You are on page 1of 12

PSYCHOLOGICAL REACTANCE THEORY

Jessica J. Tomasello Conservation Behavior October 14, 2008

BACKGROUND: REACTANCE THEORY
Brehm & Brehm (1966): A Theory of Psychological Reactance | Brehm & Brehm (1981):  Psychological Reactance: A Theory of Freedom and Control | Department of Psychology, University of Kansas | Laboratory‐based social psychological research
|

PURPOSE
Outlines a set of motivational consequences that can be  expected to occur whenever freedoms are threatened or  lost | Specifies:
|

What freedoms are y How they can be threatened y How the resulting psychological state (reactance) is manifested
y

(Brehm & Brehm, 1981)

GENERAL TENETS OF REACTANCE
Freedoms are specific, discrete; behavioral and attitudinal  | It is important for an individual to maintain his or her choice  alternatives to maximize rewards of behavior | Reduction of choice alternatives results in a motivational  state to reinstate lost alternatives or engage in behavior  which was threatened                       reassertion of freedom increased interest in                       threatened behaviors or         attitudes decreased attraction to       forced behaviors | Threats can be either social or interpersonal
|

WHAT IS REACTANCE?
|

Threat to or loss of freedoms motivates person to restore  freedom

|

Reactance = intense motivational state
Manifested through behavior or action to restore freedom y Person is often emotional, irrational, and single‐minded
y

EXAMPLES OF REACTANCE??????

VARIABLES
|

Freedoms: 
Free behaviors which are realistically possible  y Person must have physical and psychological abilities to engage in  behavior y Must know that he or she can do the behavior (knowledge)
y

|

Restriction/threat to freedom
Must be perceived as an “unfair” restriction y Something is denied and this is simply unfair!
y

|

Reactance

PROCESS OF REACTANCE
|

Perception of unfair restriction toward actions/behaviors

|

Reactance is activated

|

Take action to reduce/remove reactance
(Butterfield‐Booth, 1996) 

STUDIES
Mazis & Settle, 1972: laundry detergent in Dade, County,  Florida | Reich & Robertson, 1979: anti‐littering campaigns | Propst & Kurtzz, 1989: framework for leisure behavior | Fogarty, 1997: health care industry & patient  noncompliance | Schwartz (1970): blood marrow donors
|

ASSUMPTIONS
A person, at any given time, has a set of “free behaviors”  which he or she could engage in now or in the future | Person has knowledge of these “free behaviors” | Reactance is aroused to the extent that a person believes he  or she has control over potential outcome | The greater the importance of threatened freedoms, the  greater the reactance aroused | The amount of reactance is direct function of number of  freedoms threatened | Freedoms can be threatened by implication‐‐magnitude of  reactance is greater when implied threats occur
|

(Brehm & Brehm, 1981)

ADVANTAGES/DISADVANTAGES
|

Advantages: 
Applicable to any situation in which there is expectation of freedom  and threat arises • Provides recommendations for ways to reduce reactance in behavior  change campaigns

|

Disadvantages:
Assumes people have an expectation of freedom • Can be difficult to measure reactance, freedom

Others???

IMPLICATIONS
| | |

Individuals are often motivated to resist or act counter to social  influence (e.g. mass persuasion) Important to examine possibilities of repercussions of prohibitive  laws Behavior change:  reactance can reduce durability and reliability 
(DeYoung, 2000)

What implications does this theory have for conservation  behavior?