Photo by Steven Parke

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com by Sheldon Richman

GUEST COMMENTARY

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How the News Media Betrayed Us on Iraq
Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, ABC, NBC, MSNBC, CBS, CNN, Fox News, and others. The blood of more than a hundred thousand – perhaps more than a million – Iraqis and 4,500 Americans is on their hands, too. Today, like the Bush-administration alumni attempting to duck responsibility, the media blame “bad intelligence” for their conduct. But that will not wash. The dissenting reports of Knight Ridder’s Warren Strobel and Jonathan Landay, along with a very few others, show definitively that in 2002 and 2003, solid intelligence information undermining every propagandistic administration claim was readily available to anyone willing to use traditional reporting techniques. Strobel and Landay were mostly ignored. On the rare occasions when the New York Times or Washington Post reported on the doubts intelligence personnel had about the Bush narrative, the stories were buried deep in the paper. (See Bill Moyers’s special “Buying the War” and Greg Mitchell’s book Wrong for So Long.) The media did not merely pass along baseless assertions; the television channels also attempted to shape public opinion with a biased selection of guests. Pro-war voices abounded, while informed war skeptics were scarce. Even when an opponent of war was featured, he or she had to share the time with a pro-war advocate, yet the pro-war side was often featured unchallenged. As the war became regarded as inevitable, the cable news channels shifted almost exclusively to military analysis, as though the question was no longer whether the nation ought to go to war, but rather how it would be fought. Many of the retired generals who were presented as objective experts had seats on the boards of defense contractors and were getting Pentagon briefings. What motivated those who covered the run-up to the Iraq invasion this way? Several factors were surely at work. Groupthink and the fear of going out on a limb must have played a large role. The vaunted courage of journalists is more pose than fact. (This makes the work of Strobel and Landay, Phil Donahue of MSNBC until he was canceled, and Bob Simon of CBS’s 60 Minutes all the more admirable.) “Pack journalism” is reinforced by a fear that reports suggesting skepticism about a military action will be interpreted as unpatriotic. The smear factories run by militarist right-wing media watchdogs ensure this will be the case. Moreover, being branded un-American for doubting a president’s case for war may lead to viewer or reader boycotts, which in turn may lead to pressure from advertisers. Thus, the corporate bottom line played a role. Another factor is the simple truth that war makes better news than peace. No one wins a Pulitzer Prize for being a peace correspondent. We must not underestimate this as a motive for favoring war. Finally, we can’t overlook that many in the media were simply motivated by nationalism and deference to the state with its dazzling war technology. This story of media malfeasance would be bad enough if it were just history. Unfortunately, even as media figures now issue mea culpas about their shameful Iraq “coverage,” they are engaged in precisely the same shoddy business with respect to Iran and its alleged but unproven nuclear-weapons program. Sheldon Richman is vice president and editor at The Future of Freedom Foundation (FFF. org) in Virginia.

he 10th anniversary of the start of America’s illegal and aggressive war against Iraq should not pass without recalling that the mainstream news media eagerly participated in the Bush administration’s dishonest campaign for public support. It is no exaggeration to say that most news operations were little more than extensions of the White House Office of Communications. Abandoning even the pretense of an adversarial relationship with the government, the media became shameful conduits for unsubstantiated and outright false information about Saddam Hussein’s alleged threat to the American people. Included among the falsehoods were reports that Saddam had a hand in the 9/11 attacks, had trained al-Qaeda fighters, and had attempted to obtain uranium ore and aluminum tubes for nuclear bombs. Put bluntly, the disastrous invasion of Iraq – which was sold on the basis of lies told by President George W. Bush, Vice-President Dick Cheney, Secretary of State Colin Powell, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, national-security adviser Condoleezza Rice, and others – might not have happened without the enthusiastic help of the New York

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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ILLINOIS POLITICS

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House Does Some Heavy Lifting (Finally) on Pension Reform
retirements. As Madigan’s proposals gradually became more reasonable over the weeks, they began passing. At first, the Republicans refused to participate at all, saying they didn’t want to participate in a “piecemeal” process. But they have been voting on the measures for the past few weeks. Three significant bills have passed the House so far, including the one mentioned above. The other two would raise the retirement age and cap pensionable incomes at $113,000. Taken together, proponents say the three proposals will save the state $100 billion over the next 30 years and knock $20 billion to $21 billion off the systems’ unfunded liability. Some big questions remain. The huge pension-reform bill sponsored by Representative Elaine Nekritz, House Republican Leader Tom Cross, and Senator Daniel Biss includes some of the same reforms as the three bills that have already passed, particularly the COLA language. But there is also language guaranteeing state funding by allowing people to sue if the state doesn’t make its payments, which has picked up opposition from some business groups and Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner. There’s no word yet on whether Madigan will allow a vote on the full Nekritz bill, or whether he will revisit his proposal for a far more robust cost-shift plan. And, of course, there’s also a question of constitutionality. Reform proponents say they hope the courts will recognize that Illinois is in a crisis and cut the General Assembly some slack when interpreting the Constitution’s specific language outlawing any reductions in benefits. But that’s pretty much the same argument used when the General Assembly approved medical-malpractice-reform bills that ended up being shot down by the courts. So we’ll see. Either way, some truly heavy lifting was done in the House, at least as far as retiree benefits go. Madigan’s reform bill received six more votes than needed for passage. So the topic is apparently not as radioactive as many had feared, or threatened, depending on your perspective. And Madigan clearly showed that he can do this without relying on Republicans to come up with 30 votes. Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.

by Rich Miller CapitolFax.com

Johannes Brahms’

EIN DEUTSCHES REQUIEM
Handel Oratorio Society and Augustana Symphony Orchestra Claire Kuttler, soprano Saul Nache, baritone

Saturday, April 20 8 p.m. Augustana College | Centennial Hall
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Free tickets are available to middle and high school students and their families due to a generous grant from the Meredith Foundation.

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bill. There’s been worry for at least two years that the Democrats would have to rely heavily on Republicans to get anything out of the chamber and that maybe even 30 Republican votes – half the required 60-vote majority – wouldn’t be enough to pass a pensionreform bill. But 41 House Democrats voted for a bill in March that severely whacked retirees’ annual cost-of-living increases. Just 25 Republicans voted for the bill – five votes fewer than they’ve repeatedly said they had for a significant pension-reform proposal. The measure would cap annual cost-ofliving adjustments (COLAs) at $750 or 3 percent, whichever is less. That change has the impact of limiting COLAs to only the first $25,000 of annual pension income. Anyone who makes less than $25,000 would continue to receive compounded increases until the cap is hit. The proposal also forces retirees to wait until they either are 67 years old or have been retired at least five years to receive their annual COLAs. Cost-of-living raises have been targeted from the get-go as the biggest pension cost driver. Every major piece of pension-reform legislation has included at least some limits on COLAs. Senate President John Cullerton’s proposal, for instance, would take COLAs away entirely, but only if retirees elect to continue having access to governmentsubsidized health-insurance premiums. Speaking of Cullerton: As long as he continues to insist that the final pensionreform bill include his “consideration” language to ensure that at least part of the legislation is constitutional (in his opinion, at least), don’t expect this House proposal to go anywhere when it arrives in the Senate. Cullerton believes that to take away pension benefits, something has to be offered in return because the Constitution deems pensions a solemn contract that cannot be diminished or impaired. Anyway, it turns out that this pensionreform thing wasn’t so difficult after all. Maybe House Speaker Michael Madigan’s strategy worked; he started with outlandish proposals, including one to require employees to chip in several percent more per year for their

s it turns out, Illinois House Democrats didn’t need Republicans to put 30 votes on a significant pension-reform

The topic is apparently not as radioactive as many had feared.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Vol. 20 · No. 827
MUSIC
April 4 - 17, 2013
River Cities’ Reader
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Beauty from Different Angles

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

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Ethel, April 12 at St. Ambrose’s Rogalski Center
“When you’re by yourself, you have complete autonomy over where things go. ... [In a group setting,] you’re kind of riding a wave and going along with things that everyone else is setting up around you.” Ethel is clearly riding the wave of Kronos Quartet in obliterating the staid image of classical music. In addition to championing the work of contemporary and young composers, both ensembles refuse to recognize boundaries between genres. (Unlike Kronos, Ethel performs works by its members.) As the New York Times noted in a 2010 profile of Kronos: “Surprisingly, Kronos has spawned relatively few imitators. ... [But] the New York quartet Ethel has emerged as a true heir in its omnivorous appetites, collaborative breadth, and creative use of multimedia.” Ethel was formed in 1998, a quartercentury after Kronos, and Present Beauty includes two composers whose work is also often performed by the forebear: Glass and Terry Riley. (The program includes Riley’s “Sunrise of the Planetary Dream Collector,” which was written for Kronos.) Watstein and violinist Kip Jones auditioned together and last summer became members of Ethel, joining co-founders and artistic directors Ralph Farris (viola) and Dorothy Lawson (cello). (Watstein was about 10 when Ethel was formed.) “It’s been a little bit of baptism by fire, in that Kip and I both had to learn a tremendous amount of repertoire very quickly when we joined” – somewhere between eight and 10 full programs, Watstein said. “It was a very intense first two months on the job for sure.” Ethel will perform on Friday, April 12, at 7:30 p.m. at St. Ambrose University’s Rogalski Center Ballroom (at the corner of Ripley and Lombard streets in Davenport). Tickets are $5. For more information on Ethel, visit EthelCentral.org. Ethel is appearing as part of Quad City Arts’ Visiting Artist series. For more information, visit QuadCityArts.com/VAS.asp.

he string quartet Ethel refers to itself as a “band” and uses amplified classical instruments and improvisation. It’s called a “post-classical” ensemble, and the group has toured with Todd Rundgren and appeared on guitarist/songwriter/singer Kaki King’s 2012 album Glow. Ethel is the very definition of “crossover,” and if all that doesn’t scare you, try this sample from Pitchfork.com’s (strongly positive) review of Heavy, its 2012 record: “The violins peel off into glass shards, and the cello starts moaning. It’s a relief from the opening melee, but only insofar as scalp-prickling fear that there is a serial killer lurking in your home is technically preferable to the certainty of being stabbed to death.” At Ethel’s April 12 performance at St. Ambrose University, don’t expect quite that level of eclecticism. Or violence. But the Present Beauty program Ethel will play still covers plenty of territory on the theme of “what it is to experience beauty from different angles,” said violinist Tema Watstein in a phone interview last month. The centerpiece is a string-quartet arrangement of Philip Glass’ score for the movie The Hours, which Watstein called “meditative.” At the other end is “Early That Summer,” by Bang on a Can Co-Artistic Director Julia Wolfe; it’s “the most highimpact, high-intensity piece on the program. It’s very visceral and strident,” Watstein said. Pitchfork called the program’s “Wed” – by another Bang on a Can co-artistic director, David Lang – a “reflection pool of harmonies ... [with] hints of emotional disturbance pulling in the harmonies, lingering doubts that never dissipate.” Pitchfork’s summary judgment of the ensemble is “infectiously visceral,” and Watstein said something similar, but in terms meant to be more welcoming. “Our music tends to err on the very friendly side,” said Watstein, who joined Ethel in July. “It’s music that is very listenable, pleasurable to listen to, immediately engaging. We try to give the audience a really fun, enjoyable experience that’s not too cerebral or academic.” Amplification, she said, serves multiple purposes and “brings in a whole different

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color palette to the sound possibilities”: “It certainly gives us the ability to rock out very heavily when we want to, which we frequently do. It also gives the ability to add effects, like ... very heavy reverb that really helps create an ambiance or sound world in certain pieces [as in Lang’s ‘Wed’]. ... It [also] allows us to play very intimately but have that intimate playing projected to the audience. “The amplification most of the time is not very heavy; it’s subtle. But it gives just a little bit of a consonant edge to the sound.” The group also makes an effort to put pieces in a context that will help audiences approach them. “We always talk about the music we play from a very personal perspective on stage at each concert,” Watstein said. While Present Beauty has relatively little improvisation, the emphasis is on “relatively” – for Ethel. Watstein said that at the extreme end is flutist Robert Mirabal’s “Run to the Sun,” part of the ensemble’s Music of the Sun program: “The way it’s written out, it’s just kind of a sheet of paper that says ‘opens with sunrise,’ and then ‘begin running,’ ‘continuing running vigorously,’ ... . That is the whole piece.” It moves from calm to frenetic to calm, but beyond that basic shape it’s different each time. “It’s so much more fun to improvise with a group than by yourself,” Watstein said.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

5

Jamming with a Professional

COVER STORY

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

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Victor Wooten, April 21 at the Redstone Room
instrument, and that’s easier than you think.” Musical training, he said, begins at birth: “It’s the same way you learn to speak English. It started informally at home with people who were great at it. As babies, we’re allowed to jam with professionals, to use a musical term. The people that we’re speaking to are professionals. They don’t stick us in a room with other babies and make us practice for years ... . Even though you’re wrong, they never tell you. Our parents never make us feel inferior because we don’t speak correct English. They do the exact opposite; they learn to speak our way. We’re always made to feel good about how we speak, because we never know we’re wrong.” Wooten gave the example of his mother, whose sayings he plans to collect in a book. “She would tell us boys, ‘You are already successful. The rest of the world just doesn’t know it yet.’ That’s a good thing to hear growing up, and to hear over and over. ... Hearing it a lot allowed us to realize ... we don’t have Photo by Steven Parke to become anything to be successful. It’s not like, ‘In 10 years, when I can do this, I’ll be successful.’ No, we’re already doing what it takes to be successful. ... We don’t have to define our success by what the rest of the world thinks. And that’s a very powerful lesson.” Wooten’s brothers gave him toy instruments, and his brother Regi started teaching Victor bass when he was two. He was playing in the family band by age six. While the bass is not typically thought of as an expressive instrument, it can be, Wooten said: “It’s because of the fact that I’m expressive. ... If I want to be expressive, for me the easiest way to do it musically is through a bass. I can do that better than a piano or anything else.” He readily admits that the bass guitar is “designed to support other musicians. In a sense, it’s a role of service. It’s like a parent raising kids. You want your kids to shine more than you; you hold them up over your head. It’s not designed to be on top like a saxophone or a trumpet or the vocals; it’s underneath. It’s the foundation, and the foundation of anything has to be the strongest part, not the weakest. So it’s an understated role; you’re allowed to do the strongest work, and you can allow everyone else to get the credit. ... To me, that’s real expression, that’s true expression. It’s true power.” But he also said that the intent of the bass doesn’t limit its potential: “You can use it for other things it wasn’t designed to do.” As Wooten has ably shown with the Flecktones and on his solo albums, “the bass is a guitar, first of all. So when you realize that, you realize what a guitar can do, which means that the bass has the capabilities of doing the same thing. It’s just designed to be an octave lower. But if you were to hear a bass singer, it doesn’t mean they’re not expressive ... . It just means it’s lower. And that’s really it. ... “With the bass, I can play rhythms, I can play chords, I can play melodies, but we can also groove like no other instrument. That’s a big part of music – what it feels like based upon the groove. Our instrument is born right there.” His latest albums are Words & Tones and Sword & Stone, both released last year on his own label. The first is a series of collaborations with female singers. “It brings out a different part of me,” he said of working with the female voice. “I just don’t want to hit the bass real hard and start slapping the instrument. ... You have to be a little more sensitive and sensual.” Sword & Stone presents many of those songs in an instrumental context: “As I was getting songs together, I had a bunch of vocalists in mind,” he said. “And I knew that I would want them to write some of the lyrics. So I was preparing the songs to send to different vocalists. I would always use a different instrument to play the melodies for the verses, for the lyrics. And I just realized I liked the songs that way – instrumental. ... It allowed me to relive an older idea, which was releasing two different records at the same time.” While Wooten was already an accomplished bass player when he met Fleck in the late 1980s, he said he learned a valuable instrumental lesson from the banjoplaying bandleader: “He doesn’t always know what he’s doing, which is very liberating to see with a musician of that caliber. ... That’s the way I play a lot of the times.” That’s part of a philosophy that

he best teachers inspire as much as they instruct, and Victor Wooten both understands and practices that. His chops as a performing artist are unquestionable. He won five Grammys with Béla Fleck & the Flecktones – of which he’s a founding member – and three times was named “best bassist” by the readers of Bass Player magazine. Rolling Stone readers in 2011 voted him the 10th best bass player of all time – alongside icons from the Beatles, Cream, Led Zeppelin, Metallica, the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Rush, and the Who. Beyond being an accomplished musician, for the past 14 years he’s run music camps for kids, now held at the 147-acre Wooten Woods Retreat in Tennessee. And on April 21, as part of Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday jazz series, Wooten will give both a workshop and a concert at the Redstone Room. He will not teach how to play bass like he does. As he said of The Music Lesson, his fictional work-around to a much-requested instruction manual: “I didn’t really want to put out a Victor Wooten method. I don’t want to tell people how they have to play.” What Wooten excels at, as a phone interview last week illustrates, is gently knocking down the walls that keep creativity and music bottled up. He said he chose to tell a story in his book instead of writing an instruction manual because it freed him to explore his ideas and philosophy without being tied to facts or technique: “It lets me off the hook right away. ... ‘This isn’t true.’ ... That format allowed me to put more into the book – even things that I can’t prove.” Readers, he added, are also more receptive: “We relax into it, and we take the lessons out of it that we want. ... It’s just a lighter way to approach learning.” Wooten’s basic message can be summed up by what somebody once told him: “Never take ‘no’ from an inanimate object.” And that’s what a musical instrument is.

“The instrument doesn’t make any sound,” he said. “It’s like a computer; if you don’t touch it, it’ll sit there. ... When you sit all the instruments down in a room, they all sound the same. They only sound different and respond differently when the musician touches them. The expression comes from the musician.” But idle musical instruments can be intimidating, and Wooten said he wants to make “music as easy as possible. I want to show people that we’re already musical. You don’t have to learn to be musical when you start studying music; you’re already musical. When a song comes on and you bob your head or start to dance or sing along, you already know that; you’ve been doing that your whole lives. What you may have to do at the beginning is learn to play an instrument. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that they’re starting over with music. But no, you need to just take all your musicality and put it into an

Continued On Page 10

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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ART

F

Winners from the 37th-Annual Rock Island Fine Arts Exhibition

or the 37th-annual Rock Island Fine Arts Exhibition, the River Cities’ Reader invited winning artists – selected by juror Pamela Blotner of California – to write about their work. Excerpts of their statements follow. The exhibit runs through April 21 at the Augustana College Art Gallery (inside Centennial Hall, 3703 Seventh Avenue in Rock Island). The gallery is open from noon to 4 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays for the duration of the exhibit. A reception will be held on Friday, April 5; awards will be presented at 5:40 p.m. More winners and artist statements can be found at RCReader.com/y/rifae. Second Prize: Teresa Mesich (Rock Island, Illinois), Bird Circus, acrylic on canvas. “I love the swaying shapes of flags and tents, and the criss-crossing ropes that divide space, and the over-thetop colors and costumes of humans and animals. “Technically, my paintings are additions and subtractions. After much over-painting and wiping out, I study what is left to re-create, all the time thinking ‘circus.’ People become animals, lions become ruffled birds. Shapes change. Colors change. This evolution leads to constant surprise and discovery, until finally I am satisfied that the work is finished.” Sally MacMillan Watercolor Award: Rosalie Waranius Vass (Batavia, Illinois), Spinning, opaque watercolor. “The inspiration came from the windmills that are displayed throughout my home town of Batavia, Illinois (also known as the City of Energy). Instead of painting the actual windmill, I wanted to convey the action or motion of the object. Spinning addressed the intention of the windmill for me.” Two-Dimensional Entry Award: Peter Xiao (Rock Island, Illinois), Six Heads to Be Hatted, oil on canvas with wood. “My piece in the show fits into the period of cultural revolution when having a person ‘hatted’ meant having him/her condemned for some political crime, which was the misfortune of many by factions of red guards or politically zealous colleagues who in turn could suffer the same. To relate the idea to viewing space or experience, ‘hat hangers’ were furnished to allow the work be hung in a row or two rows. Materiality of the surface is in keeping with the sculpturalness of a piece like this – not portraits of people, but ideas of gravity-pulled heads.”

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Teresa Mesich, Bird Cirus; Dean Kugler, Blind Control; Rosalie Waranius Vass, Spinning; Peter Van Ael, Swimmingly; Peter Xiao, Six Heads to Be Hatted.

Three-Dimensional Freestanding Entry Award: Dean Kugler (Davenport, Iowa), Blind Control, resin. “The title of the sculpture speaks to the work itself as well as an idea that I am working out in my current pieces: the idea that while we may feel in charge of who we are and what we experience, there is always something limiting our understanding of the ‘big picture.’ The cloth covering

the face, limiting the subject’s view of his surroundings, represents his inability to see and therefore manipulate his surroundings; juxtaposed against the strong nature of the figure and the grace of the pose, it works to create a puzzle for the viewer to solve.” Honorable Mention: Peter Van Ael (Montgomery, Illinois), Swimmingly, reduction woodcut montage. “I

elaborate my exploration of pattern and camouflage by expanding the traditional boundaries of reduction-woodcut printing, creating a montage of multiple and varied impressions from the same block, adding depth to a grid in which multiple fishes both emerge from and recede into the picture plane, mimicking the commotion of a spooked school of fish.”

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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ART

Article and Photos by Bruce Walters

Art in Plain Sight: Bix 7 Plaza

I

n celebration of the 25th anniversary of the Bix 7 race, a bronze statue of two runners was unveiled in 1999 at the corner of Fourth Street and River Drive in Davenport, in front of the Quad-City Times building. They are atop a five-foot pedestal and base on the eastern front of the Bix 7 Plaza, a circular garden with a walkway and honorary plaques that commemorates the participants and contributors to the annual race. The runners are Bill Rodgers, who won the seven-mile race twice, and Joan Benoit Samuelson, a four-time Bix 7 women’s champion. Both athletes represented the U.S. in the Olympics; Samuelson was the gold medalist in the first women’s marathon. The life-size sculpture depicts the runners side-by-side, running nearly in tandem with a similar stride that conveys a sense of equity between the genders in sports. The figures are confident but not triumphant – not stretching their arms out in victory. Two years later, in 2001, a life-sized bronze figure of Bix Beiderbecke was also installed on the plaza; the race is named in honor of the jazz legend from Davenport. When first installed, it was an unexpected pleasure to discover the statue of Bix sitting quietly back on the plaza’s rear wall. Placed about 20 feet behind the two runners, he is seated on the three-foot wall in formal dress with

his cornet in hand. He seems to be both relaxed and attentive – as if waiting to play his next solo. The sculpture’s subject, demeanor, and vintage clothing have no direct relationship with the two runners. Yet, paradoxically, the artworks work together. Their dissimilarities seem to translate the 20-foot separation between them into a distance in time. (Bix died in 1931 – 70 years before the statue’s installation.) In 2006, a fourth sculptured figure was added. This one depicted Bill Wundram, who has written for the Quad-City Times for more than 65 years and has been an advocate of both the Bix 7 and the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival. Three years later, a statue of Ed Froehlich

– who served as the event’s director for more than three decades – was added. A sixth figure was added in 2011: Dan Hayes, who was instrumental to the event’s growth and success. The plaza has been enriched with the additional artworks and their stories, yet its overall cohesion has been lessened with each additional figure. A lack of interaction between them is, perhaps, the result of installing each sculpture separately over the course of a dozen years. Ted McElhiney, a LeClaire resident, created each of the Bix 7 sculptures. He has other bronze sculptures in the area, including a trio of children playing in Vander Veer Park, and a figure throwing a skipping stone at the edge of the Mississippi at Leach Park near the I-74 bridge. His ability to draw us into ordinary activities and to relate the figures to their environments is the outstanding feature of these works, including the six sculptured figures McElhiney created for the Bix 7 Plaza. Bruce Walters is a professor of art at Western Illinois University. This is part of an occasional series on the history of public art in the Quad Cities. If there’s a piece of public art that you’d like to learn more about, e-mail the location and a brief description to BD-Walters@ wiu.edu.

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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Movie Reviews
Gee, I Didn’t Hate Joe
G.I. JOE: RETALIATION
If you handed a box of crayons to a group of eight-year-olds with action figures, they’d probably come up with a more entertaining storyline for G.I. Joe: Retaliation than the one we’re stuck with, which is your standard blockbuster nonsense about a megalomaniac’s plan for world dominion and the crack team of wellarmed, quip-ready hotshots attempting to thwart him. In a welcome surprise, though, director Jon M. Chu’s follow-up to 2009’s G.I. Joe: Rise of the Cobra is, unlike its forebear, quite a bit of zippy, throwaway fun, a fast-moving and happily unpretentious diversion with jokes, and good ones, obviously written specifically for viewers well over the age of eight. It should go without saying that a lot of things blow up in Retaliation: vehicles, buildings, bad guys, whatever remnants of career respectability Bruce Willis was previously clinging to. Yet while Chu can stage an action scene with professional acumen (and even, in one complexly choreographed mountainside battle here, a fair amount of wit), the movie is too blandly conceived to be truly satisfying, and several prominent figures are denied even the faintest hints of personality – principally D.J. Cotrona’s heroic Flint, whose character description could easily begin and end with “buff.” Still, this second entry in what will likely be a long, lucrative franchise at least boasts a healthy share of clever ideas; I particularly admired the miniature spycameras-slash-explosive-devices designed to resemble fireflies, which created lovely,

by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz • mike@rcreader.com

picturesque malevolence, “but I images of never get bored.” nighttime calm before blasting THE HOST things to As an out-ofsmithereens. And state vacation kept while we could me happily away have used more of from film-related Channing Tatum, Web articles for a Jonathan Pryce, Luke Bracey, and Ray Stevenson in who delivers whole week-plus, G.I. Joe: Retaliation some winningly I walked into my low-key laughs before being unceremoniously screening of The Host almost completely dropped from the proceedings, Adrianne blind, knowing nothing about the picture Palicki exudes some spark, Justified’s Walton except that it was based on a lesser-known Goggins adds some snaky vibrancy as a midbook by Twilight author Stephenie Meyer, level henchman, and, best of all, Jonathan and it starred the preternaturally gifted and Pryce returns as both the president and the luminous Saoirse Ronan in the lead. I’ll nefarious mastermind impersonating the readily admit, then, that the movie did make president. If the crowd’s collective response me gasp at one point ... though not because at my screening was any indication, kids of a shocking narrative development, or an are going to have a terrific time at G.I. Joe: unexpected visual thrill, or any other reason Retaliation; there aren’t many dead spots, and I might have hoped for. What inspired my star Dwayne Johnson, as is often the case, is vocal astonishment was actually the endlike a comically genial cartoon character come credits title card “Written and directed by to life – Wreck-It Ralph with a pulse. But Andrew Niccol,” because as a huge fan of against considerable expectation, and thanks the man’s The Truman Show screenplay and to smart contributions by screenwriters Rhett the writer/director’s beautiful, underrated Reese and Paul Wernick, even adults generally Gattaca – and a moderate fan of the recent averse to generic blow-’em-ups such as this Justin Timberlake vehicle In Time – I was one may find themselves frequently amused. flabbergasted that Niccol could now be It’s tough, after all, to resist a movie in which responsible for such a silly, embarrassing, the commander-in-chief is dealt a vicious endless dud of a film. smack with the reprimand “That’s for the tax There’s this alien race of floating hike,” or one where the prez’s doppelgänger energy balls called Souls, you see, which makes an argument, and a rather hilarious is systematically inhabiting the people of one, for the employment of torture Earth and turning them into shiny-eyed, techniques. “I know they call it a waterboard,” smiling vacuums. One of the Souls’ intended says a grinning Pryce after an act of off-screen victims, however, isn’t losing her humanity

without a fight, and after a feisty teenager named Melanie is taken over by a glowing creature, The Host turns into nothing so much as a laughably serious-minded All of Me with Ronan cast in the Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin roles. Melanie and her alien invader squabble about the visitors’ plans and personal freedoms and which of two interchangeable hunks (Jake Abel and Max Irons) is the cutest, and with this lone doubles act continuing for the rest of the film – and with the Souls slowly, slowly seeking out Melanie and her traveling companions for thorough brainwashing – you find yourself staring at the inert goings-on with slack-jawed amazement, astonished that not one remotely compelling or even vaguely interesting event is taking place over a two-hour running length. Meyer may be responsible for The Host’s fundamental idiocy, but I’m afraid Niccol is to blame for the movie looking and playing like an amateurish Invasion of the Body Snatchers re-designed as a mopey teen romance that even the estimable talents of Ronan, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger can’t salvage. By the time the film mercifully ended, I actually found myself actively missing the charisma and nuance and high style of Taylor Lautner. The mind kind of boggles, doesn’t it? For reviews of Spring Breakers, Admission, The Croods, and other current releases, visit RiverCitiesReader.com. Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/ MikeSchulzNow.

Listen to Mike every Friday at 9am on ROCK 104-9 FM with Dave & Darren

10

What ’s Happenin ’ ’ What ’s Happenin
Music
Wayne “The Train” Hancock
Rock Island Brewing Company Saturday, April 6, 9:30 p.m.

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

A

Jamming with a Professional
encourages play and experimentation with instruments – something Wooten continues to do. While he already plays cello, guitar, and drums in addition to bass, he’s also learning the euphonium, which he said he’ll likely play during his band’s Redstone Room show. “I’ve always wanted to understand the bass completely, and when I say ‘bass’ I don’t mean just guitar,” he said. He noted that it’s a different way for him to play music. “For one, just breathing into it. I’ve always tried to do the same thing with the bass” – breathing with the music. “Well, with this instrument, you have to breathe into it. And also, with this instrument, you’re getting all the notes out of three valves. That’s totally a different concept. For the bass or piano, the notes are laid out in front of me. ... It’s helping me understand music a little bit better.” (Wooten said that his band’s live show features many players switching instruments – even mid-song. “I understand the importance of a show, of giving the audience something to look at.” He called the experience “musically choreographed, physically choreographed.”) While refusing to take “no” from an instrument is second nature to Wooten, it’s more difficult for many of us – or at least we think it is. “That’s one of my biggest tasks, is to get people back to the free thinking ... ,” he said, “when it wasn’t about the instrument; it was about the freedom of expression. And everyone still has it. When you sing in the shower, when you sing driving down the road going to work, you’re not trying to be right; you’re just expressing yourself. That’s like a kid playing air guitar with a smile on his face. ... “It’s already in you. You’ve been hearing good music your whole lives. But we forget all of that just to learn to play an instrument. And there’s no music in the instrument; you have to put it there. But if you forget

COVER STORY

Continued From Page 5

by Jeff Ignatius jeff@rcreader.com

everything you know, it’s going to be hard to put it there.” Victor Wooten will present a workshop and concert on Sunday, April 21, as part of Polyrhythms’ Third Sunday jazz series (Polyrhythms.Ning.com). The workshop begins at 5:30 p.m., and tickets are $5 in advance and $7 at the door. Tickets to the 7:30 p.m. concert are $25. Both events will be held at the Redstone Room (129 Main Street in Davenport). For tickets and more information, visit RiverMusicExperience.org. For more information on Victor Wooten, visit VictorWooten.com.

drews, Antoinette

cclaimed country musician Wayne “The Train” Hancock plays a Rock Island Brewing Company concert on April 6, and you’ll need to be at least 21 to attend. However, all ages are welcome to learn about the artist’s gifts right here! AllMusic.com, for instance, calls Hancock “arguably the finest country traditionalist working the 21st Century country scene.” And Scram Magazine, which describes Hancock’s 2003 CD Swing Time as “a great goddam live album,” raves that Hancock “imbues his material with the kind of I-don’tgive-a-f--- edge that pushes each and every one of these ‘old-fashioned songs’ right up into your face.” Hmm. Given the language, maybe you should be at least 21 to read this article, too. Born in 1965, singer/guitarist Hancock began writing songs at age 12 and by his teen years was already playing juke joints in his native Texas, winning the prestigious Wrangler County Showdown talent competition at age 18. Following six years spent in the military, he embarked on a professional music career in Austin, but interestingly, his rise to success didn’t start with an album. Instead, it began with a role in the stage musical Chippy, which found Hancock

performing alongside such country legends as Joe Ely, Terry Allen, and Robert Earl Keen. The exposure earned from that production, however, did score Hancock a record deal with the independent label Deja Disc, which released the artist’s 1995 solo debut Thunderstorms & Neon Signs, a word-ofmouth smash whose limited distribution still resulted in more than 20,000 copies sold. And from there, Hancock has gone on to not only release seven additional Western-swing and rockabilly albums – among them Ride, released in February – but also earn massive praise for his thrilling country stylings. The Montreal Gazette writes, “Hancock revives the honky-tonk aesthetics of Hank Williams and Ernest Tubb and dips into the Western-swing well of Bob Willis, making those styles seem utterly contemporary.” And the aforementioned Scram calls Hancock’s music “more infectious than poison ivy, and twice as hard to shake,” so be sure to bring your dancing shoes to the man’s RIBCO performance. A healthy supply of calamine lotion also wouldn’t hurt. Wayne “The Train” Hancock performs locally with opener Patrick Sweany, and more information on the night is available by calling (309)793-4060 or visiting RIBCO.com.

Theatre

Death of a Salesman

Richmond Hill Barn Theatre Thursday, April 11, through Sunday, April 21

“W

illy? Is that you?” “It’s all right, Linda. I came back.” “Why? What happened? Did something happen, Willy?” “No, nothing happened. But I’m tired to the death. I couldn’t make it. I just couldn’t make it, Linda.” “Well, you’ll just have to take a rest, Willy. You can’t continue this way. I have an idea. How about a night at the theatre? “I just got back from Florida.” “But there’s a wonderful show at the Richmond Hill Barn Theatre in Geneseo, and it’s all about a man in your line of work! It’s Death of a Salesman, the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic by Arthur Miller that won last year’s Tony Award for Best Revival of a Play and Best Director!” “Death of a Salesman ... ?” “Well, yes ... it’s a very serious play, Willy. But it’s such an exhilarating serious play! And it also has a number of truly funny moments, and features some of the most stirring dialogue ever written for the stage, and is fantastically insightful about family relationships and pride and the pursuit of the American dream ... .”

“Is that so?” “Oh, and actors just adore it, because those roles are so beautifully written! Over the years, Death of a Salesman has won awards for Dustin Hoffman and John Jim Driscoll Malkovich and Brian Dennehy and Elizabeth Franz and Arthur Kennedy and ... .” “Isn’t that remarkable?” “The Geneseo production is being directed by James Fairchild – he directed that Greater Tuna we saw at Richmond Hill last year, remember? And there are so many terrific, familiar talents in the cast: Jim Driscoll, Jackie Skiles, Dana Moss-Peterson, Justin Raver, Bruce Carmen, Bill Hudson, Bryan Woods, Stacey McKean Herrick, Molly McLaughlin ... !” “It sounds like a great thing! Let’s do it! Let’s go!” “Oh, that’s wonderful, darling! It’s changing! I can feel it changing!” “Without a question! Come on! Get in the car!” “Um ... . Maybe I should drive.” Death of a Salesman runs April 11 through 21 – with performances at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays and 3 p.m. on Sundays – and more information and tickets are available by calling (309)944-2244 or visiting RHPlayers.com.

Music
S

Big Damn Bl

The Redstone Room Thursday, April 4, 7

Theatr
Hair

o ... who out t Besides, of last year at this ti the freakin’ 80s an day ... ! Sorry. I’m writ spring, and it’s 16 red with anger. The actual ans Davenport’s Reds Damn Blues Rev energy country/b sold-out crowds i Kentucky since it concert event is n

The District Theatre Friday, April 12, thro

H

ashish. Sodom That’s righ spring at the Distri By which I mean the spring musical because those are t from the venue’s fo of Hair! (What did

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

11

by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com

c

m 7:30 p.m.

lues Revolution Tour

there has the Big Damn Blues? course, those of us who remember ime, when the temperatures were in and we weren’t freakin’ freezing every

ting this on the first morning of 6 degrees. I’m not blue so much as

swer is: the proprietors of stone Room, which hosts the Big volution Tour on April 4. A highblues extravaganza that has played to in Tennessee, Ohio, Michigan, and ts March 6 kick-off, this electrifying now set to wow Quad Citians with

re

the exceptional talents of three exciting touring ensembles. One of them is the band led by Jimbo Mathus, widely known as the front man for the famously eclectic Squirrel Nut Zippers. Performing alongside his Tri-State Coalition musicians, singer/songwriter/guitarist Mathus will surely have Redstone Room patrons jumping with the impassioned, smoky stylings that led OffBeat.com to praise his “combination of truck-drivin’, dip-spittin’ country music and evil-lurkin’, whiskey-drinkin’ dirty blues, with themes of salvation sprinkled throughout.” Joining Mathus on tour are the acclaimed duo Moreland & Arbuckle – composed of guitarist Aaron Moreland and harpist Dustin Arbuckle – whose decade-long career has found the men merging Delta 1) faith 2) friends 3) home 4) pot 5) schoolin’

blues, folk, rock, traditional country, soul, and roots music into a whole that AllMusic.com calls “powerful and expressive,” boasting artists who “charge ahead with locomotive force.” And headlining the Redstone Room’s night (and inspiring the tour’s title) are the country-blues musicians of The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band (pictured), whose new album Between the Ditches debuted at number one on the iTunes blues chart and number-two on the Billboad blues chart. After an evening spent with these exuberant talents, you’ll no doubt understand why Music City Roots raves about their “gusto and original vision,” and why Living Blues insists that “the tent-revival, almost punk energy of the Big Damn Band is a refreshing splash of cold water to the face.” ’Cause that’s what we need right now. Cold water. Because it’s obviously not cold enough these ... !!! Sorry again. I promise I’ll be better by June. For more information and tickets to the Big Damn Blues Revolution Tour, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. filled District Theatre experience with some trivia? Fans of the score know that, as the musical’s free-lovin’ characters sing, “I Got Life.” But according to the lyrics for the song “Ain’t Got No,” there’s actually quite a bit that Hair’s hippies don’t got. Which of the items above and to the left is not among the things lacking for the “Ain’t Got No” singers? Hair runs at the District Theatre April 12 through 28, with half-price preview performances on April 10 and 11, and more information and tickets are available by calling (309)235-1654 or visiting DistrictTheatre.com.

What Else Is Happenin’
MUSIC
Thursday, April 4 – Grizzly Bear. Brooklyn-based independent rockers in concert, with an opening set by Owen Pallett. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $30-32. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Saturday, April 6 – Mucca Pazza. The 30-piece, rock-fueled marching band in concert, with opening sets by Mumford’s and Brooks Strause & the Gory Details. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $12-15. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Saturday, April 6, and Sunday, April 7 – A Procession Winding Around Me. Spring concert with the professional vocal ensemble the Nova Singers, featuring Fareed Haque on guitar. Saturday: Knox College’s Kresge Recital Hall (2 East South Street, Galesburg), 7:30 p.m. Sunday: First Congregational Church of Moline (2201 Seventh Avenue, Moline), 4 p.m. $15-18. For tickets and information, call (309)341-7038 or visit NovaSingers.com. Wednesday, April 10 – 2Cellos. Concert with the award-winning string duo. The Orpheum Theatre (57

e ough Sunday, April 28

my. Going down. ht, folks! It must be ict Theatre! n it must be time for at the District Theatre, three of the song titles orthcoming production d you think I was talking

Answer: 8. Trust me, with Tristan Layne Tapscott directing, and a cast including Bryan Tank, Chris Causer, Kelly Lohrenz, Sara King, Joe Maubach, Kiarri D. A Holman, and Nina Schreckengost, there’s talent all over this thing.

about?) As likely no one needs to be told, Hair is the legendary counterculture musical that made a permanent impact on American theatre beginning with its 1967 debut, when its celebration of hippie culture, anti-war sentiments, and flower power was viewed as a collective nose-thumbing at traditional stage entertainments of the period. Nowadays, every newly created rock musical owes a debt of gratitude to this seminal work, one whose score boasts such timeless hits as

6) shoes 7) smokes 8) talent 9) underwear 10) work

“Aquarius,” “Good Morning, Starshine,” “Easy to Be Hard,” “Where Do I Go?”, and “The Flesh Failures (Let the Sun Shine in),” and whose continued stage popularity was evidenced by Hair’s huge box-office success – and Best Revival of a Musical Tony Award – when the show returned to Broadway in 2009. What say we prepare for this new, tune-

Continued On Page 12

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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Continued From Page 11

What Else Is Happenin’
South Kellogg Street, Galesburg). 7:30 p.m. $15-45. For tickets and information, call (309)343-2299 or visit TheOrpheum. org. Thursday, April 11 – America’s Music Kickoff Event. Opening celebration for the area-wide program “America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway,” featuring a performance by The Candymakers. RME Community Stage (131 West Second Street, Davenport). 4:30 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, call (563)326-1333 or visit AmericasMusicQC. com. Friday, April 12 – ETHEL String Quartet. Concert with the classical/ crossover string musicians and Quad City Arts Visiting Artists. St. Ambrose University’s Rogalski Center Ballroom (518 West Locust Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $5. For tickets and information, call (563)333-6251 or visit QuadCityArts.com. Friday, April 12 – Trampled Under Foot. Winners of the 2008 International Blues Challenge in concert. The Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport). 9 p.m. $10-12. For tickets and information, call (563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. Saturday, April 13, and Sunday, April 14 – Quad City Symphony Orchestra. The Masterworks VI concerts featuring conductor Mark Russell Smith and pianist Thomas Sauer, with a program including Rimsky-Korsakov’s Russian Easter Overture, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4. Saturday: Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street, Davenport), 7:30 p.m. Sunday: Augustana College’s Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh Avenue, Rock Island), 2 p.m. $10-53. For tickets and information, call (563)322-0931 or visit QCSymphony. com. Saturday, April 13 – The Bernie Worrell Orchestra. Concert with the founding member of ParliamentFunkadelic and his ensemble, with an opening set by Jaik Willis. Rock Island Brewing Company (1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 9:30 p.m. $12-15. For information, call (309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com. Monday, April 15 – Billy Bragg. British folk artist and activist in concert, featuring an opening set by Kim Churchill. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $30-32. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Wednesday, April 17 – California Guitar Trio & Montreal Guitar Trio. Concert collaboration between six awardwinning string players. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $18-22. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. OldCreamery.com. Friday, April 5, through Sunday, April 21 – Blackbird. David Harrower’s dark relationship drama, directed by Margaret Eginton. Riverside Theatre (213 North Gilbert Street, Iowa City) ThursdaySaturday 7;30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $15-28. For tickets and information, call (319)3387672 or visit RiversideTheatre.org. Saturday, April 6 – Godspell. Stephen Schwartz’s long-running biblical musical presented by Dino Hayz and Pastor Robb McCoy. Riverside United Methodist Church (712 16th Street, Moline). 4:30 p.m. Donations encouraged. For information, e-mail info@centerforliving. org or RvrsideRobb@mediacombb.net. Tuesday, April 9 – Kindur: The Adventurous Life of Icelandic Sheep. Theatrical production of music, dance, art, culture, and digital media by the performance artists of Copagnia TPO, in a Hancher Auditorium Visiting Artists presentation. Coralville Center for the Performing Arts (1301 Fifth Street, Coralville). 7 p.m. $10-25. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www.Hancher.UIowa.edu. Thursday, April 11, through

THEATRE

Thursday, April 4, through Sunday, April 7 – Something’s Afoot. Murdermystery musical presented by Quad City Music Guild, directed by Martha Taylor. Prospect Park Auditorium (1584 34th Avenue, Moline). Thursday-Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $11-16. For tickets and information, call (309)762-6610 or visit QCMusicGuild.com. Thursday, April 4, through Sunday, April 21 – Freud’s Last Session. Author Mark St. Germain’s therapy-themed comedic drama. Old Creamery Theatre (3023 220th Trail, Amana). Thursday and Sunday 3 p.m., Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m. $18-27.50. For tickets and information, call (319)622-6194 or visit

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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Saturday, May 11 – How I Became a Pirate. Family musical comedy based on the children’s book by Melinda Long. Circa ’21 Dinner Playhouse (1828 Third Avenue, Rock Island). Scheduled 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. performances Tuesday-Saturday. $8.50. For tickets and information, call (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.com. Thursday, April 11, through Saturday, April 20 – Blue Sky Merchants. Debuting Hollywood comedy by area author John Turner, directed by Steve Flanigin. Scott Community College’s Student Life Center (500 Belmont Road, Bettendorf). ThursdaySaturday 7 p.m. For information, e-mail sflanigin@eicc.edu. Friday, April 12, through Sunday, April 21 – She Stoops to Conquer: Or, the Mistakes of a Night. Oliver Gioldsmith’s period-comedy classic, directed by Kristin Clippard. University of Iowa’s E.C. Mabie Theatre (200 North Riverside Drive, Iowa City). ThursdaySaturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2p.m. $10-17. For tickets and information, call (319)3351160 or visit Theatre.UIowa.edu. Friday, April 12, through Sunday,

April 14 – The Broken Chord. Hancher Auditorium’s presentation of Working Group Theatre’s memory-loss drama weaving direct testimony with poetic storytelling. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). Friday and Saturday 7:30 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. $10-35. For tickets and information, call (319)335-1160 or visit http://www. Hancher.UIowa.edu.

DANCE

Friday, April 12, through Sunday, April 14 – Spring Fling Polka Fest. Three-day dance event featuring live music by Ryan Herman, Karl Hartwich, The Rhythm Playboys, Karl & the Country Dutchmen, and Barefoot Becky & the Ivanhoe Dutchmen. Walcott Coliseum (116 East Bryant Street, Walcott). Friday 7-10:30 p.m., $7. Saturday noon-8 p.m., $15. Sunday 1-5 p.m., $8. $25 for all three days. For tickets and information, call (563)285-5989 or visit EasternIowaPolkaClub.Ning.com. Friday, April 5 – Mission Creek Festival Lit Crawl. Readings in

numerous venues showcasing more than 60 fiction, nonfiction, and poetry authors representing more than 15 publishers. Downtown Iowa City. 5-9 p.m. Free admission. For information, visit MissionFreak.com. Tuesday, April 9 – Elizabeth Strout. Pulitzer prize-winning author of 2009’s Olive Kitteridge discusses her latest novel, The Burgess Boys. Prairie Lights Books (15 South Dubuque Street, Iowa City). 7 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (319)337-2681 or visit PrairieLights.com.

p.m. $5-7. For tickets and information, call (563)324-1933 or visit Putnam.org.

VISUAL ART

Friday, April 12 – Pizza Face Eating Falafel. Traveling video-art program created by mixed-media artist Keren Shavit and Michal Rubinstein, production manager with Israel’s Haifa Museum of Art. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. Free admission. For information, call (309)200-0978 or visit RozzTox.com. Saturday, April 6 – CCKMA (Cancer Can Kiss My Ass) Event. Sixth-annual survivor celebration featuring guest speakers Dr. David Bender and Dr. Michael Goodheart of the University of Iowa Gynecologic Oncology Department, raffle prizes, live and silent auctions, a 50/50 drawing, music by EIO Entertainment, and more. Quad-Cities Waterfront Convention Center (1777 Isle Parkway, Bettendorf). 6 p.m. $25, free for ages 12 and under. For tickets and information, call (309)236-3629 or visit CCKMA-QC.org.

COMEDY

Friday, April 5 – Tig Notaro & Janeane Garofalo. Standup comediennes perform in a Mission Creek Festival presentation. Englert Theatre (221 East Washington Street, Iowa City). 8 p.m. $22-25. For tickets and information, call (319)688-2653 or visit Englert.org. Tuesday, April 9 – The Silk Road. Screenings in the museum’s World Adventure series, presented by filmmaker Marlin Darrah. Putnam Museum (1717 West 12th Street, Davenport). 1, 4, and 7

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14

Ask

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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the

I’m going to propose to my girlfriend, and it seems there’s this trend of doing crazy, elaborate things to ask a girl to marry you. I know I can’t compete with the guys like the New York City dude I just read about who threw down $45,000 to pop the question. But even if friends help me out for free, I don’t know whether I can make my proposal cool enough to go viral like the Portland guy who had his choreographed and filmed. – Don’t Want to Disappoint “Will you marry me?” is a pretty powerful question. Asking this of a woman who loves you can provoke tears, and not because you didn’t hire Beyoncé to sing “Put a Ring on It” and spend a year training a humpback whale to swim by at exactly the right moment and shoot the ring out its blowhole. Regarding the proposals you mention, the New York guy is 27-year-old onlinemarketing-company honcho Josh Ogle. He wrote on Reddit.com that he actually spent around $13K on a lavish proposal evening, starting with his popping the question to Nataliya Lavryshyn on a Manhattan hotel rooftop, decorated for the event with pages of Pablo Neruda’s poetry. This price included $3,500 for a professional “proposal planner” and a $1,500 post-proposal private dinner cooked by a celebrity chef. (Media outlets came up with the $45K proposal cost by adding in the $21K custom-made ring and the $10K post-engagement European “honeymoon.”) As easy as it is to mock the guy for outsourcing his proposal, Ogle is reportedly a self-made multi-millionaire (apparently, after growing up poor while his dad was in prison), so for him, $45K probably spends like $45 does for the rest of us. The Portland guy, actor and theatrical director Isaac Lamb, pulled together 60-plus friends and family members in an elaborate (and wildly adorable) lip-synched song-anddance routine to Bruno Mars’ “Marry You.” His girlfriend, choreographer Amy Frankel, listened to the song on headphones from the tailgate of a Honda CRV pulling her slowly down the street while everyone danced in formation behind it. Lamb then got down on one knee and said to Frankel, “You have already given me a lifetime of happiness. Will

Will You Flash Mob Me?

Advice Goddess

you let me spend the rest of my life trying to give you the same?” (Not surprisingly, she said yes.) Although the trend toward extreme proposing is surely the lovechild of reality TV and social media, it has something in common with the mythic quest – an epic mission a man would go on to prove his love and worth to a woman. Of course, these days, the most dangerous journey a man can usually take for a woman is a trip to 7-Eleven on bald tires. So conspicuous romancing can act as a stand-in proving ground – an extravagant display that a man’s “all in” and somebody the woman can count on ... to keep life exciting and to call a singing, dancing, plumbing flash mob whenever the garbage disposal’s broken. That said, you’re asking a woman to grow old with you, not auditioning for America’s Got Proposal Talent. If you are “all in,” you probably show your girlfriend that in a lot of little ways every day. Keep in mind that Ogle’s and Lamb’s proposals reflected who they are and will likely continue to be – a really rich guy and an artsy, creative guy, respectively. Your proposal likewise needs to reflect who you are and tell your girlfriend that you get who she is – starting with whether she’s someone who’d be horrified to have an intimate moment such as a marriage proposal take place on the Jumbotron. The truth is: There’s no need for Jumbotrons or trying to hire away the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse from some Bar Mitzvah gig they picked up. Even if every one of Lamb’s dancers stayed home in bed, his proposal would have been extremely moving simply because of the words he spoke. Put your effort into telling your girlfriend why you always want to be there to hold her hand, even when it gets all wrinkly. Couple that with an essential element from the elaborate proposers – delighting a woman with the element of surprise. You can do this by planning your proposal around something your girlfriend once said (and will be amazed you remembered) or just by serving her toast a slightly different way: with a heart cut in the middle with the ring inside it. This sort of proposal sends a message: “I love you and want to spend the rest of my life with you” (not to be confused with “Bet I can get more YouTube hits than that big dog teaching the puppy to go down the stairs!”).

BY AMY ALKON

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River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

15

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY
ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Art cannot be modern,” said Austrian painter Egon Schiele. “Art is primordially eternal.” I love that idea. Not all of the artifacts called “art” fit that scrupulous definition, of course. Katy Perry’s music and the film Wreck-It Ralph might have some entertainment value, but they’re not primordially eternal. I bring this up, Aries, because I think you have entered a particularly wild and timeless phase of your own development. Whether or not you are literally an artist, you have a mandate to create your life story as a primordially eternal work of art. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “All my best ideas come from having no answer,” said pioneer filmmaker John Cassavetes, “from not knowing.” I hope that testimony cheers you up, Taurus. As hard as it may be for you to imagine, you are on the verge of a breakthrough. As you surf the chaotic flow and monitor the confusing hubbub, you are brewing the perfect conditions for an outburst of creativity. Rejoice in the blessing of not knowing! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Sant” is a Hindi word that comes from a Sanskrit verb meaning “to be good” and “to be real.” Personally, I know a lot of people who are either real or good. But few are both. The good ones tend to be overly polite, and the real ones don’t put a high priority on being nice. So here’s your assignment, Gemini: to be good and real; to have compassionate intentions even as you conduct yourself with a high degree of authenticity; to bestow blessings everywhere you go while at the same time being honest and clear and deep. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you have the power to pull off this strenuous feat. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let’s take a look back at the first three months of 2013. How have you been doing? If I’m reading the astrological markers accurately, you have jettisoned a portion of the psychic gunk that had accumulated in you during the past six years. You have partially redeemed the shadowy side of your nature, and you have to some degree ripened the most immature part. There’s also the matter of your heart. You have managed some healing of a wound that had festered there for a long time. So here’s my question for you: Is it possible for you to do more of this good work? The target date for completion is your birthday. LEO (July 23-August 22): Naturalist Charles Darwin formulated the theory of evolution, which has been one of history’s most influential hypotheses. A crucial event in his early development as a scientist was a five-year boat trip he took around the world when he was in his 20s. The research he conducted along the way seeded many of his unique ideas. The writing he did established his reputation as a noteworthy author. And yet before his journey, his father tried to talk him out of embarking, calling it a “wild scheme” and “a useless undertaking.” Did your parents or other authorities ever have a similar response to one of your brilliant projects? If so, now would be a good time to heal the wound caused by their opposition. VIRGO (August 23-September 22): I’ve got three sets of affirmations for you, Virgo. Say them out loud and see if they might work for you. (1) “I will be engrossed in fascinating experiences that feed my curiosity, but I will not be obsessed with grueling frustrations that drain my energy.” (2) “I will be committed to love if it opens my eyes and heart, but I will not be infatuated with maddening conundrums that jiggle my fear.” (3) “I will give myself freely to learning opportunities that offer me valuable lessons I can use to improve my life, but I will be skeptical toward rough-edged tests that ask far more from me than they offer in return.” LIBRA (September 23-October 22): “Pole of inaccessibility” is a term that explorers use to identify places on the Earth that are hard – and interesting! – to get to. On each continent, it’s usually considered to be the spot that’s farthest from the coastline. For instance, there’s a pole of inaccessibility near the frozen center of Antarctica. Its elevation is more than 12,000 feet, and it has the planet’s coldest average temperatures. As for the oceanic pole of inaccessibility, it’s an area in the South Pacific that’s most remote from land. By my reckoning, Libra, you would benefit from identifying what your own personal version of this point is, whether it’s literal or metaphorical. I think it’s also a great time to transform your relationship with it. SCORPIO (October 23-November 21): Every April, the ancient Romans celebrated a festival known as Robigalia. Among the rites they performed were ceremonies to exorcise the god of rust and mildew. I suggest you consider reviving that old practice, Scorpio. You would benefit from spending a few days waging war against insidious rot. You could start by scrubbing away all the sludge, scum, and gunk from your home, car, and workplace. Next, make a similar effort on a metaphoric level. Scour the muck, glop, and grime out of your psyche. SAGITTARIUS (November 22-December 21): “You know that place between sleep and awake, the place where you can still remember dreaming? That’s where I’ll always love you. That’s where I’ll be waiting.” Tinker Bell says that to Peter Pan in J.M. Barrie’s famous story. Sometime soon, I think you should whisper words like those to a person or animal you love. It’s time for you to be as romantic and lyrical as possible. You need to bestow and attract the nourishment that comes from expressing extravagant tenderness. For even better results, add this sweetness from French

by Rob Brezsny
poet Paul Valéry: “I am what is changing secretly in you.” And try this beauty from Walt Whitman: “We were together. I forget the rest.” CAPRICORN (December 22-January 19): Naturalist John Muir (1838-1914) had an ecstatic relationship with the California wilderness. He studied it as a scientist and he worshiped it as a mystical devotee. During the course of his communion with the glaciers and peaks of the Sierra Nevada mountains, he came close to seeing them as living entities that evolved over long periods of time. “Glaciers move in tides,” he wrote. “So do mountains. So do all things.” With Muir as your inspiration, I invite you to identify the very gradual currents and tides that have flowed for years through your own life, Capricorn. It’s prime time to deepen your understanding and appreciation of the big, slowmoving cycles that have brought you to where you are today. AQUARIUS (January 20-February 18): American author William Faulkner won a Nobel Prize for literature, an indication that he had abundant talent. The prose he wrote was often experimental, cerebral, and complex. He was once asked what he would say to readers who found it difficult to grasp his meaning “even after reading it two or three times.” His reply: “Read it four times.” My counsel to you, Aquarius, is similar. When faced with a challenging event or situation that taxes your understanding, keep working to understand it even past the point where you would normally quit. There will be rewards, I promise. PISCES (February 19-March 20): “Dear Rob: I just consulted an astrologer, and he told me that my planets are very weak because they’re in the wrong houses and have bad aspects. Please tell me what this means. Am I cursed? Is there any way to remedy my afflictions? – Paranoid Pisces.” Dear Pisces: Whoever told you that nonsense is an incompetent astrologer. You shouldn’t heed him. There’s no such thing as one’s planets being weak or being in the wrong houses or having bad aspects. There may be challenges, but those are also opportunities. Luckily, the coming weeks will be prime time for you Pisceans to overthrow the influence of inept “experts” and irresponsible authorities such as him. Reclaim your power to define your own fate from anyone who has stolen it from you. Homework: Imagine a bedtime story you’d like to hear and the person you’d like to hear it from. Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES & DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at

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16

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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BAD TO WORSE · April 4, 2013

March 21 Answers: Right

March 21 Crossword Answers

ACROSS 1. Bloke 5. Shot in billiards 10. Improbable tale 15. Overtake 19. Put freight aboard 20. Wine quality 21. Hunter of myth 22. Raceway shape 23. Calculation 25. Show a response 26. _ virilis 27. Motown’s town 28. Start of a quip by Demetri Martin: 3 wds. 31. Havens 33. Nestling hawk 34. Formerly called 35. Guarantee 38. Chemical compound 40. Fatherly 45. Consecrate 46. Fruit with a stone 47. Crippled 49. _ Pasha 50. Brainwave reading: Abbr. 51. Tropical resin 53. Caprine cry 54. Neighbor of Minn. 55. Impart 57. Voter anagram 59. _ Domingo de los Colorados 61. Spare 62. Part 2 of quip: 5 wds. 66. Disreputable paper 67. Kind of rose 68. Relief 69. Part 3 of quip: 5 wds. 79. Opposing one 80. Find at a dig site 81. Vestige 82. Sweeps 84. City in Normandy 85. Calendar abbr. 86. Unreactive 88. Unknown Jane 89. Dir. letters 90. Bend in a road 93. Sour

94. Like a bungler 96. Blushing: Hyph. 98. City in Morocco 100. Solar phenomena 101. Furrow 102. Jot 103. Cheers for the team 105. End of the quip: 2 wds. 111. Wobbles 115. Minced oath 116. _ Street, Memphis 117. Hilarious 119. Saharan 120. Archenemy of Bugs 121. Early computer 122. Beige 123. Count 124. Remains 125. Slow on the uptake 126. 500 sheets DOWN 1. Garbed 2. Fabled racer 3. Underground passage 4. Stony 5. Loose-fitting shirt 6. Rocky ridge 7. Bosh! 8. Drop 9. Large, heavy knife 10. Antebrachium 11. Spheres 12. Influence unfavorably 13. Sets of points 14. International agreement 15. Ceramist 16. Declare openly 17. “The Forsyte _” 18. Do in 24. Grating in sound 29. Bud on a spud 30. Embryonic plant 32. Mariners 35. Man found in Babel 36. Driving hazard 37. Dal _ 39. Moves 40. Honky-tonk instrument

41. Teacher of Guarneri and Stradivari 42. Bottom 43. Resembling wings 44. Analogous 46. Goddess in Hinduism 48. Blind as _ _ 52. Tenant 54. Atelier 56. Northern Territory capital 58. Stage skirts 59. Kick off 60. Medieval war engine 63. Morse code signal 64. Pasture 65. Chinese dynasty 69. Pointless 70. Knight’s mount 71. Little push 72. Output 73. Then, not now 74. Genus of heather 75. Health of a kind 76. Like a cooler 77. Noted consumerist 78. Search blindly 79. Maple genus 83. Hardens 87. Farm machine 90. Smear 91. “The Hunt for Red _” 92. Some retailers 93. Embarrassed 95. More vile 97. Wes Craven’s Krueger 99. _ _ glance 100. Woolly mass 102. Ait 104. Kett and James 105. Cauterize 106. Creature of folklore 107. Flexible armor 108. Proofer’s notation 109. Tubers 110. Newcastle upon _ 112. Behold!: Lat. 113. _ avis 114. Undesireable neighborhood 118. Misdeed

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Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

17

2013/04/04 (Thu)

St. Rock Falls, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Grizzly Bear - Owen Pallett - Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Zero to Sixty, 811 East 2nd St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Lojo Russo (noon) - Davenport North & Wood Intermediate Jazz Band (7pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: JEFF the Brotherhood - PUJOL - The Olympics - Wolves in the Attic -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Mister Lies - Ex-Action Model -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Pallbearer - Blizzard at Sea - Big Box - Sweet Chariot -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic w/ Jeff Smallwood -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL

Avey Brothers Blues Jam -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL Robert Jon & the Wreck -RIBCO, 1815 Chuck Murphy -The Cooler, 311 W. 2nd 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
You, Me, & Apollo -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL 2013/04/05 (Fri)

THURSDAY

4

Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band - Moreland & Arbuckle - Jimbo Mathus - The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

2013/04/06 (Sat)

SATURDAY

6

Kooby’s Karaoke Sing-Off -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL

FRIDAY

5

5th Gear Band -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Alan Sweet & the Candymakers - Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Band du Jour (5:30pm) - Flash Point (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Big Joe’s DJ & Karaoke Show - V.F.W. Post 9128, 2814 State Street Bettendorf, IA Chuck Murphy -Tavern on the Square, 108 E 5th St. Tipton, IA Cosmic - 11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Deja Vu Rendezvous featuring This Must Be the Band - Grood -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Gray Wolf Band - Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Jason Jackson -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA

The Bernie Worrell Orchestra @ RIBCO – April 13
Karaoke Night -Sneaky Pete’s, 207 Cody Rd. N. LeClaire, IA Kooby’s Karaoke Sing-Off -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Limbs - Radcon - Bulk - RME (River Music Experience), 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Live Lunch w/ Rachel Schuldt (noon) - David G. Smith (6pm) - Robert Jon & the Wreck (8:30pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Future Rock - Zeta June - Chasing Shade -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Joe Pug - The Pines - Frank Fairfield Douglas Kramer Nye -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Zammuto - Trouble Lights - Snowblink - Taser Island -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Mississippi Misfits -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Night Light -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA North of 40 -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Open Mic Night (5:30pm) -River Valley Library, 214 S. Main St. Port Byron, IL Rob Dahms (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Ron Johnson One-Man Band -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Southern Thunder Karaoke and DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL

The Brat Pack - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Tony Hamilton Orchestra -CASI (Center for Active Seniors), 1035 W. Kimberly Road Davenport, IA Willis and Wilcox -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Carrie Rodriguez - CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Chuck Murphy -Heineejo’s, 340 Mill St Toronto, IA Cody Rhodes (5pm) - Del Fox Band (8pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Corporate Rock -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Cross Creek Karaoke - Rumors & Excuses Pub, 230 Main St. Columbus Junction, IA Crossroads -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Dress Up & Dance: Totally Awesome ‘80s -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA Gray Wolf Band - Edje Nightclub at Jumer’s Casino and Hotel, I-280 & Hwy 92 Rock Island, IL Jason Jackson -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Jeff & Marcia Duo - Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL John Michael Montgomery (8pm) 5th Gear Band (9:30pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Johnny Cash and the Sun Rocket Railway: A Tribute to the Music of Sun Records - Princeton Boll’s Community Center, 428 S. River Dr. Princeton, IA Josh Duffee & His Orchestra -Rhythm City Casino, 101 W. River Dr. Davenport, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Keep off the Grass Trio -Bleyart’s Tap, 2210 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

Lynn Allen -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Mission Creek Music Festival: Exitmusic - Caroline Smith & the Goodnight Sleeps - The Lonelyhearts - Alex Body -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Pete Swanson - ITAL - Container - Cuticle -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: The Diplomats of Solid Sound - The Miles Kean Epictet -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Mucca Pazza - Mumford’s - Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Nervous Rex - The Office, 305 3rd St Sherrard, IL Pennies on the Rail - Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA RME Guitar Circle (2pm) - River Prairie Minstrels (6pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Roadkill Ghost Choir -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) - Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Saturday Jazz Brunch w/ the Brett Wahlberg Trio - Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL The Fry Daddies (6pm) - Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL The Karry Outz - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Continued On Page 18

18

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Continued From Page 17

John O’Meara, Rob Dahms, & Jim Stroehle -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. Wayne “The Train” Hancock - Patrick East Moline, IL Sweany -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Musical Morning (7am) -Brewed AwakIsland, IL enings, 221 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic at the Paddlehweel hosted 2013/04/07 (Sun) by Silly C & Slack Man -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St BetBettendorf Park Band Spring Contendorf, IA cert -Herbert Goettsch Community Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Center, 2204 Grant St. Bettendorf, IA Burlington Iowa City, IA Cedar Island Band (2pm) -Riverside Ca- Philip Hemmo -Galvin Fine Arts Center, sino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 2101 Gaines St. Davenport, IA 22 Riverside, IA Cross Creek Karaoke - Bootleggers 2013/04/09 (Tue) Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, Detroit Larry Davison and Chris Avey 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA (6pm) - The Muddy Waters, 1708 ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA State St. Bettendorf, IA Freddie Steenbock Duo (8am) -Daven- Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) - RME port American Legion, 702 W. 35th Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. St. Davenport, IA Davenport, IA Holly’s Buddies (4pm) - Karaoke Night Johnson Creek Stranglers - The Mill, (9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Manny Lopez Trio (10:30am) - Brady Locust Davenport, IA Street Chop House, Radisson QC Pla- Kyle Eastwood -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA za Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Mission Creek Music Festival: Deer- Open Jam w/ the Harris Collection - Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. hoof - Wet Hair - Love Songs for Davenport, IA Lonely Monsters - The Mill, 120 E Open Mic Night - Cool Beanz CoffeeBurlington Iowa City, IA house, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Songwriters Night -Studio Pub, 1465 Open Mic w/ Jeff Smallwood -Studio 19th St. East Moline, IL Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Sunday Jazz Brunch (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St. Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Davenport, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -Mc2013/04/08 (Mon) Manus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 2013/04/10 (Wed) State St. Bettendorf, IA ETHEL (6:30pm) -Moline Public Library, 2Cellos -Orpheum Theatre, 57 S. Kellogg 3210 41st St. Moline, IL St. Galesburg, IL

SUNDAY

7

TUESDAY

9

Fierce Bad Rabbit @ The Redstone Room – April 16
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Caravan of Thieves -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Chuck Murphy (5pm) - Greenbriar Restaurant and Lounge, 4506 27th St Moline, IL Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Phatswagg -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA The Hitman (6pm) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Water Liars - American Dust - BreakUp Art - Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL 2013/04/11 (Thu)

Karaoke Night - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

MONDAY

8

WEDNESDAY

10

Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night - Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Ren Edstrand Blues Jam -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Shiloh Terry -Zero to Sixty, 811 East 2nd St. Davenport, IA That 1 Guy - Captain Ahab’s Motorcycle Club - Wasted Wednesday: DJ Pat - Darius Bowie - DJ Sweets - DJ

THURSDAY

11

America’s Music Blues Performance: The Candymakers (4:30pm) - QC United Presents Raise the Roof Thursday (6pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA Jam Sessions with John O’Meara & Friends - The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Juno What?! - Black Forrest Hamm -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Karaoke Night -Zero to Sixty, 811 East 2nd St. Davenport, IA Knox-Rootabaga Jazz Festival: Knox Faculty & Friends Combo - McGillacuddy’s, 58 S. Cherry Galesburg, IL Open Mic Night -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Open Mic Night w/ Karl -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic w/ Jeff Smallwood -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Trampled Under Foot - King of the Tramps -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Two Peace -Barrel House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA University of Iowa Jazz: Guitar Ensemble & Andrew DiRuzza Quartet (6pm) - The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2013/04/12 (Fri)

Big Joe’s DJ & Karaoke Show - V.F.W. Post 9128, 2814 State Street Bettendorf, IA Bob Dorr -The Hub, 402 Main St Cedar Falls, IA Caught in the Act -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA Chris Avey Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Chuck Murphy - Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Cross Creek Karaoke -Stickman’s, 1510 N. Harrison St. Davenport, IA

Dirt Road Rockers - Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Avey Brothers Blues Jam -Rascals Live, Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA 1418 15th St. Moline, IL ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 Locust C.J. the DJ -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock St. Davenport, IA Island, IL ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill,
Chuck Murphy -The Lucky Frog Bar and Grill, 313 N Salina St McCausland, IA 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Akron Family - M. Geddes Gangras -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA

Aaron Kamm & the One Drops -Iowa City

FRIDAY

00 12

ETHEL String Quartet -Rogalski Center - St. Ambrose University, 518 W. Locust St. Davenport, IA Jazz After Five w/ The Steve Grismore Trio (5pm) - Joshua James (10pm) -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Karen Michael (5:30pm) - Funktastic Five (8:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Knox-Rootabaga Jazz Festival: The Deep Blue Organ Trio - Knox Alumni Big Band -McGillacuddy’s, 58 S. Cherry Galesburg, IL Kooby’s Karaoke Sing-Off -Wide Open Bar & Grill, 425 15th St. Moline, IL Live Lunch w/ Tony Hoeppner (noon) - Mike Cochrane (7pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Coffeehouse -First Lutheran Church - Rock Island, 1600 20th St. Rock Island, IL Project Pickle Farm -Blueport Junction, 6605 W River Dr Davenport, IA

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com • Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Cosmic -Daiquiri Factory, 1809 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Gloria Hardiman - Bruce Teague - Johnny Kilowatt Blues Band -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jeff & Marcia Duo - Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Jim the Mule -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Just Chords -Kilkenny’s, 300 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Karaoke King -Chuck’s Tap, 1731 W. 6th St. Davenport, IA Knox-Rootabaga Jazz Festival: Ben Williams & Sound Effect - Knox Jazz Ensemble (5pm) - Orpheum Theatre, 57 S. Kellogg St. Galesburg, IL Kooby’s Karaoke Sing-Off -Headquarters Bar & Grill, 119 E. 22nd Ave. Coal Valley, IL Los Vigilantes - Las Ardillas - Los Voltage - Good Habits -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Lynn Allen -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA North of 40 - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Project Pickle Farm - Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Roster McCabe - Old Shoe -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Russ Reyman Request Piano Bar (7pm) - Phoenix, 111 West 2nd St. Davenport, IA Saturday Jazz Brunch w/ the Brett Wahlberg Trio - Mama Compton’s, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL Songwriter’s All-Original Open Mic (3pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Sturgill Simpson - Shivering Timbers -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL Billy Bragg - Kim Churchill - Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA John O’Meara, Rob Dahms, & Jim Stroehle -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Musical Morning (7am) -Brewed Awakenings, 221 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic at the Paddlehweel hosted by Silly C & Slack Man -Paddlewheel Sports Bar & Grill, 221 15th St Bettendorf, IA Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA 2013/04/16 (Tue) 2013/04/17 (Wed)

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

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Raise the Roof for the Youth: Esme Haferbrier & Randy Leasman Orangadang! - Jason Carl & the Wholte Damn Band (6pm) - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL Rob Dahms -Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Ron Johnson One-Man Band -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Ryan Herman - Karl Hartwich -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Southern Thunder Karaoke and DJ -Hollar’s Bar and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL Steve Kitter-Bitterman (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Terror- Hatebreed - Every Time I Die -The Blue Moose Tap, 211 Iowa Ave. Iowa City, IA The Manny Lopez Big Band (6pm) -The Circa ‘21 Speakeasy, 1818 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Princemen - Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA

Southern Thunder Karaoke & DJ -McManus Pub, 1401 7th Ave Moline, IL The Beatles with RAIN -Paramount Theatre, 123 3rd St. SE Cedar Rapids, IA The Weeks - Comfort -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL

WEDNESDAY

17

TUESDAY

16

You, Me, & Apollo @ Rozz-Tox – April 4
The Bernie Worrell Orchestra - Jaik Willis -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL The Bishops - Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Five Bridges Jazz Band (10:30am) - Brady Street Chop House, Radisson QC Plaza Hotel, 111 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA Funday Sunday w/ Dave Ellis (6pm) -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Karaoke Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Red Horse -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA Songwriters Night -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Southern Cross Band (2pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA Sunday Jazz Brunch (10:30am & 12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA 2013/04/15 (Mon)

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) - RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA

Baby Dee - Little Annie -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA California Guitar Trio & Montreal Guitar Trio - Englert Theatre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA Jason Carl & Friends -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA

Karaoke Night - RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL

Trampled Under Foot - The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Wild Oatz -Purgatory’s Pub, 2104 State St Bettendorf, IA

The Mercury Brothers -Rascals Live, 1418 15th St. Moline, IL

Fierce Bad Rabbit -The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA

30 2013/04/13 (Sat)

SATURDAY

13

ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303 Brady St. Davenport, IA Barlowe & James (6pm) -Skinny Legs BBQ, 2020 1st Street Milan, IL Bill Sackter Centennial w/ No Coast & Dave Moore -Uptown Bill’s Coffee House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA Caught in the Act -Generations Bar & Grill, 4100 4th Ave. Moline, IL Chuck Murphy -Lamb’s Tap, 215 W. 2nd St. Rock Falls, IL

The Rhythm Playboys (noon & 4pm) - Karl & the Country Dutchmen (2 & 6pm) - Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Throw The Fight - Three Years Hollow - The Redstone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA 2013/04/14 (Sun)

Barefoot Becky & the Ivanhoe Dutchmen -Walcott Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA Cross Creek Karaoke - Bootleggers Sports Bar, 2228 E. 11th St. Davenport, IA

SUNDAY

14

MONDAY

15

ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA

Good for You - Greg Ginn & the Royal We - Alex Body (6pm) -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA Karaoke Night -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Lydia - From Indian Lakes - Sweet Talker - The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA Open Jam w/ the Harris Collection - Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Cool Beanz Coffeehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL Open Mic w/ Jeff Smallwood -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Open Mic w/ Jordan Danielsen -11th Street Precinct, 2108 E 11th St Davenport, IA

Karen Michael (6pmn) - Karaoke King (9:30pm) - The Rusty Nail, 2606 W Locust Davenport, IA Keller Karaoke -Martini’s on the Rock, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL Open Mic Night - Boozie’s Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA Open Mic Night - Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub, 1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA Ren Edstrand Blues Jam -Studio Pub, 1465 19th St. East Moline, IL Shiloh Terry -Zero to Sixty, 811 East 2nd St. Davenport, IA Spankalicious - Plunkie - Bass Coma Wasted Wednesday: DJ Pat - Darius Bowie - DJ Sweets - DJ Phatswagg -Gabe’s, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA The Chris & Wes Show -Mound Street Landing, 1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA Threefifty Duo -The Mill, 120 E Burlington Iowa City, IA

20

River Cities’ Reader • Vol. 20 No. 827 • April 4 - 17, 2013

Business • Politics • Arts • Culture • Now You Know • RiverCitiesReader.com

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