’s Kung Fu &Tai Chi
Call: (570) 457-2591
See more at: rothrockskungfu.com
ROOFING
SPR, INC
SUMMIT PEAK ROOFING, INC.
Commercial & Residential
Free Estimates ~ Licensed & Insured
PA 096716
www.summitpeakroofing.com
1-855-768-7325
CERTAINTEED
CERTIFIED
ENTERTAINMENT
The Best In “Live” Music For
Weddings & Private Parties
www.GrooveTrainBand.com
David Chaump 570-654-8368
HAULING
Discover an exceptional opportunity to deliver
quality healthcare to America’s Veterans
FEE BASIS MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIST
The VA Medical Center Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania is
currently accepting applications for a
Fee Basis Medical Technologist.
Pathology & Laboratory Medicine at the Wilkes-Barre VA
is seeking a candidate with experience in General
Laboratory practices. The successful candidate is
responsible for performing accurate specimen testing and
quality control using automated instrument systems.
This position requires coverage Monday –Friday,
hours to be determined. No benefits offered.
Interested applicants must submit the following informa-
tion: Application for Associated Health Occupations, 10-
2850c; Declaration for Federal Employment, OF-306;
Resume/Curriculum Vitae; Copy of Transcripts; copy of
ASCP certification (if applicable).
For additional information please call (570) 824-3521,
EXTENSION 7209.
Please mail your complete application package to:
DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS
VA MEDICAL CENTER
1111 EAST END BOULEVARD
WILKES-BARRE, PA 18711
ATTN: HUMAN RESOURCES/05
VA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
timesleader.com
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1213 Paving &
Excavating
*DRIVEWAYS
*PARKING LOTS
*ROADWAYS
*HOT TAR & CHIP
*SEAL COATING
Licensed and
Insured. Call
Today For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
LINEUP
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INCLASSIFIED!
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A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
You’re in bussiness
with classified!
Call 829-7130 to place your ad.
Selling
your
ride?
We’ll run your ad in the
classified section until your
vehicle is sold.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNLLLLLLLLYONNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNE LLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEADER.
timesleader.com
PAGE 12 SUNDAY, MARCH 31, 2013 SUNDAY DISPATCH
What doyouget nowthat we
accept Geisinger HealthPlan
®
?
Achoice.
The Afliate Hospitals of Commonwealth Health: Berwick Hospital Center • First Hospital • Mid-Valley Hospital • Moses Taylor Hospital
Regional Hospital of Scranton • Special Care Hospital • Tyler Memorial Hospital • Wilkes–Barre General Hospital
More patients choose Wilkes-Barre General Hospital than
any other hospital in Northeastern Pennsylvania. And if you
have Geisinger Health Plan, Geisinger Choice, Geisinger Gold,
GHP Family, GHP Kids, or Geisinger Health Options, you now
have that choice, too. We are pleased to accept these health
plans and welcome the opportunity to take good care of
even more of our neighbors.
Tolearnmore, visit CommonwealthHealth.net, or tofind
a Commonwealthphysician, call 1-800-838-WELL.

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