The BEST things in life are

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28 Mar – 4 Apr 2013
Vol 19 Issue 13
Birthday Boy
“Montecito is like growing up in a Norman
Rockwell painting,” says 75-year-old
songster Jeff Barry, p. 26
Our Town
YMCA pre-schoolers enjoy eggciting
hunt and eggcellent results as Dominique
Goodman egged them on, p. 36
All Juiced Up
Pressed Juicery opens tenth outlet; this one
is situated between Read ‘N Post and Little
Alex’s, p. 30
Photo by: Bill Dewey www.billdeweyphoto.com

THIS WEEK IN MONTECITO, P. 11 • MONTECITO EATERIES, P. 39 • CALENDAR OF EVENTS, P. 42
The Voice of the Village
S SINCE 1995 S
THE HIGH COST OF
MONTECITO’S WATER
(PART TWO)

Premiere for Finola Hughes’
$60,000 film, “The Bet,” slated
for April 19 & 20 at the Arlington;
Sue Burrows’ granddaughter
Katherine becomes American
Girl model, p. 6
MineArds’
MiscellAny
The price of supplying water
for Montecito residents is set to
rise by 55% over the next four
years; Bob Hazard explains why
(story begins on page 5)
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 2 • The Voice of the Village •
Keith C. Berry,
CrB, CrS, Gri, ABr®
Previews estates Director Lic. 363833
architecturaL ProPerties Division sPeciaList
cellular 805.689.4240 • office 805.563.7254 • Fax 805.456.3808
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3938 State Sreet Santa Barbara CA 93105
©2012, nrt incorporated. an equal opportunity company. equal housing opportunity.
coldwell Banker residential Brokerage, owned and operated by nrt, inc.
MONTECITO TUDOR ELEGANCE
Q
uietly impressive through design and details, this Tudor-style Montecito estate beautifully imbues both the dignity of the traditional English
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main entry doorway, surrounded by intricate brickwork, all through this picturesque home, and continuing outside with the park-like setting of classic
English gardens created to complement and enhance the old-world feeling.
Ofered for $6,350,000
Shown by appointment with agent, Keith C. Berry, 689-4240
MLS #13-692
.
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 3
fi ne properti es represented by
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 4 • The Voice of the Village •
lands in Your neighborhood
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401422 ©2013 Bank of Manhattan, N.A.
5 Editorial
Part two of Bob Hazard’s explanation of Montecito’s
water situation
6 Montecito Miscellany
Finola Hughes’ movie debuts; Katy Perry and John
Mayer on the rocks; Jerry Jones’ new ride; Oprah’s
body double; David Krieger’s new book; Larry
Hagman’s estate sells; Clarks’ 50/30 bash; Kardashian
courtroom drama; Sue Burrows’ granddaughter
chosen as American Girl Doll model; St. Louis
Symphony shines; Ying Quartet impresses; Rob
Kapilow dissects Beethoven; Prince Charles’ Duchy
Originals doing well
8 Letters to the Editor
Ralph T. Iannelli has a response for Rachel Wilkinson;
Donnelley Erdman and Steve Daniels continue
climate discussion; Maureen M. Masson remembers
the good ol’ days
11 This Week in Montecito
Kim Snyder exhibit reception; New Yorker discussion
group; Good Friday Breakfast; Annual Vietnam
Veterans Commemoration; Easter services in
Montecito; MUS Walk & Roll; Seniors Have Talent;
One on One Fitness event; Blue Water Ball; ongoing
events
Tide Guide
Handy guide to assist readers in determining when to
take that walk or run on the beach
12 Village Beat
Montecito Planning Commission discusses Cottage
Food law; Montecito YMCA hosts Teen Night; Rotary
Club of Montecito’s annual Public Service and Safety
Awards; Tom Mielko’s paintings on display at Mertens
Fine Art; Pressed Juicery opens; Alex’s Lemonade
Stand at Red Studio
14 Seen Around Town
CALM’s 27
th
Annual Celebrity Authors’ Luncheon;
Karen Knight’s “Re-Retirement” party; Casa del
Herrero artists reception
26 On Entertainment
Jef Barry celebrates birthday; Lake Street Dive rocks
Lobero; Bobby McFerrin takes stage at Granada
28 Sheriff’s Blotter
Grafti found at school; mock hostage exercise at
Peppers Estate
29 Ernie’s World
Ernie fnds his sanctuary in “Recliner Heaven”
32 Our Town
Grand opening of Montecito Urban Farms; Suzy
Dobreski celebrates fve years as director of ELMES;
annual Easter egg hunt at YMCA
35 Your Westmont
Women’s basketball team wins national championship
in Kentucky and brings hardware to Montecito
38 Legal Advertisements
39 Guide to Montecito Eateries
Te most complete, up-to-date, comprehensive listing
of all individually owned Montecito restaurants, cofee
houses, bakeries, gelaterias, and hangouts; others in
Santa Barbara, Summerland, and Carpinteria too
42 Calendar of Events
Circle Mirror Transformation ends this week; two flm
screenings; Gaviota Coast exhibit; Heartless Bastards
play SOhO; On Ensemble in Ojai; Ojai Youth
Entertainment Studio events; Grandparent Portrait
Show; Jesse Cook at Lobero
44 Movie Showtimes
Latest flms, times, theaters, and addresses: they’re all
here, as they are every week

Real Estate
Four properties highlighted in the low $5-million
range
45 93108 Open House Directory
Homes and condos currently for sale and open for
inspection in and near Montecito
46 Classifed Advertising
Our very own “Craigslist” of classifed ads, in which
sellers ofer everything from summer rentals to estate
sales
47 Local Business Directory
Smart business owners place business cards here so
readers know where to look when they need what
those businesses ofer
I NSI DE THI S I SSUE
p.6
p.35
p.42
p.26
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 5 Though the people may support the government, it is not the duty of the government to support the people – Grover Cleveland
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Fine Apparel & Footwear
1485 EAST VALLEY ROAD
MONTECITO, CA 93108
(805)969-6962
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“Sophisticated”
Why Does Water Cost So Much in Montecito?
T
he average residential water bill in Montecito is currently $183 per month,
compared to the national average of $43.58 per month. Montecito Water
District’s residential customers are billed a fixed flat meter service charge
of $30.95 per month for a ¾” meter, plus a variable water usage fee based on
consumption of each HCF (hundred cubic feet) of water used. A hundred cubic
feet of water contains 748 gallons.
The current Montecito water rates were set in October 2008 when the lowest
use price of water was raised from $3.75 per HCF to $3.90, a 4% increase. At the
same time, a multi-tiered conservation rate structure was instituted whereby
residential users, comprising 83% of all accounts, got their first 25 HCF per
month at the $3.90 rate, the next 26 to 60 HCF of use at $4.15; the third 61 to 120
HCF at $4.90; and above 120 HCF at $5.90 per HCF. The other classifications
were also restructured to provide tiered pricing that encouraged conservation.
The assumption at that time was that the higher rates would drive down
water usage in Montecito and Summerland. Our community uses by far the
most water per meter on the South Coast, due to its lush vegetation and mini-
mum one-acre zoning for many of our homes.
Montecito Facing 55% Increase in Water Bills
Water in Montecito, always expensive, will be getting more so. The Montecito
Water District (MWD) is currently evaluating a consultant report compiled by
Black & Veatch, which recommends raising Montecito water rates by a whop-
ping 55% between now and 2018. The increases would include a possible 16.3%
increase by July 1 in both usage fees and water meter charges, followed by four
consecutive annual compounded rate increases of 7.4% each year. This would
represent the highest rate increases during normal times in Montecito Water
District’s 92-year history.
Black & Veatch was commissioned by MWD to do a five-year financial plan,
including projections of revenues, operating expenses, retirement of existing
debt, needed capital improvements and reserve requirements for the years
2012-13 through 2017-18. The intent was to identify potential budgetary short-
falls and to have an independent third party quantify and evaluate needed rate
increases.

The Cost of the State Water Project (SWP)
One challenge in Montecito is that MWD owes a fixed share of the Coastal
Branch hooking us into the State Water Project, a commitment approved by vot-
ers in 1991. Back then, voters were told it would cost $270 million for Montecito
Water District, Carpinteria Valley District, Goleta Water District and Santa
Barbara Water to hook up to the State Water Project. The reality is that by the
time all four South Coast water agencies have paid off the bonds for the Coastal
Branch of the State Water Project, they will have spent $1.76 billion for construc-
tion, financing, operation and maintenance of SWP water.
MWD’s current share of that fixed cost is an annual payment of $4.9 million,
or 39% of its 2012-13 operating budget, taken off the top of its $12.5-million total
budget. The $4.9 million is MWD’s share of the fixed costs to finance, build and
operate the SWP dams, pipes, reservoirs, and aqueducts to transport water for
the Coastal Branch of the State Water Project. Last year, MWD didn’t use one
drop of state water, but we still had to pay our share of the fixed expenses. With
this year’s low rainfall, MWD will incur both fixed charges to pay off this year’s
portion of SWP indebtedness, plus the cost of its full allocation of high-priced
SWP water in 2012-13.
In 1991, voters were promised that the State Water Project was 97% reli-
able, even in times of severe drought. The reality is that our four South Coast
water agencies have received just 36% of their total promised allocation, either
because low rainfall reduced available supplies, or other disruptions.
The Peripheral Tunnels Project
A new water project is now being pushed by Governor Jerry Brown in com-
bination with powerful corporate agriculture interests and real estate specula-
tors. Called the Peripheral Tunnels Project, it is the latest reincarnation of a
previous proposal known as the “Peripheral Canal,” which was on the ballot
Editorial by Bob Hazard
Mr. Hazard is an Associate Editor of this paper and a former president of
Birnam Wood Golf Club
EDITORIAL Page 294
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 6 • The Voice of the Village •
“The Bet” Makes Debut
Monte ito
Miscellany
by Richard Mineards
Richard covered the Royal Family for Britain’s Daily Mirror and Daily Mail before moving to New York
to write for Rupert Murdoch’s newly launched Star magazine in 1978; Richard later wrote for New York
magazine’s “Intelligencer”. He continues to make regular appearances on CBS, ABC, and CNN, and
moved to Montecito six years ago.
MISCELLAnY Page 184
E
ight months after directing her
first film, Carpinteria-based
Daytime Emmy-winning actress
Finola Hughes’ movie The Bet is ready
for its close-up.
London-born Finola, 53, who stars
in the popular ABC soap opera General
Hospital, filmed at Santa Barbara’s
Community Film Studio in the former
Lawrence Parma school building over
18 days last summer, with 150 in the
cast and more than 30 crew, all vol-
unteers.
“But there’s much more to it than
just shooting it,” explains Finola. “The
editing itself, with co-editor, Cris
Cazor, took five months. It was every
day, all day, three or four days of the
week.
“Jack Presnal, who oversaw the
project, was very strict.
“You can’t be sentimental about
these things. You have to show the
strength and character of it. You have
to get out the way and let it be what
it is. I made a lot of mistakes as a first
timer. It was a huge learning curve.”
The film, about a young boy and his
widower grandfather who bet on the
first one to find love, is also accom-
panied by a host of musical numbers
from local bands and local songwrit-
ers.
“I picked the ones I liked best,” says
Finola. “I’m the one common denomi-
nator, delegating, I hope, to all the
right people.
“I was ready for the challenge from
day one. I just loved doing it so much.”
Even balancing the work with her
acting role at the studios in Hollywood
wasn’t too much of a drawback.
“You can do a lot online, but I’m
glad it is, at last, all completed.”
The film, which had a total budget
of around $60,000, will hit the big
screen at a benefit-sneak preview at
the Bacara next Thursday, with multi
Grammy winner Kenny Loggins
and multi Emmy winner Michelle
Stafford of the CBS Soap The Young
and the Restless, and the public pre-
miere takes place at the Arlington on
April 19th and 20th.
“The whole goal was to see how
inexpensively we could make a movie
as good as commercial fare,” says
Jack, who founded the non-profit to
teach interested community members
all aspects of filmmaking. “We obvi-
ously made compromises, but the
results speak for themselves.”
As for Finola, who was also a regu-
lar on the NBC series Blossom and
WBTV’s Charmed, she wants to do
more work behind the camera rather
than in front of it.
“I see that as the new direction I will
be taking,” she adds. “I’m currently
working on two new projects, includ-
ing another one in Santa Barbara.”
Stay tuned...
Rocky Road
It was only a month or so ago that
rocker John Mayer was in Montecito
purchasing a gold and ruby ring for
local songstress Katy Perry from
Daniel Gibbings’ bling emporium on
Coast Village Road.
Many observers thought this the pre-
amble for an engagement announce-
ment in due course.
But now it looks like the romance is
on the rocks, according to Us Weekly.
But one source tells the celebrity
glossy that Katy, a former student at
Dos Pueblos High School, is “leaving
the window open. They’ve been so
focused on work.”
The 28-year-old singer, whose
divorce from British comedian Russell
Brand was finalized in July, began
dating Mayer around the same time.
She has been busy recording her
third studio album of late, while
Mayer, 35, is preparing for tour dates
over the next few weeks.
It was only recently that he told
CBS: “For the first time in my life, I
don’t feel like I’m in a celebrity rela-
tionship. I really don’t. I’m not in a
high profile – I know it’s high profile.
“But it doesn’t seem that way to me.
Actress-director Finola Hughes’ first film about to
premiere
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 8 • The Voice of the Village •
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If you have something you think Montecito should know about, or wish to respond to something
you read in the Journal, we want to hear from you. Please send all such correspondence to:
Montecito Journal, Letters to the Editor, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA.
93108. You can also FAX such mail to: (805) 969-6654, or E-mail to jim@montecitojournal.net
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Campaigner In Chief
I
would like to thank Ms Rachel
Wilkinson for taking the time
out of her busy day to respond
to my recent Letter to the Editor in
the Montecito Journal (“Dividing &
Conquering” MJ # 19/12). Rather than
refer to her as “the writer” (as she did
when addressing me and responding
to my letter (“Apocalypse Never” MJ
# 19/10) I am happy to respond to
Ms Wilkinson. Let me start by stating
I agree with her that Barack Obama
is the President of the United States.
I looked at my letter and did not
see any mention that he wasn’t the
duly elected President. Ms Wilkinson
is also correct that Mr. Obama did
receive in excess of 50% of the vote
in 2008 and 2012 and the last person
to do that was Ronald Reagan. Now
you see, Ms Wilkinson, Republicans
and Democrats can agree on some
things, so we are off to good start.
Let’s talk about things about which
we do not agree. Mr. Reagan’s victo-
ries were made possible by a num-
ber of registered Democrats (called
the Reagan Democrats) who crossed
party lines two times to put him in
office. I would respectfully state that
very few if any Republicans crossed
over the aisle to vote for Mr. Obama.
An objective person who read your
letter would think that you are of the
belief that all Republicans walk in
lockstep and are incapable of holding
different views on a variety of topics.
Nothing could be further from the
truth. And, once again, an objective
person would say that in fact the
Democrats are much more likely to
all sing from the same hymn book (if
I haven’t offended anyone by making
a casual reference to religion) than
the Republicans.
What I also found interesting was
that the majority of your response to
my letter did not in fact respond to
any of the points I made. Based upon
that, I assume you agree with me that
the President has not demonstrated
that he can lead and continues to
campaign. Ms Wilkinson, if you want
to respond please answer the follow-
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 9 We’d rather have a message of value for the money rather than one about a lot of gut-filling, bottom-feeder stuff – Andrew Puzder (of Carl’s Jr.)
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LETTERS Page 204
ing questions:
1) Why did President Obama cre-
ate the Simpson-Bowes Commission,
since he completely ignored each and
every one of its recommendations;
2) Please tell me why life as we
know it has not changed despite the
sequester;
3) Please explain to me why Voter
ID laws would have a stifling effect
on minorities, poor, and young vot-
ers. Mr. Obama received seven mil-
lion more votes from people who
earn less than $30,000 a year, and the
majority of those voters were minor-
ity, poor, and young. Do you really
believe requiring a voter to produce
a photo ID would reduce the number
of voters in those three categories?
My guess is that it would no more
reduce the number of voters than it
has reduced the number of people
with a license to drive a car or reduce
the number of people who want to
board an airplane, both of which
require a photo ID.
Ms Wilkinson: thanks again for
your reading and responding to
my letter. I am flattered. I am sorry
you think Republicans are uncaring,
mean-spirited, greedy folks who only
take and do not give back. I think if
you have some free time you might
want to do a little research and look
at where a large percentage of the
charitable contributions come from in
this country; it may shock you when
you learn that the same amount if
not more of donations come from
Republicans. I guess we Republicans
could be like Vice President Biden,
who gave $1,100 to charity last year;
he’s a real role model for our young
people.
In closing Ms Wilkinson, I will
agree with you once more: politics is
about the art of compromise, so let’s
agree to disagree that the leaders of
your party – Barack Obama, Harry
Reid, Dick Durban, Barbara Boxer,
and Nancy Pelosi – know how to
compromise.
Ralph T. Iannelli
Montecito
“Considerable”
Victory Questioned
In your Editor’s note to one of
those low-information Obama letters
you often print, you made a throw-
away reference to the “considerable
margin of Obama’s (November elec-
tion) victory.” Words and phrases
have meaning and said often enough
will ingrain exaggerated facts in our
minds, which distort the true reality.
In a field of about a dozen tickets
running for president and vice presi-
dent, Obama-Biden received 51% of
the total national vote. The rest of
the tickets received 49%, of which
Romney-Ryan garnered 47.8%. If we
turned this election into a “left wing-
right wing” contest, the Left received
51.2% of all votes; the Right 48.8%.
I’ve heard any number of com-
mentators and pundits of all political
stripes make reference to Obama’s re-
election victory with words ranging
from “landslide” to “beyond ques-
tion” to “comfortable” to “putting the
final nails in the Republican coffin.”
Obama’s re-election success was
lackluster at best. Despite a larger
population and electorate in 2012 vs.
2008, both parties “suppressed” the
total national vote by three million
votes compared to 2008. But in doing
so, the GOP reduced Obama’s final
vote count by far more than did the
Democrats did the Republicans’ final
count.
Romney’s percentage of the total
vote was much more than McCain’s
while Obama dropped a full two per-
centage points from 2008.
Dick Morris pointed out that the
Obama demographic groups gave
him a 43 to 17 edge; in simpler terms,
that’s a 5-to-2 advantage. All Romney
had to do was capture 68% of the
white vote and he would be presi-
dent. He got 66%!
According to a DNC analyst, if
Romney-Ryan could have swept
three out of four white male voters,
he would be president. The ticket
ended up with 72% of the white male
vote.
There is no excuse for Romney-
Ryan to have lost Florida, Virginia,
Ohio and New Hampshire than to
admit that “last-minute-uncontrolla-
bles” such as images of Chris Christie
walking hand-in-hand with Barack
Obama along a New Jersey beach
suppressed just enough Republican
votes to allow Obama to squeak by.
This had a huge impact because most
Republicans wait until the actual
Election Day to vote.
People in North Carolina, Indiana
and Missouri saw those images also,
but the former two states flipped
from Obama to Romney and the lat-
ter state went from a McCain squeak-
er to almost a Romney landslide.
What we witnessed in Florida,
Ohio, Virginia and New Hampshire
was the failure of the Republican
machine to persuade its voters to
leave their homes and offices and
vote.
Obama is still president not by
anything he did but by what the
Republicans didn’t do!
Why can’t pundits just say that
Obama won the election by getting
more votes than the Republicans? His
margin of victory was neither “con-
siderable,” “comfortable,” “beyond
question” nor “a landslide.”
And he certainly didn’t receive a
mandate to do anything except occu-
py the White House and govern.
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 10 • The Voice of the Village •
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 11 A small progressive tax will be but the stepping stone to others, larger and more sweeping, until our political contests will become a war – Stephen Field
Where: Via Vai, Ennisbrook, and Casa
Dorinda trailhead
Info: 969-3249
SATURDAY APRIL 6
One on One Fitness Event
Linda Sanders of One on One Fitness
is sponsoring an event to raise funds for
Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center. Come
prepared to get a great workout and have
a blast doing it. The class will include
functional training: TRX, kettle bells, Krank
Cycle, mat Pilates, cardio blast and much
THURSDAY MARCH 28
Art Opening Reception
Kim Snyder will have 25 oil on linen
paintings for sale during her Wildlife
Art Exhibit at Santa Barbara Maritime
Museum.
At age 54, making art professionally over
35 years, Snyder says her painting career
has taken her art in different directions
but always comes back around to wildlife.
“While walking on the beach, bluffs
and wetlands, if I see an animal I enjoy
stopping and observing them in their
habitat, hunting, resting, and showing off
to their mates and potential mates. I love
to capture their movement and personality
and spirit in paintings for others to see,
remember, enjoy and bring this peaceful
and joyful imagery into their homes,” she
says.
When: 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm
Where: 113 Harbor Way
Cost: free and open to the public
Registration: www.sbmm.org
Discussion Group
A group gathers to discuss The New Yorker
When: 7:30 pm to 9 pm
Where: Montecito Library,
1469 East Valley Road
FRIDAY MARCH 29
Good Friday Breakfast
The Good Friday Breakfast event focuses
on the signifcance of the death of Jesus
Christ. Enjoy an inspirational morning of
praise, music and community fellowship
with Randy Clark, CEO of Axia and
Board President of Providence Hall
Christian Academy. The event is hosted by
Montecito Family YMCA.
When: 8:45 am
Where: Fess Parker’s DoubleTree Resort
ballroom, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard
Cost: $35 per person
Info: jennifer.freed@ciymca.org
WEDNESDAY APRIL 3
Walk & Roll
Montecito Union School students, teachers
and parents walk or ride to school, rather
than drive
When: 8 am
(If you have a Montecito event, or an event that concerns Montecito,
please e-mail kelly@montecitojournal.net or call (805) 565-1860)
SUNDAY MARCH 31
Easter Services
El Montecito
Presbyterian, 1455 East
Valley Road, 9 am & 10:30
am
All Saints-by-the-Sea
Episcopal Church, 83
Eucalyptus Lane, 8 am & 10
am
Montecito Covenant, 671
Cold Spring Road, 10 am
Our Lady of Mt. Carmel,
1300 East Valley Road, 8
am, 9:30 am, 11 am,
12:30 pm
SATURDAY APRIL 6
Seniors Have Talent
Talented seniors in our
community will be strutting
their stuff on stage at
the Seniors Have Talent
variety show. This two-hour
extravaganza features
talented singers, dancers,
musicians, and magicians
in our community, aged
50+. Directed by renowned
playwright Rod Lathim and
emceed by radio personality
Catherine Remak, the show promises to entertain the audience showcasing the
talent and energy of Santa Barbara seniors.
Proceeds from the show support the work of the Center for Successful Aging. The
Center for Successful Aging promotes the physical, spiritual, mental, and emotional
health of seniors and their families. This event is supported in part by The Marjorie
Luke Theatre’s Dreier Family Rent Subsidy Fund.
When: 2 pm to 4 pm
Where: Marjorie Luke Theater, 721 East Cota Street
Tickets: $20 for adults, $10 for children Info: www.seniors-have-talent.org
SATURDAY MARCH 30
Annual Vietnam Veterans
Commemoration
Everyone is invited to this attend this national
day of recognition – and celebration – for all
who served in the U.S. Armed Forces during
the Vietnam War era (1959-1975). It also
honors the sacrifce of the 58,267 men and
women who did not come home, 98 of which
are from Santa Barbara County.
Luncheon will serve your choice of chicken, tri-tip, plus all the fxings with choice
of lemonade, ice tea or water; beer & wine will be available. Music from the ‘50s,
‘60s and ‘70s will keep the festivities lively. Look for the 218’s Huey Helicopter
on display in front of the Veterans Building along with a military jeep. The chapter
will sell its newly designed Huey Helicopter T-shirt and a 2013 calendar featuring
photos taken at “The Moving Wall” when it was on display in Santa Barbara in
September of 2011. Veterans of all eras are encouraged to attend.
When: 11 am to 4 pm, fag ceremony at noon
Where: 112 W. Cabrillo Blvd
Cost: $15 for lunch, children under 12 free
Info: 284-6372 or e-mail vvachapter218@gmail.com
This Week
Montecito
in and around
Montecito Tide Chart
Day Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt High Hgt Low Hgt
Thurs, Mar 28
4:57 AM -0.4 11:07 AM 4.5 04:48 PM 0.6 011:05 PM 5.6
Fri, Mar 29
5:43 AM -0.5 11:55 AM 4.1 05:22 PM 1 011:42 PM 5.7
Sat, Mar 30
6:34 AM -0.4 12:50 PM 3.7 05:59 PM 1.5
Sun, Mar 31
12:25 AM 5.5 7:35 AM -0.3 02:00 PM 3.3 06:44 PM 2
Mon, Apr 1
1:18 AM 5.2 8:47 AM -0.1 03:33 PM 3 07:50 PM 2.4
Tues, Apr 2
2:27 AM 4.9 10:11 AM 0 05:16 PM 3.2 09:36 PM 2.6
Wed, Apr 3
3:56 AM 4.6 11:29 AM -0.1 06:28 PM 3.6 011:26 PM 2.4
Thurs, Apr 4
5:27 AM 4.6 12:32 PM -0.2 07:16 PM 4
Fri, Apr 5
12:44 AM 1.8 6:41 AM 4.7 01:22 PM -0.2 07:54 PM 4.5

more. All proceeds will go directly to SB
Rape Crisis Center.
When: 10 am
Where: 1809 East Cabrillo Boulevard,
Suite B
Cost: $75
Info: (805) 969-9107
Blue Water Ball
SB Channelkeeper’s 13th annual
Blue Water Ball will feature a tribute
to Patagonia for its environmental
leadership as well as a reception,
auction, dinner, live music, and a
celebration of Channelkeeper’s many
recent victories for clean water.
Proceeds from the event provide critical
unrestricted funds for Channelkeeper’s
important advocacy, research, education
and community outreach efforts to
protect water quality and restore aquatic
habitats in and along the Santa Barbara
Channel.
When: 5 pm
Where: Montecito Country Club,
920 Summit Road
Cost: $175
Info: Kira Redmond, Executive Director,
805 563-3377, ext 1, kira@sbck.org, or
www.sbck.org •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 12 • The Voice of the Village •
Beautiful Remodel • Dual Living Floor Plan
1860 Eucalyptus Hill Road
M o n t e c i t o , C A
Nestled on .8 acres along the edge of Montecito rests this bright
and spacious 3,643 +/- square foot turnkey home. Offering 4
bedrooms and 3 baths, this home was extensively remodeled with
contemporary and elegant fnishes.
Newly Reduced to $1,849,000
Natalie Grubb-Campbell
805.895.6226
natalie@villagesite.com
License: 01236143
Great Dual Living
Opportunity!
www.GrubbCampbell.com
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and itinerary are subject to change without notice. Certain restrictions may apply. AAA members must make advance reservations
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 224
MPC Weighs in on
Cottage Food Law
Village Beat
by Kelly Mahan


A
t the Montecito Planning
Commission on Wednesday,
March 20, the commissioners
help formulate recommendations to
the Santa Barbara County Planning
Commission regarding a state-wide
ordinance allowing “cottage food”
industries in private homes.
The state assembly bill, which
went into effect January 1, 2013 (see
MJ # 19/9) allows microenterprises
that prepare low-risk foods to oper-
ate without investing in a commer-
cial kitchen. The new law does not
extend to products containing meat
or dairy, but allows baked goods,
granola, trail mix, popcorn, candies,
dried fruit, coffee, tea, jams, jellies,
vinegar, mustard, pickles and other
low-risk items, sometimes referred to
as “cottage food.” The Cottage Food
Law promotes locally produced prod-
ucts and brings the consumer closer to
producer, while allowing local juris-
dictions to place limits and conditions
on the law.
As of last week, 57 cottage food
operations had applied for permits in
the entire county; three of which are in
the Montecito planning area. Dubbed
“AB 1616,” the law sets limits on the
amount of money that can be earned
through cottage food sales: $35,000 in
2013, $45,000 in 2014, and $50,000 in
2015 and beyond.
The commissioners discussed sev-
eral possible issues the law may bring
to bear in Montecito, including traffic
and parking issues when customers
pick up items from the residences.
Other issues include noise, smell,
and increased demand on water and
sewer systems.
County staff came to MPC with an
outline of possible local amendments
to the law, which included limiting
the number of cottage food opera-
tions per dwelling to one, requiring
the operation not be within 300 feet of
another cottage food operation, and
restricting customer parking to street
frontage or other non-required park-
ing spaces on the property.
While limited in its purview, the
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 13
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FOUR SEASONS BILTMORE HOTEL I 805.969.3167 I MONTECITO, CA 93108
Designed by Jeff Shelton, this
condo is comprised of two
bedrooms with a fireplace in
the master, two and one half
baths, living room, large dining
area, family room, gourmet
kitchen, and a two-car garage
with private elevator. El
Andaluz condos feature high
ceilings, open floor plans, an
open-air courtyard and high-
tech internet capabilities. is
elite, furnished Moroccan
style home is steps away from
theatres, restaurants, shops, etc.
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- Updated bathrooms and new electrical and plumbing throughout.
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PRICE UPON REQUEST
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 14 • The Voice of the Village •
I
n spite of Kindles, people still like
to buy and hold a book in their
hands when reading. The book
event CALM (Child Abuse Listening
Mediation) Luncheon is one of the
biggest of the year with over 500
attending the 27
th
annual (the event
started when Sue Grafton was only
on “B” of her alphabet series) at Fess
Parker’s DoubleTree Resort.
The evening before, celebrity
authors, auxiliary members and spe-
cial guests were treated to a cocktail
reception at Maggie Gallant’s pagoda
house in the Upper East. Her com-
pletely restored home is like being
transported to the Orient for a few
hours. As emcee Andrew Firestone
remarked, “Thanks for letting us
invade your house and use your
plumbing.” He has been the master
of ceremonies for three years and calls
the luncheon “one of the classiest,
kookiest and funnest events.” Party
co-chairs were Pegeen White and
Carol Newman.
The luncheon day began early with
the opening of the “bookstore,” which
was filled with not only books but
with 14 mostly local guest authors:
Kevin Bourke, Joan Calder, D. J.
Clancy, Penny Clemmons, Maxwell
Dickinson, Neal Graffy, Rich
Grimes, Mary Hershey, Suzanne
Landry, Marni McGee, Dan Poytner,
Dr. Bud Stuart and Leslie Westbrook.
As the sign said, “Get your books
autographed. They will be more valu-
able.”
Mary Hershey’s table was covered
with chocolate kisses. When I asked
her if she was born with that name
she replied, “No, I chose it after my
divorce. Also it has two feminine parts
– her and she.” Who knew?
After loading up on books it was
time to hit the lobby, where the four
celebrity authors, who were to be
interviewed, were stationed. What
a great way to Christmas shop and
have personalized signatures of all the
famous folks.
During lunch we heard from event
co-chairs Becky Cohn and Carolyn
Gillio. As Andrew said, “The plan-
ning for this year begins fifteen min-
utes after last year’s affair,” Long time
executive director Cecilia Rodriguez
was there, along with the auxiliary
president Dale McCaskey and all
those members who worked so hard,
including decorating the ballroom
with stunning hydrangea centerpiec-
es.
Dale surprised Jim Kearns by pre-
senting him with the Claire Miles
Seen Around Town
by Lynda Millner
Celebrity Authors Luncheon
SEEn Page 164
Ms. Millner is the author
of “The Magic Makeover,
Tricks for Looking Thinner,
Younger and More
Confident – Instantly.”
She will be giving a one-
day makeover seminar at
SBCC adult education April
20. Call her for this or an
event at 969-6164.
Celebrity author Marcia Clark at the CALM lun-
cheon
CALM
luncheon
co-chairs
Carolyn
Gillio and
Becky Cohn
with emcee
Andrew
Firestone at
the cocktail
party the
night before
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 15
‘ ONE OF A KIND’ by BOBBY WEBB

Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc.
D
ramatic 180 degree skyline views over the sun drenched
Santa Barbara coastline are aforded from this magnifcent
four acre parcel located in the Golden Triangle, in the premier
location of the grand estates of Montecito. Not ofered in over
60 years, this breathtaking parcel is situated on one of the most
desirable streets in all of Montecito. Te upper level of the
property is the ideal site for the Main Home, Pool House and
Infnity Pool, where glorious mountain and ocean views abound
in every direction. A gracious oak lined drive descends from this
site to the equally stunning location for the fully separate Guest
House. Preliminary Elevations & Floor Plans completed.
Ofered at $15,500,000
Main Home - East Elevation
www.SUZANNEPERKINS.com
805•895•2138
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 16 • The Voice of the Village •
eral restaurants including one that just
opened in Singapore.
Tom had an easy job interviewing
local resident Milt Larsen, who can
tell one story after another – all true.
He’s famous for owning the Magic
Castle in Hollywood (for 50 years).
It’s a private club for magicians that
began with 150 members and now has
5,000. Some of the more famous mem-
bers were Cary Grant and Johnny
Carson. Milt has been voted one of the
100 most influential individuals in the
history of magic. I can’t wait to read
his latest tome, My Magical Journey:
The First 30,000 Days.
Tiffany Baker, who has a PhD in
Victorian literature, is a New York
Times best-selling author of two
books, her last The Gilly Salt Sisters.
She shared one of her most embar-
rassing moments, “My mom saved
all my young stories and read them
at my first book signing.” Tiffany has
a husband and three children, telling
us, “My house is like a pig sty. I leave
the dishes so I can write.” Look for
her next book, Mercy Snow, in January
2014.
When Tom asked Marcia Clark,
“What do you get out of being an
author instead of a district attorney
(the O. J. Simpson trial)?” she quickly
answered, “That’s easy. I get to con-
trol the ending.” She said that all
the experts told them before the trial
began that they had no chance of a
conviction because of the Rodney
King furor only two years prior. “It
was an unending nightmare.” She
still practices law, but not courtroom,
and is the author of crime novels,
the latest being Guilt by Degrees. Her
books have been optioned for a tele-
vision series, which is now in devel-
opment.
All the money raised from the
luncheon goes to CALM, who last
STEAK • SEAFOOD • COCKTAI LS
LunCh • DI nnEr • PrI vATE PArTI ES
Reservations • (805) 564-1200 • Free Valet Parking • By The Boats
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EASTER BRUNCH
BUFFET 10am to 3pm
JOIN FRIENDS &
FAMILY ON THE DECK
Omelettes, French Toast, Pancakes,
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Applewood Smoked Bacon, Chilled
Oysters, Fresh Fruit, Desserts & More!
$
29
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reservations
564-1200
SEEn (Continued from page 14)
Award for outstanding service to
CALM. Claire, who was a nurse with
a physician husband, was the found-
er of CALM. After hearing cases
of child abuse, she set up a private
hotline in her home for distressed
parents with strict instruction to her
children to “not pick up that phone.”
In the first month she received over
40 calls and as they say, “The rest is
history.”
Interviewers were Debby Davison
and Tom Weitzel. Debby spoke with
Cat Cora who was the first female
Iron Chef on the Food Network’s Iron
Chef America. She confessed, “Julia
Child was my mentor.” Cat came from
a Greek home in Mississippi, giving
her an appreciation of Southern food
as well as Mediterranean. When she
applied for cooking apprenticeships
in France (a largely male bastion at
the time), she sent in ten applications
and was rejected by eight. Since many
women would rather make reserva-
tions than make dinner, Cat owns sev-
Arlene Larsen with husband, author Milt, and cocktail party co-chair Pegeen White signing books
Celebrity
author
Tiffany
Baker with
board presi-
dent Dale
McCaskey
Luncheon
founder
Sharon
Bifano with
celebrity
author Cat
Cora
Cocktail party hostess Maggie Gallant with her Foo
Dog in the pagoda house
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 17 I’ve always been a libertarian; leave everybody alone; let everybody else do what they want; just stay out of everybody else’s hair – Clint Eastwood
WHAT’S NEXT?
UCSB ARTS & LECTURES PRESENTS
OPERA SANTA BARBARA PRESENTS
THE GRANADA THEATRE CONCERT SERIES PRESENTS
SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY PRESENTS
UCSB ARTS & LECTURES PRESENTS
SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY PRESENTS
GUEST CONDUCTOR: GREGORY VAJDA
SOLOISTS: NIGEL ARMSTRONG, VIOLIN
PRESENTED IN ASSOCIATION WITH UCSB ARTS & LECTURES
3.28.13.MJ.indd 1 3/21/13 9:50 AM
SEEn Page 364
year served over 2,000 people. They
educated 7,000 children, parents and
teachers in our local schools and pre-
sented 300 child abuse prevention
workshops and more. There will be
an Open House on April 10 from 5 to
7 pm and another Antiques & Vintage
show and sale May 17, 18 and 19 at
Earl Warren Showgrounds. Join their
“I will NOT be silent” campaign to
help abused children.

Re-Retirement
United Way threw a re-retirement
party at its offices for a very spe-
cial employee, Karen Knight. Karen
Cocktail party
co-chairs
Pageen White
and Carol
Newman
in front of
the pagoda
house
United Way director of development and market-
ing Steve Ortiz with retiring coordinator and lead-
ership officer Karen Knight at her re-retirement
party
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 18 • The Voice of the Village •


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MISCELLAnY (Continued from page 6)
And great! I’m glad... For me, it feels
like something that’s very human.”
Mayer’s past girlfriends include
the likes of Taylor Swift, Jennifer
Aniston, Minka Kelly and Jessica
Simpson.
Watch this space...
Elegant Lady to Arrive
When Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones and his wife, Gene, are in our
rarefied enclave while his NFL team
does summer training in Oxnard, his
personal bus is often seen parked at
Butterfly Beach, just a tiara’s toss from
the Biltmore.
But now, I learn, we’ll be seeing a
new 45 feet-long luxury vehicle in due
course.
Jerry has splashed out around $2
million on a new bus, dubbed “The
Elegant Lady,” after the old vehicle
racked up more than two million
miles.
The new acquisition has the
Cowboys famed logo etched into the
floor and its main cabin can be wid-
ened by a foot when the bus is parked.
It has nine TVs and room for 20
guests, along with a full kitchen, a
bathroom and a retractable awning.
Perfect for shading the peripatetic
duo from the strong California sun...
Seeing Double
Former TV titan Oprah Winfrey
might not perform thrilling stunts, but
it turns out she needs a body double
on occasion.
Hawaii local Shaka was the 59-year-
old’s body double for April’s O maga-
zine cover shoot.
And the twosome found out they
had more in common than just looks
as they became friends and bonded
over their matching outfits.
The shoot and interview were put
together at Oprah’s Maui farmhouse,
which is featured in the latest edition.
Oprah has also been discussing
her latest film The Butler, due to be
released later this year.
It also stars Terrence Howard, Jane
Fonda, Alan Rickman, Cuba Gooding
Jr., Robin Williams and John Cusack.
Oprah, who plays Oscar-winner
Dallas Cowboys owner splashes out on a new
luxury bus
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 19 The only thing I’m addicted to is winning – Charlie Sheen
Bobby McFerrin
spirityouall
TUE, APR 2 / 8 PM
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“There is something almost
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Newsweek
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“She makes the trumpet sing with
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The Ukulele
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TUE, APR 9 / 8 PM
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“The sophisticated sound they
make - both percussive and
melodic - is at once hilarious and
heartfelt.” Financial Times
Legendary Broadway Star
Barbara Cook
Let’s Fall in Love
WED, APR 10 / 8 PM
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“A national treasure, the premier
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MISCELLAnY Page 244
Forest Whitaker’s wife, says she felt
“pretty good” about the romance
scenes.
“Forest is a good kisser, how about
that?”
The film is the story of Eugene Allen,
an African-American who served as a
White House butler for 34 years...
New Tome for Krieger
Prolific Montecito author David
Krieger has just published his 25th
book, Zero: The Case for Nuclear
Weapons Abolition.
David, who co-founded the Nuclear
Age Peace Foundation in 1982, dedi-
cates the tome to, among others, Albert
Einstein, Bertrand Russell and Albert
Schweitzer, and “all who continue to
struggle for a nuclear weapon-free
world.”
“It’s the greatest challenge of our
time,” he told me at a book bash
at Tecolote, the lively literary lair in
the Upper Village. “Never before in
human history have the stakes been
higher or the challenge greater.”
David was three years old when
the U.S. dropped atomic bombs on
Hiroshima and Nagasaki, cities that
he visited in 1963.
“Those visits changed my life,” he
says.
His book even has a ringing endorse-
ment from Nobel Peace Laureate
Desmond Tutu, who visited Nancy
and Larry Koppelman’s Montecito
home last year.
“It should be required reading for
all citizens of Earth,” he gushes...
Oprah Winfrey has a body double
Author David Krieger and Tipper Gore’s daughter,
Sarah Gore Lee, at Tecolote (photo credit: Rick
Carter)
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 20 • The Voice of the Village •
ONE ON ONE
Fitness Event
Saturday, April 6, 2013
at 10am
1809 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Suite B
Montecito, CA 93108
$75 per person
Linda Sanders of One on One Fitness is sponsoring an
event to raise funds for Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center.
Come prepared to get a great workout and have a blast doing
it. The class will include functional training: TRX, kettle bells,
Krank Cycle, mat Pilates, cardio blast and much more.
All proceeds will go directly to Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center.
For reservations or more information,
please contact Linda Sanders at (805) 969-9107.
If you are unable to attend,
please consider a donation to SBRCC.
THANK YOU!

LETTERS (Continued from page 9)
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Published by Montecito Journal Inc., James Buckley, President
PRINTED BY NPCP INC., SANTA BARBARA, CA
Montecito Journal is compiled, compounded, calibrated, cogitated over, and coughed up every Wednesday
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FAX: (805) 969-6654; Letters to Editor: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito,
CA 93108; E-MAIL: news@montecitojournal.net
The best little paper in America
(Covering the best little community anywhere!)
David McCalmont
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: I must disagree with
you on this, Mr. McCalmont. There is
no denying that a powerful movement
towards Romney with just two weeks to
go before the election was halted by the
super storm and subsequent embrace of
the president by Governor Christie. I was
a dedicated poll watcher at the time and
the numbers began to go back towards
the president when the storm took over
as the number-one interest of the nation’s
newscasters. There is no denying also
that Mr. Obama looks great in a presi-
dential flight jacket and that he is almost
as good as former President Clinton at
faking sincerity. It was a masterful per-
formance.
For me, however, the fact that the
Democrats were able to harvest votes for
nearly a month before election day was
the major swing factor. Having such a
long time to collect votes – valid or not –
can only lead to corruption. It is difficult
to determine how much vote debasement
took place in the 2012 election, but no
doubt there was some. As we stretch the
voting season past the 30-day mark, there
will be more. It becomes easier for folks
to vote two, three, or more times, in dif-
ferent localities, and even under different
names. Democrats were smart enough
to set up polling booths where their vot-
ers were: malls, fast-food joints, on the
sidewalks of busy mid-city boulevards
and elsewhere. The Republican Party
was completely blindsided by the tactic
and subsequently lost states they should
never have lost: Florida, Ohio, Virginia,
and New Hampshire among them. – J.B.)
Preferential Editing
Mr. Buckley is showing preferential
editing of the facts when respond-
ing to a reader’s concern (“Climate
Change” Controversy, MJ # 19/12).
To quote an article on Dr. David
Whitehouse published by source-
watch.com…
In an early December 2010 Global
Warming Policy Foundation blog-
post, Whitehouse predicted that
“2010 will be remembered for just
two warm months [March and June],
attributable to the El Nino effect,
with the rest of the year being noth-
ing but average, or less than average
temperature.”[2]
According to the NASA and NOAA
datasets, 2010 tied with 2005 for the
hottest year on record[3]; and NASA’s
GISS data showed November 2010 as
the hottest November on record[4].
And the use of the term “aver-
age” in Whitehouse’s statement was
misleading, as the dataset referenced
(CRU, through Oct 2010) actually
shows every month in 2010 to be
considerably warmer than the cor-
responding historic (1850+) aver-
age.[5] - a pattern evident visually
in NASA’s GISS data.[6]. Whitehouse
later explained (see Talk page) that
he meant the “average” for just one
decade: a timeframe statisticians con-
sider too short to be meaningful[7] in
seeing the underlying trend.[3]
Another of Whitehouse’s blog-
posts [4]at the GWPF was debunked
by London School of Economics cli-
mate change guru Bob Ward with the
epithet “I do not know of any other
web page about global warming that
is so error-ridden.”
Donnelley Erdman
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: I have no desire to get
down into the weeds on “Climate Chaos”
or whatever. I don’t know enough, but
I did e-mail a friend who has extensive
knowledge in the field of climatology
and is what you would probably refer to
as a “denier.” He turned me on to Mr.
Whitehouse’s website.
My skepticism stems from the false
panic of the early 1970s, when many
“experts” were predicting imminent
global cooling as Earth’s chief worry.
Their solution was – as it is now – a
reduction in carbon-based energy use.
Have our winters become less cold
over the past few decades? It certainly
seems that way, at least in much of
North America. Are excess carbon emis-
sions the cause? Maybe part of it. But,
the more important question is: if that
is true, is the quickest way to reduce
man’s impact on Earth’s climate what
has been proposed, or are there safer,
swifter, more intelligent ways of dealing
with what many believe is a problem?
My guess is there are probably quite a
few other possible solutions other than
gouging businesses worldwide for the
benefit of governments worldwide. –
J.B.)
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 21 Nothing inspires forgiveness quite like revenge – Scott Adams
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Short of the Mark
Your attempt in the “Letters” sec-
tion last week to debunk further the
reality of human-caused global cli-
mate change falls short of the mark.
Specifically:
1) You cite Roger Pielke Jr., a pro-
fessor of environmental studies,
as stating that flooding and severe
hurricanes have not increased.
Consulting Pielke’s background on
the Internet, one finds that he sup-
ports the Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC) conclusion
that human-caused climate change is
real, and he writes that “on this basis
alone I am personally convinced that
it makes sense to take action to limit
greenhouse emissions.”
2) The Global Warming Policy
Foundation, which you cite, is noto-
rious for selectively choosing data
to skew its denial position. Its direc-
tor is a social anthropologist, not a
climate scientist, and on its board
of trustees sit many notable climate
change deniers, notably including
Richard Lindzen, whose work has
been rejected as unreliable by an
overwhelming majority of climatolo-
gists. In addition, the GWPF has
repeatedly demanded public infor-
mation about the funding sources
of climatologists, but has repeatedly
refused to divulge its own sources
of funds.
Steve Daniels
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: I too believe “it makes
sense to take action to limit greenhouse
emissions,” but what I also believe is
that the proposals to confiscate hundreds
of millions, probably billions of dollars a
year from businesses is simply that: con-
fiscation. Or better yet: robbery. All that
collected money will go towards main-
taining fat salaries, pensions, and ben-
efits for government employees world-
wide. They’ll throw some pittance at
research perhaps, but it’ll be a pittance.
There are probably thousands of better
market-oriented ways of arriving at a
more efficient solution than to dump
the kinds of sums being suggested to
international kleptocrats [for reference,
see “Cyprus”]. As for the bona fides of
Roger Pielke or Richard Lindzen or many
others, it is so easy to defame individuals
who hold unorthodox views – and it is
done with such frequency – that many
of us pay no attention to those smears at
all. On the other hand, it is refreshing, is
it not, to read our give and take on this
issue? – J.B.)
What Changed It All?
Sixty-one years ago, four of us
would collect bottles and cans and
then walk a couple of miles east on
East Valley Road and up Romero
Canyon with our .22-caliber rifles
shouldered. When we reached the
top of Romero Canyon we would
set up our targets and do practice
shooting. We were never stopped or
questioned. We had been taught how
to safely handle our guns and were
trusted to behave responsibly, which
we did.
What a different world we live in. I
wonder what changed it so?
Maureen M. Masson
Montecito
(Editor’s note: I too remember gun-club
kids bringing their rifles to school during
“Show and Tell” in the classroom, and
explaining how their guns worked. As for
what changed: one look at what passes for
“entertainment” in movie houses and on
television sets and computer screens today
will probably give you some plausible expla-
nations as to what has changed. – J.B.)
Voting For Free Stuff
This has been floating around the
internet for a couple of weeks and
I appreciate the message so much I
thought I’d run it by you.
Maxim: Give a man a fish and he
will eat for a day; teach a man to fish
and he will eat for a lifetime.
2013 version:
Give a man a welfare check, a free
cell phone, free internet, cash for his
clunker, food stamps, Section 8 hous-
ing, free contraceptives, Medicaid,
ninety-nine weeks of unemploy-
ment, free medicine, and he will vote
Democrat the rest of his life, even after
he dies.
Please don’t use my name; I have
customers who feel differently and I
need their business.
Name Withheld
Santa Barbara
(Editor’s note: They sound like good
solid reasons for voting a particular way
to us. You would not want to vote for a
party that even suggests you pay for those
goodies, would you? – J.B.) •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 22 • The Voice of the Village •
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VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 12)
commission, which included new
commissioner J’Amy Brown, asked
staff to add stricter ordinance con-
ditions to help protect the integrity
of Montecito neighborhoods. Those
conditions include limiting the hours
in which customers can pick up prod-
ucts, as well as verbiage that could
limit noxious cooking odors likely to
become a nuisance. The recommenda-
tions will then be forwarded to the
Board of Supervisors for review.
Also on Wednesday, Chair Sue
Burrows read a resolution into the
record, honoring Claire Gottsdanker
for her eight years of service on the
commission. Ms Gottsdanker will
be returning to Montecito Board of
Architectural Review, where she says
she can better serve the community by
acting on the front line of new projects
in Montecito.
Montecito Planning Commission
meets the third Wednesday of each
month at 9 am.
Teen night at YMCA
Next Saturday, April 6, Montecito
YMCA will host Teen Night, a new
program designed to give teens and
pre-teens a place to hang out and
socialize in a safe, supervised envi-
ronment. Dubbed “Teens Forging
Friendships,” the event is the first of
what may become a welcome addition
to the Y’s programming.
“It’s an exciting, great new initia-
tive, especially for junior high teens,”
says Senior Program Director Cary
Young, who will oversee the event.
“Right now, they have few places to
socialize in Santa Barbara on Saturday
nights. The YMCA provides a safe
place for teens to meet and engage
in constructive and positive activi-
ties aimed at fostering team build-
ing, healthy relationships and athletic
activity,” Young says.
The event, open to all Santa Barbara
area teens and pre-teens age 11-14,
will feature music, dancing, swim-
ming, basketball, in-line skating, soc-
cer, and other activities. Pizza and
Senior Program Director Cary Young will oversee
Teen Night at the Montecito YMCA
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 23
Montecito Rotary, visit www.monteci
torotary.org.
Art on Exhibit
Local artist Tom Mielko says he
is proud to announce his association
with Montecito art gallery, Mertens
Fine Art. Owned and operated by
Alex and Maria Mertens, the Coast
Village Road gallery will now be the
exclusive representative of Mielko’s
fine art work in California.
Mielko, an American Romantic
Realist painter, is acknowledged glob-
ally as a master of visual storytell-
ing. He is best known for his abil-
ity to communicate with the viewer
in a personal, intimate way. Born in
Dorchester, Massachusetts, Tom drew
his first sketches at the age of six and
has been a working artist ever since.
He studied at the Boston Museum
of Fine Arts School and the presti-
gious Art Institute of Boston. Tom has
exhibited at the Smithsonian Institute
in Washington, D.C., the Dyansen
Gallery in New York, NY, in addition
It is just as vulgar to work for the sake of posterity as to work for the sake of money – Orson Welles
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VILLAGE BEAT Page 284
refreshments will be served. The
evening will take place after regular
YMCA hours, from 7 pm to 9:30 pm.
“Junior high is a tricky age,” says
Young, who has been with the YMCA
the last fifteen years. He oversees
youth aquatics and sports program-
ming at the center, and says he is
pleased to see Teen Night added to
the schedule. “It’s my hope that it
creates a place for teens to feel like
they belong and to bolster respectful
relationships,” he said.
Teen Night takes place Saturday,
April 6, at 7 pm. Early registration
is $8, or $10 at the door. For fur-
ther information, please contact Cary
Young, Montecito YMCA, 591 Santa
Rosa Lane, cary.young@ciymca.org,
or by phone at 969-3288.
Montecito Rotary
On Tuesday, March 26, the Rotary
Club of Montecito held its annual
Public Service and Safety Awards,
recognizing men and women of
law enforcement, fire protection,
and marine safety who serve Santa
Barbara County.
Hosted by Mike Klan, the cere-
mony honored nine individuals from
nine county agencies, including Santa
Barbara City Fire Department, CHP,
Carpinteria Fire, SB County Sheriff’s
Department, SBPD, Montecito Fire
Protection District, the U.S. Coast
Guard Marine Safety Detachment,
County Fire, and USCGC Blackfin.
This week’s event was the sixth time
such awards were given to local res-
cue personnel. The nine people were
chosen from their respective agencies
for heroic and or other remarkable
contributions they made during the
past year.
The recipients of this year’s
awards include Captain Gary Pitney,
Officer Isaac Clocherty, Fire Captain
Charles A. Reed, Sr., Deputy Bryan
Dickey, Sergeant Ed Olsen, Captain
Todd Edwards, Petty Officer Wayne
Alleyne, Captain Adam Estabrook,
and Machinery Technician 2nd Class
Robert DeJager.
For more information about
Artist Tom Mielko and gallery owner Alex Mertens announce a collaboration
Local public safety front liners were honored Tuesday at the Rotary Club of Montecito’s Annual Public
Service and Safety Awards
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 24 • The Voice of the Village •
Coast 2 Coast Collection
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Phone: 805.845.7888 ~ www.C2Ccollection.com
Store Hours: Mon-Sat 10am-6pm & Sunday Noon-5pm
Featuring Bernardaud from France
MISCELLAnY (Continued from page 19)
Heaven Sells
The late Dallas star Larry Hagman’s
43-acre Ojai aerie has finally been sold
for $5 million, I note.
The actor, who died of cancer in
November, first listed the sprawling
mountaintop estate in 2009 for a hefty
$11 million.
However, it failed to attract any
buyers despite its famous owner, who
dubbed it Heaven.
The seven-bedroom, ten-bathroom
Mediterranean-style property, which
also includes a two-bedroom guest-
house and a helipad, was designed
and built for Hagman and his Jacuzzi
designer wife, Maj, in 1992.
It has separate solar systems provid-
ing energy for the 18,000-sq-ft main
house and caretaker’s home, while
creating surplus power.
In a move that would have made
Hagman’s character, oil tycoon JR
Ewing, proud, when he installed the
first system in 2003 his annual power
bill went from $37,000 to $13!
50/30 Bash
Social gridlock reigned when sing-
er Peter Clark and his wife, Dallas,
threw a 50/30 party to celebrate their
30th wedding anniversary and his
50th year moving from Australia to
America, at their Birnam Wood manse.
Music dominated the bash as Peter,
who is off to Oz again next month on
a cabaret tour, sang a variety of his
songs, including a version of Beach
Boy Bruce Johnston’s 1975 Grammy-
winning “I Write the Songs” with the
man himself.
“I don’t need the lyrics!” he joked,
as Peter handed him the words for the
song. “I wrote them!”
Adding to the musical mix was
Montecito composer Norm Gimbel,
an Oscar and Grammy winner, who
wrote “The Girl From Ipanema,”
the second most covered song in the
world after The Beatles’ “Yesterday,”
and Herman’s Hermit Peter Noone.
Dallas, the stepmother of publish-
ing tycoon Jann Wenner, owner of
Us Weekly and Rolling Stone, is cur-
rently working on her autobiogra-
phy, I Did It, You Can Too! with ghost
writer Alicia St. John, while Marcia
Orland’s Afterglow Media is work-
ing on a three-hour video biography
featuring her life.
“She has quite a collection of pho-
Larry Hagman’s old Ojai estate sells at last
Peter Clark,
Norman
Gimbel, Dallas
Clark, Mireille
and Peter
Noone at the
Clarks 50/30
party (photo by
Priscilla)
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 25 The longer I am out of office the more infallible I appear to myself – Henry Kissinger
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MISCELLAnY Page 274
tographs built up over the years and
doesn’t want to leave anything out,”
says Marcia, whose husband, John,
was a producer on the film version of
Ayn Rand’s novel Atlas Shrugged.
“It should be finished by the sum-
mer.”
Among those turning out for the bus-
tling soirée were Harold and Annette
Simmons, Carter and Victoria Hines,
Gene Sinser and Patty DeDominic,
and Toni Simon and Madison Cox...
Courtroom Drama Continues
Kim Kardashian is apparently fed
up with the courtroom antics of her
estranged husband, Kris Humphries
– accusing his lawyers of leaking tes-
timony that some scenes in her E! TV
reality shows are staged and that she
uses a “tear stick” to cry on camera.
The duo, who notoriously tied the
knot at a Montecito estate nearly two
years ago, have been at legal swizzles-
ticks at dawn, with the star basketball
player refusing to divorce Kim, who
is now expecting a baby in July by
musician and fashion designer, Kanye
West, 35.
Kardashian, 32, believes Humphries’
hometown legal eagle in Minneapolis,
Lee Hutton, leaked last month’s
deposition of Keeping Up With the
Kardashians producer Russell Jay to
celebrity weekly Life & Style.
Jay attested under oath how
Kardashian didn’t like the way she
reacted on camera two years ago when
Humphries proposed, so she had him
pop the question again.
Another scene, where Kardashian
told her mother, Kris Jenner, about
troubles in her marriage, was actually
shot after Kardashian, 32, had ended
the 72-day union with the Brooklyn
Nets player by filing for divorce.
“This is normal operating proce-
dure on any reality show,” says one
Kardashian source. “None of this
shows fraud, which is what Kris is try-
ing to prove. His entire case is based
on the premise that he is the stupidest
person on the planet.”
Humphries, 28, is claiming
Kardashian married him just for pub-
licity and exploited him to boost TV
ratings.
But Humphries’ L.A. lawyer,
Marshall Waller, is reportedly quit-
ting the case because he has had
enough of it...
American Girl
Montecito Planning Commission
chair Sue Burrows is a proud grand-
mother.
Her seven-year-old granddaughter,
Katherine, has just been chosen to be
an American Girl Doll model.
The models are chosen from a series
of auditions held in January, with
approximately just 20 percent of the
500 Southern California candidates
being chosen.
Katherine and her co-winners will
participate in the American Girl fash-
ion shows held in cities across the
U.S., wearing a variety of outfits from
historical clothing to the present day.
“They are non-competitive events
to promote self-esteem and self-con-
fidence in young women,” says Sue.
“The fashion shows and other events
have raised more than $17 million
over the years for local children’s
charities across America.”
Katherine lives in San Diego with her
parents, Wyeth and Laurie Burrows.
“But she loves coming to Montecito,
hiking the creeks and playing hide
and seek in her grandma’s garden,”
adds Sue.
Dynamic David
It looks like CAMA left the best for
last when the 133-year-old St. Louis
Symphony, under dynamic conduc-
tor David Robertson, came to the
Granada at the end of the interna-
tional series season.
It was their first visit to our Eden by
Beach since 1999 and the first time per-
forming at the venerable theater, which
celebrates the fifth anniversary of its
restoration with a glittering bold faced
name-packed gala next Thursday.
Robertson, who grew up in Malibu
but spent the early part of his career in
Europe until landing his current posi-
tion eight years ago, was in top form
with Richard Strauss’ “Don Juan” and
“Till Eulenspiegel’s Merry Pranks,”
Paul Hindemith’s “Mathis der Maler”
symphony, and living composer
Christopher Rouse’s Flute Concerto.
The electricity was certainly flowing
with the latter when the appropriately
named Mark Sparks, the sympho-
ny’s principal flute, gave a thoroughly
entertaining performance.
It is to be hoped it isn’t another 15
years before the orchestra, America’s
second oldest, is back in our midst...
Ying Quartet at SBMA
Just 24 hours later I was in the more
intimate setting of the Mary Craig
Auditorium at the Santa Barbara
Museum of Art for a performance by
the extremely talented Ying Quartet.
The 25-year-old Grammy Award-
winning foursome, currently in resi-
dence at the Eastman School of Music
in Rochester, New York, combine bril-
Doting grandmother, Sue Burrows, with her own
American Girl Doll, Katherine...
Conductor David Robertson produces a cracker at
the Granada (photo credit: Dan Dreyfus)
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 26 • The Voice of the Village •
T
his week’s column is all about
pop music voices, and they are
each quite different. We’ve got
a vastly experienced, genre-defiant
singer whose vocal alchemy challeng-
es preconceptions about what humans
can do with sound. There’s the up-
and-coming jazz singer whose nine-
year-old college-formed quartet is
now turning critics on their ear (while
also turning heads). But we begin
with a Montecito-based fella who by
his own admission isn’t known for his
own singing, but has surely served as
the voice of a generation (or two) dat-
ing all the way back to the early 1960s,
and who is marking a milestone this
week.
Jeff Barry will turn 75 on Wednesday.
It’s not something he especially wants
to take note of, which is understand-
able given the rampant ageism in
our society. And, well, you know,
“Because I’m really not seventy-five,”
Barry says. “It’s just a number. I see
that guy in the mirror, but that’s not
me. I don’t feel seventy-five. I don’t
really look seventy-five. And I’m just
loving life.”
Plus, Barry doesn’t spend a whole
lot of time looking back. Even though
there’s a great deal to revisit.
For those who don’t know about this
songwriting-producing treasure living
in our midst, Barry composed his first
No. 1, ”Tell Laura I Love Her,” back in
1960, when he was just 20. Soon after,
he teamed up with future wife Ellie
Greenwich to form one of the most
successful songwriting partnerships
of all time, based at the famed Brill
Building in New York, which also
housed Neil Diamond, Carole King
and Neil Sedaka. The pair wrote such
hits as “Da Do Ron Ron” and “Be
my Baby” – which became staples of
Phil Spector’s Wall of Sound – while
“Chapel of Love” (Dixie Cups), “Do
Wah Diddy Diddy” (Manfred Mann),
“Leader of the Pack” (Shangri-La’s)
and “Hanky Panky” (Tommy James
and the Shondells) all hit No. 1 on the
Billboard charts.
Barry’s credits, solo or with other
partners, also include “River Deep,
Mountain High,” “Baby I Love You,”
“I Can Hear Music,” “Montego
Bay,” The Archies’ “Sugar, Sugar,”
Gary Stewart’s “Out of Hand,” Lyn
Anderson’s “He Ain’t You” and Olivia
Newton-John’s “I Honestly Love
You.” Out in Los Angeles, he also
composed the theme songs for the TV
series One Day at a Time, Family Ties
and The Jeffersons. Barry was inducted
into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
in 2010.
But even though Barry and his
current wife, Nancy, relocated from
Los Angeles to Montecito nearly two
decades ago in order to start a family,
he hasn’t really rested on his laurels.
And now that his twins are on the
verge of adulthood, he’s been back
in the swing of the music business as
energetically as ever.

Q. What are your latest projects?
A. A few years ago I started getting
calls from people who really wanted
me to come to L.A. and write with
them. So I got a place down there and
I’m in L.A. most weekdays, and try
to make it home on the weekend. It’s
working out great. I’ve been working
with some of the best young writers
in the world, and it’s been very excit-
ing and rewarding. I really love to get
together with new artists. It’s fantas-
tic. I’m writing with kids. Not any of
my contemporaries. I’m not interested
in doing that.
Who are we talking about?
A boy named Cassius (D. Kalb),
who co-wrote the ASCAP song of the
year for Bruno Mars in 2010 “Just the
Way You Are” (which pushed Santa
Barbara-raised Katy Perry’s “Teenage
Dream” off the top of the Billboard’s
chart). We’re writing regularly. I’m
also composing something for Cee Lo
Green right now. That’s the level I’m
working at. There’s a girl named LP
who just signed with Warner Brothers.
I’ve got one who is 14 from London
they sent over to write songs with
me. Mostly it’s kids in their twenties.
They’re loving it. When I first started
I figured I’d see how it works, but it’s
wonderful. It’s old school and new
school put together, and what’s com-
ing out is cool school.
I’m also writing a musical with Jeff
Lieber, the son of Jerry (who with
Mike Stoller are fellow Brill Building
alums), we’re writing Ruthless People,
the Musical… We’ve got six songs so
far, and it’s fantastic.
Are you bringing back that Brill
Building sound that you helped make so
popular?
No, not at all. In fact, if somebody
said we need a movie where you imi-
tate those songs, I don’t think I could
do it anymore. I did do The Idolmaker,
Taylor Hackford’s movie about the
‘sixties. But that was 1980. I’m a much
better writer today, much better song-
writer. Those were crazy days. We
were really cranking them out. Now
I take my time and enjoy them more.
I’d love to have hits again, and all that
stuff. But it’s so great just to be writ-
ing. And getting the reception I have
– everyone seems to value what I do.
You come up here [to Montecito]
and think you‘re going to chill, but it
doesn’t work that way. Sitting on your
butt isn’t a good thing… [But] a guy
couldn’t wish for more, just getting
back into what you’re good at doing,
and still having a good time with it.
Speaking of Montecito, what’s new with
you here?
Montecito is like growing up in a
Norman Rockwell painting. It’s really
like that. So it was great for the twins
here. But now Clayton and Jessica
are turning 18, graduating from Santa
Barbara High, and heading off to col-
lege. Jessica got into Pitzer on early
decision, and Clayton got his final
acceptance to USC today. Only 18
kids in each class out of thousands
who apply get in to this special act-
ing program, and they wanted him so
much they offered him the presiden-
tial scholarships. It’s the best school in
the world for his kind of acting, so it’s
pretty exciting.
Congratulations! That’s great… Now,
back to you: If I made you pick three
songs from your catalogue that are your
favorites…
Number one is definitely “I
Honestly Love You” (co-written with
Peter Allen). It won a Grammy for
Record of the Year (and also Best
Female Pop Vocal Performance). It’s
a good song, well crafted and it says
something unique. A lot of people use
it as a wedding song, but it’s actually
about two people who will never be
together. He’s not trying to get her
into bed, he just loves her and wishes
they could be together, but he’s happy
she’s doing well. So I‘m kind of proud
of that one.
Number two, just because it’s fun
and turned into a huge copyright
for me would be “Sugar Sugar” (co-
written with Andy Kim). It sold more
than any other songs (it hit Number
One in the U.S., U.K. and Canada),
and I produced it as well. And of
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Prolific songwriter and local man Jeff Barry turns
75 this week
EnTERTAInMEnT Page 334
Leader of the Pack
On Entertainment
by Steven Libowitz
Steven Libowitz has
reported on the arts and
entertainment for more
than 30 years; he has
contributed to Montecito
Journal for over ten
years.
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 27 Aging can be fun if you lay back and enjoy it – Clint Eastwood
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MISCELLAnY (Continued from page 25)
liantly communicative performances
with a fearlessly imaginative view of
chamber music in today’s world.
The musicians, who were also
the Blodgett Artists-in-Residence at
Harvard University, kicked off the
show with Haydn’s Quartet in C
Major, wrapping the performance
with Schubert’s Quartet in D minor
“Death and the Maiden.”
But their Chinese roots were not
forgotten with a musical Dim Sum, a
selection of three pieces by Chinese-
American musicians, wedged between
the major composers.
It was a most impressive show.
No wonder they have wowed audi-
ences at venues worldwide, including
the Sydney Opera House and New
York’s Carnegie Hall...
Kapilow Captivates
Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra
hosted a show with a distinct differ-
ence at the Lobero with “What Makes
It Great?” with Rob Kapilow, dubbed
“The Pied Piper of Classical Music,” con-
ducting an “inquest” into Beethoven’s
Violin Concerto in D Major.
Yale graduate Kapilow, who went on
to become an assistant professor at the
Ivy League college and has conducted
many of America’s finest orchestras,
spoke for more than an hour slic-
ing and dicing various aspects of the
famous 1806 work, which had been
written for the German composer’s
colleague, Franz Clement.
Kapilow’s enjoyable format made
its debut on NPR nearly 20 years ago
and in 2008 was featured on the popu-
lar PBS show Live From Lincoln Center.
After an intermission, the orches-
tra, featuring violin soloist Chee-Yun,
played the full work to a now very
knowledgeable audience...
Prince of Sales
Four years after his world renowned
Duchy Originals food empire began to
deflate like a bad soufflé, it appears
that Prince Charles’ Midas touch has
finally returned to him.
Under the four-year stewardship
of Waitrose, one of Britain’s largest
upscale supermarket chains, the prod-
ucts have been achieving record sales.
There is also happy news for HRH’s
other range of Highgrove household
products, including silverware, cush-
ions, blankets and garden tools, which
appears to be in equally rude health.
A.G. Carrick – named after the pseud-
onym the Prince of Wales uses on his
watercolors –, which sells his goods at
his three shops and on the Highgrove
website, had a turnover of more than $6
million last year, up a third on 2011.
The firm made profits of nearly
$1 million in the year, compared to
$600,000 the year before.
A.G. Carrick items are not cheap and
include a range of hampers priced from
$75 to $240, gardening goods such as a
watering can gifts set priced at $140, a
Highgrove teddy bear for $255 and a
checked scarf and flat cap for $120.
The most expensively priced items
are limited edition lithographs of
Charles’ watercolors of his Cotswold
estate and the Castle of Mey in
Scotland, the former summer home
of the late Queen Mother, priced at
$3,750 each.
The prince’s charitable foundation
received nearly $4.5 million from
Waitrose last year, due to its licensing
agreement.
The line was set up by Queen
Elizabeth’s eldest son in 1990, but it
was hit by the recession and at one
point had annual losses of nearly $5
million, leading critics to brand it a
vanity project...
Pleasing the Post
I note the New York Post’s popular
Page Six gossip column picked up
my item on Carpinteria reality TV
twosome, Spencer Pratt and Heidi
Montag’s hefty $5,000 room service
laundry bill at London’s Dorchester
Hotel under the headline “Taken to
the Cleaners.”
But, of course, as usual, you read it
here first...
Sightings: Saturday Night Live’s
Molly Shannon noshing at Ca’Dario...
Country warbler Brad Paisley and his
family chowing down at the Palace
Grill... Brooks and Kate Firestone
checking out the crowd at Café Del Sol
Pip! Pip! for now
Readers with tips, sightings and
amusing items for Richard’s column
should e-mail him at richardmin-
eards@verizon.net or send invita-
tions or other correspondence to the
Journal •MJ
Rob Kapilow dissected Beethoven at the Lobero
Prince Charles
raking in the
dough for his
charities from
his Duchy
Originals
brand
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 28 • The Voice of the Village •
SANTA BARBARA RAPE CRISIS CENTER
our 5th annual celebration of chocolate & wine
…featuring a competition of unique, blossom-themed chocolate creations
judged by a panel of local chefs
proudly invites you to experience
Saturday, March 30, 7–10 pm
VIP reception at 6 pm sharp
Santa Barbara Woman’s Club
670 Mission Canyon Rd., Santa Barbara
Featuring
California Wines & Local Chocolatiers
Cocktail Attire
For more information,
call 805.963.6832 or buy tickets
online: www.sbrapecrisiscenter.org
TICKETS AVAILABLE
$65 in advance/$75 at the door
Private VIP reception $100
includes hors d’oeuvres and special wines
a benefit for
SBRCC
Beckmen Vineyards • Brasil Arts Café
Brewer-Clifton • Dierberg Estate Vineyard
Dogwood Cellars • The French Table • Giessinger Winery
Imagine Wine • Mama Ganache Artisan Chocolates
Oreana Winery • Palmina • Piece of Mind
Renaud's Patisserie & Bistro
Rideau Vineyard • Rincon Catering & Beach Club
Riverbench Vineyard & Winery • Santa Barbara Fudge
Shaybu Chocolates • Sojourner Café
Starlane Vineyard • Whitcraft Winery
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT!
AREA 51
VILLAGE BEAT Page 304
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 23)
to many rotating exclusive exhibi-
tions. His signature style is influenced
by nature and his love for his wife,
Eileen, who appears in many of his
paintings.
Mielko is the first of three new
regional artists chosen by Mertens
this year; the two others are Aristides
Demetrios and Robert Emmons.
“We’ve deemed these artists to be
highly skilled; their work is well
worth collecting,” Alex Mertens says.
Mertens Fine Art specializes in
American and European Modern and
Contemporary paintings, prints and
sculpture. The gallery exhibits works
by Helen Frankenthaler, Jasper Johns,
Andy Warhol, Richard Diebenkorn,
Brad Howe, Tom Wesselmann, Sam
Francis, Pablo Picasso, Marc Chagall,
Pierre Auguste Renoir, Henri Matisse
and Joan Miro, to name a few. They
also represent Contemporary Artists
Richard Schemm, Douglas Dubler,
Robert Dunahay, Wesley E. Johnson
and Henry Wessels.
Tom Mielko currently has paintings
on display at Mertens. A reception
Tom Mielko’s
“Mediterranean
Holiday” is the
first of three
paintings to be
displayed at
Mertens Fine Art
in Montecito
compiled by Kelly Mahan from information supplied by Santa Barbara County
Sheriff’s Department
SHERIFF’S
BLOTTER
Graffiti at School
Thursday, 14 March, 9:14 am – Deputy Dickey was dispatched to a school on
San Leandro Lane to investigate graffiti to school property. The school secretary
showed the deputy a bench that had been vandalized with illegible words in
black ink. As the deputy was taking pictures of the bench, a student approached
and told of two other locations on campus where graffiti was present: a table
and a sprinkler pipe. A report and pictures were taken.
Training Exercise in Montecito
The Santa Barbara Police Department Crisis Negotiation Response Team
staged a mock hostage training exercise March 20 at the Peppers Estate Day
Center and Care Home in Montecito.
A senior resident and an employee of the Peppers Day Center participated
in the training. “The interactive spectacle was better than live theater for the
seniors at the Day Center and excellent real world training for the police,” said
Peppers owner David Sullins.
The training exercise started when crisis team members were dispatched to
the Peppers Estate to deal with a senior man who had barricaded himself. The
man has onset dementia and was confused and afraid living in his new envi-
ronment. He threatened to harm himself if he was not taken home to familiar
surroundings.
A command center was set up, a cell phone connection was established and
the training was under way. Most of the crisis team was unaware of where
the event would lead as only Officer Keld Hove had mapped out the various
obstacles beforehand. The first twist was that the senior spoke only Swedish.
Peppers employee Elizabeth Sullins was recruited to translate over the com-
mand post phone consoles. Elizabeth and senior Roland Augustsson, who had
been instructed to be stubborn and non-cooperative, soon began to converse.
At least 10 phone calls were made and a record of each step was written on
large charts in fascinating detail. Roland told police he had scissors to defend
himself if officers tried to enter his locked room. He also said he was “taking
pills like crazy.”
At one point, he said he could not come out because the door was locked. The
crisis team members dealt with each new twist and many of the protocols in
their training were put to the test.
The observing seniors at the Day Center seemed both engrossed and enter-
tained by the display. Roland eventually emerged peacefully to a round of
applause.
“We were so happy to host the police for this training exercise, and no movie
show could ever match the drama, comedy and suspense in the day center today,”
David Sullins said. “But I have to say, if these strapping young officers had sim-
ply walked in, turned around and left, the ladies would have been thrilled. To see
them in action and pacing through actual training was quite a show.”
Hove and the crisis team were grateful for the opportunity to use the Peppers
Estate. The scenario was very real and the training was highly valuable, they
said. •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 29 You either love or you hate; you live in the middle, you get nothing – Charlie Sheen
EDITORIAL (Continued from page 5)
in 1982 and was defeated by a two-to-one margin. Cost estimates to build two
buried tunnels to re-direct water from the lower Sacramento River to Southern
California and the western San Joaquin Valley range from $20 billion to $69 bil-
lion, paid for entirely by water users. There is an $11.1 billion water bond for
this Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta water project scheduled for the November
2014 ballot.
Remembering the $270 million price tag for SWP that ballooned into $600
million and then into $1.76 billion when all the financing charges were added,
suggests that MWD, and the other 12 members of the Central Coast Water
Authority (CCWA) should be forewarned that they could be assuming an addi-
tional estimated debt of somewhere between $767 million and $5.12 billion for
the Central Coast’s share of the full Peripheral Tunnels Project. Montecito and
its CCWA partners need to look carefully for a less expensive emergency supply
of water in the event of a prolonged drought.
How do Montecito Water Costs
Compare to its neighbors?
In Montecito, a residential user consuming 20 HCF (14,960 gallons) per
month currently pays a water bill of $109 a month, rising to $127 a month if
a 16.3% increase is enacted on July 1. Compare that cost to a residential water
user in Orcutt who pays only $65 for the same 20 HCF of water. A residential
user in Guadalupe pays $69 per month and in Buellton $80 per month for the
same 20 HCF. Water users in Santa Maria pay $127 per month; Goleta $131;
Santa Barbara $136; and Carpinteria $176 per month – all higher than Montecito
– according to the Santa Barbara County Water Agency (SBCWA). A residential
water user in Santa Monica pays $88.04 per month for 20 HCF, while a residen-
tial user in Beverly Hills pays $117 a month.
The cost of water is not necessarily related to available rainfall. The aver-
age monthly residential water bill for Phoenix, Arizona in the Sonoran Desert,
where most residents have swimming pools, is only $34.29 per month, com-
pared to $65.47 per month in wetter Boston for the same amount of water. In
dry Las Vegas, the average residential water bill is $32.93 per month compared
to $72.95 in wetter Atlanta, which enjoys ten times the amount of annual rain-
fall, according to a 2010 Circle of Blue Water Rate Study in the 30 largest U.S.
cities.
Cost of Service
MWD will be making the case that a rate increase is needed, and that the
debate should be over how much rates should be raised and how to fairly
apportion increases over multiple classifications of users. Possible rate increase
discussions need to address at least four issues:
1) Conservation. The good news is that rate increases in 2008 were successful
in cutting water usage. From the highest water sales on record of 6,500 AF in
2007-08, water usage has steadily declined to 5,300 AF in 2011-12, a reduction of
1,200 acre feet, or 18% in four years. The bad news is that because of lower con-
sumption in 2010-11 water revenues were not sufficient to fully fund operating
costs, so $1.3 million had to be taken from MWD reserves. Last year, 2011-12, an
additional $1.1 million was taken out of reserves for the same reason.
2) Drought. The bad news is that we have had two successive years of below
average rainfall, meaning MWD has begun to purchase expensive SWP water to
service customer demand. The good news is that, if we are blessed with two years
of above average rainfall, we would refill Lake Cachuma, Lake Jameson, Doulton
Tunnel and groundwater wells, negating the need for more expensive SWP water.
3) Long-term debt. The bad news is that 39% of MWD revenues come off the
top to pay MWD’s share of the capital and operating costs of MWD’s Coastal
Connection to the STW. The good news is that the Lake Cachuma bond debt
will be paid off in 2015, and the SWP debt will be paid off in 2035.
4) Capital Repair and Replacement. The bad news is that MWD lacks cur-
rent funding to finance the annual pay-as-you-go $1.8-million cost of deferred
maintenance and capital replacement costs. Still unfunded is the replacement
of 23 miles of pre-1930 water pipes at a cost of roughly a million dollars a mile.
The Board of Directors of MWD has a difficult public relations and marketing
challenge to convince Montecito and Summerland users that a 55% increase in
the cost of their water over the next five years is the best solution for its capital
care and replacement program and a needed buildup of its reserves.
In order to adopt the Black & Veatch recommendation, the Board of MWD will
have to convince the residents of Montecito and Summerland that the same water
meters we now have at a collective cost of $3 million per year, should be billed at
$4.7 million in 2017-18. Similarly, the same number of acre feet of water we now
use, which costs residents $9 million, should cost $14 million in 2017-18.
That is a tough sell.
Stay tuned. •MJ
My Kingdom For a Recliner
Ernie’s World
by Ernie Witham
Join Ernie at the premier showings of The Bet, a funny, poignant, three-genera-
tional love story, from the Community Film Studios of Santa Barbara. Tickets are
going fast! Go to cfssb.org for info.
W
hen your computer opens
with Mozart’s Requiem
instead of its usual upbeat
symphonic tone, you know you need a
new one. When your garbage disposal
makes a sound like a cat coughing up
a hairball, you know you need a new
one. And when your car looks like the
letter V and drives sideways because it
stupidly wandered in front of a larger
vehicle in a busy intersection, well, you
definitely know you need a new one.
But what about furniture? It never
really stops working. Sure, you may
get the occasional broken spring
marks on your butt, or a cushion may
start to molt a bit, or the salsa stain
that looks like Donald Trump may be
a bit hard to look at on a daily basis,
but basically it still works, so therefore
the only way you know when you
need to replace it is...
“We need new living room furni-
ture!”
“What? It’s just getting broken in.”
“The dog won’t even sit on it any-
more. I think she’s afraid one of her
animal friends will see her.”
I looked at the dog. She was licking
her private parts. I picked her up and
placed her on the love seat. She kept
licking. “Ha!” I said.
“We need new furniture,” my wife
said again defiantly.
We locked eyes in a battle of deter-
mination. Me, the time-honored tradi-
tionalist, she, the catalyst for change.
Me, the master of frugality – not count-
ing essential electronic entertainment
items, of course, she a strong supporter
of the economic recovery. Me, the king
of my domain, she, the frail queen,
unable to resist my steely resolve.
“What about this one?” she asked
a short time later, as we traversed the
largest furniture showroom I’d ever
seen. “It’ll go beautifully with the
fireplace.”
I sat on something called the “Frieda
Firm and Functional.” “It’s like sitting
on the actual fireplace, only not as soft.”
“But it comes in exactly the choco-
late brown I have been searching for.”
“I guess if we got some of those
sport cushions they use at football
games, it might be okay.”
A smiling saleslady approached
with a burgeoning swatch book and
I left them hmm-ing and haw-ing and
wandered off in search of something
worthy of my guydom.
I sat on suede, corduroy, leather and
some materials I couldn’t even iden-
tify, in patterns designed by out-of-
work, hotel lobby suppliers. The more
I sat, the more I knew our existing
furniture was still the best...
Wait a minute! What the? I entered a
section called “Recliner Heaven.”
“You gotta try this one,” a guy said.
I climbed on and sank into bliss, but
I couldn’t get it to recline.
“Use the buttons,” another guy said.
I found the buttons on the side and
like magic a footrest slowly lifted my
tired feet. Then I pushed again and I
was slowly lowered into a prone posi-
tion instantly nodding off.
“This is what God intended when
He made furniture,” a third guy said,
waking me.
“You got that right.” I lowered myself
to the point when I could jump out to
go get my wife. I found her at the order
desk, about to sign a contract.
“Wait!” Using a combination of flail-
ing arms and spittle-producing phras-
ing, I quickly told her of my discovery
and how a recliner would be perfect,
because I often had trouble sleeping
after one of my many sports-related
accidents and ensuing surgeries.
“I know,” she said. “I bought a set
with a recliner.” She pointed it out.
“Where are the buttons?”
“It’s a manual,” the
department manager said.
“But...”
“You have to plug the electric ones
in, which means you have to run an
extension cord across the floor.”
“We could get a giant car battery.”
“Needs 120 volts.”
“We could get a gas-powered gen-
erator.”
“Might make it hard to hear the TV.”
“We could...”
“Just sit in it,” my wife suggested.
I sunk into the recliner. Ahh. I
pushed back and my feet came up.
Ahh. I kept going until I got to the
nod-off position. Ahh.
Life is all about compromise.
Besides, one of the recliner guys told
me they had humongous TVs on spe-
cial and we had to walk right by them
on the way out.
I opened my eyes and garnered my
best look of determination. •MJ
A smiling saleslady approached
with a burgeoning swatch book
and I left them hmm-ing and haw-
ing and wandered off in search of
something worthy of my guydom
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 30 • The Voice of the Village •
www.vnhcsb.org
Please join us to celebrate and
remember the life of your loved one
Remembrance Service
Ritual of the Roses & Candle Lighting
Sunday, April 7, 2013
at 3:00 pm
First Presbyterian Church
of Santa Barbara
Fellowship Hall, 21 E. Constance Ave.
For more information,
please call Karin Marhefka
at 690-6233
Children Welcome
VILLAGE BEAT (Continued from page 28)
and exhibit opening will take place
later this spring.
Mertens Fine Art is located at 1266
Coast Village Road. For more informa-
tion visit www.mertensfineart.com.
In Business:
Pressed Juicery
Los Angeles-based Pressed Juicery,
has chosen Montecito Country
Market, between Little Alex’s and the
newly re-opened Read N’ Post, as its
tenth location. Located in a space of
less than 100 square feet, the location,
similar to Pressed’s other locations, is
a satellite store with a walk-up win-
dow.
Pressed Juicery opens in Montecito County Mart; the company has nine other locations in California.
Employees Jeremy Thompson, Mike Quaranta and Holly Emerson are well versed on the health benefits
of each juice variety.
Pressed Juicery’s refrigerator is stocked with various vegetable, root, fruit, and almond juices, as well as
aloe vera, chlorophyll, and coconut waters
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 31 Informed decision-making comes from a long tradition of guessing and then blaming others for inadequate results – Scott Adams
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According to store manager Mike
Quaranta, the two-year-old juice com-
pany was born when its three found-
ers, Hayden Slater, Carly Brien, and
Hedi Gored, decided to bring the
benefits of juicing to the public. “They
were inspired by juicing at home, and
wanted to provide a convenient way
for people to get vital nutrients and
health benefits,” Quaranta told us ear-
lier this week.
The juice is made fresh each morn-
ing at a commercial kitchen in West
Los Angeles, it’s bottled and delivered
to each of the 10 locations throughout
California. Each night, the refrigera-
tors are cleared, and unopened bottles
of juice are sent back to be donated,
Quaranta said. A fresh batch is deliv-
ered the next day. The juice has a
three-day refrigerator life span, based
on the perishable and non-pasteur-
ized nature of the product, which is
cold pressed and organic whenever
possible.
The juice, waters, and other drinks,
of which there are about three dozen
varieties, are made from green vegeta-
bles, citrus, root vegetables, almonds,
herbs and other fruits. One of the most
popular options, called “Greens 2,” is
a mixture of juice from kale, spinach,
romaine, parsley, cucumber, celery,
apple, lemon and ginger. “It’s by far
one of our bestsellers, because it tastes
sweet but has a ton of nutritional
value,” Quaranta says. The company
also offers a seasonal menu, featuring
quality produce at its peak, according
to Quaranta.
Pressed Juicery also specializes in
cleansing systems, which the found-
ers say can detox and recharge the
body. They have put together dif-
ferent three- and five-day programs,
which provide eight bottles of juice,
waters, and almond milk to be drunk
throughout the day in place of solid
food. The products can be picked up
or delivered to your door each morn-
ing.
Juices, waters (aloe vera, chloro-
phyll, and coconut) and various
almond milk beverages range in price
from $3 to $8 per 16-oz. bottle. The
store is open 7:30 am to 7 pm Monday
through Friday, and 8 am to 7 pm on
the weekends.
For more information, visit www.
pressedjuicery.com, or call 845-
2093.
Alex’s Lemonade
Comes to Montecito
In an effort to join the battle against
childhood cancer, the Coppola fam-
ily of Montecito will host an Alex’s
Lemonade Stand on Saturday, March
30, from noon to 4 pm at Red Studio
on Coast Village Road. The Coppola
family became involved on the urging
of their daughter, Cesca, who wanted
to host a lemonade stand in order to
donate money to children that need
help.
Along with lemonade, the stand
will also include pink lemonade, rice
krispy treats, candy and treats and
water for four-legged friends.
Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation
(ALSF) emerged from the front yard
lemonade stand of cancer patient
Alexandra “Alex” Scott (1996-2004).
In 2000, 4-year-old Alex announced
that she wanted to hold a lemonade
stand to raise money to help find
a cure for all children with cancer.
Since Alex held that first stand, the
Foundation bearing her name has
evolved into a national fundraising
movement, complete with thousands
of supporters across the country car-
rying on her legacy of hope.
To date, Alex’s Lemonade Stand
Foundation, a registered 501(c)3 char-
ity, has raised more than $60 million
toward fulfilling Alex’s dream of find-
ing a cure, funding over 275 research
projects nationally.
For more information or to donate
to the Coppola family’s cause,
visit www.alexslemonade.org/
mypage/93343. •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 32 • The Voice of the Village •
Montecito to Vermont and back
Paintings by Elaine Malm
To view more paintings for sale: artvt.net
Our Town
by Joanne A. Calitri
Joanne is a professional international photographer and journalist. Contact her at :
jcalitri_internationalphoto@yahoo.com
Montecito Urban Farms
Celebrates Grand Opening
OUR TOWn Page 364
M
ontecito Urban Farms,
owned and operated by Alex
Thomson – a commercial
food grower located in Summerland–,
is setting a forward pace in healthy
organic farming with minimal space
by growing edible, above-the-ground
plants and herbs. The concept uses
a patented vertical food production
system by Tower Garden and Future
Growing, LLC, founded by Tim Blank.
The Tower Garden is an 8-foot-tall
aeroponic tower made from USDA-
approved, UV-stabilized, food-grade
plastic that is opaque to block damage
to the plastic from the sun. Each tower
has 20 built-in “chambers,” where
plant roots are suspended in air and
intermittently “rained” on through
the interior of the tower with a nutri-
ent-rich, mineral based solution.
Tim explains, “Aeroponics is the
process of growing plants in an air or
mist environment without the use of
soil. It is the most effective and effi-
cient way to provide plants with the
necessary nutrients, hydration, and
oxygen, producing food in a fraction
of the time that the same crops would
require when grown in traditional
soil. Most lettuces, herbs, and leafy
greens can be produced in three to five
weeks as a mature living plant with
the roots intact.” Tim started research-
ing and developing his aeroponic tow-
ers in 2005, after working at Epcot
Center in Orlando, Florida growing
100 food crops year round with the
hydroponic agriculture method. His
towers are 100% U.S. manufactured.
His company’s philosophy is to be
pro-active, supporting customers to
be successful growers and networking
them together.
This concept of sustainable growing
is said to have the following benefits:
no gardening experience is necessary;
it uses as little as 10% of traditional
growing nutrients and water; the soil-
free system means there is no weed-
ing, tilling, kneeling, or getting dirty;
it produces crops in less time than it
takes to grow in soil; and it fits easily
on urban patios, decks, porches, bal-
conies, terraces, or rooftop gardens.
Tim explained that the plants grow so
fast the usual pests do not have time
to grow on them. The towers use a
closed irrigation system of recaptured
water in a 20-gallon tank at the bottom
that is treated with minerals for the
plants. Some growers use solar power
for the tower’s irrigation system as
well.
Currently Alex has over
3,000-square-feet of space, with 150
Tower Gardens, an outdoor class-
room and 160 square-foot area where
seedlings are grown. Partnering with
local restaurants, the chefs choose the
plants they want him to grow and har-
vest. Creating a new business model
with local restaurants and homeown-
ers is just the start of Alex’s dream
to have everyone grow and control
their own food source worldwide.
“Farmers can grow the same crops in
the same amounts using a quarter of
the land they currently use, and re-
purpose the balance of their land for
other environmental uses,” says Alex.
At Alex’s grand opening celebration
on March 20, Wine Cask, Intermezzo
and Bouchon, the first restaurants to
source specialty greens and produce
from his farm, served fresh made hors
d’oeuvres using their Tower-grown
plants. These restaurant chefs talked
about how fragrant the plants are
and even the roots can be sautéed
and used in recipes. Over 50 guests
attended the event, including award
winning Chef John Rivera Sedlar
who has 35 Towers on the roof of
his Rivera and Playa Restaurants in
Los Angeles; First District Supervisor
Salud Carbajal (who exclaimed, “This
is awesome healthy environmental
innovation at its best, and it’s in our
district!”); Dr. Patricia Bragg, daugh-
ter of world renown Dr. Paul C. Bragg/
Bragg Live Foods, considered the
Father of today’s health food indus-
try; and Donna Mudge, owner of the
Sojourner Restaurant celebrating 35
years in Santa Barbara, whose new
Juice Plus Might Green Shake on the
menu is made from kale grown at the
Montecito Urban Farms.
Montecito Urban Farms is located
at 2353 Lillie Ave in Summerland. For
more information, visit www.monteci
tourbanfarms.com or call (805) 694-
8224.
El Montecito Early
School’s Suzy Dobreski
Honored
Suzy Dobreski, Director of El
Montecito Early School, was celebrat-
ed on Friday, March 22, for her 5
th
year
as Director of the school. The surprise
party held in her office was planned
by the teachers and staff. She was pre-
sented with a bound keepsake book
of quotes by past and present fami-
lies of the school and staff members.
Memorable quotes chosen to share
with our readers are:
“Miss Suzy, You were the reason,
your sweet words and your willing-
ness to let God work through you
that made us choose El Montecito
Early School for Ruby. There has not
been one moment that I did not know
100% that being with you and all the
wonderful teachers you have brought
together is exactly where Ruby is sup-
posed to be. My heart is filled with
gratitude for your love of children and
for your love of God. Thank you for
being a part of our lives.” The Neels
Family.
“To Our Dear Ms. Suzy, There are
truly no words to describe how thank-
ful we are to be part of the beautiful
and loving school you have created.
You have made these years for all
our children filled with so much love,
tenderness and care and have made it
even better for us as parents knowing
Owner of Montecito Urban Farms Alex Thomson
with Dr. Patricia Bragg in Summerland
Founder of
Future Growing
Tim Blank
with award
winning Chef
John Rivera at
the Montecito
Urban Farm’s
opening
Tim Blank demonstrates how seedlings are placed
into the growing towers at the Montecito Urban
Farm
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 33
EnTERTAInMEnT (Continued from page 26)
EnTERTAInMEnT Page 344
course it’s by a group (The Archies)
that doesn’t exist. I wrote it for three-
and four-year-old pre-school kids for
a Saturday morning TV show. The
way it got so big is just crazy. So that
jumps out.
Number three, “Be My Baby” (co-
written with Ellie Greenwich). It’s so
popular and on so many lists of the
all-time favorites, and it’s just a great
song.
So looking back is there anything you
might have changed or done differently?
The first thing that comes to mind
is I would have saved things. And I
would have taken more pictures. And
I would have saved everything that
has to do with my career. I wasn’t a
saver, but now I wish I had a lot of
those things. I get these calls asking if
I have any old lyrics handwritten on
yellow pads for a coffee table book,
but I didn’t keep any of it. You don’t
have a sense of its place at the time –
who knew I was going to turn out to
be Irving frigging Berlin to a whole
different generation? Some do have a
sense as they’re doing it, but for me it
happened so young and quick I never
did. It was just – wow!
Weird Jazz Meets Rock
The name Lake Street Dive doesn’t
quite fit a band that boasts breezy,
bright and bubbly pop-jazz full of wit
and whimsy, a fact bassist Bridget
Kearney readily admits.
“Yeah, it might be the worst name
ever,” she sighed over the phone,
before being reminded that she was
talking to someone from Santa Barbara,
home of Toad the Wet Sprocket. “OK,”
she said. “That’s worse.”
But the group’s moniker – drawn
from the bar-heavy thoroughfare in
downtown Minneapolis – made a lot
of sense when Kearney first teamed
up with vocalist Rachael Price, drum-
mer Michael Calabrese and trum-
peter Mike Olson in a freshman class
at the New England Conservatory of
Music in Boston to play avant-garde
country music in a “Loretta Lynn-
meets-Ornette Coleman style” almost
a decade ago.
“We had all been in projects that
were somewhat heady, with lots
of intellectual musical ideas,” she
recalled. “We wanted this one to be
a bar band, something fun you could
just hang out and enjoy and not have
to think about too much. A whole lot
else has changed, but we’ve really
stuck to that concept.”
The morphing took place organi-
cally, Kearney said, gleaned through
tours and countless hours working
things out. It was early on that the
members discovered their mutual
taste in music.
“We found a lot of common ground
in music that we liked to listen to.
There was no MP3 player available
in our van for our first tour, so we’d
make mystery mix CDs for the road.
We decided to just pass the computer
around and have each of us put a song
on it without listening to the others’,
and we found out we ended up with
the same song over and over again.
We all love the Beatles, Paul Simon,
Carole King. That’s when we knew
wanted to be a rock band rather than
a weird jazz band.”
Indeed, they’re both. Lake Street
Dive – which makes its Santa Barbara
debut at a Sings Like Hell series con-
cert at the Lobero on Saturday – has
become a brilliant blend of academic
approach with D.I.Y. ethos, classic
jazz with quirky pop, familiar musical
phrases with unexpected twists, and
tried-and-true subjects with unusual
angles. On top of that is Price’s almost-
like-she’s-teasing-us malleable voice
making the band incredibly infectious
even though you’d be hard-pressed
to explain exactly why. You might be,
that is, but Kearney had no problem
taking a stab at it.
“The way I approach songwriting
and coming up with arrangements is
to make something I’d enjoy listening
to,” she said. “I’ll go through songs I
love and figure out what I love about
them, and take those elements and
mutate them into something else we
can do. Separate and extract them
from the rest of the elements of the
song, so you’re not copying. That’s
the bag of tricks. Analyze what makes
it good and try your hand at using
it. Then you have weapons in your
arsenal that you can put together in
different combinations.”
That includes songs that frequently
have both the bass and trumpet way
out front in the mix, things that might
normally make the sound too pre-
cious for pop, but come off as not
only natural but utterly compelling in
LSD’s hands.
“When we started out we didn’t
have guitar at all,” explained Kearney,
who recently left her other band, the
superb Boston-based bluegrass outfit
Joy Kills Sorrow (which appeared at
Sings Like Hell in early 2012) to focus
on Lake Street. “So there was a ton
of space for the bass. And if I only
played roots, we would have been
super boring. So we needed the bass
to be interesting. Now we need it less,
but we’re in that habit.”
Meanwhile, after two early indepen-
dent CDs went nowhere, the public
has recently discovered the group via
a video of their cover of the Jackson
5’s “I Want You Back” that went viral.
That came up around the same time
as a self-titled full-length disc on
Signature Sounds that has drawn rave
reviews for its instantly memorable
melodies and deeper tonal appeal,
plus a lyrical approach that uses irony
and referential humor to address age-
old issues of heartbreak and relation-
ships. That clever off-kilter perspec-
tive shows up in titles like “My Hearts
in its Right Place” and “I Don’t Really
See You Anymore,” plus the Beatles-
baiting “Don’t Make Me Hold Your
Hand” and “Hello? Goodbye!”
“These days our main things are
Motown and the Beatles,” Kearney
said. “But the fact is that we all went
to school for jazz so we interpret the
songs that we write in an improvisa-
tional way. Even if they’re not what
you’d actually call jazz, we play them
in a jazzy way. So I guess we are still a
weird jazz band.”
Yes Man
Bobby McFerrin needs little intro-
duction. If indeed one required a
refresher course on the vocalist who
scored big with the little pop ditty
“Don’t Worry, Be Happy” in 1998 but
has done much, much more impres-
sive work in the ensuing 25 years,
you’d only have to listen to him sing
for a few minutes to remember that
Lake Street Dive makes its Santa Barbara debut at the Lobero on Saturday as part of the Sings Like Hell
series
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 34 • The Voice of the Village •
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EnTERTAInMEnT (Continued from page 33)
he treats a song like a kitten does a
ball of string, playing with it, clawing
at it, teasing it, batting it around, and
just generally having his way until
it unravels in his mercy, ready to do
anything he asks.
McFerrin, who has made sever-
al solo appearances in town over
recent years, returns on Tuesday in
advance of a new spirituals album
to play with a full band and backing
vocalists at the Granada, a venue
most worthy and acoustic haven
that’s appropriate for his vocal
skills.
He answered questions via email
from the road recently.
Q. You do a great deal of improvising.
Do you find yourself repeating certain
patterns or approaches, or is it all entirely
fresh and based on the moment every time
you perform?
A. Sometimes I think improvising is
all about saying yes. The answer to all
of your questions is yes. I try to keep
things fresh and spontaneous, even
when I’m singing lyrics and sticking
to a written melody. Of course some-
times I sing things I’ve sung before,
hopefully not just out of habit but
because I truly love the sound of those
notes and rhythms together. Life is
like that. You do some things over and
over again, but there’s always the ele-
ment of surprise.
Where do the syllables and sounds
come from? Do you feel like a vessel they
pass through, or is there more a sense of
shaping and crafting?
Again, there’s both. I do try to get
out of the way and let the music take
me where it wants to go. But I also
make some conscious decisions. I try
to avoid singing “scat” syllables that
call up a particular style or era. I try to
use sounds that have the ebb and flow
of language, even if they’re not any
language I know.

Your concerts also always seem to be
much more than a performance, like there’s
an energetic connection with the audience
that goes beyond just listening. What is
the process that allows that to happen?
I realized, very slowly over a period
of years, that I think the most impor-
tant thing I can do onstage is invite
the audience into the joy and freedom
I feel when I sing. I don’t perform.
I try to show up and sing the way I
would in my kitchen. The acoustics,
the weather, the mood of the audi-
ence, my own thoughts, whatever was
in the news that day – it’s all part of
the moment. We’re all there together,
in the moment.

Your new album, spirityouall, is obvi-
ously all about faith. I know religion is
important in your life. How does your
spirituality show up in your non-gospel
music?
My spirituality shows up in every
note I sing, in every breath. It’s a part
of me. All music is sacred music to
my ears.

You recorded the 23rd Psalm way back
in 1990, dedicated to your mother. What
prompted you to explore your father’s
spiritual/gospel legacy for a full album
now?
When I was a little kid I heard my
father sing the spirituals. I grew up
with these songs. I always thought I
might record some of them, I’ve been
thinking about it for a long time. I
couldn’t do it, though, until I could
hear my own way of singing them. Of
course I’m influenced by my father,
but I couldn’t try to sing them his way.
He already did that better than I ever
could.

Would you talk about your choice
of gospel songs you covered on the album,
as well as your own originals you wrote
for the project?
You’ve used the word “gospel” sev-
eral times in these questions, so I feel
like I should clarify that this really
isn’t a gospel album at all. Gospel
is a particular style, with its own
great tradition. This album honors
the American Negro Spiritual, songs
that so many of us grew up singing.
My originals are also expressions of
faith, and I’ve tried to pay homage to
the tradition that inspired them while
letting them find their own way. One’s
a blues, one’s kind of a hoedown.
It would make me really happy if
people sang them as they went about
their daily lives.

What are you hoping people take away
from listening to the new record?
Hope. Faith. Joy.

For this current tour, you have a five-
piece band. How does it change things
versus when you are performing solo?
It’s very different. I’m loving it.
Don’t get me wrong, I love doing solo
concerts, and I’ve done a few solo
pieces on most of the band shows so
far. But it’s great to have this beauti-
ful cocoon of sound all around me, all
these wonderful people to play with.

What do you think of the way “Don’t
Worry Be Happy” has shown up in pop
culture? For example, when it was in a
commercial for a state lottery, which was
kind of off-point of the subject?
I don’t think about it! It’s too amaz-
ing for me to even comprehend.

You turned sixty-three earlier this
month. Are you finding that your voice
is losing some of its range or flexibility, or
is it more like a fine wine, getting better
with age?
The biggest difference I notice is that
my taste has changed some. I like to
sing more softly, more gently. •MJ
Bobby McFerrin plays the Granada Theatre on
Tuesday, April 2 (photo credit: Carol Friedman)
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28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 35 I use my money to buy privacy because during most of my life I am not allowed to be normal – Johnny Depp
Scott Craig is manager of media relations at
Westmont College
Your Westmont
Celebrating Our national Champions
by Scott Craig (photos by Brad Elliott)
H
undreds of faculty, staff, stu-
dents and alumni welcomed
the NAIA National Champion
Westmont women’s basketball team as
they returned to campus by bus March
20. Warrior supporters, armed with
balloons, signs, pom-poms, newspa-
pers, flowers and noisemakers, cre-
ated an arm tunnel as the Warriors,
fresh off the college’s first national
title in basketball, waded into a sea of
adoring fans.
The crowd quickly followed the
players into Murchison Gym, where
President Gayle D. Beebe congratu-
lated the team. Beebe explained that
he had arrived at the championship
game in Kentucky minutes before
tipoff.
He interviewed Esther Lee, who
made the First NAIA National
Tournament Team, about her resil-
iency during an incredibly physical
match to make four of five three-point
shots in the championship game. Lee
recorded a tournament-high 17 three-
pointers and averaged 13.2 points per
game.
Kelsie Sampson, who scored 25
points and pulled down six rebounds
for the Warriors in the championship
game, credited the win to exceptional
teamwork and remarkable supporters.
Tugce Canitez, NAIA Player of the
Year and Championship MVP, said
their offensive focus this year was to
include Sampson and Lee more when
Canitez was being double- and triple-
teamed. She averaged 22.2 points per
game and led all tournament par-
ticipants in scoring, rebounds and free
throws.
John Moore, the head men’s basket-
ball coach, whipped the crowd into a
chant of “We are proud of you, yes,
we are proud of you.” The loudest
applause of the afternoon came when
he asked the crowd to stand and show
their appreciation for Kirsten Moore,
head basketball coach of the women’s
team, and her daughter, Alexis, who
stayed in Kentucky to visit family.
Kirsten was named NAIA Coach of
the Year.
Beebe closed the ceremony, urging
the crowd to continue to keep Kristen
and Alexis in their prayers. He said
one of Westmont’s hallmarks is sup-
porting each other and not allowing
setbacks in our lives to define us.
Instead, we forge ahead and create
a path for our lives, as Kirsten and
the team have done in winning the
national championship. •MJ
The team posed for photos after a brief ceremony in Murchison Gym
The college
celebrates its
first national
champion-
ship since
women’s soc-
cer in 2003
Kirsten Moore, who won NAIA coach of the year,
and Alexis stayed in Kentucky with family
Team cap-
tain Jillian
Wilber makes
it through
the fan tun-
nel with the
hardware
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 36 • The Voice of the Village •
how safe our children are in your care.
Your loving guidance is truly a bless-
ing to us all and we are so, so grateful
for all that you do!” Joanna and Jan
Marco von Yurt.
“Miss Suzy is special because
she lets us sing and talk so much.”
Charlee Cate, age 4.
“Miss Suzy gives the best hugs and
went to a basketball game with me
and my family.” Emil Arconian, age 5.
Suzy has a teacher’s background,
and graduated from Westmont
College with a double major in
Sociology and Social Work. She start-
ed a drop in daycare in the mid-‘90s
called “Merry Pop-ins” where she uti-
lized Montessori, Reggio Emilio and
many hands-on techniques to educate
children as young as 6 months. In
2000, Suzy became a full time pre-
school teacher at El Montecito Early
School. She moved with her family to
Pine Mountain and started “Creations
Children’s Art Studio,” a fully licensed
art school for children of all ages. She
focused on art history as well as tech-
nique of the masters.
In 2007, Suzy and her family
returned to Santa Barbara and she
subbed for preschool teachers until
being recruited in 2008 as the new
director of El Montecito Early School.
During the first 6 months she over-
saw a complete renovation of the
facility at El Montecito Presbyterian
Church. For 5 years Suzy has watched
the school grow and has overseen the
education of young hearts and minds
in a Christian environment. Suzy
says, “I find it an honor to carry on
the tradition of over fifty years of
educating children in God’s name. I
am committed to providing a high
degree of excellence in a loving and
nurturing environment. I am grateful
for the support of the whole church
staff, my elder Bob Phinney, hus-
band Mike Dobreski, and amazing
teaching staff and preschool special-
ists that help me to fulfill my passion.
Our focus is to maintain excellence,
exceed the expectations of parents,
and to be a model school for other
preschools.”
YMCA Preschool
Annual Easter
Egg Hunt
The Montecito Family YMCA
Preschoolers have been busy celebrat-
ing the arrival of spring. Preschool
Director and Room 3 teacher Annie
Fischer with assistant Miss Corina
Gonzales, Room 2 teachers Ruthy
Ambriz and Lauren Beebe, and Room
1 teachers Dominique Goodman and
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SEEn (Continued from page 17)
came to United Way in 1993 when
she and her husband, Arlen, created
a Charitable Remainder Trust ben-
efiting United Way of Santa Barbara
County. President and CEO Paul
Didier liked what he saw and she
began a part-time job to build a major
gifts society – a program she created.
During the next nine years, she
also helped Katherine Abercrombie
start and sustain the annual fun-
draiser, the Red Feather Ball. In
2003, she moved to Temecula to take
care of her father, but in 2007 she
returned, both working from home
and commuting.
Director of development and
marketing Steve Ortiz couldn’t say
enough good things about Karen.
“She changed the lives of many peo-
ple in Santa Barbara. Others chimed
in with, “ She created something
from nothing. She was very smooth,
gave the same to all people and was
persuasive. She was easy to work
with and could remember names.”
Paul Didier’s wife added, “What a
great heart you have.” Her friends
and co-workers will miss her greatly,
but she promises to come and visit.
Preserving

Precious Spaces 2013
Casa del Herrero gave a reception for
the twelve artists who will be participat-
ing in the garden art show and fund-
raiser sale on May 19 titled, “Preserving
Precious Spaces 2013.” As executive
director Molly Barker said to them,
“You’ll be free to come and go if you
wish to paint the Casa and its gardens.”
Event co-chairs Carolyn Williams
and Jane Dailey were greet-
ing and introducing all the artists:
Meredith Brooks Abbott, Whitney
Brooks Abbott, Marcia Burtt, Chris
Chapman, Nancy Davidson, Dr.
James Dow, Rick Garcia, Ray Hunter,
Ann Sanders, Richard Schloss, Frank
Serrano and Ralph Waterhouse.
The volunteer caterers were Mary
Coslett and Sue Kenderian, who
even made four kinds of biscotti from
scratch! The co-chairs’ husbands John
Dailey and Bob Williams were lend-
ing a hand with pouring wine.
Tickets are limited to 150 people and
there’ll be libations, canapés and a band
while you stroll the gardens of this 1920s
estate. Call 565-5653 for information. •MJ
Co-chairs of the
upcoming art show
at Casa del Herrero
Carolyn Williams and
Jane Dailey, with art-
ist Rick Garcia at the
artists’ reception
Celebrating Suzy
Dobreski’s 5
th
year
as El Montecito Early
School Director are:
(front row) Mike
Dobreski, Suzy
Dobreski, and Meika
McCrindle. Back
row: Markus Kirsch,
Caitlyn Patton, Linda
James, Shannon
Zamora, Jenny
Slorah, Rebecca
Miller, and Nancy
Boger.
Suzy with preschool
students Natalie
Myers Johansing, Eve
Steiner, Evie Comis
and Brandon Fuladi
imitating the Easter
Bunny
YMCA preschooler Mia Trikfovic with mom Jovana
at the annual Easter Egg Hunt
OUR TOWn (Continued from page 32)
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 37
Julie Henley planned activities that
culminated in an Easter Egg Hunt
and celebration for Friday, March 22,
as the school is closed for the week
before Easter.
The focus for the spring session is
“New Life.” The children discover
new life all around them through art,
music, stories, gardening, and spring
weather, animals, insects, rabbits and
farm animals.
For the Easter Egg Hunt and party,
the kids learned about where eggs
come from and how to color hard-
boiled eggs. They wrote letters to
Peter Rabbit giving him advice on
visiting Mr. McGregor’s garden, and
they made their baskets and bunny
ears for the hunt out of recycled
materials. For the hunt, special plas-
tic eggs had surprise gifts inside,
and the kids helped each other find
the eggs so they all shared the same
amount.
The Y wishes our readers a Happy
Easter and Happy Spring! •MJ
Nobody gets justice; people only get good luck or bad luck – Orson Welles
Diana Paradise
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Room 3 kids
with teacher
Annie Fischer
and assistant
Miss Corina
Gonzales
YMCA Room 3 kids
take off on the annu-
al Easter Egg Hunt
YMCA preschool Room 1 with teacher Dominique Goodman ready to hunt for Easter eggs
Room 2
preschoolers
with their
teacher
Ruthy
Ambriz and
live Easter
Bunny
named
Buddy
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 38 • The Voice of the Village •
PUBLIC NOTICES
PART A – LEGAL AND PROCEDURAL DOCUMENTS

SECTION A1 – NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS

This is a federally-assisted project and Davis-Bacon (DBRA) requirements will be strictly enforced. Federal Labor Standards provisions HUD-4010 will be incorporated into the successful bidderʼs contract. Contractors,
including all subcontractors and apprectices, must be eligible to participate. Contractors, including all subcontractors and apprentices, must be eligible to participate. Federal Wage Determination #CA120023 is incorporated
herein.

This project is subject to Section 3 Economic Opportunities to Low and Very-Low Income Persons and Business Concerns of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968. Bidders seeking Section 3 preference as
defined in the specifications must submit a Certification for Business Concerns Seeking Section 3 Preference in Contracting and Demonstration of Capability form and required documentation.

Sealed proposals for Bid No. 3575 for the LOWER SYCAMORE CREEK CHANNEL WIDENING AND PUNTA GORDA STREET BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT will be received in the Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega
Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101, until 3:00 p.m., Thursday, May 2, 2013, to be publicly opened and read at that time. Any bidder who wishes its bid proposal to be considered is responsible for making certain that its
bid proposal is actually delivered to said Purchasing Office. Bids shall be addressed to the General Services Manager, Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, and shall be labeled, “LOWER
SYCAMORE CREEK CHANNEL WIDENING AND PUNTA GORDA STREET BRIDGE REPLACEMENT PROJECT, Bid No. 3575.”

The work includes all labor, material, supervision, plant and equipment necessary to complete the following: Constructing earthen channel and other drainage facilities, removing and replacing concrete bridge and roadway
approaches, relocating water and sewer facilities, planting landscape materials, installing irrigation systems, and other incidental and appurtenant work necessary for the proper construction of the contemplated
improvement, as indicated on the project plans. The estimated cost of work is $1,441,000. The estimated cost will be used as the basis for the comparison of bids. Each bidder must have a Class A- General Engineering
Contractor license to complete this work in accordance with the California Business and Professions Code.

The plans and specifications for this Project are available electronically at http://tinyurl.com/CityofSantaBarbara-eBidBoard. Plan and specification sets can be obtained from CyberCopy (located at 504 N Milpas St, cross
street Haley) by contacting Alex Gaytan, CyberCopy Shop Manager, at (805) 884-6155. The Cityʼs contact for this project is John L. Ilasin, Project Engineer, 805-564-5383.

In order to be placed on the plan holderʼs list, the Contractor can register as a document holder for this Project on Ebidboard. Project Addendum notifications will be issued through Ebidboard.com. Although Ebidboard will
fax and/or email all notifications once they are provided contact information, bidders are still responsible for obtaining all addenda from the Ebidboard website or the Cityʼs website at:
http://www.santabarbaraca.gov/Business/Purchasing/Projects/.

There will be a mandatory Pre-Bid Conference scheduled for Thursday, April 11, 2013, from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the David Gebhard Public Meeting Room located at 630 Garden Street, Santa Barbara, California. The
mandatory Pre-Bid Conference will ONLY provide information on the requirements of Section 3 Economic Opportunities to Low and Very-Low Income Persons and Business Concerns of the Housing and Urban
Development Act of 196. All other bidder inquiries about the project can be submitted on Ebidboard.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general prevailing rate of wages as determined by the
Director of the Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to apprentice public works
contracts.

Pursuant to Section 1773 of the Labor Code, the general prevailing wage rates in the county in which the work is to be done have been determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations. These
wages are set forth in the General Prevailing Wage Rates for this Project, available at the City of Santa Barbara, General Services Manager, Purchasing Office, 310 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, and available
from the California Department of Industrial Relationsʼ Internet web site at http://www.dir.ca.gov/DLSR/PWD. The Federal minimum wage rates for this Project as predetermined by the United States Secretary of Labor are
set forth in the specifications and in copies of these specifications that may be examined at the offices described above where project plans, special provisions, and bid forms may be seen. Addenda to modify the Federal
minimum wage rates, if necessary, will be issued to holders of these specifications. Future effective general prevailing wage rates, which have been predetermined and are on file with the California Department of Industrial
Relations are referenced but not printed in the general prevailing wage rates.

Attention is directed to the Federal minimum wage rate requirements in the specifications. If there is a difference between the minimum wage rates predetermined by the Secretary of Labor and the general prevailing wage
rates determined by the Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations for similar classifications of labor, the Contractor and subcontractors shall pay not less than the higher wage rate. The City of Santa
Barbara will not accept lower State wage rates not specifically included in the Federal minimum wage determinations. This includes "helper" (or other classifications based on hours of experience) or any other classification
not appearing in the Federal wage determinations. Where Federal wage determinations do not contain the State wage rate determination otherwise available for use by the Contractor and subcontractors, the Contractor
and subcontractors shall pay not less than the Federal minimum wage rate, which most closely approximates the duties of the employees in question.

Bidders are hereby notified that the Contractor shall comply with provisions of the Copeland “Anti-Kickback” Act (18 U.S.C. 874) as supplemented by U.S. Department of Labor regulations.

Bidders are hereby notified that the Contractor shall comply with provisions of Sections 103 and 107 of the Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act (40 U.S.C. 327-330), as amended, and as supplemented by U.S.
Department of Labor regulations.

Per California Civil Code Section 3247, a payment bond in the amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided within 10 calendar days
from notice of award and prior to the performance of any work.

Section 1352, Title 31, United States Code prohibits Federal funds from being expended by the recipient or any lower-tier sub-recipient of a Federal-aid contract to pay for any person for influencing or attempting to influence
a Federal agency or Congress in connection with the awarding of any Federal-aid contract, the making of any Federal grant or loan, or the entering into of any cooperative agreement.

If any funds other than Federal funds have been paid for the same purposes in connection with this Federal-aid contract, the recipient shall submit an executed certification and, if required, submit a completed disclosure
form as part of the bid documents.

A certification for Federal-aid contracts regarding payment of funds to lobby Congress or a Federal agency is included in the contract documents. Standard Form - LLL, “Disclosure of Lobbying Activities,” with instructions for
completion of the Standard Form is also included in the contract documents. Signing the proposal shall constitute signature of the Certification.

The above referenced certification and disclosure of lobbying activities shall be included in each subcontract and any lower-tier contracts exceeding $100,000. All disclosure forms, but not certifications, shall be forwarded
from tier to tier until received by the Engineer.

The Contractor, subcontractors and any lower-tier contractors shall file a disclosure form at the end of each calendar quarter in which there occurs any event that requires disclosure or that materially affects the accuracy of
the information contained in any disclosure form previously filed by the Contractor, subcontractors and any lower-tier contractors. An event that materially affects the accuracy of the information reported includes:

(1) A cumulative increase if $25,000 or more in the amount paid or expected to be paid for influencing or attempting to influence a covered federal action; or

(2) A change in the person(s) or individual(s) influencing or attempting to influence a covered federal action;

(3) A change in the officer(s), employees(s), or member(s) contacted to influence or attempt to influence a covered Federal Action.

The proposal shall be accompanied by a proposal guaranty bond in the sum of at least 5% of the total amount of the proposal, or alternatively by a certified or cashierʼs check payable to the City in the sum of at least 5% of
the total amount of the proposal.

A separate performance bond in the amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful bidder. The bond must be provided within 10 calendar days from the notice to award and prior to the performance of
any work.

The City of Santa Barbara hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively ensure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids
in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, creed, color, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, political affiliations or beliefs, sex, age, physical disability, medical
condition, marital status or pregnancy as set forth hereunder.

GENERAL SERVICES MANAGER
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA


William Hornung, C.P.M.
PUBLISHED March 27 and April 3, 2013
Montecito Journal (Rev. 5/18/11)


28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 39 The American foreign policy trauma of the ‘sixties and ‘seventies was caused by applying valid principles to unsuitable conditions – Henry Kissinger
Bella Vista $$$
1260 Channel Drive (565-8237)
Cafe Del Sol $$
30 Los Patos Way (969-0448)
CAVA $$
1212 Coast Village Road (969-8500)
Regional Mexican and Spanish cooking
combine to create Latin cuisine from tapas and
margaritas, mojitos, seafood paella and sangria
to lobster tamales, Churrasco ribeye steak and
seared Ahi tuna. Sunfower-colored interior
is accented by live Spanish guitarist playing
next to cozy beehive freplace nightly. Lively
year-round outdoor people-wat ching front
patio. Open Monday-Friday 11 am to 10 pm.
Saturday and Sunday 10 am to 10 pm.
China Palace $$
1070 Coast Village Road (565-9380)
Giovanni’s $
1187 Coast Village Road (969-1277)
Los Arroyos $
1280 Coast Village Road (969-9059)
Little Alex’s $
1024 A-Coast Village Road (969-2297)
Lucky’s (brunch) $$ (dinner) $$$
1279 Coast Village Road (565-7540)
Comfortable, old-fashioned urban steak-
house in the heart of America’s biggest little
village. Steaks, chops, seafood, cocktails,
and an enormous wine list are featured, with
white tablecloths, fne crystal and vintage
photos from the 20th century. The bar
(separate from dining room) features large
fat-screen TV and opens at 4 pm during the
week. Open nightly from 5 pm to 10 pm;
Saturday & Sunday brunch from 9 am to
3 pm. Valet Parking.
Montecito Café $$
1295 Coast Village Road (969-3392)
Montecito Coffee Shop $
1498 East Valley Road (969-6250)
Montecito Wine Bistro $$$
516 San Ysidro Road 969-7520
Head to Montecito’s upper village to indulge in
some California bistro cuisine. Chef Nathan Heil
creates seasonal menus that include fsh and
vegetarian dishes, and fresh fatbreads straight
out of the wood-burning oven. The Bistro of-
fers local wines, classic and specialty cocktails,
single malt scotches and aged cognacs.
Pane é Vino $$$
1482 East Valley Road (969-9274)
Plow & Angel $$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Enjoy a comfortable atmosphere as you dine
on traditional dishes such as mac ‘n cheese
and ribs. The ambiance is enhanced with
original artwork, including stained glass
windows and an homage to its namesake,
Saint Isadore, hanging above the fre-
place. Dinner is served from 5 to 10 pm
daily with bar service extending until 11 pm
weekdays and until midnight on Friday and
Saturday.
$ (average per person under $15)
$$ (average per person $15 to $30)
$$$ (average per person $30 to $45)
$$$$ (average per person $45-plus)
MONTECI TO EATERI ES . . . A Gu i d e
Sakana Japanese Restaurant $$
1046 Coast Village Road (565-2014)
Stella Mare’s $$/$$$
50 Los Patos Way (969-6705)
Stonehouse $$$$
San Ysidro Ranch
900 San Ysidro Lane (565-1700)
Located in what is a 19th-century citrus
packinghouse, Stonehouse restaurant features
a lounge with full bar service and separate
dining room with crackling freplace and
creekside views. Chef Matthew Johnson’s
regional cuisine is prepared with a palate of
herbs and vegetables harvested from the on-site
chef’s garden. Recently voted 1 of the best 50
restaurants in America by OpenTable Diner’s
Choice. 2010 Diners’ Choice Awards: 1 of 50
Most Romantic Restaurants in America, 1 of
50 Restaurants With Best Service in America.
Open for dinner from 6 to 10 pm daily.
Sunday Brunch 10 am to 2 pm.
Trattoria Mollie $$$
1250 Coast Village Road (565-9381)
Tre Lune $$/$$$
1151 Coast Village Road (969-2646)
A real Italian boite, complete with small but
fully licensed bar, big list of Italian wines, large
comfortable tables and chairs, lots of mahogany
and large b&w vintage photos of mostly fa-
mous Italians. Menu features both comfort food
like mama used to make and more adventurous
Italian fare. Now open continuously from lunch
to dinner. Also open from 7:30 am to 11:30 am
daily for breakfast.
Via Vai Trattoria Pizzeria $$
1483 East Valley Road (565-9393)
Delis, bakeries, juice bars
Blenders in the Grass
1046 Coast Village Road (969-0611)
Here’s The Scoop
1187 Coast Village Road (lower level)
(969-7020)
Gelato and Sorbet are made on the premises.
Open Monday through Thursday 1 pm to 9 pm,
12 pm to 10 pm Friday and Saturday, and
12 pm to 9 pm on Sundays.
Jeannine’s
1253 Coast Village Road (969-7878)
Montecito Deli
1150 Coast Village Road (969-3717)
Open six days a week from 7 am to 3 pm.
(Closed Sunday) This eatery serves home-
made soups, fresh salads, sandwiches, and its
specialty, The Piadina, a homemade fat bread
made daily.
Panino
1014 #C Coast Village Road (565-0137)
Pierre Lafond
516 San Ysidro Road (565-1502)
This market and deli is a center of activity
in Montecito’s Upper Village, serving fresh
baked pastries, regular and espresso cofee
drinks, smoothies, burritos, homemade
soups, deli salads, made-to-order sandwiches
and wraps available, and boasting a fully
stocked salad bar. Its sunny patio draws
crowds of regulars daily. The shop also
carries specialty drinks, gift items, grocery
staples, and produce. Open everyday 5:30 am
to 8 pm.
Village Cheese & Wine
1485 East Valley Road (969-3815)

In Summerland / Carpinteria
Cantwell’s Summerland Market $
2580 Lillie Avenue (969-5893)
Garden Market $
3811 Santa Claus Lane (745-5505)
Jack’s Bistro $
5050 Carpinteria Avenue (566-1558)
Serving light California Cuisine, Jack’s ofers
freshly baked bagels with whipped cream
cheeses, omelettes, scrambles, breakfast bur-
ritos, specialty sandwiches, wraps, burgers, sal-
ads, pastas and more. Jacks ofers an extensive
espresso and cofee bar menu, along with wine
and beer. They also ofer full service catering,
and can accommodate wedding receptions to
corporate events. Open Monday through Fri-
day 6:30 am to 3 pm, Saturday and Sunday
7 am to 3 pm.
Nugget $$
2318 Lillie Avenue (969-6135)
Padaro Beach Grill $
3765 Santa Claus Lane (566-9800)
A beach house feel gives this seaside eatery its
charm and makes it a perfect place to bring the
whole family. Its new owners added a pond,
waterfall, an elevated patio with freplace and
couches to boot. Enjoy grill options, along with
salads and seafood plates. The Grill is open
Monday through Sunday 11 am to 9 pm
Sly’s $$$
686 Linden Avenue (684-6666)
Sly’s features fresh fsh, farmers’ market veg-
gies, traditional pastas, prime steaks, Blue Plate
Specials and vintage desserts. You’ll fnd a full
bar, serving special martinis and an extensive
wine list featuring California and French wines.
Cocktails from 4 pm to close, dinner from 5 to 9
pm Sunday-Thursday and 5 to 10 pm Friday and
Saturday. Lunch is M-F 11:30 to 2:30, and brunch
is served on the weekends from 9 am to 3 pm.
Stacky’s Seaside $
2315 Lillie Avenue (969-9908)
Summerland Beach Café $
2294 Lillie Avenue (969-1019)
Tinkers $
2275 C Ortega Hill Road (969-1970)
Santa Barbara / Restaurant Row
Bistro Eleven Eleven $$
1111 East Cabrillo Boulevard (730-1111)
Located adjacent to Hotel Mar Monte, the
bistro serves breakfast and lunch featuring
all-American favorites. Dinner is a mix of tradi-
tional favorites and coastal cuisine. The lounge
advancement to the restaurant features a big
screen TV for daily sporting events and happy
hour. Open Monday-Friday 6:30 am to 9 pm,
Saturday and Sunday 6:30 am to 10 pm.
Cielito $$$
1114 State Street (225-4488)
Cielito Restaurant features true favors of Mexi-
co created by Chef Ramon Velazquez. Try an an-
tojito (or “small craving”) like the Anticucho de
Filete (Serrano-chimichurri marinated Kobe beef
skewer, rocoto-tomato jam and herb mashed po-
tatoes), the Raw Bar’s piquant ceviches and fresh
shellfsh, or taste the savory treats in handmade
tortillas at the Taqueria. It is located in the heart
of downtown, in the historic La Arcada.
Chuck’s Waterfront Grill $$
113 Harbor Way (564-1200)
Located next to the Maritime Museum, enjoy
some of the best views of both the mountains
and the Santa Barbara pier sitting on the newly
renovated, award-winning patio, while enjoy-
ing fresh seafood straight of the boat. Dinner is
served nightly from 5 pm, and brunch is ofered
on Sunday from 10 am until 1 pm. Reservations
are recommended.
Enterprise Fish Co. $$
225 State Street (962-3313)
Every Monday and Tuesday the Enterprise Fish
Company ofers two-pound Maine Lobsters
served with clam chowder or salad, and rice or
potatoes for only $29.95. Happy hour is every
weekday from 4 pm to 7 pm. Open Sunday
thru Thursday 11:30 am to 10 pm and Friday
thru Saturday 11:30 am to 11 pm.
Los Agaves $
600 N. Milpas Street (564-2626)
Los Agaves ofers eclectic Mexican cuisine, using
only the freshest ingredients, in a casual and
friendly atmosphere. Serving lunch and dinner,
with breakfast on the weekends, Los Agaves fea-
tures traditional dishes from central and south-
ern Mexico such as shrimp & fsh enchiladas,
shrimp chile rellenos, and famous homemade
mole poblano. Open Monday- Friday 11 am to
9 pm, Saturday & Sunday 9 am to 9 pm.
Miró $$$$
8301 Hollister Avenue at Bacara Resort & Spa
(968-0100)
Miró is a refned refuge with stunning views,
featuring two genuine Miro sculptures, a
top-rated chef ofering a sophisticated menu
that accents fresh, organic, and native-grown
ingredients, and a world-class wine cellar. Open
Tuesday through Saturday from 6 pm to 10 pm.
Olio e Limone Ristorante $$$
Olio Pizzeria $
17 West Victoria Street (899-2699)
Elaine and Alberto Morello oversee this
friendly, casually elegant, linen-tabletop eatery
featuring Italian food of the highest order. Of-
ferings include eggplant soufé, pappardelle
with quail, sausage and mushroom ragù, and
fresh-imported Dover sole. Wine Spectator
Award of Excellence-winning wine list. Private
dining (up to 40 guests) and catering are also
available. It is open for lunch Monday thru
Saturday (11:30 am to 2 pm) and dinner seven
nights a week (from 5 pm).
Next door at Olio Pizzeria, the Morellos
have added a simple pizza-salumi-wine-bar
inspired by neighborhood “pizzerie” and
“enoteche” in Italy. Private dining for up to
32 guests. The Pizzeria is open daily from
11:30 am to close.
Pierre Lafond Wine Bistro $
516 State Street (962-1455)
The Wine Bistro menu is seasonal California
cuisine specializing in local products. Pair your
meal with wine from the Santa Barbara Winery,
Lafond Winery or one from the list of wines
from around the world. Happy Hour Monday
- Friday 4:30 to 6:30 pm. The 1st Wednesday of
each month is Passport to the World of Wine.
Grilled cheese night every Thursday. Open for
breakfast, lunch and dinner; catering available.
www.pierrelafond.com
Rodney’s Steakhouse $$$
633 East Cabrillo Boulevard (884-8554)
Deep in the heart of well, deep in the heart of
Fess Parker’s Doubletree Inn on East Beach in
Santa Barbara. This handsome eatery sells and
serves only Prime Grade beef, lamb, veal, hali-
but, salmon, lobster and other high-end victuals.
Full bar, plenty of California wines, elegant
surroundings, across from the ocean. Open for
dinner Tuesday through Saturday at 5:30 pm.
Reservations suggested on weekends. •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 40 • The Voice of the Village •
PUBLIC NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE
City of Santa Barbara

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of
Santa Barbara will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, April
9, 2013, during the afternoon session of the meeting which
begins at 2:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber, City Hall, 735
Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara. The hearing is to consider the
recommendations from the Historic Landmarks Commission
that the Veterans Memorial Building at 112 W. Cabrillo
Boulevard (APN 033-101-013), and the Stark House at 1709
Overlook Lane (APN 015-192-016), be designated as City
landmarks.

You are invited to attend this hearing and address your verbal
comments to the City Council. Written comments are also
welcome up to the time of the hearing, and should be
addressed to the City Council via the City Clerkʼs Office, P.O.
Box 1990, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-1990.

On Thursday, April 4, 2013, an Agenda with all items to be
heard on Tuesday, April 9, 2013, will be available at 735
Anacapa Street and at the Central Library. Agendas and Staff
Reports are also accessible online at www.santabarbaraca.gov;
under Quick Links, click on Current Council Agenda & Packet.
Regular meetings of the Council are broadcast live and
rebroadcast on Wednesdays and Thursdays at 7:00 p.m. and
on Saturday at 9:00 a.m. on City TV Channel 18. These
meetings can also be viewed over the Internet at
www.santabarbaraca.gov: Click on the Government tab, click
City Council Meeting Videos (under Quick Links), and then click
on the Video link for the meeting date.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you
need special assistance to gain access to, comment at, or
participate in this meeting, please contact the City
Administrator's Office at 564-5305 or inquire at the City Clerk's
Office on the day of the meeting. If possible, notification at
least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make
reasonable arrangements in most cases.

(SEAL)



_______________________
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager
March 27, 2013


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 3692

DUE DATE & TIME: April 11, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Airport Building 247 Demolition

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on April 2,
2013 at 9:00 a.m., at the Airport Administration Office,
located at 601 Firestone Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93117, to
discuss the specifications and field conditions. Bid
Documents are available at the Purchasing Office and at
the pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California A Contractors License. The
company bidding on this must possess the above mentioned
license at the time bids are due and be otherwise deemed
qualified to perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted
using the license name and number of a subcontractor or other
person who is not a principle partner or owner of the company
making this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Bid Guaranty Bond in the
form of a money order or a cashierʼs certified check, payable to
the order of the City, amounting to ten percent (10%) of the bid,
or by a bond in said amount and payable to said City, signed by
the bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue
bonds in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.

____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: March 27, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5220

DUE DATE & TIME: April 11, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Annual Buoy Installation & Removal


Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that any service purchase order
issued as a result of this bid may be subject to the provisions
and regulations of the City of Santa Barbara Ordinance No.
5384, Santa Barbara Municipal Code, Chapter 9.128 and its
impending regulations relating to the payment of Living Wages.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.



____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: March 27, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Global Digital Protection, 4612
Via Roblada, Santa Barbara, CA
93110. MPH Development, Inc,
4612 Via Roblada, Santa Barbara,
CA 93110. This statement was
fled with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on February 26,
2013. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in
the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Catherine Daly. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000649. Published
March 27, April 3, 10, 17, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Rao Properties, 4235 Cresta Ave,
Santa Barbara, CA 93110. Joseph
S Rao, 4235 Cresta Ave, Santa
Barbara, CA 93110. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on March
5, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Catherine Daly. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000740. Published
March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Barbie Locks, 701 Rimes Ct.,
Santa Maria, CA 93454. Divya
Bhatia, 701 Rimes Ct., Santa
Maria, CA 93454. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on February
19, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Eva Chavez. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000561. Published
March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Golf Greens Fore
U of The Tri-Counties; Golf
Greens of California, 285
Chateaux Elise #G, Santa Barbara,
CA 93109. George W Umholtz,
285 Chateaux Elise #G, Santa
Barbara, CA 93109. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on February
19, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by
Hector Gonzalez. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000550. Published
March 20, 27, April 3, 10, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: Casabella Property
Enhancement; Tuscan Sun;
Chateau Bow Wow; Fi-Dough,
1187 Coast Village Road #617,
Santa Barbara, CA 93108. Shari
Mequet, 617 Sierra Street, Santa
Barbara, CA 93103. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on February
12, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by
Hector Gonzalez. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000472. Published
March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business
as: 1912 Picture Company, 40
Willow Springs Lane #101, Goleta,
CA 93117. Christina Lauranne
Eliason, 40 Willow Springs Lane
#101, Goleta, CA 93117. This
statement was fled with the County
Clerk of Santa Barbara County
on March 6, 2013. This statement
expires fve years from the date
it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that
this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Catherine Daly. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000750. Published
March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Flex Fitness Coaching; Peak
Construction Management &
Inspection, 250-B West Mountain
Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.
L & M Success Company, LLC,
250-B West Mountain Drive, Santa
Barbara, CA 93103. This statement
was fled with the County Clerk of
Santa Barbara County on March
6, 2013. This statement expires
fve years from the date it was fled
in the Offce of the County Clerk. I
hereby certify that this is a correct
copy of the original statement
on fle in my offce. Joseph E.
Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Melissa Mercer. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000743. Published
March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The
following person(s) is/are doing
business as: SDY Jewellery, PO
Box 311, Summerland, CA 93067.
Sara Dapra-Young, 2176 Ortega
Hill Rd, Summerland, CA 93067.
Jack R Young, 2176 Ortega Hill
Rd, Summerland, CA 93067. This
statement was fled with the County
Clerk of Santa Barbara County on
February 26, 2013. This statement
expires fve years from the date
it was fled in the Offce of the
County Clerk. I hereby certify that
this is a correct copy of the original
statement on fle in my offce. Joseph
E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)
by Joshua Madison. Original FBN
No. 2013-0000640. Published
March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013.
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS
NAME STATEMENT: The following
person(s) is/are doing business as:
Bracknell Capital, 3230 Serena
Ave, Carpinteria, CA 93013. Green
Estates and Realty, INC, 1505
E Valley Road, Santa Barbara, CA
93108. This statement was fled
with the County Clerk of Santa
Barbara County on February 26,
2013. This statement expires fve
years from the date it was fled in the
Offce of the County Clerk. I hereby
certify that this is a correct copy of
the original statement on fle in my
offce. Joseph E. Holland, County
Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Armstrong.
Original FBN No. 2013-0000642.
Published March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013.
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1415781. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Brier Ghen fled a
petition with Superior Court of
California, County of Santa Barbara,
for a decree changing name to
Brier Summer, and name of child
from Natasha Monique Ghen
to Natasha Monique Summer.
The Court orders that all persons
interested in this matter appear
before this court at the hearing
indicated below to show cause,
if any, why the petition for change
of name should not be granted.
Any person objecting to the name
changes described about must fle
a written objection that included
the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the
matter is scheduled to be heard
and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition
should not be granted. If no written
objection is timely fled, the court
may grant the petition without
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 41 The only gossip I’m interested in is things from the Weekly World News: “Woman’s bra bursts, eleven injured,” that kind of thing – Johnny Depp
PUBLIC NOTICES

ORDINANCE NO. 5610

AN ORDINANCE OF THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF
SANTA BARBARA APPROVING A TWENTY-YEAR LEASE
AGREEMENT WITH THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF
TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION
ADMINISTRATION, WITH NO MONETARY
CONSIDERATION, FOR APPROXIMATELY 2.5 ACRES OF
LAND AT 10 EDWARD BURNS PLACE, AT THE SANTA
BARBARA MUNICIPAL AIRPORT, EFFECTIVE OCTOBER 1,
2013

The above captioned ordinance was adopted at a regular

meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council held on

March 19, 2013.

The publication of this ordinance is made pursuant to the

provisions of Section 512 of the Santa Barbara City Charter as

amended, and the original ordinance in its entirety may be

obtained at the City Clerk's Office, City Hall, Santa Barbara,

California.




(Seal)



/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager

ORDINANCE NO. 5610


STATE OF CALIFORNIA )
)
COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA ) ss.
)
CITY OF SANTA BARBARA )

I HEREBY CERTIFY that the foregoing ordinance

was introduced on March 12, 2013, and was adopted by the

Council of the City of Santa Barbara at a meeting held on

March 19, 2013, by the following roll call vote:

AYES: Councilmembers Dale Francisco, Frank
Hotchkiss, Grant House, Cathy Murillo,
Randy Rowse, Bendy White; Mayor
Helene Schneider

NOES: None

ABSENT: None

ABSTENTIONS: None


IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereto set my

hand and affixed the official seal of the City of Santa Barbara on

March 20, 2013.


/s/
Gwen Peirce, CMC
City Clerk Services Manager

I HEREBY APPROVE the foregoing ordinance on

March 20, 2013.


/s/
Helene Schneider
Mayor


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5219

DUE DATE & TIME: April 16, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

Automatic Door Maintenance at Airport

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on April 4,
2013 at 9:00 a.m., at the Airport Maintenance Conference
Room, 1699 Firestone Road., Santa Barbara, CA, to
discuss the specifications and field conditions. Bid
Documents are available at the Purchasing Office and at
the pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California C61 - Limited Specialty
Classification with a D28 - Doors, Gates and Activating
Devices Contractor subcategory License. The company
bidding on this must possess one of the above mentioned
licenses and be otherwise deemed qualified to perform the work
specified herein. Bids submitted using the license name and
number of a subcontractor or other person who is not a
principle partner or owner of the company making this bid, will
be rejected as being non-responsive.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Bid Guaranty Bond in the
form of a money order or a cashierʼs certified check, payable to
the order of the City, amounting to ten percent (10%) of the bid,
or by a bond in said amount and payable to said City, signed by
the bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue
bonds in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.



____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: March 27, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal


CITY OF SANTA BARBARA
NOTICE TO BIDDERS


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sealed bids will be received
by the City of Santa Barbara Purchasing Office located at 310
E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, California, until 3:00 p.m. on
the date indicated at which time they will be publicly opened,
read and posted for:

BID NO. 5218

DUE DATE & TIME: April 16, 2013 UNTIL 3:00P.M.

TREE TRIMMING AND REMOVAL AT VARIOUS CITY
PARKS

A MANDATORY pre-bid meeting will be held on April 3,
2013 at 9:00 a.m. in the Parks Conference Room, located at
402 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara, CA, to discuss the
specifications and field conditions. Maps will be provided
only at pre-bid meeting.

Bids must be submitted on forms supplied by the City of Santa
Barbara and in accordance with the specifications, terms and
conditions contained therein. Bid packages containing all
forms, specifications, terms and conditions may be obtained in
person at the Purchasing Office or by calling (805) 564-5349, or
by Facsimile request to (805) 897-1977. There is no charge for
bid package and specifications.

Bidders are hereby notified that any service purchase order
issued as a result of this bid may be subject to the provisions
and regulations of the City of Santa Barbara Ordinance No.
5384, Santa Barbara Municipal Code, Chapter 9.128 and its
impending regulations relating to the payment of Living Wages.

Bidders are hereby notified that pursuant to provisions of
Section 1770, et seq., of the Labor Code of the State of
California, the Contractor shall pay its employees the general
prevailing rate of wages as determined by the Director of
Department of Industrial Relations. In addition, the Contractor
shall be responsible for compliance with the requirements of
Section 1777.5 of the California Labor Code relating to
apprentice public works contracts.

If there is a difference between the prevailing wage and
living wage rates, bidder shall pay not less than the higher
wage rate.

The City of Santa Barbara requires all contractors to possess a
current valid State of California C-61 Limited Specialty License
with a D-49 Tree Service or a C-27 Landscaping Contractors
License. The company bidding on this must possess the
above-mentioned licenses and be otherwise deemed to be
qualified to perform the work specified herein. Bids submitted
using the license name and number of a subcontractor or other
person who is not a principle partner or owner of the company
making this bid, will be rejected as being non-responsive.

The City of Santa Barbara requires that all pruning and tree
work shall conform to ISA and ANSI pruning standards and
performed by or under the immediate supervision of an ISA
Certified Arborist. This Arborist shall be on site at all times. A
list of Certified Arborists/Certified Tree worker by name and ISA
Certification number shall be supplied at the time of bid
submittal.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Payment Bond in the amount
of 100% of the bid total will be required from the successful
bidder for bids exceeding $25,000. The bond must be provided
with ten (10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to
the performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

Bidders are hereby notified that a Performance Bond in the
amount of 100% of the bid total will be required from the
successful bidder for bids. The bond must be provided with ten
(10) calendar days from notice of award and prior to the
performance of any work. The bond must be signed by the
bidder and a corporate surety, who is authorized to issue bonds
in the State of California.

The City of Santa Barbara affirmatively assures that minority
and disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full
opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will
not be discriminated against on the grounds of age (over 40),
ancestry, color, mental or physical disability, sex, gender
identity and expression, marital status, medical condition
(cancer or genetic characteristics), national origin, race,
religious belief, or sexual orientation in consideration of award.



____________________
William Hornung, C.P.M. Published: March 27, 2013
General Services Manager Montecito Journal

a hearing. Filed March 4, 2013,
by Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk.
Hearing date: April 25, 2013 at
9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME: CASE No.
1415652. To all interested parties:
Petitioner Michael Bryan Coan
fled a petition with Superior Court of
California, County of Santa Barbara,
for a decree changing name to
Michael Bryan Studer. The Court
orders that all persons interested in
this matter appear before this court
at the hearing indicated below to
show cause, if any, why the petition
for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described about must
fle a written objection that included
the reasons for the objection at
least two court days before the
matter is scheduled to be heard and
must appear at the hearing to show
cause why the petition should not
be granted. If no written objection is
timely fled, the court may grant the
petition without a hearing. Filed March
4, 2013, by Terri Chavez, Deputy
Clerk. Hearing date: April 18, 2013
at 9:30 am in Dept. 6, 1100 Anacapa
Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101.
Published 3/13, 3/20, 3/27, 4/3
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 42 • The Voice of the Village •
ENDINg THIS WEEk
Closing the ‘Circle’ – DramaDogs
area premiere of Annie Baker’s Obie
Award-winning 2009 play Circle Mirror
Transformation has just one more
weekend of performances. And this
might be one of those occasions when
waiting to the end proves rewarding, as
the material calls for the actors to dig
deep within their own stories and souls
to deliver this funny, absorbing and
unflinching look at how an acting class
affects five residents of a small Vermont
town. The title refers to an acting
exercise where improvisation is copied
and then transformed spontaneously,
leading to revealing insights and
uncovered truths. DramaDogs is to be
commended for unearthing and getting
the rights to the work just a few years
after its New York premiere had Charles
Isherwood of The New York Times
gushing about the play as “the kind of
unheralded gem that sends people into
the streets babbling and bright-eyed with
the desire to spread the word.” WHEN:
8pm Thursday-Saturday WHERE: Center
Stage Theater, upstairs in Paseo Nuevo
mall COST: $20 general, $15 students
& seniors INFO: 963-0408 or www.
centerstagetheater.org
THURSDAY, MARCH 28
SBIFF redux – Two flms that had their
world premieres at the Santa Barbara
International Film Festival are coming back
to town for one-off screenings tonight. The
Condor’s Shadow, from local flmmaker
Jeff McLoughlin (co-written by the Santa
Barbara Independent’s Matt Kettmann),
traces the monumental effort to bring the
big raptor back from the brink of extinction
that took place right here in our local Los
Padres mountains. The 2013 year-in-the-life
documentary follows US Forest Wildlife
Service biologist Joseph Brandt through
his efforts to help the species recover and
be able to be self-sustaining once again.
McLoughlin, Brandt and Jan Hamber will
be on hand for a post-show Q&A when
The Condor’s Shadow screens in a beneft
event for the Los Padres ForestWatch and
the host Santa Barbara Museum of Natural
History. WHEN: 7pm WHERE: 2559 Puesta
Del Sol Road COST: $10 ($2 discount for
museum members) INFO: 682-4711 ext.
170 or www.sbnature.org. Over at the
Arlington, surf flmmaker Jack McCoy’s
flm A Deeper Shade Of Blue, which sold
out the vast 2,200-seat theater at its debut
screening during SBIFF 2011, returns
as part of a simulcast to more than 400
theaters across the country. The event begins
CALENDAR OF EVENTS
Note to readers: This entertainment calendar is a subjective sampling of arts and other events taking place in the Santa
Barbara area for the next week. It is by no means comprehensive. Be sure to read feature stories in each issue that complement
the calendar. In order to be considered for inclusion in this calendar, information must be submitted no later than noon on the
Wednesday eight days prior to publication date. Please send all news releases and digital artwork to slibowitz@yahoo.com)
by Steven Libowitz

FRIDAY, MARCH 29
‘Visions of the
Gaviota Coast’
– The California
coastline just north
of the Santa Barbara
metro area had been
acknowledged by
the wildlife scientifc
community as one
of the 15 most
biologically diverse
and ecologically
signifcant regions
in the world. Now
local artists are not
only taking note and
capturing the natural
beauty of the region,
but also pitching
in to help do
something to save it from development. The members of SCAPE (Southern California
Artists Painting for the Environment) and fne art photographer Reeve Woolpert
are getting together for a two-day exhibit of more than 100 works of art, all created
on the Gaviota Coast, home to more than 195 distinct species of birds, 60 species
of fsh, and 1,400 plant and animal species, including threatened and endangered
ones such as the steelhead trout, the tidewater goby, the white-tailed kite and the red-
legged frog. In that, one of the goals is to raise awareness of the efforts to preserve
and maintain the rural character of the rare open coastline, admission is free, but 40
percent of the proceeds of art sales will go to the Gaviota Coast Conservancy and
Save Naples organization. The opening reception for “Visions of the Gaviota Coast”
features live music, screenings of a flm by Global NGO Media called Future of the
Gaviota Coast, refreshments, and a silent auction with some unique prizes, including
artwork, dinner at the Bacara, and more. WHEN: 1–8pm Friday, 10am–5pm
Saturday (reception 5-8pm Friday; flm screens 6:30pm tonight and 12, 2 & 4pm
Saturday, followed by flmmaker Q&A) WHERE: Bacara Resort & Spa, 8301 Hollister
Ave. COST: free INFO: 965-3434 or www.s-c-a-p-e.org

FRIDAY, MARCH 29
Have a heart – The
Heartless Bastards,
a so-called garage-
band power trio who
hail from the same
Ohio area as The
Black Keys, haven’t
earned the reputation
or popularity of their
region-mates, but it
was Keys’ Patrick
Carney who helped
get the band their
record deal back in
2004. Lead singer-pianist-guitarist-principal songwriter Erika Wennerstrom is
the only original member, and she’s already on her third iteration of the Bastards,
although the classic MC5-style crunchy, hook-flled approach remains even as the
songs delve deeper into Wennerstrom’s soul, offering the femme fatale approach
to what’s normally a very male-dominated genre. Bring earplugs. Nashville
songwriter Jonny Fritz, who has dropped his Corndawg moniker and has a
new album co-produced by Dawes’ Taylor Goldsmith due in April, opens the
show. WHEN: 9pm WHERE: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State Street,
upstairs in Victoria Court COST: $15 INFO: 962-7776/www.sohosb.com or www.
clubmercy.com
with a very special welcome from the red
carpet premiere in Hawaii with music
by Kaukahi featuring Jack Johnson, Paul
McCartney & Youth, Foo Fighters, Coldplay
and many others. After the movie, McCoy
will be joined by world-renowned surfng
legends as they discuss the evolution, the
culture and the impact of surfng from
its beginnings to today’s billion-dollar-
a-year global industry. Panelists include
surfng movie star Gidget and legendary
surfng sensations Jamie O’Brian, The
Marshall Brothers, Derek Hynd,
Marty Paradisis, Terry Chung, Jordy
Smith, and others. WHEN: 7:30pm
WHERE: Arlington Theatre, 1317 State
Street COST: call INFO: 963-440 or www.
thearlingtontheatre.com
SATURDAY, MARCH 30
Other Ojai outings – OYES – the Ojai
Youth Entertainment Studio – boasts two
special events this weekend, beginning
tonight with the Household Gods with
special guest Emy Reynolds Band. The
Gods, not to be confused with Santa
Barbara’s Headless Household, are a local
Ojai Valley outft of veteran musicians
comprised of Charlie Bosson, Peter
Bellwood, Jim Lashly and J. B.
White, who have twice been voted
most popular band by the Ojai Valley
News. The band celebrates and reinvents
popular songs, with a repertoire ranging
from Stephen Foster to Bing Crosby to
The Kinks to Prince, plus a few originals.
Saturday night, they’re marking their 10th
anniversary with a reprise of their frst
show, dubbed “The Killer Bees,” featuring
songs by artists whose name begins with
the letter “B”. Emy Reynolds is another
Ojai product, a pop-infected singer-
songwriter blessed with a deep, raspy
voice whose quirky songs have traveled
well, including showing up on the TV series
Grey’s Anatomy (Season 6) with the song
“Tonight,, while “Best Day Ever” was the
soundtrack for a Payless Shoe commercial.
Her trio features a slew of instruments and
lots of harmonies and hooks. On Sunday,
OYES launches its Play Reading Series,
headed up by John & Laurie Slade,
who are actors, directors and founders of
the long-running Ojai Shakespeare Salon.
The quarterly series features local actors
offering a staged reading of independent
theater new to the valley. The series kicks
off with Paul Rudnick’s I Hate Hamlet, a
gleeful ghost story about a down on his
luck young television star who moves into
a gothic New York apartment once owned
by John Barrymore. As he contemplates an
offer to play Hamlet on stage – a role he
hates – the ghost of Barrymore appears to
offer encouragement, leading to a wildly
funny duel over women, art, success,
duty, television and even the apartment
itself. The New York Times called the
play “unapologetically silly and at times
hilarious.” The reading will be preceded
by a potluck dinner; admission is free for
food contributors, otherwise pay just $5 for
the reading itself. WHEN: 8pm Saturday;
6:30 (potluck), 7:30pm (reading) Sunday
WHERE: 316 E. Matilija Street COST: $20
INFO: 646-4300 or www.ojaiyes.org
MoNDAY, APRIL 1
Grandparent Portrait Show – More
than 150 works in a variety of media
created by area high school and junior
high school students and featuring portraits
of their grandparents and other signifcant
elders in their lives go on display today in
the culmination of a project that both raises
artistic awareness and connects youth to
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 43 The enemy of art is the absence of limitations – Orson Welles
New York International
Children’s Film Festival
Kid Flix Mix
SAT, APR 6 / 11 AM
UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
(Note special time. Best for ages 4 and up.)
The best new animations and short
flms for kids from this year’s festival.
(Approx. 65 min.)
An hour before the show, kids can dive
right into the fun with balloons, face
painting and craft-making parties
Underwater Photographer
Brian Skerry
Ocean Soul
SUN, APR 7 / 3 PM
UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
$20 / $15 UCSB students
and youth 18 & under
Skerry’s presentation showcases his
stunning photography and a career
of more than 10,000 hours spent
underwater with marine wildlife.
Books will be available for purchase and signing
TICKETS
$10 Children
$15 Adults
Best-selling Author of
Understanding Comics
Regents’ Lecturer in the
UCSB Writing Program
Scott McCloud
Comics and Visual
Communication
WED, APR 10 / 8 PM
UCSB CAMPBELL HALL
“Just about the smartest
guy in comics.” – Frank Miller,
creator of Sin City and 300
Books will be available for purchase and signing
FREE
(805) 893-3535
www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
Community Partner:

SATURDAY, MARCH 30
On is on again – The world fusion band On Ensemble, which appeared at the
frst Ojai World Music Festival a couple of years back, returns to the mountain
village for a non-festival gig at Matilija Auditorium. With Japanese drums at the
foundation of its world fusion mix, the group takes the ancient instruments of Taiko
into new realms, infusing the powerful rhythms of ensemble Japanese drumming with
elements of hip-hop, rock and electronica. On Ensemble’s four members – Masato
Baba, Kristofer Bergstrom, Shoji Kameda and Kelvin Underwood – are
also individually recognized as leading artists in their feld who teach, conduct
workshops and compose as well as perform and who have been featured in the
music of the hit TV show Heroes, in the David Mamet movie Redbelt and performing
with Stevie Wonder at the 2008 Democratic National Convention. In addition to
the concert, they will be offering a very hands-on workshop for people that want
to experience the excitement of Taiko drumming frst-hand (1pm at the Ojai Arts
Center). WHEN: 7:30pm WHERE: 703 El Paseo Road, Ojai COST: $27 general,
$25 students/seniors in advance, $30/$28 at the door (workshop $20/$15) INFO:
646-8907 or www.ptgo.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 2
Cook-ing famenco, and more –
Canadian guitarist Jesse Cook, widely
considered one of the most infuential fgures
in “nouveau famenco” music, has won several
awards for his craft, including a Juno (the
Canadian equivalent of a Grammy; he’s been
nominated for 11 more), and Canadian Smooth
Jazz Guitarist of the Year, which he’s claimed
three times. His rumba famenco records have
sold more than 1.5 million copies worldwide,
earning Cook two Platinum and fve Gold album
awards in Canada. But his latest body of work
signals a dramatic new direction. After spending
the summer of 2011 cottage hopping with his family, he wrote some new-sounding
material for The Blue Guitar Sessions, which was released in the U.S. last fall. He
steered clear of anything resembling rumba famenco, using vintage microphones
and an unusual approach eschewing his natural instinct to fll in space. That gave
lots of room for his guest musicians to shine, including violinist Chris Church, cellist
Amy Laing, accordionist Tom Szczesniak, and vocalist Emma-Lee, who sings
on “I Put a Spell on You,” a cover of the Screamin’ Jay Hawkins song. Cook arrives
at the Lobero Theatre tonight in the middle of a fve-month tour both supporting “Blue
Guitar” and revisiting his earlier work. WHEN: 7:30pm WHERE: Lobero Theatre, 33
E. Canon Perdido St. COST: $38 & $48 ($78 VIP tickets include a meet and greet
with Cook following the performance.) INFO: 963-0761 or www.lobero.com
their families. Young artists submitted more
than 400 works spanning such media as
painting, drawing, sculpture, photography
and collage for consideration; 11 have been
chosen to receive special awards at the
opening reception next Thursday evening,
with the families of all of the participating
artists invited. The show – sponsored by
the Student Art Fund of the Santa Barbara
Art Association – aims to get students to
“focus on the faces of their grandparents as
a way of strengthening those connections,
and, possibly, of inspiring the students
with the hopes and aspirations that these
grandparent fgures have for them,” said
Audie Love, a retired Dos Pueblos High
School art teacher who is a member of
the Student Art Fund Committee, said in a
press release. Which leads us to think that
no matter whose pieces were chosen for
display let alone singled out for awards, all
of the youngsters – and their ancestors – are
already winners. WHEN: Exhibit open today
through April 30; reception takes place
5-7pm on April 3 WHERE: Faulkner Gallery,
Downtown Public Library, 40 E. Anapamu
St. COST: free INFO: 962-1402 or www.
studentartfund.org •MJ
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 44 • The Voice of the Village •
Gloria Kaye, Ph.D.
314 East Carrillo Street, Suite 10
Santa Barbara, California 93101
805-701-0363
www.drgloriakaye.com
EASING RECOVERY
FROM SURGERY
Recovering from surgery can be a long and arduous
journey.  Painful incisions and infammation are
frequently present even after the most successful surgeries.
Using a feather light touch the body is magically speeded
along the road to recovery.  Recently however, scientists
at the Pacifc Advanced Technology Laboratory were
able to provide proof positive that I emit and transfer
energy.  Using sophisticated infrared research equipment
scientists were able to identify that the energy from my
hands was successfully transferred to my subjects,  If you
go to my website you can view this ..just click medicine
and science.
 
Tis healing energy will reduce infammation, heal
hematomas and reduce scar tissue.  Please allow me to
assist you along the road to recovery
FAIRVIEW
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
Information Listed for Friday, March 29 thru Thursday, April 4
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
Gael Garcia Bernal
 NO (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:00 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:00 5:00 7:45
Rachel Roberts
 THE HOST (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 12:45 3:30 6:50 9:40
Mon-Thu - 1:50 4:45 7:30
 THE CROODS (PG)
3D: Daily - 3:00
2D on 2 Screens:
Fri-Sun -
12:30 1:40 4:10 5:25
6:40 7:50 9:00
Mon-Thu -
1:40 4:10 5:25 6:40 7:50
LIFE OF PI (PG)
3D: Fri-Sun - 3:40 6:30
Mon-Thu - 4:30 7:20
THE CALL (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
Mon-Thu - 2:20 5:10 7:40
THE INCREDIBLE
BURT WONDERSTONE (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:15 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:00
 THE HOST (PG-13)
1:00 4:00 7:00 9:50
Bruce Willis (PG-13)
 G. I. JOE: RETALIATION
3D: 3:50 6:30 9:10
2D: 1:15 2:20 4:50
7:30 10:10
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)
1:30 4:20 7:20 10:00
ADMISSION (PG-13)
2:00 4:30 7:10 9:40
OZ (PG)
THE GREAT AND POWERFUL
3D: 5:00 2D: 1:45 8:00
 G. I. JOE:
RETALIATION (PG-13)
2D: Daily - 5:30 8:15
3D:
Fri-Sun - 12:20 2:50
Mon-Thu - 2:50
Cannes Film Festival
Official Selection
 RENOIR (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:15
Sat/Sun - 1:30 4:35 7:15
Maggie Smith
in A Dustin Hoffman Film
QUARTET (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:00
Sat/Sun - 1:45 4:20 7:00
 THE CROODS (PG)
3D: 4:45
2D on 2 Screens:
1:00 2:15 3:25
5:50 7:10 8:10
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
1:40 7:40 (R)
THE INCREDIBLE
BURT WONDERSTONE
5:00 (PG-13)
 GINGER & ROSA (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:10 6:30 8:45
Mon-Thu - 2:30 4:40 7:15
Kim Kardashian (PG-13)
 Tyler Perry’s TEMPTATION
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:00 6:40 9:15
Mon-Thu - 2:10 4:50 7:25
ADMISSION (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:50 6:50 9:25
Mon-Thu - 2:20 5:00 7:35
SPRING BREAKERS (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:40 5:15 7:45
Bruce Willis (PG-13)
 G. I. JOE: RETALIATION
2D: 1:30 4:10
3D: Fri-Sun - 7:00 9:40
Mon-Thu - 7:00
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)
Fri-Sun- 1:10 2:30 4:00 5:10
6:40 8:00 9:20
Mon-Thu- 1:10 2:30 4:00
5:10 6:40 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
OZ (PG)
THE GREAT AND POWERFUL
3D: 1:20 2D: 4:35 7:40
Features Stadium Seating
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
Courtyard Bar Open
Fri & Sat - 5:00 - 8:30
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
 THE FINAL MET Opera 2013 
Saturday - April 27 - 9:00 am
Arlington Theatre Presents
Handel’s  GIULIO CESARE
Floyd
Mayweather
vs.
Robert
Guerrero
              
HD LIVE - Las Vegas - on the Big Screen! Now On Sale!
Saturday, May 4 - 6:00 pm
METRO 4
Do You Know About BARGAIN TUESDAYS?
The Best Way to $ave! At All Locations!
Children....Seniors (60+) ALL SHOWS - ALL DAY - $5.50
Adults: Before 6:00 pm - $5.75 After 6:00 pm - $7.50
3D: Add $3.00 to pricing
FAIRVIEW
225 N. Fai rvi ew - Gol eta
PLAZA DE ORO
371 Hi t chcock Way - S. B.
PASEO NUEVO
8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.
RIVIERA
2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.
Information Listed for Friday, March 29 thru Thursday, April 4
FIESTA 5
Features Stadium Seating
916 Stat e St reet - S. B.
CAMINO REAL
Features Stadium Seating
CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE
Hollister & Storke - GOLETA
METRO 4
Features Stadium Seating
618 Stat e St reet - S. B.
Gael Garcia Bernal
 NO (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 5:00 7:45
Sat/Sun - 2:00 5:00 7:45
Rachel Roberts
 THE HOST (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 12:45 3:30 6:50 9:40
Mon-Thu - 1:50 4:45 7:30
 THE CROODS (PG)
3D: Daily - 3:00
2D on 2 Screens:
Fri-Sun -
12:30 1:40 4:10 5:25
6:40 7:50 9:00
Mon-Thu -
1:40 4:10 5:25 6:40 7:50
LIFE OF PI (PG)
3D: Fri-Sun - 3:40 6:30
Mon-Thu - 4:30 7:20
THE CALL (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30
Mon-Thu - 2:20 5:10 7:40
THE INCREDIBLE
BURT WONDERSTONE (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:15 9:20
Mon-Thu - 2:00
 THE HOST (PG-13)
1:00 4:00 7:00 9:50
Bruce Willis (PG-13)
 G. I. JOE: RETALIATION
3D: 3:50 6:30 9:10
2D: 1:15 2:20 4:50
7:30 10:10
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)
1:30 4:20 7:20 10:00
ADMISSION (PG-13)
2:00 4:30 7:10 9:40
OZ (PG)
THE GREAT AND POWERFUL
3D: 5:00 2D: 1:45 8:00
 G. I. JOE:
RETALIATION (PG-13)
2D: Daily - 5:30 8:15
3D:
Fri-Sun - 12:20 2:50
Mon-Thu - 2:50
Cannes Film Festival
Official Selection
 RENOIR (R)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:15
Sat/Sun - 1:30 4:35 7:15
Maggie Smith
in A Dustin Hoffman Film
QUARTET (PG-13)
Fri & Mon-Thu - 7:00
Sat/Sun - 1:45 4:20 7:00
 THE CROODS (PG)
3D: 4:45
2D on 2 Screens:
1:00 2:15 3:25
5:50 7:10 8:10
SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK
1:40 7:40 (R)
THE INCREDIBLE
BURT WONDERSTONE
5:00 (PG-13)
 GINGER & ROSA (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:45 4:10 6:30 8:45
Mon-Thu - 2:30 4:40 7:15
Kim Kardashian (PG-13)
 Tyler Perry’s TEMPTATION
Fri-Sun - 1:20 4:00 6:40 9:15
Mon-Thu - 2:10 4:50 7:25
ADMISSION (PG-13)
Fri-Sun - 1:10 3:50 6:50 9:25
Mon-Thu - 2:20 5:00 7:35
SPRING BREAKERS (R)
Fri-Sun - 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:35
Mon-Thu - 2:40 5:15 7:45
Bruce Willis (PG-13)
 G. I. JOE: RETALIATION
2D: 1:30 4:10
3D: Fri-Sun - 7:00 9:40
Mon-Thu - 7:00
OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R)
Fri-Sun- 1:10 2:30 4:00 5:10
6:40 8:00 9:20
Mon-Thu- 1:10 2:30 4:00
5:10 6:40 8:00
Playing on 2 Screens
OZ (PG)
THE GREAT AND POWERFUL
3D: 1:20 2D: 4:35 7:40
Features Stadium Seating
ARLINGTON
1317 State Street - 963-4408
Courtyard Bar Open
Fri & Sat - 5:00 - 8:30
 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions
877-789-MOVIE www.metrotheatres.com
 THE FINAL MET Opera 2013 
Saturday - April 27 - 9:00 am
Arlington Theatre Presents
Handel’s  GIULIO CESARE
Floyd
Mayweather
vs.
Robert
Guerrero
              
HD LIVE - Las Vegas - on the Big Screen! Now On Sale!
Saturday, May 4 - 6:00 pm
METRO 4
Do You Know About BARGAIN TUESDAYS?
The Best Way to $ave! At All Locations!
Children....Seniors (60+) ALL SHOWS - ALL DAY - $5.50
Adults: Before 6:00 pm - $5.75 After 6:00 pm - $7.50
3D: Add $3.00 to pricing
A Look At The Low $5’s
Real Estate by Mark Hunt
Mark and his wife, Sheela Hunt, are real estate agents. They live in Montecito with their daughter Sareena,
a sophomore at SBHS. His family goes back nearly one hundred years in the Santa Barbara area. Mark’s
grandparents – Bill and Elsie Hunt – were Santa Barbara real estate brokers for 25 years.
A
lthough Montecito is a relatively small place – both in population and
land area – there are many options in terms of the type of environment
one might choose to live in. From the rural feel of the eastern end of
Montecito to the ocean-front condominium compounds of Bonnymede and
Montecito Shores, to the gated communities of Birnam Wood and Ennisbrook,
to the close-in ocean-view estates just up the hill from Coast Village Road.
Driving just a couple of minutes from one area to the other can make a person
feel as if he’s gone on a journey to another place altogether. This is very evi-
dent during our broker tours on Wednesdays, when we go from one home to
another, up a hill, down to the beach, then over to the country club… all within
minutes of each other.
Because there is such a variety of neighborhoods, price ranges, and even
micro-climates, I have found it convenient to zero in on a particular price range.
For this column, I have focused on the low $5-million market, a range that is
a stretch for even the wealthier Montecito buyer, but it is a range that virtu-
ally guarantees you a property that is both impressive and full of amenities.
Whether you want an oceanfront, immaculate condo or a recently remodeled
ocean-view villa, you will likely be able to find something at this price that suits
you.
1305 Plaza Pacifica: $5,250,000
Ocean, island, and coastline
views abound from this sophisti-
cated residence on the sand within
Montecito’s guarded and gated
beachfront condominium enclave,
Bonnymede. This light-filled sin-
gle-level condominium has two
bedrooms and two and a half baths
within 1,694 square feet of living
space. There are only a handful of
oceanfront units at Bonnymede,
and along with the nearly exclu-
sive location, one benefits from
the amenities the complex provides, such as swimming pool, tennis court, etc.
The spacious master bedroom opens to the dramatic limestone beachfront ter-
race with sunrise-to-sunset views, including a unique view of Santa Barbara’s
city lights at night. Bonnymede is located next to the Coral Casino Beach Club
and Biltmore Hotel, and is in the Montecito Union School District.
Elegant and on the sand, this 1,694-sq-ft Bonnymede
condominium is for sale at $5,250,000
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 45 Life’s pretty good, and why wouldn’t it be? I’m a pirate, after all. – Johnny Depp
Adam Black | VP, Senior Loan Officer
805.452.8393 | ablack@bankofmanhattan.com
Exceeding Expectations in Your Neighborhood
Member FDIC

If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
93108 OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY

SATURDAY MARCH 30
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1206 Channel Drive 1-4pm $8,750,000 3bd/2ba Arthur Kalayjian 455-1379 Sotheby’s International Realty
1163 Summit Road 2-4pm $5,975,000 5bd/6ba Jack Maxwell 451-1669 Village Properties
2862 East Valley Road 1-3pm $3,950,000 4bd/7ba Grubb Campbell Group 895-6226 Village Properties
2080 East Valley Road 2-4pm $2,950,000 5bd/4.5ba John McGowan 637-5858 Sotheby’s International Realty
620 Oak Grove Drive By Appt. $1,995,000 3bd/3.5ba Deanna Solakian 453-9642 Coldwell Banker
1157 High Road 1-4pm $1,100,000 1bd/1ba Brian Goldsworthy 570-1289 The Channel Group


SUNDAY MARCH 31
ADDRESS TIME $ #BD / #BA AGENT NAME TELEPHONE # COMPANY
1154 Channel Drive 2-4pm $8,950,000 4bd/4.5ba Omid Khaki 698-1616 Sotheby’s International Realty
1206 Channel Drive 1-4pm $8,750,000 3bd/2ba Arthur Kalayjian 455-1379 Sotheby’s International Realty
482 Woodley Rd 1-3pm $3,300,000 4bd/4ba Thomas Johansen 886-1857 Village Properties
620 Oak Grove Drive By Appt. $1,995,000 3bd/3.5ba Deanna Solakian 453-9642 Coldwell Banker
1157 High Road 1-4pm $1,100,000 1bd/1ba Brian Goldsworthy 570-1289 The Channel Group
If you have a 93108 open house scheduled, please send us your free directory listing to realestate@montecitojournal.net
1081 Alston Road: $5,295,000
This home is just a short stroll
from Coast Village Road and
offers close-in ocean views. The
gated, private, and stately Italian
Mediterranean home is on nearly
one full acre and includes five bed-
rooms, four and a half bathrooms
and a den/study. The home was
extensively re-built in 2010. An
elegant motor court leads to a dra-
matic entry and two-story foyer.
The spacious living room with
tall French doors opens up to a
stone terrace and an ocean view. There is a well-thought-out floor plan for
entertaining and the landscaping includes extensive rolling lawns, mature trees
and a pool and spa. There is a fireplace in the master bedroom and wood floors
throughout. The second-floor balcony offers a substantial view of the property
and Pacific Ocean beyond.
2085 Stratford Place: $5,375,000
This red-brick Georgian Manor
is located on over an acre in the
guarded and gated Birnam Wood
Country Club area. Boasting over
6,000 square feet of living space,
the living room, foyer and fam-
ily rooms are suited for large-scale
entertaining. There is a grand for-
mal dining room, a versatile den,
gallery hallway and more. The
master suite includes a spa bath
and oversized walk-in closet.
There are two additional guest
bedrooms, also of large proportions. The home features 13’ ceilings throughout,
a total of five fireplaces, hardwood floors, crown moldings, gourmet kitchen,
extensive brick terraces, a pool, loggia and southern exposure.
275 Toro Canyon Road: $5,395,000
Just a short drive up from Padaro
Lane on Toro Canyon Road is this
elegant Mediterranean home in
a private, gated setting. Resting
on over four acres near the Santa
Barbara Polo Club, this property
offers ocean and mountain views
from the approximately 5,000+/-
square foot, two-story main home.
There are four bedrooms and four
bathrooms in the main home as
well as a game room, den-library,
butler’s pantry, remodeled kitchen, dual-pane windows and cathedral ceilings.
The grounds include parking for guests, a pool, spa, spacious two-room guest-
house and a north-south tennis court… not to mention room for horses or addi-
tional landscaping and development.
This home is not in one of the two Montecito school districts, so if that is impor-
tant, please double-check with your agent for clarification on all these properties.
•••
For more information see my website www.montecitobestbuys.com or contact your
realtor. If you are not working with anyone I would be more than happy to answer any
questions. You can contact me directly, (call or text) at 805-698-2174 or by email to
mark@villagesite.com - •MJ
This substantial home on Alston Road features privacy,
a large pool and extensive ocean views
A Georgian Manor-style home on Stratford Place fea-
tures expansive inside living areas
Four-acre estate near the Santa Barbara Polo Club
features well-maintained north-south tennis court and
many other amenities
Advertise in
Affordable. Effective. Efficient.
Call for rates (805) 565-1860
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 46 • The Voice of the Village •
REAL ESTATE FOR SALE
Residential Income Property
Hedgerow area of Montecito
2.94 Mil , Proforma NOI 125,000,
4.2% CAP
2 Year secured lease.
Contact: Frank
805 565 9025
www.crelisting.net/EdW7VfO5A
Four adjacent parcels w/stunning 4 storey
redwood observation lodge, aggregate
price $2,025,000. Monumental sandstone
gardens. All Southwest section of Painted
Cave settlement is your garden. Location
x 3. Awesome views and trees with grey
squirrels.
HOUSE/APT/COTTAGE WANTED
Long-time local seeks long-term rental/
guest cottage for $1600 or less.
Impeccable references. Must be in quiet
area, have plenty of natural light, and allow
one mature cat.
Amanda
448-8856
SHORT/LONG TERM RENTAL
CARMEL BY THE SEA vacation getaway.
Charming, private studio. Beautiful garden
patio. Walk to beach and town.
$110/night.
831-624-6714
WOODWORK/RESTORATION
SERVICES
Ken Frye Artisan in Wood
The Finest Quality Hand Made
Custom Furniture, Cabinetry
& Architectural Woodwork
Expert Finishes & Restoration
Impeccable Attention to Detail
Montecito References.
lic#651689
805-473-2343 ken@kenfrye.com
PAVING SERVICES
MONTECITO ASPHALT & SEAL COAT,
•Slurry Seal• Crack Repair• Patching• Water
Problems• Striping• Resurfacing• Speed
Bumps• Pot Holes • Burms & Curbs •
Trenches.
Call Roger at (805) 708-3485
Fit for Life
Customized workouts &
nutritional guidance for
any lifestyle. Individual/
group sessions in ideal
setting. House calls
available.
Victoria Frost,
CPT,FNS,MMA. 805 895-9227.
SPECIAL/PERSONAL SERVICES
NEED HELP? Pet, house sitting, nanny
or elder care by responsible local woman
in exchange for living accommodations.
Contact Karen 805-886-0375 or karenhp@
cox.net. Local references available.
Professional Chauffeur
Local or long distance. Exceptional
references. Discreet. Your car or mine.
Victoria 805-696-8655.
Let it shine! I will polish your silver or
brass. Call (805) 729-5067.
CULINARY SERVICES
PRIVATE CHEF-Experienced, local chef
offering in home cooking or weekly meal
drop-off. Resume available upon request.
Inquire: 805-895-0256
SEWING SERVICES
HEMS & ALTERATIONS
Expert
sewing*Reasonable
prices
1817 Robbins St.(near
W. Mission)
Mon-Sat 10am 6pm
*No appt needed
Barbara Logan (805)687-6677
The Stitch Witch
Alterations, mobile service available, house
calls, rush jobs. Call today. Ellen Sztuk
805 363-2067
TUTORING SERVICES
PIANO LESSONS Kary and Sheila
Kramer are long standing members of the
Music Teachers’ Assoc. of Calif. Studios
conveniently located at the Music Academy
of the West. Now accepting enthusiastic
children and/or adults. Call us at 684-4626.
Fun Piano & Guitar
Lessons. Students
choose music.
First lesson FREE.
Experience, degree
& references. www.
martismusic.com
martirichter@live.com
220-6642
POSITION WANTED
Property-Care Needs? Do you need a
caretaker or property manager? Expert
Land Steward is avail now. View résumé at:
http://landcare.ojaidigital.net
ESTATE/MOVING SALE SERVICES
THE CLEARING HOUSE, LLC
Recognized as the Area’s
Leading Estate Liquidators –
Castles to Cottages Experts in the
Santa Barbara Market! Professional,
Personalized Services for Moving,
Downsizing, and Estate Sales .
Complimentary Consultation
(805) 708 6113 email:
theclearinghouseSB@cox.net
website: theclearinghouseSB.com
Estate Moving Sale Service-Effcient-
30yrs experience. Elizabeth Langtree
689-0461 or 733-1030.
REAL ESTATE SERVICES
Nancy Hussey
Realtor ®
“…This Deal
Would Have Never
Happened Without
You.”
~Client
805-452-3052
Coldwell Banker / Montecito
DRE#01383773
www.NancyHussey.com
COMMERCIAL SPACE FOR LEASE
1205 COAST VILLAGE ROAD
Now Available For Sublease
Stunning 2,665sf service retail or offce with
high visibility. Reserved prkg. 2009 remodel.
Call Michael Martz
805-898-4363
Hayes Commercial Group
SPECIAL REQUEST
WANTED.
LOCAL CONTRACTOR NEEDS
YARDSPACE FOR WORK TRUCKS.
ASAP.
TORI 805 696-8655
SPECIALTY ITEMS FOR SALE
I buy/sell rare records.
50’s/60’s, Jazz, Classical LPs. Excellent
condition only.
Cell 818-631-8361.
Inquire: venusofvinyl@gmail.com
CAREGIVING SERVICES
In-Home Senior
Services: Ask Patti Teel
to meet with you or your
loved ones to discuss
dependable and affordable
in-home care. Individualized
service is tailored to meet
each client’s needs. Our
caregivers can provide transportation,
housekeeping, personal assistance and
much more. Senior Helpers: 966-7100
Caregiver, hospital advocate, cook, driver.
Experienced, CPR & First Aid certifed.
Local references available. Call 965-2495
HEALTH SERVICES
Stressed? Anxious? Feel
relaxed & calm
Biofeedback training is fast
& effective
Tina Lerner, MA Licensed
HeartMath & Biofeedback
Therapist
The Biofeedback Institute of
Santa Barbara (805) 450-1115
Spring Into Action In-
Home Physical Therapy
Build strength, fexibility,
balance, coordination and
stamina to prevent falling.
Josette Fast, PT-over 32
years experience.
722-8035
www.ftnisphysicaltherapy.com

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING (805) 565-1860
(You can place a classifed ad by flling in the coupon at the bottom of this section and mailing it to us: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108. You can also FAX your ad to us at: (805) 969-6654.
We will fgure out how much you owe and either call or FAX you back with the amount. You can also e-mail your ad: christine@montecitojournal.net and we will do the same as your FAX).
It’s Simple. Charge is $2 per line, and any portion of a line. Multiply the number of lines used (example 4 lines x 2 =$8) Add 10 cents per
Bold and/or Upper case character and send your check to: Montecito Journal, 1206 Coast Village Circle, Suite D, Montecito, CA 93108.
Deadline for inclusion in the next issue is Thursday prior to publication date. $8 minimum. Email: christine@montecitojournal.net
Yes, run my ad __________ times. Enclosed is my check for $__________
$8 minimum TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD $8 minimum
MONTECITO
ELECTRIC
EXCELLENT REFERENCES
Over 25 Years in Montecito
• Repair Wiring
• Remodel Wiring
• New Wiring
• Landscape Lighting
• Interior Lighting
(805) 969-1575
STATE LICENSE No. 485353
MAXWELL L. HAILSTONE
1482 East Valley Road, Suite 147
Montecito, California 93108
Over 25 Years in Montecito
MONTECITO
ELECTRIC
EXCELLENT REFERENCES
• Repair Wiring
• Remodel Wiring
• New Wiring
• Landscape Lighting
• Interior Lighting
(805) 969-1575
www.montecitoelectric.com
STATE LICENSE No. 485353
MAXWELLL. HAILSTONE
1482 East Valley Road, Suit 147
Montecito, California 93108
28 March – 4 April 2013 MONTECITO JOURNAL 47 As not what you can do for your country; ask what’s for lunch – Orson Welles
GARDENING/LANDSCAPING/TREE
SERVICES
Estate British Gardener Horticulturist
Comprehensive knowledge of Californian,
Mediterranean, & traditional English plants.
All gardening duties personally undertaken
including water gardens & koi keeping.
Nicholas 805-963-7896
Garden healer/landscape maintenance.
My secrets will surprise you with unexpected
beauty! Steve Brambach, 722-7429
Rico’s organic gardening and maintenance.
Nutritional spraying/organic compost/
veggie gardens/feed & restore fruit trees.
Rico 805 689-9890.
Delicious gourmet gardens, fne foral cut
gardens and bee friendly gardens.
805 272-5139 www.rosekeppler.com
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
SOME BUNNY NEEDS YOU!
Mia & Pixie are a beautiful mother/
daughter duo. Mia is 1+ years old,
daughter Pixie is approx. 6 months. Both
girls are lively and curious and would love
to fnd a forever home.

Bunnies Urgently Needing Shelter is
located at the Santa Barbara County
Animal Shelter, 5473 Overpass Rd,
Santa Barbara, Ca. www.bunssb.org
Adopt /Volunteer/Donate with us, and
help give abandoned & stray rabbits &
guinea pigs a better life.

Help Save Threatened Shorebirds!
Coal Oil Point Reserve is looking for
volunteers to help protect Western
Snowy Plovers on Sands Beach. We are
looking for volunteer docents to spend 2
hours a week on Sands Beach, teaching
the public about the importance of
protecting the snowy plover habitat. The
Snowy Plover Breeding Season starts in
March, and we need your help! Interested
parties should call (805)893-3703 or
email copr.conservation@lifesci.ucsb.edu.
Next training date: Saturday, March 2,
9AM-12PM
Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian
Center employs the power of the horse
to enhance the capabilities of children
and adults with special needs in Santa
Barbara.
Join our volunteer team and make a
difference in someone’s life. To lean more,
visit www.heartsriding.org
964-1519.
LOCAL BUSINESS DIRECTORY (805) 565-1860
Live Animal Trapping
“Best Termite & Pest Control”
www.hydrexnow.com
Free Phone Quotes
(805) 687-6644
Kevin O’Connor, President
$50 off initial service
Voted
#1
Termite Inspection 24hr turn around upon request.
Got Gophers?
Free
Estimates
BILL VAUGHAN 805.455.1609

Principal & Broker DRE LIC # 00660866
www.MontecitoVillage.com
®
Broker Specialist In Birnam Wood
Active Resident Member Since 1985
w w w . M o n t e c i t o V i l l a g e . c o m
Foundation RepaiRs
and FlooR leveling
• Anchor Bolts • Concrete Underpinnings •
• Anchor Brackets • Diagonal Bracings •
Replacement of deteriorated foundations, crippled walls
& center vertical supports & post bases.
Residential & Commercial Foundation Inspection Service Available
WilliaM J. dalZiel & assoC., inC
698-4318 billdalziel@yahoo.com
General Building Contractors Lic#B 414749
Do you love Reagan history? The
Reagan Ranch Center is seeking
volunteers who would be interested
in serving as docents for the Exhibit
Galleries. Docents will have the
opportunity share the history of President
Reagan and his “Western White House.”
For more information or to apply, please
contact Danielle Fowler at 805-957-1980
or daniellef@reaganranch.org.
“The 1st Memorial Honors Detail is
seeking veterans to get back in uniform
to participate in an on-call Honor Guard
team to provide military honors at funeral
or memorial services throughout Ventura
and Santa Barbara Counties.
For more information visit
www.usmilitaryhonors.org, email
carlvwade@gmail.com,
or call 805-667-7909.”
Clearance Sale

1 N. Calle Cesar Chavez #7
Santa Barbara
(805)963-3343 • www.futonplace.net
Mon-Fri 10-5 / Sat 12-5
Closed on Tues & Sun
• Platform Beds
• Futon Covers
• Coffee & End Tables
• Click Clack Sofa Bed
ComputerorPhoneproblems?
Call450-4188Santa Barbara
MacIntegration–WeInstall,
Configure, Integrate and
Recommend. We are the Montecito and Santa
BarbarahousecallservicesforAppleTV,MacBook,
iMac,iPad&iPhoneWWW.SBMACINTEGRATION.COM

romanticgardenco.com
the
Garden Design
805 682-1778
renovations
restorations
new construction
Relationship Guidance for Partners, Families,
Friends, Co-Workers & Individuals who seek
further Self- Growth
Maggie Gressierer M. Sc.,
Member IACT, Member AHHA
50% Of Your First Consultation
805 637 4994
www.LightWithinUs.com
Eva Van Prooyen, MFT
Psychotherapist
1187 Coast Village Road Suite 10-G
Santa Barbara, CA 93108
(805) 845-4960
Mailing Address:
P.O. Box 50105
Santa Barbara, CA 93150
LIC#: 43829
Cleaning Plus
CARPET-FLOOR-UPHOLSTERY-RESTORATION
Steam Dry*Pet Odor Removal*Oriental Rugs
Sofas-Chairs*Repairs*Patching*Re-installation
Stretching*Tile & Grout Cleaning & Restoration
Stone Polishing & Restoration*Structural Drying
805-483-6345
Frank Perez
*24 HOUR SERVICE*
EMERGENCY WATER REMOVAL
every wednesday
Summerland:
“Food Walk” Market
2330-2350 Lillie Ave. 3-6pm
every Fr|day
Santa Barbara:
La Cumbre Plaza
121 S. Hope Ave. 3-7pm
(inside the mall) free tote bags!
clip this ad
for S1 off
any item
www.localartisansmarket.com
ART
CLASSES
beginning to advanced
681-8831
classes@rivierafinearts.com
Carolyn Groth-Marnat, Ph.D., MFT
Psychotherapy
Lic# MFC 36066
Individual, Adolescents & Family Therapy
Specializing in addictions, trauma & depression
539 San Ysidro Rd. Montecito, CA 93108
805.570.4383
“ D a u n t l e s s ”
L U C K Y ’ S
s t e a k s / c h o p s / s e a f o o d / c o c k t a i l s
D i n n e r & C o c k t a i l s N i g h t l y , 5 t o 1 0 p m . B r u n c h S a t u r d a y & S u n d a y , 9 a m t o 3 p m .
M o n t e c i t o ’ s n e i g h b o r h o o d b a r a n d r e s t a u r a n t . 1 2 7 9 C o a s t V i l l a g e R o a d M o n t e c i t o C A 9 3 1 0 8 ( 8 0 5 ) 5 6 5 - 7 5 4 0
w w w . l u c k y s - s t e a k h o u s e . c o m
P h o t o g r a p h y b y D a v i d P a l e r m o

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N
D
A
Y
,

9

A
M

T
O

3

P
M