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Reserves Database For Minex v5.

3 April 2008

Copyright 2008 Surpac Minex Group Pty Ltd (A Gemcom Company). All rights reserved. This software and documentation is proprietary to Surpac Minex Group Pty Ltd. Surpac Minex Group Pty Ltd publishes this documentation for the sole use of Surpac licenses. Without written permission you may not sell, reproduce, store in a retrieval system, or transmit any part of this documentation. For such permission, or to obtain extra copies please contact your local Surpac Minex Group Office. Surpac Minex Group Pty Ltd Level 8 190 St Georges Terrace Perth, Western Australia 6000 Telephone: (08) 94201383 Fax: (08) 94201350 Support: 02 4872 6003 Minexhelp@surpac.com http://www.gemcomsoftware.com While every precaution has been taken in the preparation of this manual, we assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damage resulting from the use of the information contained herein.

www.gemcomsoftware.com
All brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of there respective companies. About This Manual This manual has been designed to provide a practical guide to the many uses of the software. The manual describes one way of using the software; these instructions are by no means exhaustive. However, it provides a starting point for new users and a good overview for existing users by demonstrating how to use many of the functions in Minex. If you have any difficulties or questions while working through this manual please contact your local Surpac Minex Group Office. Contributors James Willoughby Rohit Sarin Surpac Minex Group Perth, Western Australia

Product Minex v5.3

Table of Contents
About This Document ................................................................................................................ 5
Requirements ........................................................................................................................................... 5 Document Conventions ............................................................................................................................ 5 Typographical Conventions ................................................................................................................... 5 Keyboard Conventions .......................................................................................................................... 6 Menu Conventions ................................................................................................................................. 6 Mouse Conventions ............................................................................................................................... 6 Windows and Forms .............................................................................................................................. 7 Elements of Windows and Dialog Boxes ............................................................................................... 7

Introduction to Reserves Database .......................................................................................... 9


Requirements ........................................................................................................................................... 9 Objectives ............................................................................................................................................... 10 Workflow ................................................................................................................................................. 11

Creating a Database ................................................................................................................. 12


Overview .............................................................................................................................................. 12 Task: Create a Reserves Database .................................................................................................... 12 Summary.............................................................................................................................................. 13

Setting Up Codes and Layers .................................................................................................. 14


Codes ..................................................................................................................................................... 14 Surf code, Pre code, Mine code .......................................................................................................... 14 Layers ..................................................................................................................................................... 15 Task: Set up Codes and Layers .......................................................................................................... 16 Summary.............................................................................................................................................. 17

Adding a Pit............................................................................................................................... 18
Requirements....................................................................................................................................... 18 Task: Adding a Pit ................................................................................................................................ 18

Generating Reserves................................................................................................................ 20
Task: Generate Reserves .................................................................................................................... 20 Common Problems in Reserves Generation .......................................................................................... 21 Null Values in Grids. ............................................................................................................................ 21

Quality Variables ...................................................................................................................... 23


Adding Quality Variables ........................................................................................................................ 23 Task: Adding Quality Variables............................................................................................................ 23 Importing Quality Variables .................................................................................................................... 24 Task: Import Quality Defaults .............................................................................................................. 24

Displaying Reserves ................................................................................................................ 26


Displaying Reserves in 3D ..................................................................................................................... 26 Task: Plot Reserves in 3D ................................................................................................................... 26 Finding Coal Tonnage and Volume ........................................................................................................ 28 Task: Find Out the Tonnage and Volume of Coal in a Block .............................................................. 28 Creating a Pit Section ............................................................................................................................. 30 Task: Create a Pit Section with a Seam Cross-Section ...................................................................... 30

Reports ...................................................................................................................................... 34
Creating a Status Report ........................................................................................................................ 34

Table of Contents

Task: Create a Status Report for Pit 7 ................................................................................................. 34 Creating a Detailed Report ..................................................................................................................... 36 Task: Create a Detailed Report ........................................................................................................... 36

Checking Reserves .................................................................................................................. 39


Creating an Insitu Report........................................................................................................................ 39 Task: Create an Insitu Resource Report for Pit 7 ................................................................................ 39 Grid Volumetrics ..................................................................................................................................... 42 Task: Create a Grid Volumetrics Report for Pit7 ................................................................................. 42

Summary ................................................................................................................................... 43

About This Document


This document is designed to help you to create and update a reserves database. Also, you will learn how to display it and report on it. More detailed training information is available from your local Surpac Minex Group Support Office. Visit http://www.surpac.com to find your nearest support office or contact Minex support as follows: Call the Mittagong Office: 02 4872 6003 Call the Brisbane Office: 07 3036 7000 E-mail minexhelp@surpac.com

Requirements
Before proceeding with this tutorial, you should ensure you have the following items: 1. Minex 5.3, and the tutorial data provided on the installation disc, installed on your computer. This is usually installed from a CD. 2. A Minex license file and sentinel correctly installed Store the license file (provided by the Minex Support Office) in <Minex installation directory>\etc\license. Place the sentinel in an appropriate port.

Document Conventions
Typographical Conventions
Some text in this manual has special formatting to identify it as a particular element of information. The following list describes the different formats and their meanings:

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About This Document

Document Conventions

Text Format
<Bold Italic>

Meaning
Text or data that varies with each input is shown in italic font and enclosed in angle brackets. Some examples are installation directories, dates, names and passwords. When you substitute the text for the variable, do not include the brackets. For example: <password> requires you to substitute a password in place of <password>. A words or phrase to which the author wants to give emphasis. For example, the new text is in memory; the old text is deleted. This typeface indicates one of the following:

Italics Bold


UPPER CASE

A file name, path or URL. Strongly emphasised text. For example, It is very important to save the data. Text that a procedure has instructed you to type. A menu option, tab, button, check box, list, option button, text box or icon. For example, click Apply.

When a keystroke is described, the key is shown in this font. For more information on keystroke conventions, see below.

Keyboard Conventions
Key Combination
<KEYy>+<KEY>

Meaning
Press and hold down the first key, then press the second key. For example: CTRL+O means hold the CTRL key down, then press O.

Menu Conventions
When you click, or move the pointer over, some menu commands, a subordinate menu appears. To indicate that you should select a command on a subordinate menu, this documentation uses a greater than (>) sign to separate the main menu command from the subordinate menu command. For example, File > Project > Project Manager means click the File menu, move the mouse pointer over the Project command, and then select Project Manager on the secondary menu.

Mouse Conventions
The mouse is the pointing device you use to select objects and menu items, and to click the buttons that you see on screen. If a particular mouse button is not specified, use the left button. When a different button should be used, this is specified in the text. You can rotate or press the wheel button on the mouse. In this manual, the following terms are used to describe actions with the mouse.

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About This Document

Document Conventions

Action
Click Right-click Double-click Drag and drop <an object> Drag Right-drag Rotate

Description
Press and release the left mouse button without moving the mouse. Press and release the right mouse button without moving the mouse. Without moving the mouse, click the left button twice rapidly. With the pointer over the object, press and hold down the left mouse button to select the object. Move the mouse until the pointer is in the position you want and then release the mouse button. Press and hold down the left mouse button. Then move the mouse in the direction that the text specifies. Press and hold down the right mouse button. Then move the mouse in the direction that the text specifies. Use your finger to make the wheel button roll. Move it forward, that is in a clockwise direction, or backward, that is in a counter clockwise direction.

Windows and Forms


Windows and forms contain several elements that enable users to carry out particular operations. In Minex window means the main window of a computer application. For example the Minex window is the large window that includes the Minex Explorer and the Graphics area and the Status bar and all the toolbars and menu bars. In Minex, form means the same thing as dialog box. Here is an example of a form.

Elements of Windows and Dialog Boxes


Windows and dialog boxes can contain the following elements. Element Name
Check box

Description
Square box that you select or clear to turn an option on or off. You can select more than one check box. Rectangular or square button that initiates an action. Buttons have text labels to indicate their purpose. Arrow associated with a drop-down list. You can view a list by clicking the arrow. Closed version of a list box with an arrow next to it. Clicking the arrow opens the list. A graphical button that you can click to initiate an action.

Example

Button

Drop-down arrow Drop-down list Icon

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About This Document

Document Conventions

Label

Text attached to any option, box, button, or to any other element of a window or dialog box. Any type of box containing a list of items, in table format, that you can select.

List box

Menu

A set of options or actions that you can perform.

Option button Spin box

Round button you can use to select one of a group of mutually exclusive options. Text box with up and down arrows that you click to move through a set of fixed values. You can also type a valid value in the box. Labelled group of options used for many similar kinds of settings. Rectangular box in which you can type text. If the box already contains text, you can select that text and edit it. Title of the dialog box. It usually, but not always, matches the title of the command button that launched it. A graphical representation of a hierarchical structure. A plus sign next to an item on the tree indicates that you can expand the item to show subordinate items; a minus sign indicates that you can collapse the item.

Tab

Text box

Title

Tree

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Introduction to Reserves Database


The pit design, which you complete before creating the reserves database, represents the geometric shape of your mine. Each block should represent a sensible mining unit. When you create a reserves database, the volumes in these blocks are calculated and stored. You must create a reserves database before scheduling mining operations. This section of the tutorial describes the database used to store these volumes. The pit you designed is identified by a pit number (for example 7). The pit is divided into benches, strips, and blocks. In the Reserves database, the labels or keys that are used to store the volumes are as follows: PIT BENCH STRIP BLOCK

Keys or labels enable rapid access to the database. Each block can also contain layers. For example, the following block contains a coal layer and an overburden layer.

The reserves database has an additional key called layer name. The reserves database is an Indexed Sequential Access Method (ISAM) file. The indexes used are pit, bench, strip, block, and layer. The indexes enable fast retrieval of data.

Requirements
Before proceeding with this tutorial, you should ensure you have: 1. Minex v5.3 installed on your computer. This is usually installed from a CD, but the software can be downloaded from http:/www.surpac.com. 2. The Ashes data set stored on your computer. This is available for installation on the Minex installation CD. It is installed by default with Minex.
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Introduction to Reserves Database

Objectives

3.

The Minex working directory set to the location of the Ashes data set. By default, the Ashes data set is stored in <Minex install folder>\tutorials\Ashes. For example, if you installed Minex v5.3 to the default location, the complete Ashes data set is stored in C:\Program Files\Gemcom Software\MINEX53\tutorials\Ashes.

4.

A Minex license file and sentinel correctly installed. Store the license file (provided by the Minex Support Office) in <Minex installation directory>\etc\license. Place the sentinel in an appropriate port.

5.

A seam model for the deposit. Read the seam modelling tutorial for information about creating a seam model.

6.

A pit design. Read the pit design tutorial for information about designing a pit.

Objectives
By working through this document, you should be able to: Calculate the volumes in the blocks of your pit design Set up the database to store the volume data Produce reports that show the volume and tonnage of coal (and waste) in the reserves Show the reserves, and the seams within the pit, in the graphics window.

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Introduction to Reserves Database

Workflow

Workflow

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Creating a Database
Overview
If you do not already have a reserves database, you should create one. After you have created a reserves database, it appears as a .dbr file in the Minex Explorer.

Note:

If a reserves database is already listed in the Minex Explorer, and you want to work with it, right-click it and select Open.

Task: Create a Reserves Database


1. 2. From the main menu choose File > New. Select ReservesDB.dbr, and click Next.

3. 4.

Follow the steps in the wizard to create the reserves database. Name it resdb1 instead of <default name>.

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Creating a Database

Workflow

Summary
You should now see a resdb1.dbr file in the Minex Explorer. Next, you will set up codes and layers in the database.

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Setting Up Codes and Layers


You set up codes to help ensure that mining equipment is used to mine the types of material (such as coal or parting) for which it is designed.

Codes
The codes file contains a series of codes and values which you can use for all layers. The following image shows the contents of a typical codes file:

Material Code Each code usually has its own defaults. Here we used codes WASTE, PART and COAL. Type This is an abbreviation for the codes. It will save you time when you are typing. W = Waste, C = Coal, P = Part.

Surf code, Pre code, Mine code


These codes stand for surface code, premining code, and mining code. These are primarily used in scheduling, although they are also useful in database editing. When scheduling, you can do these three operations on material. These are explained in the figure below:

The codes (for example CMIN, PMIN, WMIN) are also defined on each equipment item. These codes prevent equipment from doing the wrong work. For example, a dragline should not normally mine coal. Bulk Factor This factor, usually 1.3, is used to calculate loose or swollen volumes from bench volumes. This number can be used for truck calculations.

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Setting Up Codes and Layers

Layers

Recovery/Rehandle In coal mines the coal is recovered from the pit but some coal is permanently lost. It might remain on the pit floor or in a rib or fender. Using the recovery/rehandle factor, you can reflect this loss in the yield. Run-of-mine (ROM) COAL is calculated as: INSITU COAL x RECOVERY/100 RECOVERY is stored as a % value. The rehandle value is usually associated with waste material. Waste material, particularly in dragline operations, could be double-handled or rehandled. The rehandle is also a percentage. Description This field is optional. It is used only for information purposes.

Layers
In the context of a reserves database, a layer is a layer of overburden, coal, or interburden. The following image shows five layers of coal, one layer of overburden, and four layers of interburden.

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Setting Up Codes and Layers

Layers

A typical layers file is named Layers.min.The following is an example of a Layers.min file.

To help you understand the information in Layers.min, look at the WEATH line. WEATH is a layer of waste, it bulks at 1.2, and has a rehandle of 0. The layer goes from TOPS to WSF (WSF stands for weathering seam floor). The Roof Grid and Floor Grid columns refer to grids in the Model.grd folder.

Requirements
Before doing this task, make sure you have: Opened a reserves database, for example resdb1.dbr. If you have just created a reserves database, it is already open.

Task: Set up Codes and Layers


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Choose Reserves > Initialise > Edit Codes and Layers. Click Click Select. Click in the Layers section, and navigate to LAYERS.MIN. in the Codes section, and navigate to CODES.MIN.

Click Update Code Info. The Layers table is updated with the codes from the Codes table.

6.

Click Validate Layers to validate the information in the Layers table. The validation checks the layer order and identifies any missing roof or floor grids. You might see an error similar to the following.

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Setting Up Codes and Layers

Layers

7.

Click Ok. Notice that the first line of layers.min states that it extends from TOPS grid to the BOW grid. Remember that these grids are model grids and look in the Model.grd folder in the Minex Explorer. However, there is no grid called BOW in Model.grd; instead the grid that represents the base of weathering is called WSF. To correct the error that appeared, you must edit the first layer so that it extends from TOPS from to WSF and the second layer so that it extends from WSF to SW1SR.

8.

Edit the first two layers, replacing BOW with WSF.

9. 10. 11.

Click Ok. If you see a prompt to overwrite the Codes.min file or the Layers.min file, click Yes. Click Cancel.

Summary
You should now be able to load and edit a Codes file and a Layers file. Next, you will add a pit to the reserves database.

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Adding a Pit
Before you can store any reserves data in the database, you must add a pit to the database.
Note: You can add more than one pit to your reserves database. This enables you to make subtle modifications to the reserves and cater for unknown variables. For example, if you were unsure of the most realistic recovery/rehandle value to use for coal, you could define two pits with different recovery/rehandle values.

Requirements
Before doing this task, make sure you have: an open reserves database a Layers.min file that contains the layers in the stratigraphic sequence.

Task: Adding a Pit


1. 2. Choose Reserves > Initialise > Add Pit. Fill in the form as shown in the following image.

It is a sensible convention to enter a reserves database pit number that is the same as the geometry pit number (that is, the pit number of the pit design that you will use). You can use a .MIN file or a .OLC file as the layers file. 3. Click Ok.

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Adding a Pit

Layers

In the Output Window you will see an image confirming your action.

4.

Click Cancel to close the dialog.

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Generating Reserves
When you generate reserves, the volumes in the blocks are calculated and stored in the reserves database. For more information about the Generate Reserves form, see the Generate Reserves topic in the Minex Help.

Task: Generate Reserves


1. If THEDON.GM3 is not already open, open it. Minex needs a pit design to generate reserves. Each pit design is stored in a geometry file. 2. 3. Choose Reserves > Build > Generate Reserves. Fill in the form as shown in the following image:

So you can understand how to generate reserves with other data, heres an explanation of some of the important fields on the form:

Reserves DB Pit and Specify Geometry Pit When you added a pit earlier in this tutorial, you added Reserves DB Pit 7. Because Specify Geometry Pit is cleared, Minex will use Geometry Pit 7 in the open geometry file to define the benches, strips, and blocks when it generates reserves. If you want to use a different pit in the geometry file, you should select Specify Geometry Pit and specify the Geometry Pit you want.
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Reserves_db.doc

Generating Reserves

Common Problems in Reserves Generation

Note:

For more information about the Generate Reserves form, see the Generate Reserves topic in the Minex Help.

4. 5.

Click Auto Range. Save the parameters on this form. It is a good idea to save parameters because you might need to run the reserves generation more than once, for example if there are any reserves generation errors.

6.

Click Ok. The Output window displays the results of the reserves generation, including any errors.

7.

If there are any errors, correct them and generate the reserves again. See the topic Common Problems in Reserves Generation (in this document) for common problems and their solutions.

Common Problems in Reserves Generation


Null Values in Grids.
When you generate reserves, and the Output window reports a message such as Null grid values Grid : LDBSF, this can cause Minex to report reserves incorrectly. This message can appear if grids were not merged correctly. If you display the grid for which null values are reported, you should be able to see an area that the grid does not cover the area of null values. To solve the problem: 1. 2. Display the grid, in Model.grd, for which null values are reported. If you can see any holes in the grid, run an SQL statement to correct the holes. This procedure is fully described in the Pit Design tutorial, in the task: Use an SQL Statement to Fix Holes in a Model Grid. 3. Create the merged model again (that is, create the grids in Merged.grd from the grids in Model.grd). You use the Create Merged Model command on the Pit Design menu to do so. This procedure is described in the Pit Design tutorial, in the task: Create Merged Grids up to TOPCOAL.

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Generating Reserves

Common Problems in Reserves Generation

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Quality Variables
A quality variable is a quality; such as ash, relative density, or moisture; that you are measuring in a coal deposit and whose value could be different across the coal deposit. When you have to deliver coal that has particular quality characteristics, you should ensure that you have quality variables defined for each of the characteristics. Two quality variables are already defined: RAWRD (relative density) and RAWASH (percentage of ash). The first variable in the reserves database must be RAWRD, and the second variable must be RAWASH, so that you can import quality data correctly. In the following task, you will add the moisture quality variable.

Adding Quality Variables


Task: Adding Quality Variables
1. 2. Choose Reserves > Initialise > Add Quality Variable. Fill in the form as shown in the following image.

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Quality Variables

Importing Quality Variables

The following table explains the purpose of the columns in the form that are not obvious. Column
Grid Suffix Coal Default Waste Default

Purpose
The suffix of the grids, in the merged.grd folder, which represent this quality variable. The value for this quality that Minex will use in a coal layer when there is no corresponding quality grid. The value for this quality that Minex will use in a waste layer when there is no corresponding quality grid.

3. 4.

Click Add Variable. Click Ok. You have now defined the MOIST variable.
Note: To add the quality data to the reserves database, you first generate reserves, and then use the Reserves > Build > Quality Update command. This command loads the data in the quality grids into the reserves database. Because there are no grids for ash, relative density or moisture in the Ashes data set, performing a quality update will have no effect.

Importing Quality Variables


Task: Import Quality Defaults
You might know (or be working on the assumption) that the average relative density of a coal layer is 1.4. You might have some quality grids that specify what the relative density of the layer actually is, but in many cases you will not have a complete set of relative-density quality grids. In that situation, you could import the relative-density default value into your reserves database. By doing so, you store a relative density value of 1.4 for coal throughout the database except where a different relative density value is already stored.
Note: If you do have a quality grid that you want to load, you can do it before or after you do this task (using the Reserves > Build > Quality Update command).

Relative density is only one example of a quality. You can also import default values for other qualities. You import quality defaults from a comma separated value (CSV) file. You can create CSV files from many different programs, including Excel and text editors. Alternatively, you can create a CSV file in Minex, as described in the following steps.
Note: In the Minex Help, the topic Define Quality Variable Defaults, states the fields you must define in the CSV file of you want to import it.

1. 2.

Open resdb1.dbr if it is not already open. Choose Reserves > Import > Import Quality Defaults.

3.

Click Create/Edit.
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Reserves_db.doc

Quality Variables

Importing Quality Variables

4.

Fill in the form by doing the following steps: a. Click Select Pits, and select pit 7. b. Click Select Variables, and select RAWRD. c. Enter a file name of rd.csv. d. Click Add to List.

5. 6. 7. 8.

Click Ok in the Define Quality Variable Defaults form. Choose Reserves > Import > Import Quality Defaults. Click .

Navigate to the rd.csv file.

9.

Click Ok.

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Displaying Reserves
Displaying Reserves in 3D
Task: Plot Reserves in 3D
This task shows you how you can show the reserves in 3D with different colours for each layer. You can use the same form to show the reserves for each bench. 1. 2. 3. Choose Reserves > Plot > Reserves 3D Display. Select pit number 7 from the Pit Number drop-down list. Select Display block annotation.

4. 5.

Click the Colors button


th

Set up the form to use every 8 colour, and then click Setup Color Range.

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Displaying Reserves

Displaying Reserves in 3D

6. 7.

Click Ok. Enter a name for the colour parameters, and click OK.

8.

Click Ok in the Reserves 3D Display form. The entire reserves database is displayed in graphics.

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Displaying Reserves

Finding Coal Tonnage and Volume

9.

Change the parameters in the Reserves 3D Display form to show the reserves of only one bench, for example bench 22, and click Ok.

Finding Coal Tonnage and Volume


Task: Find Out the Tonnage and Volume of Coal in a Block
You can use the Plan Detail Pit Block command to find out how much coal is in a block. You can also use this command to provide other information such as the strip ratio, quality characteristics, or thickness of a block. 1. Clear graphics.

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Displaying Reserves

Finding Coal Tonnage and Volume

2. 3. 4.

Create a plan mount around the pit, and draft on it. Choose Reserves > Plot > Plan Detail Pit Block. Fill in the form as shown in the following image:

To fill in the variables table, click Select Variables, hold down CTRL, and click the variables In situ Tonnage, Prime Volume, and Strip/Block.

By filling the form in with these parameters, you will show those blocks on bench 10, strip 14 that contain the DL coal seam. The graphics window will show the in situ tonnage of coal in each of those blocks (rounded to the nearest 100 units) and the volume of coal in each of those blocks (also rounded to the nearest 100). 5. Plot geometry data so that bench 10 of pit 7 is shown.

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Displaying Reserves

Creating a Pit Section

The previous image shows that strip 14, block 14 contains an In situ tonnage of coal for seam DL between 2451 and 2550 (remember that you specified rounding to the nearest 100 units). The prime volume of DL coal in block 14 is approximately 1800 (cubic meters or feet depending on whether your site uses metric or imperial measurements). This is one way of finding out tonnage and volume. The next section of this document describes the textual reports you can run in Minex that you can use to find reserves database information. If you want to see how seams are intersecting strips and blocks, you can use a section mount.

Creating a Pit Section


Task: Create a Pit Section with a Seam Cross-Section
1. Create a section mount in the region of the pit: a. Display and open PIT7 grid in the Merged folder. b. Choose Mounts > Section > Create. c. Click Digitise. d. Digitise a cross-section line from the front of the pit to the rear of the pit.

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Displaying Reserves

Creating a Pit Section

e. f.

Click Ok. Type 7XSec as the name, and click Ok.

2. 3. 4. 5.

Choose Mounts > Mounts Control Panel. Right-click the section mount, and click Draft on Mount. Choose Mounts > Section > Pit Section. Fill in the form as shown in the following image, and click Ok.

6.

Zoom in.

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Displaying Reserves

Creating a Pit Section

Next show a seam cross-section on the pit section. 7. 8. 9. Choose Mount > Section > Seam Cross-Section. Click the Seams tab. Select the Merged folder, and click Load Seams.

10. 11.

Click Ok. Zoom in.

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Displaying Reserves

Creating a Pit Section

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Reports
Creating a Status Report
The status report is a very flexible and easy-to-use report that you can use to find total waste and coal volumes for the pits, benches, strips, blocks, and layers that you choose.

Task: Create a Status Report for Pit 7


1. 2. Choose Reserves > Reporting > Status Report. First, run a report to show the results for pit 7, bench 10, strip 14, block 14, and layer DLC so that you can compare the results with the results from the Plot Reserves in 3D task.

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Reports

Creating a Status Report

Note:

In the status report, an asterisk indicates coal, so the previous example shows that block 14 contains 2549 tonnes of coal (rather than 2549 tonnes of waste).

The total coal volume and coal tonnage should be within 50 of the volume and tonnage for block 14 that was reported in the Plot Reserves in 3D task. Next, run a status report to find out how much coal from all layers is in bench 10, strip 14.

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Reports

Creating a Detailed Report

3.

Finally run a status report to find out how much coal and waste is in the entire pit.

Creating a Detailed Report


You use the detailed report to find out the values of specific quality variables in the pits, benches, strips, and blocks you select. For example, you can use this report to find out the moisture content of each of the blocks in pit 7, bench 10, strip 10.
Note: By contrast, the status report that you used in the Create a Status Report for Pit 7 task provides relative density and ash data, but no data for any other variables.

The Detailed Report is also useful when you need to: use a limiting polygon to show results only within the polygon. produce results in CSV format. You can open CSV files in Excel. CSV format is useful when you want to calculate a total or an average of values (because you can open a CSV file in Excel and see the data in columns). This can help during scheduling when you need to work out how you will deliver coal with a specified average ash or moisture to a specific customer at a specific time.
Note: There is no meaningful quality data in the Ashes data set so you cannot create a report that provides useful quality information. Instead you can use a detailed report to show volumes of waste and coal.

Task: Create a Detailed Report


1. 2. Choose Reserves > Reporting > Detailed Report. Fill in the form as shown in the following image:

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Reports

Creating a Detailed Report

To add the variables, click Variables Select, and select them.

Next, you will digitise a limiting polygon, but first heres an explanation of some of the important sections and fields of the form:

Select Variables. In this section, you specify the variables to appear in the report. Pit Selection. In this section, you specify which pits, benches, strips, blocks, and layers to include in the report. Use Limiting Polygon. Select this check box (and then click one of the adjacent buttons) to limit the report to the area within the polygon. Report Type. You can select .txt or .csv as the file format. On many computers, Excel is the default application for CSV files. When that is true, you can select Open CSV report in default application to make sure that the report will open in Excel after you click Ok.

3. 4.

Click Dig and digitise a limiting polygon in graphics. Click Ok.

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Reports

Creating a Detailed Report

5.

If the CSV file opened in Excel, scroll down to the bottom of column I in Excel, and calculate the total tonnes of coal.

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Checking Reserves
Some reports you can use to check your reserves are the Insitu Resource report and the Grid Volumetrics report.

Creating an Insitu Report


Task: Create an Insitu Resource Report for Pit 7
1. Open the following files if they are not already open:

borehole database, THEDON.B31. geometry file, THEDON.GM3.

2.

Choose Seam Model > Insitu Resource Reporting.

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Checking Reserves

Creating an Insitu Report

3. 4.

Select Merged as the DD Name for seams and for quality. Click Create List. The form should appear as shown in the following image:

5.

Click the Limits tab.

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Checking Reserves

Creating an Insitu Report

6. 7.

Specify that the DD Name is Merged, and the upper limit is TOPS. Specify that the lower limit is PIT7 (also with a DD Name of Merged).

8.

Click Ok.

9. 10.

Start the Windows calculator program (In Windows, choose Start > Run, and type Calc). Perform the following calculation to find out the percentage difference, for total coal tonnes, between the two reports:
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Reserves_db.doc

Checking Reserves

Grid Volumetrics

Using the results shown in this task as an example, the equation is:

79856140 79418880 100 = 0.55 79856140


This shows that the two reports return results that are within half a percent of each other.

Grid Volumetrics
Task: Create a Grid Volumetrics Report for Pit7
1. 2. Choose Grid > Volumes from the menu in Minex. Fill in the Grid Volumes form as shown in the following image, and click Ok.

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Summary

Grid Volumetrics

The Grid Volumetrics report appears in the Output window.

3.

Compare the combined total volume of waste and coal (that is, Volume cu. metres Nett) with the combined total volume of waste and coal from the Insitu Resource report. In this example, the Grid Volumetrics report shows a result of about 592 million cubic meters whereas the Insitu Resource report showed a result of about 614 million cubic meters (535 waste and 79 coal). The precise total of waste and coal from the Insitu Resource report is 535596282 + 79856140 / 1.4 = 592636382. The percentage difference between the reports is ( (592683328 - 592636382) / 592683328) x 100 = 0.01 Therefore the Grid Volumetrics report shows 0.01% more waste and coal than the Insitu Reserves report.

Summary
Upon completion of this tutorial you should be able to: Calculate the volumes in the blocks of your pit design. Set up the database to store the volume data. Produce reports and a 3D representation of the volume data.

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Summary

Grid Volumetrics

This tutorial is designed to help you become familiar with the Reserves Database functionality in Minex. It is not designed as a training aid and should not be considered as a substitute for training. Your local support office has access to additional training aids and can help you with advice on your particular training needs. Visit http://www.surpac.com to locate your nearest Support Office.

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