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Monday • April 1, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 194
OPENI NG DAY
SPORTS PAGE 11
PROSECUTOR
SLAIN IN HOME
NATION PAGE 6
POPE PLEADS FOR
PEACE ON EASTER
FOR THE RECORD PAGE 2
WORLD SERIES CHAMPS OPEN AGAINST
HATED DODGERS
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
After joining most of the rest of
the county in an effort to stamp out
the use of single-use plastic bags,
the Foster City Council will consid-
er tonight whether to subsidize the
purchase of reusable bags and dis-
tribute them to households.
The council has tentatively
capped the expense at $2,500 and
has some alter-
natives to con-
sider at its next
m e e t i n g
i n c l u d i n g
whether to dis-
tribute the
bags to every
household, limit the distribution to
some households or do nothing at
all.
Councilman Steve Okamoto,
however, has come up with a new
idea — find a corporate sponsor to
pay for the bags so the city will not
have to.
Okamoto told the Daily Journal
that the plastic bag ban will end up
costing the average household any-
where from $20 to $50 a year in
extra expenses as consumers will
have to pay 10 cents for paper bags
at retail establishments starting
April 22.
Okamoto proposed taking the
money for the program out of the
city’s construction and demolition
fund.
Councilman Herb Perez applaud-
ed Okamoto’s effort to build aware-
ness and outreach and said the con-
struction and demolition funds were
created to reduce solid waste in
landfill.
“I believe the effort is worthwhile
and consistent with its intent. The
bag purchase is being considered as
part of an overall strategy to educate
Councilman wants city to distribute reusable bags
Foster City to hold discussion on idea, corporate sponsor may be sought
See BAGS, Page 20
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
As the county’s new half-cent
sales tax kicks in, officials are ready
to start making concrete decisions
about where to allocate the estimat-
ed $60 million generated annually.
The tax known as Measure A,
which increases the county rate to 9
percent, begins April 1. The cities of
Half Moon Bay and San Mateo will
see their tax rates rise to 9.5 percent
and 9.25 percent, respectively,
because of voter-approved increas-
es.
The Board of Supervisors have
made several indications of where
they wish to use its share of the
increase, including hospital seismic
upgrades and park upkeep, but have
yet to take final votes. Several of the
possibilities, like a large infusion to
SamTrans, require further study and
supervisors Tuesday established a
timeline over several meetings
Tax kicks in,
county preps
for spending
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
It’s easy for students to become
disinterested in their studies.
That’s a practice Rachel Zabaneh,
director of the Caritas Scholars
Program and Social
Entrepreneurship Lab at Alma
Heights Christian School, wanted to
combat.
After 10 years as an educational
mentor, Zabaneh noticed students
often had a lack of purpose in what
they were doing. Through graduate
research on the topic, she found that
connecting academics with future
Creating social lessons
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Like most moms, Joanie Hahn
would like to spend more time with
her 2-year-old son Jared.
Hahn, a math teacher at the
Bayside STEM Academy in San
Mateo, would also love a shorter
commute. Those were two of her
real-life problems posed to a group
of middle school students taking
part in the Design Thinking Camp,
which took place at Bayside this
month during a school break.
Four seventh- and eighth-grade
boys, using the team name Nintendo
Freaks, used their time at camp to
create a solution for Hahn — a
rocket-powered car that flies, is self
driving, and includes space for
Hahn to work while providing safe-
ty options like a panic button and
helmets.
On Friday, Hahn and her little one
looked at the final product Friday
with many smiles and questions.
The prototype had been changed
over the week to include more safe-
ty measures, a suggestion Hahn
made.
“I like it,” Hahn said of the stu-
dent-created solution, adding who
wouldn’t want to fly to work?
The camp also offered some edu-
cational benefits Hahn enjoyed see-
ing. Middle schoolers spend the
week focused on hands-on projects
led by Stanford University students.
It’s part of a collaboration between
Bayside STEM and the Hasso
Plattner Institute of Design, known
as the d.school.
“This is the way school should
always be,” said Bayside Principal
Jeanne Elliott.
Bayside students take the basics
of design thinking in sixth grade.
This one-week camp allows the 35
Embracing design thinking
HEATHER MURTAGH/DAILY JOURNAL
Joanie Hahn and her 2-year-old son Jared, right, look at the flying car prototype designed by Bayside STEM
Academy students Alberto Hernandez, counter clockwise, Zach Golan-Strieb, Nick Dal Porto and Felipe Porras
designed during the Design Thinking Camp this past week.
Bayside students help teacher fly to work — at least in concept
See DESIGN, Page 20
Officials near decisions on $60M
generated by sales tax increase
See TAX, Page 20
Scholars program and entrepreneurship
lab connects academics with vocation
See SOCIAL, Page 20
A weekly look at the people who
shape our community
FOR THE RECORD 2 Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
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Reggae singer
Jimmy Cliff is 65.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1789
The U.S. House of Representatives held
its first full meeting in New York;
Frederick Muhlenberg of Pennsylvania
was elected the first House speaker.
“A caval donato non si guarda in bocca.”
(Don’t look a gift horse in the mouth.)
— Italian proverb.
Actress Ali
MacGraw is 75.
Singer Hillary Scott
is 27.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A child looks at people dressed up as Easter Bunnies during the Easter Bonnet Parade in New York Sunday.
Monday: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of
showers. Highs in the upper 50s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
Monday night: Mostly cloudy. Patchy fog
after midnight. Lows in the upper 40s. West
winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming sunny. Patchy fog in the
morning. Highs around 60. Northwest winds 5 to 10 mph.
Tuesday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s.
Northwest winds 10 to 15 mph decreasing to around 5 mph
after midnight.
Wednesday: Sunny in the morning then becoming partly
cloudy. Highs in the upper 50s.
Wednesday night: Mostly cloudy. A chance of rain. Lows in
the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
The Daily Derby race winners are No.04 Big Ben
in first place; No. 05 California Classic in second
place; and No. 12 Lucky Charms in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:40.24.
(Answers tomorrow)
TINGE TIPSY TANDEM FORMAL
Saturday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: The insect was no longer bugging him, and
was quickly becoming his — PEST FRIEND
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
NARGT
ROGUD
COTYSK
NIZHET
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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Answer
here:
8 6 8
25 31 36 46 53 21
Mega number
March 29 Mega Millions
3 12 28 30 39
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
6 4 5 4
Daily Four
9 0 1
Daily three evening
On this date:
In 1853, Cincinnati, Ohio, established a fire department made up
of paid city employees.
In 1912, the city of Branson, Mo., was incorporated.
In 1933, Nazi Germany staged a daylong national boycott of
Jewish-owned businesses.
In 1939, the United States recognized the government of Gen.
Francisco Franco in Spain, the same day Franco went on radio
to declare victory in the Spanish Civil War.
In 1945, American forces launched the amphibious invasion of
Okinawa during World War II.
In 1962, the Katherine Anne Porter novel “Ship of Fools,” an
allegory about the rise of Nazism in Germany, was published by
Little, Brown & Co. on April Fool’s Day.
In 1963, New York City’s daily newspapers resumed publishing
after settlement was reached in a 114-day strike. The daytime
drama “General Hospital” premiered on ABC-TV.
In 1972, the first Major League Baseball players’ strike began; it
lasted 12 days.
In 1976, Apple Computer was founded by Steve Jobs, Steve
Wozniak and Ronald Wayne.
In 1983, tens of thousands of anti-nuclear demonstrators linked
arms in a 14-mile human chain spanning three defense installa-
tions in rural England, including the Greenham Common U.S.
Air Base.
In 1984, recording star Marvin Gaye was shot to death by his
father, Marvin Gay (cq) Sr. in Los Angeles, the day before his
45th birthday. (The elder Gay pleaded guilty to voluntary
manslaughter, and received probation.)
In 1992, the National Hockey League Players’Association went
on its first-ever strike, which lasted 10 days.
Ten years ago: American troops entered a hospital in Nasiriyah,
Iraq, and rescued Army Pfc. Jessica Lynch, who’d been held
prisoner since her unit was ambushed on March 23.
Actress Jane Powell is 85. Actress Debbie Reynolds is 81.
Country singer Jim Ed Brown is 79. Actor Don Hastings is 79.
Rhythm-and-blues singer Rudolph Isley is 74. Supreme Court
Justice Samuel Alito is 63. Actress Annette O’Toole is 61. Movie
director Barry Sonnenfeld is 60. Singer Susan Boyle (TV:
“Britain’s Got Talent”) is 52. Country singer Woody Lee is 45.
Actress Jessica Collins is 42. Rapper-actor Method Man is 42.
Movie directors Albert and Allen Hughes are 41. Political com-
mentator Rachel Maddow is 40. Singer Bijou Phillips is 33. Actor
Sam Huntington is 31. Actor Matt Lanter is 30. Actor Josh
Zuckerman is 28.
Pope makes Easter
pleas for world peace
VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis
marked Christianity’s most joyous day
with a passionate plea for world peace,
celebrating his first Easter Sunday as
pontiff in the enthusiastic company of
more than 250,000 people who over-
flowed from St. Peter’s Square.
With eloquent words in his Easter
message, Francis lamented enduring
conflicts in the Middle East, on the
Korean peninsula and elsewhere and
remembered the world’s neediest peo-
ple. With physical gestures, he illustrat-
ed the personal, down-to-earth caring he
brings as a pastor to this new papacy —
cradling a disabled child held out to him
in the crowd and delightedly accepting a
surprise gift thrust at him.
Francis shared in his flock’s exuber-
ance as they celebrated Christianity’s
core belief that Jesus Christ rose from
the dead following crucifixion. After
Mass in flower-bedecked St. Peter’s
Square, he stepped aboard an open-
topped white popemobile for a cheerful
spin through pathways in the joyous
crowd, kissing babies, smiling constant-
ly and patting children on the head.
One admirer of both the pope and his
favorite soccer team from his Argentine
homeland, Saints of San Lorenzo, insist-
ed that Francis take a team jersey he was
waving at the pontiff — “take it, go
ahead, take it,” the man seemed to be
telling the pope. Finally, a delighted
Francis obliged, briefly holding up the
shirt, and the crowd roared in approval.
He handed the shirt to an aide in the
front seat, and the popemobile continued
its whirl through the square.
In a poignant moment, Francis cradled
and kissed a physically disabled boy
passed to him from the crowd. The child
worked hard to make one of his arms
hug the pope back, then succeeded,
smiling in satisfaction as the pope
patiently waited for the boy to give his
greeting.
Francis has repeatedly put concern for
the poor and suffering at the center of his
messages, and he pursued his promotion
of the causes of peace and social justice
in the Easter speech he delivered from
the central balcony of St. Peter’s
Basilica, the same vantage point above
the square where he was introduced to
the world as the first Latin American
pope on March 13.
The Roman Catholic leader aimed his
Easter greetings at “every house and
every family, especially where the suf-
fering is greatest, in hospitals, in pris-
ons.” Francis prayed that Jesus would
inspire people to “change hatred into
love, vengeance into forgiveness, war
into peace.”
As popes before him have, he urged
Israelis and Palestinians to resume peace
talks and end a conflict that “has lasted all
too long.” And, in reflecting on the two-
year-old Syrian crisis, Francis asked,
“How much suffering must there still be
before a political solution” can be found?
The pope also expressed desire for a
“spirit of reconciliation” on the Korean
peninsula, where North Korea says it has
entered “a state of war” with South
Korea. He also decried warfare and ter-
rorism in Africa, as well as what he
called the 21st century’s most extensive
form of slavery: human trafficking.
The first pontiff to come from the
Jesuits, an order with special concern for
the poor, and the first pope to name him-
self after St. Francis, a medieval figure
who renounced wealth to preach to the
down-and-out, Francis lamented that the
world is ‘’still divided by greed looking
for easy gain.”
5 22 28 37 43 19
Mega number
March 30 Super Lotto Plus
REUTERS
Pope Francis waves during his “Urbi et
Orbi”(To the City and the World) address
from a balcony in St. Peter’s Square at
the Vatican Sunday.
3
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
D
uring early modern Europe when
the code of chivalry began, knights
in shining armor felt one had to
defend his honor in the best way he knew —
with swords.
Unusually, his honor could be settled in a
remote area, away from the sheriffs and in the
early morning in case the challenger had
sobered up and decided his honor didn’t
require being killed. If the duel did go on, a
“second” would arrange for the type of sword
he would use (a rapier, the smallsword or the
French foil). Of course, the weapon chosen
would be the one with which the challenger
was most proficient.
Over time, rules were set up that would
ensure the offender would have a chance to
defend himself decently. The challenge could
even be called off or the men could agree not
to aim. If one member of the group was killed,
it was not considered murder and sometimes
the victor of the duel became a hero. If these
facts are to be believed by a researcher of
dueling, during the reign of Henry IV, more
than 4,000 French aristocrats were killed in
duels “in an 18-year period.” The 20 years of
Louis XIII’s reign saw some 8,000 pardons
for “murders associated with duels.”
In the late 18th century, the duels were con-
ducted with dueling pistols.
David C. Broderick, born in Washington,
D.C. in 1820, of Irish parents, favored the
northern attitude of no slavery. After moving
to New York, he became absorbed in politics
of the type dealt out by Tammany Hall politi-
cians. He had great native ability and tremen-
dous powers of leadership. He was very
excitable and sometimes lacked good judg-
ment at times. He became a Tammany
Democrat and became adept at all of the tricks
of corrupt politicians. After being defeated in
the race for a seat in Congress in 1846, he sold
his business and moved to California in 1848.
It wasn’t long before he was immersed in the
local political scene. He was elected state sen-
ator and served briefly as lieutenant governor
of California.
The Democrats were divided into two
groups in California due to the advent of the
Civil War. Those favoring slavery were called
Lecompton Democrats and they could
become very angry and aggressive when the
topic of slavery came up. Broderick, while at
the Capitol, began to speak out about slavery
and upset and antagonized many of the
Congress.
Judge David S. Terry was a pro-slavery
Southern from Tennessee and became a bitter
enemy of Broderick after his speeches on
slavery. He began to attack Broderick in his
speeches and in the newspaper. Broderick was
infuriated and a battle of words went on until
after the election of 1859 when Terry chal-
lenged Broderick to a duel. Broderick was
backed into the corner and had to do it.
Monday, Sept. 12, 1859 was the day of the
duel that was to be held near the border of San
Francisco and San Mateo County. When
Monday arrived, the duel that was illegal in
these counties was stopped by the sheriff who
arrested the two participants. The arrest was
nixed by a local judge who said there was no
misdemeanor committed and they were
released. The “field
of honor” was an
o u t - o f - t h e - wa y
place who few knew
of and many of the
20 buggies and 67
spectators that
arrived on Tuesday
were late due to the
fog and bad roads.
What followed
was short of a farce.
The pistols were
chosen by Terry and
they were consid-
ered to be hair trig-
gers. Broderick was
not familiar with
pistols and discounted this information as he
did not know what it meant. Pistols were now
ready and held hanging beside the legs of the
men. The two men faced each other and the
second asked them if they were ready. “Yes”
came the reply. “Fire, one, two!” pronounced
the second. Immediately, Broderick began
lifting his pistol and it fired before he lifted it
one foot, ready to fire. Immediately Terry lift-
ed his pistol, aimed and fired. The shot hit
Broderick and he grabbed his side of his
chest, reeled and fell down.
Broderick died three days later. At the
funeral in Portsmouth Square, 30,000 people
attended.
Judge Terry was tried in Marin County for
manslaughter but the charges were dismissed.
Rediscovering the Peninsula by Darold Fredricks
appears in the Monday edition of the Daily
Journal.
The Terry-Broderick duel with pistols
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
Dueling gun of the 1800s.
BURLINGAME
Suspicious activity. A suspicious man in a
blue four-door Toyota followed a high school
student as she walked home on the 500 block
of Burlingame Avenue before 4:07 p.m.
Thursday, March 21.
DUI. A citizen reported a fellow bar patron
had driven away from the bar at the intersec-
tion of Burlingame Avenue and California
Drive before 1:48 a.m. Wednesday, March 20.
BELMONT
Theft. Registration tabs were stolen from a
vehicle on Judson Street before 9:55 a.m. on
Thursday, March 14.
Burglary. Multiple storage units were broken
into on Old County Road before 6:58 p.m. on
Wednesday, March 13.
Disturbance. An aggressive solicitor
approached a woman at her home on Fifth
Avenue before 5:35 p.m. on Wednesday,
March 13.
FOSTER CITY
Burglary commercial. Business was broken
into through the backside lower window on
Triton Drive before 8:02 a.m. Monday,
March 18.
Fraud. A person reported sending an elec-
tronic check to a fraudulent online company
on Foster City Boulevard before 10:01 a.m.
on Thursday, March 14.
Reckless driver. A fare reported his cab driv-
er was under the influence on Chess Drive
before 9:28 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13.
Arrest. A woman was arrested for driving
with a suspended license on Avocet Court
before 1:36 p.m. on Wednesday, March 13.
SAN CARLOS
Vandalism. Property was vandalized on the
200 block of Laurel Street before 3:28 p.m.
Friday, March 15.
REDWOOD CITY
Burglary residential. Someone reported their
laptop, iPad, two cellphones, cash, gift cards
and jewelry was stolen on Westgate Street
before 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 19.
Stolen vehicle. Someone reported their
Suzuki GSX-R1000 was stolen on Leahy
Street before 9:36 a.m. Tuesday, March 19.
Petty theft. Bag of medication was stolen
from an unlocked vehicle on Medford Avenue
before 5:29 p.m. Monday, March 18.
Grand theft. Someone reported their jewelry
was stolen Madison Avenue before 1:08 p.m.
Monday, March 18.
Grand theft. Someone reported their teapot
was stolen on Standish Street before 1:10 a.m.
Monday, March 18.
Police reports
Six for six
Six men took six bottles of liquor on
Roosevelt Avenue in Redwood City
before 8:02 p.m. Sunday, March 17.
4
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Amy Brooks Colin Flynn Hal Coehlo
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Al Stanley Jim Esenwen
Family Owned & Operated
Established: 1949
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OAKLAND — Families of the
people killed in a shooting ram-
page at a small Oakland university
last year are remembering their
lost loved ones as the one-year
anniversary of the massacre
approaches.
Seven people were killed in the
shooting at Oikos University on
April 2, 2012 when authorities say
One Goh opened fire.
Investigators say Goh — a for-
mer Oikos student — had planned
the shooting after becoming angry
with school officials over a tuition
dispute. He previously had decided
to drop out of the school’s nursing
program.
Wa n g c h e n
Nyima told the
O a k l a n d
Tribune a bad
dream has
awakened him
almost every
night since his
sister, Sonam
Choedon, was
killed in the
attack.
He told the newspaper that in his
dreams, he sees his sister calling
out to him in her native Tibetan.
“Cho-cho,” she cries out, using the
Tibetan word for older brother,
“Cho-cho, can I have some pocket
money?”
He is rarely able to go back to
sleep after the dream, Nyima said.
“I keep thinking, ‘Why?”’ he
said. “I still can’t believe that she’s
gone.”
Nyima has spent hours praying
for his sister, and will do so again
Tuesday with a small group of
friends and family, including
another sister who flew in from
Canada for the memorial, he said.
Goh — a 44-year-old Korean
immigrant and former classmate to
six of the victims— has pleaded
not guilty to the killings. He is
confined to a psychiatric hospital
after two court-appointed psychia-
trists determined that he suffered
from paranoid schizophrenia and a
judge in January found him incom-
petent to stand trial.
June Lee, executive director of
the Korean Community Center of
the East Bay, said the shooting
traumatized the Korean-American
community and emphasized the
need for more services.
“The community had no aware-
ness of how to deal with it,” she
said. “They find it really horrify-
ing. In the Korean community, if
you have cancer, people will talk
about it. But if you have mental ill-
ness, nobody wants to talk about
it.”
Lia Little, a co-founder of
Oikos’ nursing program, called
school’s front desk when news of
the shooting broke.
“The phone just rang and rang
and rang,” said Little, who knew
each of the victims, as well as the
suspect.
The phone went unanswered
because Katleen Ping, a 24-year-
old immigrant from the
Philippines and prospective nurs-
ing student who ran the front desk,
already had been shot dead.
Her brother, Kaine Ping, said the
loss of his sister has left the fami-
ly, particularly Ping’s 6-year-old
son, Kayzzer Bryant, devastated.
On Tuesday, Ping, his parents
and his orphaned nephew will visit
Katleen’s grave.
In April, Oikos will host two
memorial concerts — one in
Oakland next Saturday and a sec-
ond in El Dorado Hills on April 13
— to remember the victims.
Families mark anniversary of massacre
One Goh
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Thousands of ankle
monitors that track the movements of paroled
sex offenders and other criminals were ordered
removed and replaced by California officials
last year because they were flawed and unreli-
able, the Los Angeles Times reported.
The move was made after field testing of
devices made by a division of 3M Co., which
had supplied GPS monitors used by about
4,000 parolees. The company was competing
for a statewide contract valued at about $51
million over six years.
The company’s bid was rejected because of
defects found in the devices, the Times said,
and they also failed a second round of tests
after 3M protested.
The company disputed the allegations.
“This is one agency’s testing,” said Steve
Chapin, vice president of government rela-
tions for 3M’s electronic monitoring division.
“We have the most widely used system in the
world. It’s been proven time and time and
time again to be very safe and reliable.”
In February, a Sacramento County judge
ruled that Denise Milano, who heads the
state’s GPS monitoring program, had violated
state contract laws but he upheld her decision
that the 3M devices failed state standards.
Flaws in parolee trackers found
Four hurt in crash, attack
at San Jose Wal-Mart
SAN JOSE — Authorities say four people
were hurt when a driver crashed his vehicle
into a Wal-Mart in California and assaulted
people in the store.
San Jose police Officer Albert Morales, a
department spokesman, says after the crash
around 11:15 a.m. Sunday, the driver got out his
vehicle and used a blunt object to attack people.
One person suffered what Morales
described as serious injuries. He did not know
the extent of the injuries to the three other
people but says they are not life-threatening.
The driver of the vehicle was arrested when
officers arrived. It’s not known what prompt-
ed the attack, but Morales described him as
“uncooperative.” The name of the driver has
not yet been released.
Student visiting family
in SF shot, killed
SAN FRANCISCO — Police say an
Oregon college student visiting his family in
San Francisco was shot and killed a block
from his family’s home after a gunman
approached him and asked if he was a mem-
ber of a gang.
Nineteen-year-old Jacob Valdiviezo was
shot after the gunman got out of a car, walked
up to Valdiviezo and a friend as they walked
to the home in the city’s Mission District
around 3 a.m. Saturday.
Local briefs
6
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
KAUFMAN, Texas — Kaufman
County District Attorney Mike
McLelland took no chances after
one of his assistant prosecutors was
gunned down two months ago.
McLelland said he carried a gun
everywhere he went and was extra
careful when answering the door at
his home.
“I’m ahead of everybody else
because, basically, I’m a soldier,”
the 23-year Army veteran said in an
interview less than two weeks ago.
On Saturday, he and his wife were
found shot to death in their rural
home just outside the town of
Forney, about 20 miles from Dallas.
While investigators gave no
motive for the killings, Forney
Mayor Darren Rozell said: “It
appears this was not a random act.”
“Everybody’s a little on edge and
a little shocked,” he said.
The slayings came less than two
weeks after Colorado’s prison chief
was shot to death at his front door,
apparently by an ex-convict, and a
couple of months after Kaufman
County Assistant District Attorney
Mark Hasse was killed in a parking
lot a block from his courthouse
office. No arrests have been made in
Hasse’s slaying Jan. 31.
McLelland, 63, is the 13th prose-
cutor killed in the U.S. since the
National Association of District
Attorneys began keeping count in
the 1960s.
Sheriff David Byrnes would not
give details Sunday of how the
killings unfolded and said there was
nothing to indicate for certain
whether the DA’s slaying was con-
nected to Hasse’s.
El Paso County, Colo., sheriff’s
spokesman Sgt. Joe Roybal said
investigators had found no evidence
so far connecting the Texas killings
to the Colorado case, but added:
“We’re examining all possibilities.”
Colorado’s corrections director,
Tom Clements, was killed March 19
when he answered the doorbell at
his home outside Colorado Springs.
Evan Spencer Ebel, a white
supremacist and former Colorado
inmate suspected of shooting
Clements, died in a shootout with
Texas deputies two days later about
100 miles from Kaufman.
McLelland himself, in an
Associated Press interview shortly
after the Colorado slaying, raised
the possibility that Hasse was
gunned down by a white suprema-
cist gang.
The weekend slayings raised con-
cerns for prosecutors across Texas,
and some were taking extra security
precautions. Byrnes said security
would be increased at the court-
house in Kaufman but declined to
say if or how other prosecutors in
McLelland’s office would be pro-
tected.
Harris County District Attorney
Mike Anderson said he accepted the
sheriff’s offer of 24-hour security
for him and his family after learning
about the slayings, mostly over con-
cerns for his family’s safety.
Anderson said also would take pre-
cautions at his Houston office, the
largest one in Texas, which has
more than 270 prosecutors.
“I think district attorneys across
Texas are still in a state of shock,”
Anderson said Sunday.
McLelland, elected DA in 2010,
said his office had prosecuted sever-
al cases against racist gangs, who
have a strong presence around
Kaufman County, a mostly rural
area dotted with subdivisions, with
a population of about 104,000.
“We put some real dents in the
Aryan Brotherhood around here in
the past year,” he said.
In recent years, the DA’s office
also prosecuted a case in which a
justice of the peace was found
guilty of theft and burglary and
another case in which a man was
convicted of killing his former girl-
friend and her 10-year-old daughter.
McLelland said he carried a gun
everywhere, even to walk his dog
around town, a bedroom communi-
ty for the Dallas area.
Texas DA slain in his home; had armed himself
The McLellands
By David Crary
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Rival legal teams, well-financed
and highly motivated, are girding
for court battles over the coming
months on laws enacted in Arkansas
and North Dakota that would
impose the nation’s toughest bans
on abortion.
For all their differences, attorneys
for the two states and the abortion-
rights supporters opposing them
agree on this: The laws represent an
unprecedented frontal assault on the
Supreme Court’s 1973 Roe v. Wade
decision that established a nation-
wide right to abortion.
The Arkansas law, approved
March 6 when legislators overrode a
veto by Democratic Gov. Mike
Beebe, would ban most abortions
from the 12th week of pregnancy
onward. On March 26, North Dakota
went further, with Republican Gov.
Jack Dalrymple signing a measure
that would ban abortions as early as
six weeks into a pregnancy, when a
fetal heartbeat can first be detected
and before some women even know
they’re pregnant.
Abortion-rights advocates plan to
challenge both measures, contend-
ing they are unconstitutional viola-
tions of the Roe ruling that legalized
abortion until a fetus could viably
survive outside the womb. A fetus is
generally considered viable at 22 to
24 weeks.
“I think they’re going to be
blocked immediately by the courts
— they are so far outside the clear
bounds of what the Supreme Court
has said for 40 years,” said Nancy
Northup, president of the Center for
Reproductive Rights.
The center will be leading the
North Dakota legal challenge and
working in Arkansas alongside the
American Civil Liberties Union’s
state and national offices. Both
Northup and ACLU lawyers say
they have ample resources to wage
the battles.
Rivals prepare for legal battle over abortion
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Has the
nation lived down its history of
racism and should the law become
colorblind? Addressing two pivotal
legal issues, one on affirmative
action and a second on voting rights,
a divided Supreme Court is poised
to answer those questions.
In one case, the issue is whether
race preferences in university
admissions undermine equal oppor-
tunity more than they promote the
benefits of racial diversity.
Just this past week, justices sig-
naled their interest in scrutinizing
affirmative action very intensely,
expanding their review as well to a
Michigan law passed by voters that
bars “preferential treatment” to stu-
dents based on race. Separately in a
second case, the court must decide
whether race relations have
improved to the point that federal
laws protecting minority voting
rights are no longer warranted.
The questions are apt as the
United States closes in on a demo-
graphic tipping point, when non-
whites will become a majority of the
nation’s population for the first time.
Supreme Court poised to
upend civil rights policies
7
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Tuesday April 9
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Wednesday April 24
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HUSSAN, West Bank —
Mahmoud Abbas’ government in
the West Bank is getting tougher
with critics, interrogating, prosecut-
ing and even jailing several journal-
ists and bloggers in recent months
for allegedly “defaming” the
Western-backed Palestinian leader.
Rights activists say the legal has-
sles are meant to silence dissent and
that the campaign is intensifying
despite promises to the contrary by
Abbas. Targets of the crackdown
include supporters of Abbas’ politi-
cal rival — the Islamic militant
Hamas — and political independ-
ents who have written about alleged
nepotism and
abuse of power
in Abbas’
P a l e s t i n i a n
Authority.
Abbas’ aides
insist the
P a l e s t i n i a n
leader opposes
any curb on
e x p r e s s i o n .
They blame
overzealous prosecutors and securi-
ty officials, but government critics
say Abbas could easily halt the
clampdown.
“It’s a good cop, bad cop routine.
The bad cops are the security serv-
ices, and the good cop is the benev-
olent president,” said Diana Buttu, a
former Palestinian Authority insid-
er. They want to send a chilling
message, she said, “and it works.”
Abbas’ foreign backers, who view
him as key to delivering any future
peace deal with Israel and maintain-
ing quiet in the West Bank, have
said little in public about the issue.
Instead, during a visit to the West
Bank in late March, President
Barack Obama showered Abbas and
his security forces with praise for
their efforts to prevent militant
attacks on Israel.
The new tactic of taking journal-
ists and bloggers to court has invited
speculation about timing and motive.
Some say Abbas and his inner cir-
cle are lashing out at critics because
they feel increasingly vulnerable
politically. Others suggest the 78-
year-old Abbas is either an old-
school Arab politician not used to
criticism or an out-of-touch leader
getting bad advice.
“It’s a weak authority and that’s
why it’s doing this,” said Shahwan
Jabareen, who heads the human
rights group Al-Haq. “They fear the
criticism is growing — that they
will lose the (Palestinian) authority
— and they are trying to keep it by
acting like this.”
Such insecurities are rooted in the
political split of 2007, when Hamas
seized the Gaza Strip from Abbas.
Since then, Hamas has been going
after sympathizers of Abbas’ Fatah
movement in Gaza, while Abbas’
security forces have tried to disman-
tle the Hamas infrastructure in the
West Bank to prevent a similar
takeover there.
Reconciliation efforts have failed,
and both sides are entrenched in
their respective territories.
The split has prevented new elec-
tions, meaning Abbas has already
overstayed his term as president by
four years, weakening his claim to
lead. His troubles are compounded
by a cash crisis in his foreign aid-
dependent government and lack of
progress toward his main objective
of negotiating terms of a Palestinian
state with Israel.
Palestinian leader clamps down on critics
By Aye Aye Win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
YANGON, Myanmar — For most people
in Myanmar, it will be a novelty when pri-
vately run daily newspapers hit the streets on
Monday. Many weren’t even born when the
late dictator Ne Win imposed a state monop-
oly on the daily press in the 1960s.
But for 81-year-old Khin Maung Lay, the
rebirth of daily newspapers is like a second
lease on life. He is chief editor of Golden
Fresh Land, one of four dailies going on sale
Monday as Myanmar takes another step in its
march toward democracy.
He’s old enough to recall there once had
been a big and vibrant daily press in the
Burmese, English, Indian and Chinese lan-
guages in the period of parliamentary democ-
racy after Myanmar, known then as Burma,
won independence from Britain in 1948.
Khin Maung Lay worked as a senior news-
man at the Burmese language Mogyo daily
before it was driven out of business by gov-
ernment pressure in 1964.
Now as chief editor of Golden Fresh Land
— the name sounds less awkward in the orig-
inal Burmese — he heads a team of young
journalists he recruited from various weeklies,
who have only the briefest of acquaintances
with the concept of a free press, having grown
up under the military government that ruled
for five decades. They are up against some
media behemoths and papers belonging to the
country’s top political parties.
Khin Maung Lay acknowledges there are
innumerable challenges ahead, but said he is
ready to face them “in the name of freedom of
press.” He’s well acquainted with the cutting
edge of the concept — he went to jail three
times under Ne Win, including a three-year
stretch in “protective custody.”
Private daily newspapers
make return to Myanmar
By Sarah El Deeb
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAIRO — A popular television satirist
known as Egypt’s Jon Stewart was released on
bail Sunday after nearly five hours of interro-
gation over allegations that he broke the law
by insulting Islam and the president.
Bassem Youssef is the most prominent crit-
ic of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi to
be called in for questioning in recent weeks in
what the opposition says is a campaign to
intimidate critics amid wave after wave of
political unrest in deeply polarized Egypt.
Arrest warrants have been issued for five
prominent anti-government activists accused
of instigating violence.
Deputy chief prosecutor
denied the interrogation
was part of an intimidation
campaign and said his
department was enforcing
the law and seeking to
establish some guidelines
on freedom of expression.
“The prosecution is the
protector of social rights
and we work on implementing the law. ...
There must be guidelines for those working
in the media to observe so as not violate the
law,” Hassan Yassin told the Associated
Press.
Egypt’s ‘Jon Stewart’
held for questioning
Mahmoud
Abbas
Bassem Youssef
OPINION 9
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Lempert for a day
Editor,
If life was fair we all should get to be
Daily Journal columnist Sue Lempert
for at least one day — and what a won-
derful day that would be.
Imagine having all the money you
need, powerful political friends and
hanging out all day with your wealthy
Woodside/Hillsborough friends.
Even better yet, you get to write a
weekly column for a local newspaper
where you get to publish names of
politicians that you hope get elected
into office.
During your day as Lempert you will
never run into sad, desperate men who
smoke (gasp) and play cards (disgust-
ing) because people like that are not
allowed in your neighborhood. As
Lempert for a day you will make sure
that no third world, disease-producing
people, such as thoroughbred race
horse caretakers, will ever be back in
San Mateo.
Please big guy in the sky, let me be
Lempert for at least one day. It would
be the right thing to do.
Robert Bacon
San Mateo
Clearing up misinformation
Editor,
I am responding to several recent let-
ters in which the authors attempted to
support the fire board recall movement
on the coastside. In so doing you, the
readers, have been exposed to some of
the twisted logic that has been preva-
lent over the last several months. A lit-
tle background checking would have
revealed the following.
First we are asked to follow the
money. Let’s start with major financing
of the recall campaign by Cal Fire’s
union which included the payments to
signature gatherers for the recall
One writer shows little knowledge of
the hiring process in a modern San
Mateo County fire department in which
prospective firefighters undergo inten-
sive testing and background screening
processes.
Another writer would have us ignore
the hours and hours of discussion,
research and interviews with fire pro-
fessionals that preceded this decision.
He would ignore the projections that
have established the labor cost differen-
tial to be $360,000/year along with a
five-year projection showing a positive
cash flow for the district
They quote a civil grand jury report
without reading the fire board’s
response which is attached to the
report. They are clearly not experts in
the length of fire academies and the
feasibility of shared services with other
county fire departments. They seem to
be able to see the future and believe
that isolated incidents in the past will
define the future.
Words and allegations are cheap, but
construction and solid improvements
take hard work. The closer the govern-
ment is to the people, the more
accountable and responsive it has to be.
The coastside has to make a decision as
to who sets the standards for its com-
munity and to whom its fire chief is
accountable.
Doug Mackintosh
El Granada
The letter writer is on the Board of
Directors for the Coastside Fire
Protection District.
Gun background checks
Editor,
A recent poll showed support for
closing gun show loopholes by mandat-
ing background checks for gun pur-
chasers at 92 percent. Even in house-
holds with gun owners it was 91 per-
cent. I’ve never seen a poll that showed
90+ percent support for anything, in
fact the same poll showed support for
motherhood at only 87 percent. OK, I
made that last part up.
You can’t accuse them of rigging the
poll for the president, the same poll
DID show 46 percent support the NRA
positions overall on gun ownership com-
pared with 43 percent for the president.
It tells you that even the hard-core,
NRA-supporting, pickup truck driving
and presumably malted beverage swill-
ing segment of the gun owner popula-
tion realize this is sensible legislation.
I’m sure there are a few who ques-
tion the wisdom of checking whether
the person buying a high-powered
weapon at a gun show is a certified
psychopath. Perhaps even the odd
Daily Journal reader or two. That is
their prerogative, but I’m equally sure
it must be sobering for them to realize
that for the first time since the Age of
Exploration in the 16th century that
their numbers have officially been
exceeded by the membership of the
Flat Earth Society.
John Dillon
San Bruno
Letters to the editor
The Stockton Record
C
alifornia needs to eliminate
some of its state parks. That’s
the conclusion, and a reason-
able if controversial one, of a yearlong
investigation by the state’s Little
Hoover Commission.
“A great public institution is falling
apart,” commission member Virginia
Ellis said in a statement.
Literally falling apart.
Since the 1990s, some 168,000 acres
have been added to the park system
using voter-approved bonds. At the
same time, operational funding —
money for maintenance and staffing —
declined in part because of general fund
cuts by the governor and Legislature.
Today there is a backlog of mainte-
nance that exceeds $1 billion.
So what do we do, just keep adding
land to the 278-unit system?
Doing that only perpetuates the prob-
lem.
“The growth curve for the department
is no longer in acreage, but in deferred
maintenance,” according to the Little
Hoover Commission report.
The 13-member commission makes a
host of recommendations, including
adding a new job classification of “park
manager” allowing workers other than
park rangers, who must have peace-
officer training, to oversee a park. The
governor and Legislature are urged to
commit to a consistent level of general
fund support for the system. And the
department should study crime trends
in the parks and hire more rangers as
needed.
The Parks Department management
structure is obsolete, the report argues,
one example being its focus on land
acquisition at the expense of mainte-
nance and finding ways to generate
income.
But undoubtedly the most controver-
sial suggestion is to appoint an advisory
council to decide which parks truly
have “statewide significance” and
which serve more regional or local
needs. Those units falling into the latter
category should be transferred to local
agencies, the report said.
Work on this report began before it
became known in July that the Parks
Department had been hiding some $22
million even as it moved to shutter 70
of the 278 parks because of budget
cuts.
Those budgetary shenanigans serve to
underscore the commission’s call for
structural changes in department man-
agement just as our inability to care for
the parks we have makes the case for a
close, albeit hard, look at the need to
eliminating some.
Nobody is against parks. But nobody
can be for adding parks just for the
sake of having them either.
State parks system needs change
Is it time to
revisit CEQA?
S
tate Sen. Jerry Hill, D-San Mateo, has a major chal-
lenge. He’s the new chair of the important
Environmental Quality committee, which among
other things, will be considering possible changes to the
California Environmental Quality Act, also known as
CEQA. Gov. Jerry Brown called for reform of CEQA in his
State of the State address. Now, state Senate President Pro
Tem Darrell Steinberg is
introducing Senate Bill 731
to do just that. Both the gov-
ernor and Steinberg feel the
act has been used or mis-
used for corporate competi-
tion (one corner gas station
trying to stop a competitor
from adding more pumps),
by unions to force project
labor agreements, and by
opponents of infill develop-
ment and transportation
projects to delay or stop
work.
***
CEQA was signed into
law in 1970 by then governor Ronald Reagan to provide a
statewide policy of environmental protections. CEQA
requires analysis and public disclosure of possible environ-
mental impacts and necessary mitigation. It has been a
mandatory part of California state and local government
land use decision making. It has also been the basis of
numerous lawsuits. According to the governor and senators
Steinberg and Hill, it has been used to stop development
often for reasons that have nothing to do with environmental
protection. It also has not been updated to reflect new envi-
ronmental challenges including climate change and sea level
rise.
This is a new assignment for Hill. The former chair of the
committee, Michael Rubio, D-Bakersfield, recently resigned
from the state Senate to take a job with Chevron. He was a
conservative senator, albeit a Democrat, and his approach to
CEQA change was quite different from Hill, who has been a
longtime environmental advocate. Rubio wanted to use a
standards-based approach which would allow state or local
government laws to prevail. Hill was against this and it will
not be included in the proposed legislation. Instead, the bill
will probably include language to speed up environmental
review for renewable energy projects, bike lanes, mass tran-
sit initiatives and other “green” projects as well as cut back
on lawsuits designed to slow down and block construction.
Hill has strong environmental credentials. He was a mem-
ber of the California Air Resources Board and at one time
chaired the Bay Area Quality Management Board. In the
city of San Mateo, he is remembered as being a leader in
Measure H, which lowered building heights. He also has
some strong environmentalists on his committee including
Ellen Corbett, D-San Leandro, Loni Hancock, D-Berkeley,
and Fran Pavley, D-Agoura Hills, who introduced
California’s first strict auto emissions law. The hope is to
have a bill ready to introduce this month so it can be dealt
with this session.
But it won’t be easy — even with the backing of the gov-
ernor and the Senate president. Already there is opposition
aplenty to any change led by environmental stalwarts such
as the California League of Conservation Voters and the
Sierra Club, and by organized labor.
***
Hill’s committee will also be looking at water quality
issues connected with fracking, especially at one of the
largest oil deposits, the Monterey Shale, which has 15.4 bil-
lion barrels of oil. The state currently has no fracking regu-
lations (Meanwhile, Sen. Pavley is calling for a moratorium
until the state does a thorough study of fracking’s benefits
and risks). Hill is also part of the leadership in Sacramento
and heads the Democratic Caucus. Any possibility he could
be the next Senate president when Steinberg is termed out?
While he is not campaigning for the job as some others are,
Hill is certainly on the A-list.
***
Over in the state Assembly, Rich Gordon, D-Menlo Park,
is chairing a select committee on sea level rise and its
impact on the California economy. It’s a statewide problem
but with special significance for the Bay Area. When
Gordon was a county supervisor, he served on Bay
Conservation and Development Commission, which has
mapped the potential impacts of sea level rise on the imme-
diate area. The committee will be collecting data on possi-
ble damage to California ports and goods movement, major
airports, the coastline economy, state infrastructure, etc. A
bill is expected next year. I’ve seen the BCDC presentation
and it’s scary. It will be interesting to see the recommenda-
tions from Gordon’s committee.
Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo. Her column
runs every Monday. She can be reached at sue@smdailyjour-
nal.com.
Other voices
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business 10
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — The dollar is rising again.
After a drop last autumn, the U.S. dollar has
climbed 5 percent against other currencies
over the past two months, reaching the high-
est level since August.
The main reason is the U.S. economy.
Although growth is still weak, the outlook for
the U.S. is better than elsewhere in the devel-
oped world. Europe is stuck in a recession and
struggling to control its debt. Japan is trying
to push down the value of the yen to boost
exports and end deflation.
A strong dollar helps Americans by making
imports cheaper and keeping inflation low, but
it can hurt U.S. companies two ways. Their
goods become more expensive for overseas
customers, and the profits on sales abroad are
worth less when converted from a foreign cur-
rency to dollars.
The impact of the dollar’s appreciation is
starting to show up in earnings reports. The
insurer Aflac, which does much of its business
in Japan, says its earnings were hurt as the yen
fell against the U.S. currency. Procter &
Gamble, which makes Gillette razors and
Crest toothpaste, said the stronger dollar was
holding back its sales growth overseas.
Many analysts predict that the dollar will
continue to rise. Here’s a look at what a
stronger dollar means for investors.
TOUGH FOR TECHNOLOGY COM-
PANIES AND MATERIALS MAKERS
A rising dollar could spell trouble for U.S.
companies that make software and consumer
products, as well as companies that make
basic materials like aluminum.
The tech industry relies heavily on foreign
sales for growth. About 56 percent of its rev-
enue comes from outside the U.S., according
to research by RBC Capital Markets. As the
dollar strengthens, U.S. goods become more
expensive overseas, discouraging buyers.
Investors worry that could slow business —
and profits. As a result, technology companies
are tied with materials makers as the worst
industry in the S&P 500 this year, rising just
4.2 percent, compared with 10 percent for the
overall market. Business software giant
Oracle said in its most recent earnings report,
on March 20, that the rising dollar lowered its
earnings by about two percent.
The materials industry, which includes Dow
Chemical and miner Cliffs Natural Resources,
also gets more than half of its sales overseas.
“We would be wary of sectors that derive a
lot of their sales overseas, given that fact that
we expect the dollar’s strength to remain,”
says Kristen Scarpa, an investment strategist
at Barclays Wealth and Investment
Management.
COMMODITY CONCERNS
When the dollar appreciates, it makes com-
modities like oil and metals — which are
priced only in dollars — more expensive for
customers who buy them with other curren-
cies like the euro and the yen.
That can weaken demand for commodities,
hurting the profits of the companies that pro-
duce them, like oil producers Exxon Mobil,
Chevron and metals companies like the alu-
minum producer Alcoa.
The S&P mining and metals index, which
includes Alcoa and the gold miner Newmont
Mining, has fallen 6.6 percent this year.
Energy is the weakest industry in the S&P
500 in the past month, up less than 2 percent,
versus 4 percent for the S&P 500.
RETREAT FROM EMERGING MAR-
KETS
For investors putting their money to work
overseas, the stronger dollar presents a differ-
ent problem.
The rising dollar reduces the return on over-
seas holdings, notes Kurt Umbarger, global
equities portfolio specialist at T. Rowe Price.
The MSCI emerging markets index, a
benchmark of stocks in developing countries,
including Brazil, South Korea and China, is
down 1 percent this year before accounting
for changes in currency rates. When measured
in dollar terms, the loss widens to 2.1 percent.
That’s because the currencies of those coun-
tries have fallen in value against the dollar.
HOME SWEET HOME
If you’re worried about the dollar rising,
telecommunications companies like AT&T
and utility companies like Duke Energy offer
a haven.
These companies are shielded from the
impact of a stronger dollar because almost all
of their sales are in the U.S.
Utility stocks have risen 5.1 percent in the
past month, the second-best performing
industry group in the S&P 500.
BIGGER GAINS FOR THE SMALL
Smaller companies make fewer sales over-
seas than large multinationals, so they aren’t
affected as much by the strengthening dollar,
says Phil Orlando, chief equity strategist at
Federated Investors.
The Russell 2000 Index, which tracks small
companies, has risen 12 percent since the start
of the year, outperforming the 10 percent
advance for the S&P 500.
Gains in small companies have been led by
health care stocks like Keryx
Biopharmaceuticals, which has risen 170 per-
cent since the start of the year, and Coronado
Biosciences, which is up 116 percent.
WIDER BENEFITS
A gradually strengthening dollar is good for
the stock market as a whole, and will out-
weigh the initial impact on earnings, says
David Bianco, the head of U.S. equity strate-
gy for Deutsche Bank.
As the dollar rises, it lowers the cost of
imports, holding down inflation.
Rising dollar could hurt earnings in short term
By Martha Mendoza
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CUPERTINO — Apple’s ring-
shaped, gleaming “Spaceship
Headquarters” will include a world
class auditorium and an orchard for
engineers to wander. Google’s new
Bay View campus will feature walk-
ways angled to force accidental
encounters. Facebook, while putting
final touches on a Disney-inspired
campus including a Main Street with
a B-B-Q shack, sushi house and bike
shop, is already planning an even
larger, more exciting new campus.
More than ever before, Silicon
Valley firms want their workers at
work.
Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer has
gone so far as to ban working from
home, and many more offer prodi-
gious incentives for coming in to the
office, such as free meals, massages
and gyms.
This spring, as the tech industry is
soaring out of the Great Recession,
plans are in the works for a flurry of
massive, perk-laden headquarters.
“We’re seeing the mature technol-
ogy companies trying to energize
their work environments, getting rid
of cube farms and investing in facili-
ties to compete for talent,” said
Kevin Schaeffer, a principal at archi-
tecture and design firm Gensler in
San Jose. “That’s caused a huge tran-
sition in the way offices are laid out.”
New Silicon Valley headquarters or
expansions are under way at most of
the area’s major firms, including
eBay, Intel, LinkedIn, Microsoft,
Netflix, Nvidia and Oracle. Many
will be huge: Apple Corp.’s 176-acre
campus will be one of the world’s
largest workplaces. On the outside,
many of the new buildings boast
striking architectural designs and will
collectively be among the most envi-
ronmentally friendly in the country.
Inside, there are walls you can draw
on, ping pong tables, Lego stations,
gaming arcades and free haircuts.
Critics say that while some work-
place perks and benefits are a good
thing, the large, multibillion dollar
corporate headquarters are colossal
wastes of money that snub the pio-
neering technology these firms actu-
ally create.
“Companies led by older manage-
ment tend to be very controlling, but
when I look at people in the 20s or
30s, they’re totally capable of work-
ing on their own and being produc-
tive,” said Kevin Wheeler, whose
Future of Talent Institute researches
and consults on human resources for
Silicon Valley businesses. “To have
artificial structures that require
everybody to be in the office at cer-
tain hours of the day is simply asi-
nine.”
Wheeler said he thinks Yahoo
called everyone back to work
“because they had gotten into a cul-
ture of laziness,” and that the firm
will likely loosen the restrictions
soon.
Yahoo was, in fact, an early model
of Silicon Valley’s happy workplace
culture, touting their espresso bar
and inspirational speakers as a
method of inspiring passion and
originality.
Tech firms bumping up perks to recruit, retain
Business, labor
get deal done on
worker program
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Big business and labor have struck a deal
on a new low-skilled worker program, removing the biggest
hurdle to completion of sweeping immigration legislation
allowing 11 million illegal immigrants eventual U.S. citizen-
ship, labor and Senate officials said Saturday.
The agreement was reached in a phone call late Friday night
with AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, U.S. Chamber of
Commerce head Tom Donohue, and Democratic Sen. Chuck
Schumer of New York, who’s been mediating the dispute.
The deal resolves disagreements over wages for the new
workers and which industries would be included. Those dis-
putes had led talks to break down a week ago, throwing into
doubt whether Schumer and seven other senators crafting a
comprehensive bipartisan immigration bill would be able to
complete their work as planned.
The deal must still be signed off on by the other senators work-
ing with Schumer, including Republicans John McCain of
Arizona and Marco Rubio of Florida, but that’s expected to hap-
pen, according to a person with knowledge of the talks who spoke
on condition of anonymity. With the agreement in place, the sen-
ators are expected to unveil their legislation the week of April 8.
Their measure would secure the border, crack down on employ-
ers, improve legal immigration and create a 13-year pathway to
citizenship for the millions of illegal immigrants already here.
It’s a major second-term priority of President Barack
Obama’s and would usher in the most dramatic changes to the
nation’s faltering immigration system in more than two decades.
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Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
]
OPENING DAY 13
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
By the numbers, the Giants-
Dodgers rivalry is the most dynam-
ic in Major League Baseball. While
the Yankees own the best all-time
winning percentage (.568) among
active major league teams, the
Giants (.538) and the Dodgers
(.524) rank second and third,
respectively — an astonishing feat
considering both teams were estab-
lished in the 1880s, and have been
playing as division rivals since divi-
sion play began in 1969.
“It’s such a great history, and one
of the great rivalries in all of sports,”
Giants vice president and assistant
general manager Bobby Evans said.
“So, it’s exciting baseball whenever
the two teams meet.”
For the 11th time since the two
teams moved west from New York
in 1958, the Giants and Dodgers
will pair up on opening day, as the
teams are set to play at Dodger
Stadium today at 1:10 p.m. The
scheduled pitching matchup certain-
ly fits the bill, with 2012 NL All-
Star starter Matt Cain going against
2011 NL Cy Young Award winner
Clayton Kershaw.
But while the teams figure to
match up as a competitive jugger-
naut in 2013, the two squads have
been constructed via vastly differing
philosophies.
Dodgers general manager Ned
Colletti has chiseled a marquee ros-
ter with well-publicized megadeals
— including a trade with the Red
Sox last August in which Los
Angeles acquired former All-Stars
Josh Beckett, Carl Crawford and
Adrian Gonzalez. Then, over the
offseason, the Dodgers signed the
prize of the free-agent pack — 2009
AL Cy Young winner Zack Greinke.
The Giants have countered by
investing from within. Sure, Giants
general manager Brian Sabean
secured the 2012 World Series-win-
ning lineup by resigning free agents
Angel Pagan and Marco Scutaro to
multiyear contracts. But the splash
of the offseason for San Francisco
was the nine-year megadeal signed
last week by the reigning NL MVP
Buster Posey.
All told, the Giants figure to have
five homegrown starters in their
opening-day lineup — Cain, Posey,
Brandon Belt, Brandon Crawford,
and Pablo Sandoval. The Dodgers
project to feature three products of
their organization — Kershaw, A.J.
Ellis and Matt Kemp.
SEASON LONG RIVALRY
Not only have the Giants returned
all eight starting position players
from last year’s World
Championship team. They also
retain all five pitchers from their
starting rotation.
Cain, Madison Bumgarner and
Tim Lincecum will take the ball for
the three-game series in Los
Angeles, while Barry Zito is slated
to start Friday’s home opener
against St. Louis. Ryan Vogelsong
— fresh off his World Baseball
Classic stint with Team USA — will
round out the rotation as the fifth
starter.
Last season, other than two games
— one started by Eric Hacker and
the other by Yusmeiro Petit — the
Giants current rotation accounted
for every start.
That’s not unlike the success they
saw during the 2010 championship
run when seven pitchers accounted
for all San Francisco’s starts. The
rotation of Lincecum, Zito, Cain,
and Jonathan Sanchez pitched in
order throughout a vast majority of
the season until manager Bruce
Bochy shuffled his starting five for
the final four games of the season.
The only alteration to the rotation
previous to that was when No. 5
starter Todd Wellemeyer was
spelled by Joe Martinez for one start
before Bumgarner was recalled to
assume his starting spot for the rest
of the year.
And like the final 2010 rotation,
four of the pitchers are original
products of the Giants farm system.
Vogelsong, of course, was traded for
Jason Schmidt in 2001. But he was
originally drafted by the Giants in
1998, and broke into the big leagues
with San Francisco in Sept. of 2000,
before rejoining the Giants in 2011.
“We’re very proud of our farm
system and the work that’s been
done in the draft, and our scouts,”
Evans said. “We’ve been fortunate
in the six-year free-agent market to
get quality to come in and help us,
and that includes Gregor Blanco and
Andres Torres and Joaquin Arias
and Santiago Casilla and others like
that who have come in through the
secondary market.”
Still, with heart-of-the-order slug-
gers Posey and Sandoval, and the
skill-position anchors in Crawford
at shortstop and Posey behind the
plate, the foundation of San
Francisco’s roster is largely home-
grown. And as a long-term invest-
ment, the Giants are already reaping
the benefits of that foundation with
a second World Championship in
three years to its credit.
That is the Sabean way, though.
As the winningest general manager
since the halfway mark of the 20th
century, Sabean has already brought
several eras of winning baseball to
San Francisco. Previous to taking
the front-office reins for San
Francisco in 1996, Sabean laid the
foundation of one of the greatest
dynasties in modern sports as scout-
ing director of the Yankees, and
oversaw the signings of Derek Jeter
and Mariano Rivera.
“It’s just a very fruitful time in our
history,” Evans said. “I think that
Brian Sabean comes from such a
strong scouting background, I can
even see the fruits of Brian Sabean’s
work at some of the Yankees’ suc-
cess … overseeing scouting [of
Jeter, Bernie Williams, and Rivera].
Those were all players who were
under Brian’s tutelage. But none
greater than Jeter. And yet he’s still
going, and Brian has been here for
[19] years. So, Brian has a rich his-
tory of scouting and development,
and I think he brought that to the
Giants. I think we’re seeing some of
the best fruits of that.”
Now with the signing of Posey
just days before the start of the 2013
season, the Giants have set the
wheels in motion to potentially sus-
tain another such legendary era
under the direction of Sabean.
“The truth is [Posey] has had one
of the historic starts to a career – a
Rookie of the Year, a World Series
championship, National League
MVP, and a World Series champi-
onship again – I think only Derek
Jeter is able to match that in the last
20 years,” Evans said. “So, they’re
very special.”
Don’t discount the Dodgers hav-
ing fallen out of contention in 2012
as a collapse. The truth of the matter
is manager Don Mattingly was dealt
a barrage of injuries down the
stretch run last season. All-Star cen-
ter fielder Matt Kemp underwent
shoulder surgery just two days after
the close of the regular season. And
ace left-hander Kershaw battled
through a hip labrum injury that
nearly required a Tommy John-
esque surgery. Still, the Dodgers
managed to win 86 games, finishing
just two games shy of a wild-card
berth.
Kershaw and Kemp are both set to
begin the 2013 season with a clean
bill of health. But the Dodgers will
start the year with a different super-
star on the disabled list, as All-Star
shortstop Hanley Ramirez — anoth-
er headline acquisition at the 2012
trade deadline — broke his thumb at
AT&T Park during WBC play, and
is scheduled to miss eight weeks
following March 22 surgery.
NL West is all about the Giants-Dodgers rivalry
OPENING DAY 14
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
OPENING DAY 15
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ARLINGTON, Texas — Trey Burke
and Michigan had the perfect response
for everyone who said they were too
young or not tough enough to make it all
the way to Atlanta.
The championship trophy for the
South Region is headed back to Ann
Arbor, while another fabulous group of
young Wolverines is going to the Final
Four.
Led by Burke and sharp-shooting
guard Nik Stauskas, one of three fresh-
men starters, Michigan controlled
Florida from start to finish in a 79-59
win Sunday.
“It means the world — 20 years has
passed and we haven’t been on that
stage yet,” said Tim Hardaway Jr., the
junior elder statesman in the starting
lineup.
The last time Michigan made it this
far was the Fab Five era of the early
1990s, what until now had been consid-
ered the program’s glory years.
Might be time to start rethinking that.
Once they got ahead Sunday, the
Wolverines (30-7) maintained a double-
digit lead against the experienced
Gators (29-8), who won the regular-sea-
son title in the Southeastern Conference,
but lost in a regional final for the third
straight year.
“We’ve almost become numb to it
now. Been here before,” Gators junior
center Patric Young said. “I just really
wish we were out there cutting the nets
down.”
Stauskas scored 22 points while mak-
ing all six of his 3-pointers. Burke, the
South Region’s most outstanding player,
scored 15 points even while dealing
with some spasms in his upper back,
and 6-foot-10 freshman Mitch McGary
had 11 points and nine rebounds.
When the game ended, Burke and sev-
eral of his teammates went to the oppo-
site side of the court toward Michigan
fans behind press row with fingers
raised. Fans were chanting, “It’s great to
be a Michigan Wolverine!”
And great to be young.
“Seeing it all come together, I don’t
what to say,” sixth-year Wolverines
coach John Beilein said. “I’m a little bit
speechless.”
Michigan rolls into Final Four
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS — With tears in their
eyes and Kevin Ware in their hearts, there
was no way Louisville was losing this
game.
Russ Smith scored 23, Gorgui Dieng
had 14 points, 11 rebounds and four
blocks, and top-seeded Louisville put
aside the shock from Ware’s gruesome
leg injury to earn a second straight trip to
the Final Four with an 85-63 victory over
Duke on Sunday afternoon.
As the final seconds ticked down,
Chane Behanan put Ware’s jersey on and
stood at the end of the Louisville bench,
screaming. Cardinals fans chanted
“Kevin Ware! Kevin Ware!”
“We won this for him,” coach Rick
Pitino said. “We were all choked up with
emotion for him. We’ll get him back to
normal. We’ve got great doctors, great
trainers.”
Ware played his high-school ball in
Georgia and the Final Four is in Atlanta,
just adding to the emotion for the victori-
ous Cardinals.
“We talked about it every timeout, ‘Get
Kevin home,”’ Pitino said.
This was the first time Pitino and Mike
Krzyzewski had met in the regional finals
since that 1992 classic that ended with
Christian Laettner’s improbable buzzer-
beater, a game now considered one of the
best in NCAA tournament history.
This game will be remembered, too,
but for a very different — and much more
somber — reason.
With 6:33 left in the first half, Ware,
who has played a key role in Louisville’s
14-game winning streak, jumped to try
and block Tyler Thornton’s 3-point shot.
When he landed, his right leg snapped
midway between his ankle and knee, the
bone skewing almost at a right angle.
Ware dropped to the floor right in front of
the Louisville bench and, almost in uni-
son, his teammates turned away in horror.
Thornton grimaced, putting his hand to
his mouth as he turned around.
Louisville forward Wayne Blackshear
fell to the floor and Behanan looked as if
he was going to be sick on the court,
kneeling on his hands and feet.
Louisville beats Duke to reach Final Four
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA CITY — Louisville shot its way to one of the
biggest upsets in the history of the women’s NCAA tourna-
ment, stunning Brittney Griner and Baylor on Sunday night.
Shoni Schimmel scored 22 points and Monique Reid hit two
free throws with 2.6 seconds left to lift fifth-seeded Cardinals
over the defending national champions 82-81, ending Griner’s
incredible career.
The Cardinals hit 16 3-pointers, matching the NCAA
record, to pull off the shocking victory.
Odyssey Sims scored 29 points and hit a pair of free throws
with 9.1 seconds left to give the Lady Bears (34-2) their only
lead of the game.
Reid caught an inbounds pass near the baseline after that
and went coast to coast before getting fouled by Griner on her
way to the basket.
Louisville women upsets
No. 1 Baylor Bears 82-81
DATEBOOK 17
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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P
erhaps you have a huge soft spot for
homeless animals and truly want to
help them, but just seeing so many
together in a shelter breaks your heart (or
you’re afraid it will break your budget or
break up your relationship since you’d take
too many home!). You’re not alone.
Fortunately, there are a number of important
volunteer roles at most shelters that could be
a good match for you. My mom falls into
that camp, sort of. She loves animals, loves
our work, but didn’t want to interact with
the animals daily. So, she decided to volun-
teer with our Education Department, specifi-
cally as a helper for our summer camp.
Given her background with after-school
care, it was a perfect match. Then, once we
opened our new Center for Compassion, she
switched gears and now volunteers her time
as a greeter in our front lobby. And, she can
even tolerate visiting all the dogs available
for adoption! We have many opportunities
besides the Education Department (which
also sends volunteer docents to local schools
for classroom presentations) and our greeter
role. We have a need for clerical volunteers
and volunteers who help us hold our four
annual special events. Next up, our Fashion
Show on Sunday, April 21. We have volun-
teers who help update our website, represent
us in public at “tabling events” such as
street fairs and art and wine festivals, sort
items at our Pick of the Litter secondhand
store and work behind the counter of our
adoption center’s Furchandise retail store. If
you’re not squeamish, we could use your
help in our Spay/Neuter Clinic. We even
have a need for handy types to help with
painting and other maintenance projects.
And, if you decide one of these roles is right
for you, we offer a small discount on adop-
tions if you just happen to fall in love with
one of the animals!
Scott oversees PHS/SPCA’s Customer
Service, Behavior and Training, Education,
Outreach, Field Services, Cruelty
Investigation, Volunteer and Media/PR pro-
gram areas and staff. His companion,
Murray, oversees him.
By Derrik J. Lang
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — After a nine-
month delay, “G.I. Joe: Retaliation”
deployed to the top spot at the box
office.
The action film starring Dwayne
“The Rock” Johnson, Bruce Willis
and Channing Tatum as the gun-tot-
ing military toys brought to life
marched into the No. 1 position at
the weekend box office, earning
$41.2 million, according to studio
estimates Sunday. “Retaliation”
opened Wednesday at midnight,
which helped bring its domestic
total to $51.7 million.
Paramount postponed the sequel
to 2009’s “G.I. Joe: Rise of Cobra”
last May from its original June
opening date to convert the film to
3-D. The last-minute switcheroo
came just weeks after “Battleship,”
another movie based on a Hasbro
toy, sank at the box office. At that
time, Paramount already began its
advertising campaign for
“Retaliation.”
“It certainly vindicates the deci-
sion,” said Don Harris, the studio’s
head of distribution. “Any time you
make those sorts of moves, people
always assume the worst. The truth
is I’d seen this movie a long time
ago in 2-D, and the movie worked
in 2-D. It’s not trying to be
‘Schindler’s List.’ This movie is
intended to be enjoyed as a big,
action spectacle.”
Internationally, Harris said
“Retaliation” earned $80.3 million,
making it the biggest international
opening of the year. The film
opened in 53 markets outside of the
U.S. and Canada, including Russia,
South Korea and Mexico.
After debuting in the top spot last
weekend, the 3-D animated prehis-
toric comedy “The Croods” from
DreamWorks Animation and 20th
Century Fox slipped to the No. 2
spot with $26.5 million in its second
weekend. The film features the
voices of Nicolas Cage, Emma
Stone and Catherine Keener as a
cave family on the hunt for a new
home.
Among the other new films this
weekend, “Tyler Perry’s
Temptation” starring Jurnee
Smollett-Bell and Lance Gross
opened above expectations at No. 3
with $22.3 million, while the sci-fi
adaptation “The Host” featuring
Saoirse Ronan, Max Irons, and Jake
Abel as characters from the
Stephenie Meyer novel landed at
No. 6 in its debut weekend with a
modest $11 million.
Overall, the weekend box office
was on par with last year when “The
Hunger Games” continued to domi-
nate in its second weekend of
release with $58.5 million. After a
slow start, Hollywood’s year-to-
date revenues are still 12 percent
behind last year, heading into next
month when summer movie season
unofficially kicks off with “Iron
Man 3” on May 3.
“It’s getting us back on track after
many weekends of down trending
box office,” said Paul
Dergarabedian, box office analyst
for Hollywood.com. “Last weekend
was a turning point with the strength
of ‘The Croods’ and ‘Olympus Has
Fallen’ doing better than expected.
We’re heading toward the summer
movie season on solid footing. It’s
been a tough year so far.”
‘G.I. Joe’ commands No. 1 at box office with $41M
1.“G.I.Joe:Retaliation,”$41.2 mil-
lion ($80.3 million international).
2. “The Croods,” $26.5 million
($52.5 million international).
3. “Tyler Perry’s Temptation,”
$22.3 million.
4.“Olympus Has Fallen,”$14 mil-
lion.
5.“Oz the Great and Powerful,”
$11.6 million ($22.2 million in-
ternational).
6.“The Host,”$11 million ($6 mil-
lion international).
7.“The Call,”$4.8 million.
8.“Admission,”$3.2 million.
9.“Spring Breakers,”$2.7 million.
10.“The Incredible Burt Wonder-
stone,”$1.3 million.
Top 10 movies
18
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THOMAS JUNG
Come Sail Away! was the theme of the Mercy High School Parents' Club fundraiser at the
Kohl Mansion in Burlingame March 9. Proceeds from the event, which featured a live auc-
tion, student performances, dinner and dancing, go towards the renovation of the school's
Biology labs. Among those in attendance were (left to right) Live Auction Chair Caroline
Romeo, Decorations Co-Chair Catherine Miller, Parents' Club President Laurie Gomes, and
Event Coordinator Patricia Glasser.
COME SAIL AWAY
Wedding announcement:
Amelia Cuevas and Jeffrey Connick
are getting married 12:30 p.m. March 30 in
San Bruno.
Birth announcements:
Christopher Johnson and Dr. Tamara
Doukas, of Redwood City, gave birth to a
baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood
City March 13, 2013.
Rishi and Soniya Jobanputra, of Menlo
Park, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City March 19, 2013.
Michael and Sara Maes, of Fremont,
gave birth to a baby boy and a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
20, 2013.
Mark and Leah Dillon, of Burlingame,
gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City March 21, 2013.
Miki and Stephanie Vedder, of
Redwood City, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
21, 2013.
Ernal and Cynthia Dawson, of
Pittsburg, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
21, 2013.
Terry Neitman and Amanda Stallings,
of San Mateo, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
21, 2013.
Matthew and Natalie McDermontt, of
San Mateo, gave birth to a baby boy at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
22, 2013.
James and Miriam Nielsen, of
Mountain View, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
22, 2013.
Gregory and Racquel Walker, of San
Carlos, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City March 23, 2013.
Fraser and Leslie Street, of Redwood
City, gave birth to a baby girl at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City March 23, 2013.
Carlos Castro and Veatriki Petinaraki,
of San Mateo, gave birth to a baby girl at
Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City March
23, 2013.
Henry and Sara Styles, of Menlo Park,
gave birth to a baby boy at Sequoia
Hospital in Redwood City March 24, 2013.
Christopher Lomboy and Verona
Salvaleon, of East Palo Alto, gave birth to
a baby boy at Sequoia Hospital in
Redwood City March 25, 2013.
Steven Rabkin and Jody Vandergriff,
of Redwood City, gave birth to a baby girl
at Sequoia Hospital in Redwood City
March 25, 2013.
19
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Sue and Fred Gaggioli of Redwood City consider silent auction items at the
Ragazzi Boys Chorus fundraising gala “Sing it Forward” at the Fremont
Hills Country Club in Los Altos Hills March 10. The evening brought to-
gether a community of musicians and lovers of choral performance to
support Ragazzi and celebrate 25 years of remarkable music.Other guests
in attendance were Kirsten Tucker of San Mateo; Jane Frank of San Mateo;
Mary and Joe Sacco of Redwood City;Jonathan MacQuitty of Palo Alto;Alex
and John Martin of Menlo Park; Lowell and Samantha Ness of Redwood
City; David Hsaio of Palo Alto; Jinhee Kim Of Palo Alto; Jeff and Diane Wil-
son of San Carlos; Terry and Lisa Clancy of San Carlos; Arthur and Patty
Navarro of San Carlos; and Robert and Stephanie Wilen of Palo Alto.
SING IT FORWARD
THOMAS JUNG
The Peninsula Mu-
seum of Art has a
new location at
1777 California Dr.
in Burlingame.The
new eighteen thou-
sand square foot
complex houses
both the Museum
and the Peninsula
Art Institute, which
contains 28 artists’
working studios
and a classroom.
Visiting the new
premises March 14
are (left to right)
Peninsula Museum
of Art Chair and
Founder Ruth Wa-
ters, featured
sculptor Lori Kay,
and featured
painter Ira Yeager,
whose work can be
seen in the back-
ground.
NOW OPEN
On March 13, Derin High (center), a senior at
San Mateo High School and president of
the Student Interact Club, was awarded Stu-
dent of the Month by the Rotary Club of
Foster City. After graduation, High is inter-
ested in International Organic Farming,
possibly in Turkey. He is seen with Rotary
President Noemi Avram (left) and Rotarian
Assistant Principal Cynthia Rapaido (right).
GOOD STUDENT
LOCAL 20
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
MONDAY, APRIL 1
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m. to
noon. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St.,
San Carlos. Free. Drop into this
relaxed and welcoming computer
tutoring session for one on one help
with your technical questions. This
class will occur every Monday
morning. For more information call
501-0341.
Hearing Association of the
Peninsula Chapter Meeting. 1 p.m.
Veterans Memorial Senior Center,
1455 Madison Ave., Redwood City.
Refreshments will be served before
the meeting. The program will be “An
Intro to the California Public Utilities
Commission: How to Save Money,
Recognize Scams and More”given by
Sheri Boles, CPUC representative.
Free. For more information call 345-
4551.
Urban Market Reopening. 4:30 p.m.
to 8:30 p.m. Downtown San Mateo
Caltrain Station, 385 First Ave., San
Mateo. Urban Table hosts food trucks
and a mini farmers’ market. It will
start up again this summer, every
Monday until October TBA. Free. For
more information visit
www.urbantable.org.
Dance Connection with Nob Hill
Sounds. Post Easter Dance. Free
dance lessons 6:30 p.m.-7 p.m., open
dance 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Burlingame
Woman’s Club, 241 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Admission, $8 members,
$10 guests. Light refreshments,
mixers and raffles. Male dance hosts
have free entry. For more information
call 342-2221.
TUESDAY, APRIL 2
What’s Next In Higher Education
with Sebastian Thrun. 7 p.m.
Oshman Family JCC, 3921 Fabian
Way, Palo Alto. $12 members, $20
non-members and $7 students. For
more information contact
ggehue@commonwealthclub.org.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 3
Free Tax Preparation. Mondays,
Wednesdays and Fridays from Jan. 14
to April 5. 9 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m.
to 4 p.m. Samaritan House, 4031
Pacific Blvd., San Mateo. To make an
appointment or for more information
call 523-0804.
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
las Pulgas, Belmont. Computer class
for adults on Wednesday mornings.
Open to all. Free. For more
information visit
http://www.smcl.org/content/belmo
nt.
San Mateo Professional Alliance
Weekly Networking Lunch. Noon
to 1 p.m. Speido Ristorante, 223 East
4th Avenue, San Mateo. Free
admission. Lunch $17. For more
information call 430-6500.
Veterans Invited to See “High
Ground.” 2:30 p.m. Oracle
Conference Center, 350 Oracle
Parkway, Redwood City. Free. For
more information contact
militaryandveteranoutreach@gmail.c
om.
Mystery Writer Panel. 7 p.m. San
Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Free. Light refreshments will be
served. Panel will include Andrew
Macrae, Heather Haven, Vinnie
Hansen and Kirsteon Weiss. For more
information call 591-0341.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
and support social responsibility for the environmental impacts
of city waste,” Perez wrote the Daily Journal in an email.
While Perez might support the use of the construction and
demolition fund to pay for the program, Okamoto is not sure the
rest of the council will buy into it.
Mayor Pam Frisella, for one, thinks residents will figure out
on their own to pick up their own reusable bags rather than
choose to repeatedly pay 10 cents for paper bags at the check
stand.
“I’ve got seven or eight of those reusable bags in the trunk of
my car,” she told the Daily Journal.
Okamoto has since decided it may be best to find a sponsor
to pay for the program and will present the idea to the council
Monday night.
The Foster City Council meets 6:30 p.m., Monday, April 1,
City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd., Foster City.
Continued from page 1
BAGS
between April 23 and July 23 for
those discussions.
The reports will be grouped into
categories so that the Board of
Supervisors can “clearly see what
need is being addressed, what gap is
being filled,” County Manager John
Maltbie said when unveiling the
Measure A plan at the last board
meeting.
Each proposal’s analysis will
include the community impact,
demonstrated need and service gaps,
evidence the approach works, per-
formance measures with two-year
goals, other funding sources available
that could leverage the Measure A
money, other agencies involved, a
two-year budget estimate and how
data will be collected and reported.
Once all the proposals have been
heard and either approved, modified
or denied, they will be incorporated
into the working budget for the next
two fiscal years, Maltbie said.
When voters approved Measure A
on the November 2012 ballot, propo-
nents weren’t allowed to offer a con-
crete list of uses because it is a gener-
al use tax. However, the ballot did list
some possibilities, many of which are
now on the short list for implementa-
tion and some — like operating the
new jail — continue to cause contro-
versy.
The current timeline for the initia-
tives, grouped by priorities, is:
• April 23: Parks, including the
strategic plan and Devil’s Slide, and
facilities infrastructure;
• May 7: Housing affordability,
including homeless veterans and
affordable housing solutions, and
community based safety net services;
• May 21: Health care including
Seton Medical Center;
• June 4: Early childhood education
and health, school safety and mental
health services at schools, after
school programs;
• June 18: Libraries, arts and reduc-
ing long-term liabilities
• July 9: Transportation, including
SamTrans and a bicycle coordinator,
the North Fair Oaks Community Plan
and technology projects;
• July 23: Adult mental health and
safety, including realignment and a
mental health drop-off center, and
public safety including a veterans
court and replacement of dispatch
and the Pescadero fire station.
Before accepting the timeline,
Supervisor Adrienne Tissier also sug-
gested adding in pieces that may
come out of the county’s violence
summit scheduled for the end of
April.
Supervisors at past meetings have
made it clear they must choose wise-
ly in how to spend Measure A money
and opt for uses that tackle the struc-
tural deficit because it sunsets after
10 years.
Maltbie said actual allocation
amounts have yet to be proposed in
many of the cases and that with the
analysis officials may find out what
needs more resources. He threw out
the idea of possibly not allocating all
the Measure A money in the first or
second year because of the “evolv-
ing” needs.
Supervisor Dave Pine agreed that
some of the initiatives on the list are
more crystallized than others and that
a funding commitment might be bet-
ter later rather than now.
“There’s always unanticipated
needs,” he said.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Continued from page 1
TAX
students who signed up the opportunity
to take those skills further. For example,
students were able to explore the con-
cepts and ideas of product design by
working with real people instead of
doing research through books, said 13-
year-old Zack Golan-Strieb, a member
of the Nintendo Freaks.
The group started by chatting with
one of the college students who had a
hypothetical problem — he was a ninja
who wanted to keep his agility but easi-
ly bring more items with him. The team
designed a utility belt to solve that
issue. Hahn’s issue took a bit more time
and allowed for revisions.
Golan-Strieb said he liked that the
camp allowed for more interaction with
a real person who had a real issue.
Conducting the interviews was a new
challenge for the middle school stu-
dents. Golan-Strieb said it was often
difficult to think of questions during the
process.
His Nintendo Freaks teammates
agreed, this camp was a great learning
experience.
Fourteen-year-old Felipe Porras said
that camp was definitely more fun than
staying at home, where he most likely
would have spent his time watching tel-
evision.
Nick Dal Porto, 12, agreed the camp
offered more fun than a normal school
day. Alberto Hernandez, 13, added it
was an environment that allowed for
more ideas.
For Hahn, it was great to see students
be able to work together in an environ-
ment where there weren’t right and
wrong answers — something students
can often get stumped on in a class like
math.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
DESIGN
vocations was a great motivation for students.
The idea then became to help students discov-
er their passions through developing a project
to help others.
This year, the Pacifica school launched
Caritas Scholars Program to foster that cre-
ative passion. Twenty-five students took part
in this year’s program. They have started data-
driven projects that will promote awareness
and raise funds for teen cancer, childhood
obesity and adolescent psycho-social issues.
In addition, groups chose to mentor at-risk
youth and provide support to orphans and fos-
ter children. For many students, it was a
chance to turn ideas into actions while learn-
ing leadership skills.
“I’m really proud of the work they’ve
done,” said Zabaneh, who added the lessons
have been aided by professional visitors and
studying past leaders. “What we’ve done is
taken leadership lessons and made them rele-
vant to modern society.”
Students were given the freedom to, in
groups, tackle something they felt to be
important.
For 17-year-old Alicia L. and 18-year-old
Rosemary Y., a senior and junior respectively,
the hope is to help students dealing with tough
social issues. Dreams Behind Scars hopes to
bring people together to talk about and over-
come issues the girls know many teens face
such as depression, anxiety and eating disor-
ders. The group organized a night out at the
Chit Chat Cafe in November with performers
and testimonies from those who had over-
come social struggles. They also sold mer-
chandise.
Alicia L. said the program has helped her be
more motivated in other courses. Rosemary Y.
agreed, adding it teaches her how to be a
leader while embracing Christianity.
Junior Jacob R., 17, helped start the Big
Brother Project which provides after-school
mentorship for junior high students at the
local Boys and Girls Club. Jacob R. said he
was inspired by a trip freshman year to
Mexico in which he helped build a classroom
for a local orphanage.
“We have so many more resources than
them. It’s kind of a waste to not use those
resources to help,” he said.
Jacob R. had attended the Boys and Girls
Club when he was younger. The group visits
the same location one to two times a month in
hopes of helping children who may not be get-
ting support they need at home.
Eighteen-year-old Joseph C., a senior, tied
his organization to his long-term goal of being
a doctor. By Teens for Teens with Cancer
works to raise awareness for teen cancer.
Joseph C. said most of the students within the
group have had a family member affected by
cancer but they wanted to focus on issues
related to youth.
Many teens don’t share the health issues
with their parents right away and will hide
their changing bodies from friends, said
Joseph C. The group held a spaghetti feed and
raised $400 that will help buy gifts for those in
local hospitals and also support research
efforts.
Junior Abigail W., 17, is in a group that
focused on supporting foster youth. Project
Ezra aims to raise awareness of the challenges
faced by foster youth in the Bay Area, partic-
ularly those who aren’t adopted right away.
Abigail W. said the group, many of which
have adopted family members, has been sur-
prised to learn about the challenges of foster
youth through the project’s research. To help,
the group made bracelets that it sells along
with some goodies at school. Proceeds are
being donated to Court Appointed Special
Advocates of San Mateo County.
Most of the groups will continue to plan
events throughout the school year. To support
the causes, search for the group name on
Facebook and like the group.
heather@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 105
Continued from page 1
SOCIAL
PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHEL ZABANEH
Project Ezra, which aims to support Bay Area
children in foster care, is one of the social en-
trepreneurship groups created by students at
the Alma Heights Christian School in Pacifica.
COMICS/GAMES
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kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


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numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

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called cages, must combine using the given operation
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top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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16 Made an impolite noise
18 Elvis’ hometown
20 Make an appearance
21 Peace gesture
22 Hair goop
24 Fast sleds
27 Harbinger
30 Comparable
31 Sugar source
32 Lout
34 Plead
35 Labyrinth
36 To be, to Brutus
37 Appetizing
39 Parish donation
40 Furry friend
41 Flying mammal
42 Sport
45 Flammable gas
49 Dairy cow
53 Poetic black
54 Dollar bill
55 Eager
56 Gambler’s town
57 Flavor enhancer
58 Lectern’s place
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2 Freedom org.
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4 Nevada lake
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6 Cul-de- --
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8 Dog food brand
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10 Directed
12 Lopsided
17 Stanford rival
19 Guitarist Paul
22 DNA component
23 Prior to
24 Chem room
25 Banjos’ kin
26 Prefx with byte
27 Misty
28 Off-course
29 Pinch of salt
31 Haul
33 Doctor’s payment
35 Ostrichlike bird
36 This or that
38 DVD player predecessors
39 Make lace
41 Leans over
42 Oft-misused pronoun
43 Untold centuries
44 “Shake -- --!”
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47 Taboo (hyph.)
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diLBerT® CrOsswOrd PUZZLe
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MOndaY, aPriL 1, 2013
aries (March 21-April 19) -- Your creativity is
skyrocketing, so take advantage of it. Your ideas
will be successful, as long as you follow through on
them.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Don’t despair if your
recent schemes have yet to pan out. Check to make
sure that you’ve done everything possible, and have
patience.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Intangible ideas could
prove to be of greater value than things of a material
nature. This will become very evident today.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Even if benefts
are presently coming your way without too much
exertion on your part, imagine how much more could
happen if you put forth some effort.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- It could be to your
beneft to try to help others realize their hopes and
expectations. What would be benefcial for them
could be of advantage to you as well.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- You’re destined to
accomplish something of signifcance that could
produce more than a few benefts. However, it may
not be apparent that a bonus is on its way -- it is.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- This is a good day to
once again analyze a problem that you’ve been
unable to resolve. A number of solutions that
previously eluded you could now become quite
obvious.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- If an important
enterprise in which you’re involved has a dire need
for something you possess, do your best to deliver.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Even if you’re
operating well on your own, you would be even more
productive with a capable partner. Try to fnd one
with all due haste.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- It looks like the
career opportunity that you’ve been looking for is
about to come your way. Keep your plans fexible so
you can take advantage of it.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Friends are likely
to talk to you about all kinds of things, imparting
information that they wouldn’t reveal to others. What
you learn will be useful and then some.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your fnancial
prospects look to be quite encouraging over the next
few days. You could be unusually lucky in ways that
could affect your public image.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Monday • Apr. 1, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Monday• Apr. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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110 Employment
HUSKY LADY CAREGIVER WANTED -
12 hours only, Saturdays, $100 (cash),
San Mateo, Call (650)342-6639
110 Employment
CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.
Call (650)777-9000
HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
110 Employment
LGBT PROGRAM COORDINATOR
Peer Counseling Program
Coordinate peer counseling services
to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and
Transgender clients. Duties include
recruiting volunteers to become peer
counselors and LGBT clients for peer
counseling services, and co-supervise
LGBT Program senior peer counse-
lors. Responsibilities include providing
outreach and sensitivity training in the
community. Email:
hr@peninsulafamilyservice.org
TAXI DRIVER
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Clean DMV and background. All shifts
available. Call (650)703-8654
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
120 Child Care Services
AGAPE VILLAGES
Foster Family Agency
Become a Foster Parent!
We Need Loving Homes for
Disadvantaged Children
Entrusted to Our Care.
Monthly Compensation Provided.
Call 1-800-566-2225
Lic #397001741
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255083
The following person is doing business
as: Markmilleritpro, 50 Horgan Ave., Apt.
8, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94061 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Mark Miller, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 03/21/2013.
/s/ Mark Miller /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/21/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/25/13, 04/01/13, 04/08/13, 04/15/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
210 Lost & Found
LOST CHIHUAHUA/TERRIER mix in
SSF, tan color, 12 lbs., scar on stomach
from being spade, $300. REWARD!
FOUND!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! 15LBS All White Dog, needs
meds in the area of Oaknool RWC on
3/23/13 (650)400-1175
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
23 Monday• Apr. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
296 Appliances
L6 WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER - DeLonghi, 1500
watts, oil filled, almost new, $30.,
(650)315-5902
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
49ERS MEMORBILIA - superbowl pro-
grams from the 80’s, books, sports
cards, game programs, $50. for all, obo,
(650)589-8348
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. SOLD!
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
298 Collectibles
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
POSTER - New Kids On The Block
1980s, $12., call Maria, (650)873-8167
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE 1970S Grecian Made Size 6-7
Dresses $35 each, Royal Pink 1980s
Ruffled Dress size 7ish $30, 1880s Re-
production White Lace Gown $150 Size
6-7 Petite, (650)873-8167
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
DELL 17” Flat screen monitor, used 1
year $40, SOLD!
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
CHILDREN’S VHS Disney movies, (4),
SOLD!
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
SANDWICH GRILL vintage Westing
house excellent condition, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
303 Electronics
FREE TV - 27" Sony TV SOLD!
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) $75 (650)349-5003
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET - TV, mahogany,
double doors; 24"D, 24"H x 36"W, on
wheels. $30. Call (650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
BULOVA ANNIVERSARY CLOCK -
lead crystal, with 24 carot guilding, model
# B8640, beautiful, $50., (650)315-5902
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER 6 Drawers 4’ wide $20
SOLD!
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
END TABLES (2)- Cherry finish, still in
box, need to assemble, 26”L x 21”W x
21”H, $100. for both, (650)592-2648
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
304 Furniture
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING/QUEEN FRAME with 2 twin box-
springs, no mattress, like new, Foster
City, $100., (954)907-0100
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RATTAN PAPASAN Chair with Brown
cushion excellent shape $45 SOLD!
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
WATCHES (21) - original packaging,
stainless steel, need batteries, SOLD!
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
DRAFTING TABLE - 60” x 40” tilt top,
with 3 full sets of professional ruling
arms, great deal, $50. all, (650)315-5902
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. (650)878-9542
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8’ BY 11’ CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy $3700.00. Will sell
for $600, (650)349-5003
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
310 Misc. For Sale
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CEILING FAN - 42”, color of blades
chalk, in perfect condition, $40.,
(650)349-9261
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
OUTDOOR SCREEN - New 4 Panel
Outdoor Screen, Retail $130 With Metal
Supports, $80/obo. (650)873-8167
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PROFESSIONAL BEAUTY STYLING
STATION - Complete with mirrors, draw-
ers, and styling chair, $99. obo,
(650)315-3240
24
Weekend• Mar. 30-31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Bouncing toy
5 What waiters wait
for
9 Finishes making,
as a black-and-
white cookie
13 __ vera lotion
14 Length times
width
15 Arm of a sea
16 *Evangelist
honored with a
basilica in Venice
18 Resell at a big
profit
19 Flatter the boss
for personal gain
20 English class
assignment
22 Huck Finn’s ride
25 Astrological
edges
27 Pyromaniac’s
crime
31 Lock horns (with)
33 Figs. well above
100 in Mensa
35 Marsh grasses
36 BBC nickname,
with “the”
37 Juan’s water
38 Spawned
39 Ice show site
40 “Hud” Best
Actress Patricia
41 Yours and mine
42 Dean’s __
43 Inelegant laugh
44 ICU personnel
45 Campaign sticker,
e.g.
46 Cold hard cash
47 Cubes in a bowl
49 Folk icon Seeger
51 Spiteful, as gossip
53 Antitheft
noisemakers
58 Bracelet site
60 Cry heard today,
and a hint to the
ends of the
answers to
starred clues
63 Deep trepidation
64 Not hypothetical
65 “Not only that ...”
66 Mayo holders
67 Beaver-built
barriers
68 Conserve energy
DOWN
1 Soak up the sun
2 Jai __
3 Superman’s Lane
4 Binoculars part
5 __ Bay Rays
6 Composer
Gershwin
7 Pay-__-view
8 Sushi bar cupful
9 Machu Picchu
builders
10 *Trapshooter’s
target
11 Snakelike
swimmer
12 Longtime auto
racing sponsor
15 Newsletter edition
17 Spins in board
games, say
21 Reef explorer’s
gear
23 Seamstress’s
purchase
24 *Tapped maple
fluid
26 Unhip type
27 Ann __, Michigan
28 “Seinfeld”
episodes, now
29 *Lightweight,
crinkled material
used for suits
30 Betting info
32 Soft-hearted
34 Thirst-inducing,
like potato chips
37 Year, on
monuments
39 Vigilant
43 Aroma
45 Passé
48 Grand parties
50 Coin toss choice
52 Scotland __
54 Quite a distance
55 Actor’s cameo,
e.g.
56 Forest-floor plant
57 One-armed
bandit
58 Descriptive wd.
59 Org. that created
American Hunter
magazine
61 Potpie veggie
62 Chrysler truck that
sounds hard-
hitting
By Patti Varol
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/01/13
04/01/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
310 Misc. For Sale
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SHOWER STOOL, round, 14" diameter,
revolves, and locks in place (never used)
$40 (650)344-2254
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WALL LIGHT FIXTURE - 2 lamp with
frosted fluted shades, gold metal, never
used, $15., Burl, (650)347-5104
X BOX with case - 4 games, SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WOOL YARN - 12 skeins, Stahlwolle,
Serenade, mauve, SOLD!
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
YAMAHA KEYBOARD with stand,
SOLD!
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
COAT - Size 6/8, Ladies, Red, Jones
New York, cute, like new, polyester,
warm above knee length, $35.,
(650)34 5-3277
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
316 Clothes
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
SNOW BOOTS, MEN'S size 12. Brand
New, Thermolite brand,(with zippers),
black, $18. (510) 527-6602
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
BACKPACK - Large for overnight camp-
ing, excellent condition, $65., (650)212-
7020
BASKETBALL RIM, net & backboard
$35/all SOLD!
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF BALLS Many brands 150 total,
$30 Or best offer, SOLD!
GOLF CART (bag boy express model) 3
wheeler, dual brakes, SOLD!
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
318 Sports Equipment
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES &
PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. Call (415) 314-1737 to take a
look.
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Inertior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
2009 INFINITY FX 35 Silver, 16,800k,
Low Jack, lots of extras, $32,000. obo,
(650)742-6776
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
NEED AMSOIL?
The First in Synthetics
Super Premium
Synthetic Motor Oil
Extends Your Oil Changes
Maxium Wear Protection
Exceeds Worldwide
Performance Standards
Cars • Trucks
• Motorcycles • Boats
OEM • Diesel • Racing • Marine
Serving SF Bay Area &
Peninsula
Call Robert
(650)878-9835
630 Trucks & SUV’s
CHEVY ‘03 Pickup SS - Fully loaded,
$17,000. obo, SOLD!
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
25 Monday• Apr. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
635 Vans
NISSAN ‘01 Quest - GLE, leather seats,
sun roof, TV/DVR equipment. Looks
new, $15,500. (650)219-6008
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
1974 OWNERS MANUAL - Mercedes
280, 230 - like new condition, $20., San
Bruno, (650)588-1946
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
680 Autos Wanted
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
Cabinetry Cleaning
Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specalizing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Concrete
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry • Drywall • Tile
Painting • Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Construction
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
26
Weekend• Mar. 30-31, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Handy Help
SENIOR HANDYMAN
“Specializing in Any Size Projects”
•Painting • Electrical
•Carpentry •Dry Rot
•Carpet Installation
40 Yrs. Experience
Retired Licensed Contractor
(650)201-6854
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)518-1173
Hauling
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
Painting
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Plumbing
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Window Coverings
RUDOLPH’S INTERIORS
Satisfying customers with world-
class service and products since
1952. Let us help you create the
home of your dreams. Please
phone for an appointment.
(650)685-1250
Window Fashions
247 California Dr
Burlingame • 650-348-1268
990 Industrial Rd Ste 106
San Carlos • 650-508-8518
www.rebarts.com
BLINDS, SHADES, SHUTTERS, DRAPERIES
Free estimates • Free installation
Window Washing
Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contrac-
tor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their li-
cense number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-
321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State Li-
cense Board.
Attorneys
Law Office of Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
Food
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo -
(650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -
(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
Furniture
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day
Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
27 Monday• Apr. 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Insurance
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real
, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
Dr. Sami r Nanj apa DDS
Dr. I nsi ya Saboowal a DDS
“I had not been to the dentist in 20 years! For good reason,
they are scary! However, I finally bit the bullet and through a
friend found Dr Nanjapa. Wow... “ - Julie H.
“He does a great teeth cleaning, is very attentive and not once
got impatient amid all my questions...” - Vince E.
“I highly, highly recommend him.” - C.B.
“He did a super job. I love his gentle touch” - Hardial A.
5/5 Stars on ratemds.com
5/5 Stars on healthgrades.com
REVI EWS:
Dr. Nanjapa’s dental degree is from MAHE, India
(1997) and a Masters in Dental Biomaterials at
the Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham (1999)
He began private practice while teaching as
Assist. Clinical Professor at College of Dentistry,
Chicago. In 2007 he moved to San Francisco for
private practice and continued teaching at UC
San Francisco Dental School. He opened his San
Mateo office in 2010.
Dr. Saboowala trained in India and has 4 years of
clinical experience with a DDS degree from Uni-
versity of Illinois at Chicago. She brings top notch
experience including pediatric dental care, complex
extractions & root canal treatment to our practice.
6 5 0 - 4 7 7 - 6 9 2 0 | 3 2 0 N . S a n M a t e o D r . S u i t e 2 , S a n M a t e o
$60 New Patient Special!!!
We Also Speak Cantonese, Mandarin and Hindi!
28
Monday • April 1, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Original Nick’s Pizzeria and
The Daily Journal are proud to present
1. Shawn Cotton, Jr. 51 points
2. Dennis Zouzounis 50 points
2. Charlie Hegarty 50 points
4. Alisha Flaaten 48 points
4. Chase Hartmann 48 points
4. Dorothy Hintz 48 points
7. Gail Loesch 47 points
7. Terry Zouzounis 47 points
7. Al Yano 47 points
7. Robin Martin 47 points
7. Larry Kitagawa 47 points
12. Ed Barber 46 points
12. Rich Bassi 46 points
12. Cy Kon 46 points
12. John Merid 46 points
12. Mike Potolny 46 points
12. Leonard Robinson 46 points
12. Kevin Zouzounis 46 points
12. Lynn Faulkn 46 points
12. Cheryl Sullivan 46 points
12. Lisa Flaaten 46 points
MONDAYS
4:30-8:30pm
FOOD TRUCKS +
MINI FARMERS
MARKET
Bring this ad to the market to
claim a free piece of fruit!
Follow: @urbantable
Visit: www.urbantable.org
SAN MATEO
URBAN MARKET
GRAND OPENING
APRIL 1
st
!

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