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International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.2 Issue 4, April 2012, ISSN 2231 5780

EFFECTIVENESS OF TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES- A CASE STUDY OF CANARA BANK EMPLOYEES IN KURNOOL DISTRICT
DR. G. RAMAKRISHNA*; MRS. KAMESWARI**; MR. M. GIRIDHAR KUMAR***; DR. CH. KRISHNUDU****
*In-Charge, Department of Management, Rayalaseema University, Kurnool, A.P. 518002. **Research Scholar, ***Associate Professor & HOD of M.B.A., G. Pullaiah College of Engg. & Tech., Kurnool. ****Assistant Professor, SKIM, Sri Krishnadevaraya University, Anantapur, A.P. 515003.

ABSTRACT In India the banking industry becoming more competitive than ever, private and public sector banks are competing each other to perform well. The executives of the bank are now in the position to modify their traditional human resources practice in to innovative human resources practices in order to meet the challenges from other competitive banks. The Human Resource Development department has to play a more proactive role in shaping the employees to fight out the challenges. The banks not only have to make plans and policies and devise strategies, the actual functionaries have to show competence and effectiveness in executing the said policies and strategies. In commercial organizations like banks, HRD departments have the advantages of not being excessively burdened with day–to–day problems of running the banks or ensuring profitability of individual transactions. They are in positions to take strategic and long term view of the competitive advantage of the human resources as well as identify areas of professional weaknesses to rectify well before any damage takes place in the organization. Indeed they have the golden opportunity to implement the desired HR policies to improve and strengthen the organization to withstand the onslaught of fierce competition in future. KEYWORDS: Training & Development, Bank Employees, HRM in banks, HRD in banks, Canara bank. ______________________________________________________________________________ INTRODUCTION In India the banking industry becoming more competitive than ever, private and public sector banks are competing each other to perform well. The executives of the bank are now in the position to modify their traditional human resources practice in to innovative human resources

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In commercial organizations like banks. In this context. competence and effectiveness in executing the said policies and strategies. the actual functionaries have to show willingness. April 2012. The management without any right policy is like “building a house on sand”. It is aimed to bring out those innovative and best human resource practices developed and found successful that made them more competitive in the present competitive banking environment in the various human resource areas where they want to gain competitive advantage over the rival banks in order to attract and retain the talents and to differentiate their human resources practice and other services than the competitive banks. As emphasized by Dr. Sharma said: “The expansion of banking facilities was uneven and lopsided. HRD departments have the advantages of not being excessively burdened with day–to– day problems of running the banks or ensuring profitability of individual transactions. A major challenge for many banks will be to develop the special competencies and skills for credit appraisal and risk management in an environment of deregulation and openness. may lead to substantial transformation of banks to compete in an environment of risks and uncertainty. and banks were concentrating their operations in metropolitan cities and towns. Governor of Reserve Bank of India. the importance of building and reinforcing corporate vision and culture that fosters creativity and recognizes talent and merit cannot be relegated to the behind. if implemented. Based on this perspective. REVIEW OF LITERATURE Banking is a prime mover in the economic development of a nation and research is so essential to improve its working results. . the recommendations of the second Narasimhan Committee could provide useful guidance to banks particularly in recruiting skilled manpower from the open market. They are in positions to take strategic and long term view of the competitive advantage of the human resources as well as identify areas of professional weaknesses to rectify well before any damage takes place in the organization. including lateral induction of experts and deployment of existing staff in new businesses and activities after suitable training.in . and the consequences of organisation. An overall view of a few studies is presented below. Bimal Jalan. ISSN 2231 5780 practices in order to meet the challenges from other competitive banks.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. In line with this. A fairly large number of rural and semi urban centres with 150 www.zenithresearch. The Human Resource Development department has to play a more proactive role in shaping the employees to fight out the challenges.org. Indeed they have the golden opportunity to implement the desired human resources policies to improve and strengthen the organization to withstand the onslaught of fierce competition in future. It means an effective management always needs a thorough and continuous search into the nature of the reasons for. Branch expansion is a thrust for economic development. The banks not only have to make plans and policies and devise strategies.2 Issue 4. some related earlier studies conducted by individuals and institutions are reviewed to have an in-depth insight into the problem and exploring the reformation of banking policy. an attempt has been made to highlight the factors which.

Saxena stated that ”Improvement in the systems and procedures of inspection of stocks. Calcutta. April 2012. maintenance of stock register is required. as a result. ”The branching activities of banks particularly in the rural areas are unprecedented in the banking sector of India. The study also states that CEOs of poorly performing banks are likely to face higher turnover than CEOs of well performing ones. The study includes comparison of structural deposits and credits of all scheduled commercial banks from 1950 to 2000.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.B. with Dr A. much remains to be done. we witness that the performance of commercial banks was quite unimpressive and the urban orientation still appears to be persisting.”6 T Abhiman Das and Saibal Ghosh’s sample study conducted “to know the performance of bank CEOs in the era of corporate governance.Vasudevan. like any other option. Building up an information infrastructure at the apex level first and at the lower tiers subsequently should be initiated.N. tried to identify the adaptability characteristics of CEOs in terms of technology. Chandran stated that “Legal action should not be the inevitable last step in the process.”1 The commercial banks had made a commendable progress in extending the frontiers of banking both geographically and functionally and.org. highlighted “the branch expansion statistics from 1969 to 1999 with a clear comparison of rural branch expansion with total branch expansion. to examine the structure and functioning of the existing financial system of India and suggest financial sector reforms. former Governor of Reserve Bank of India. Constituted by R.zenithresearch.”2 V. However. As far as the deposit mobilization in the rural areas is concerned. coming to the issue of dispersion of their lending activities.Gnanadoss. Inadequate management competence in individual bank is a major cause of the non-viability of rural branches of many public sector bankls. Madras and Delhi cities has remained almost at 100 percent during the period 1969-75.”5 A. 1991. as Chairman submitted report in 1999. branches should be educated to evaluate this option for recovery.2 Issue 4. The report of the committee was tables in the Parliament on December 17. cover a wider area and much larger segment of population than did it in the pre-nationalization. The credit-deposit ratio of banks in Bombay. objectively before launching the same. The Committee has strongly advised to adopt latest technology in Banking sector.2000.” 7 Committee on Technology Upgradation in the Banking Sector.I. recovery and consultancy.8 The Government of India set up a nine-member committee under the chairmanship of Narasimham.” 3 S.in . it is argued that “there is nothing inherently non-viable about banking in rural areas.” 4 In a study on myth of viability of rural branches. Reforms should be initiated in extension of sponsorship schemes. 9 151 www. He has compared the performance of scheduled commercial banks in priority sector lending during 1990 . ISSN 2231 5780 reasonable potentialities of growth failed to attract the attention of commercial banks.

OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY The following are the objectives of the study:  To study about the training and development programmes offered for Canara Bank employees. METHODOLOGY AREA SELECTION FOR PRIMARY DATA Kurnool District of Andhra Pradesh has been selected for the purpose of primary data collection. The Report was submitted in April 1998. Rama Krishna and Venu Gopal Rao.2 Issue 4.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. Narasimhan to recommend reforms of the Indian banking sector. 10 Madhu Lincoln. conducted a study on “HRM Practices in Public Sector and Private Sector Banks” and has suggested that HR policies of Public Sector Banks should be revised there by making them more competitive in this challenging era of globalisation”.  To ascertain satisfaction levels of employees on improving the present system www. The introduction of Voluntary Retirement Scheme (VRS) in public sector banks demonstrated the resolve of the Banking sector to take hard decisions to gear up themselves in terms of human resources for today’s highly competitive environment. of India appointed once again a committee under the chairmanship of Sri M. Technology has brought in substantial changes in banking in terms of customer services and new product innovations.  To evaluate the effectiveness of the training and development programmes.11 NEED FOR THE STUDY The last decade. has been eventful one for the Banking industry changing the face of the industry far beyond recognition.org. ISSN 2231 5780 The Finance Ministry of Govt.in  To seek the suggestions from by the employees on improving the present system. Reviewing the developments that have taken place during the period 1991-98. 152 .zenithresearch. It is in this scenario that a study on Effectiveness of Training and Development Programmes with specific reference to Canara bank Employees in Kurnool District is to be examined. which marks the era of liberalization and reforms in the country. On the other hand private sector banks are more dynamic in adopting latest Human Resource Practices. the committee made recommendations for reforming the banking sector. April 2012.

2 Issue 4. the researcher has used both primary and secondary data. magazines. The secondary data and information have been collected from various sources like business newspapers.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. Primary data has been collected through structured questionnaire from the employees of Andhra Bank (public sector bank) and ING Vysya (private sector bank). 153 . RBI Reports and publications. SAMPLE OF THE STUDY: 85 employees covering all Canara bank branches in Kurnool District have been considered for the study at random. journals. ISSN 2231 5780 SELECTION OF BANKS Canara Bank has been selected for the purpose of study because. NIBM publications etc. IBA publications.in Source: Compiled from bank manuals. it is one of the oldest banks in India.zenithresearch. April 2012. TABLE 1: DETAILS OF CANARA BANK IN KURNOOL DISTRICT Name of the No. of Clerical Total No. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY DATA: To carry out the objectives.org. of Managerial No. of Branch cadre employees cadre employees and other lower Employees in the cadre employees branch Adoni Belagal Circle Office H. Kairawadi Kurnool Nandyal Pyalakurthy Varkur Total 1 1 12 1 3 2 1 1 22 5 4 9 3 11 7 3 4 46 2 1 18 1 4 4 2 1 33 8 6 39 5 18 13 6 6 101 www. of Officer No.

76% 84. ISSN 2231 5780 TABLE 2: DETAILS OF SAMPLE SIZE Designation Managers Officers Total No. DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION The primary and secondary data collected from different sources have been tabulated and interpreted meaningfully.zenithresearch.36% 89.13% 75. OF PROGRAMMES LESS THAN 3 3-6 ABOVE 6 TOTAL SAMPLE SIZE 4 18 63 85 PERCENTAGE 4. pie diagrams. April 2012.org. The information has been represented using bar charts.71 21.12 100 www.2 Issue 4.in 154 .ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. of employees 22 46 Sample size 19 41 25 85 Percentage 86.16% Clerk and other lower 33 cadres Total Source: Field survey SAMPLING TECHNIQUE 101 Simple random sampling technique has been employed in this study. SCOPE OF THE STUDY Scope of the study has been confined to Canara bank branches located in Kurnool District of Andhra Pradesh only. TABLE 3: DETAILS OF NUMBER OF TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES ATTENDED NO. graphical method etc.18 74.

in 49.00% of the employees have agreed about the necessity of training and development programmes. TABLE 4: OPINION ABOUT THE NECESSITY OF TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES Opinion Strongly Agree Agree To Some Extent Disagree Strongly Disagree Total Sample Size 46 34 2 3 0 85 Percentage 54. majority of 54. TABLE 5: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER’S SUBJECT KNOWLEDGE Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Sample Size 42 42 1 0 0 Percentage www. 3.53 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be understood from the above table that.18% of the employees have attended more than 3 and less than 6 training and development programmes and 4. majority of 74.35 3.41 49.53% of the employees Disagreed about the necessity of training and development programmes and 2.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.zenithresearch. April 2012.12 40.12% of the employees strongly agreed about the necessity of training and development programmes. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be inferred from the above table that.18 0 0 155 .41 1.12% of the employees have attended more than 6 training and development programmes. 40. 21.00 2.org.71% of the employees have attended less than 3 training and development programmes.2 Issue 4.35% of the employees have agreed to some extent about the necessity of training and development programmes.

00 56. TABLE 6: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER’S EXPERIENCE Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 38 45 2 0 0 85 Percentage 44.zenithresearch. 49.94% of the employees rated trainers experience as Good.53 0 0 100 www. April 2012.41% of the employees rated trainers subject knowledge as Excellent.35 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be seen from the above table that.35% of the employees rated trainers experience as Fair.71% of the employees rated trainers experience as Excellent and 2.71 52. TABLE 7: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER’S PREPARATION Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 34 48 3 0 0 85 Percentage 40.2 Issue 4. 49.in 156 .org.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. 44.18% of the employees rated trainers subject knowledge as Fair.94 2.41% of the employees rated trainers subject knowledge as Good and 1. majority of 52. ISSN 2231 5780 Total 85 100 INFERENCE: It can be interpreted from the above table that.47 3.

TABLE 9: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER’S INTERACTION WITH THE GROUP Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 42 38 5 0 0 85 Percentage 49.47% of the employees rated trainers preparation as Good.88 0 0 100 www. majority of 56.41 44. TABLE 8: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER’S STYLE AND DELIVERY Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 48 31 6 0 0 85 Percentage 56.53% of the employees rated trainers preparation as Fair.71 5.47 36.47% of the employees rated trainers style and delivery as Excellent. April 2012.00% of the employees rated trainers preparation as Excellent and 3.47% of the employees rated trainers style and delivery as Good and 7.zenithresearch.06 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be visualized from the above table that. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be concluded from the above table that.org.47 7. 40. majority of 56.2 Issue 4.06% of the employees rated trainers style and delivery as Fair.in 157 .ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. 36.

44. majority of 61.zenithresearch.71 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be understood from the above table that.12 4.2 Issue 4.12% of the employees rated trainers created learning atmosphere as Good and 4. 34.71% of the employees rated trainers created learning atmosphere as Fair.88% of the employees rated trainers interaction with the group as Fair. TABLE 11: OVERALL RATING TOWARDS THE TRAINER OF T&D PROGRAMMES Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 24 55 6 0 0 85 Percentage 28.24 www.71 7.18 34. 49.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.18% of the employees rated trainers creating learning atmosphere as Excellent. TABLE 10: OPINION TOWARDS TRAINER ABOUT CREATING A LEARNING ATMOSPHERE Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 52 29 4 0 0 85 Percentage 61. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be inferred from the above table that.06 0 0 100 158 .41% of the employees rated trainers interaction with the group as Excellent. April 2012.71% of the employees rated trainers interaction with the group as Good and 5.in 64.org.

88 49. 28.41 4.2 Issue 4.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.org.71 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be inferred from the above table that. 45.88 0 0 100 www.24% of the employees given overall rating for trainers as Excellent and 7. TABLE 12: RATING TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT IN INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 39 42 4 0 0 85 Percentage 45.in 159 . April 2012.06% of the employees given overall rating as Fair.71 5.71% of the employees given rating for improvement in interpersonal relations as Fair.zenithresearch. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be identified from the above table that. majority of 64. 49. TABLE 13: RATING TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT IN PROBLEM SOLVING ABILITY OPINION EXCELLENT GOOD FAIR BAD POOR TOTAL SAMPLE SIZE 25 55 5 0 0 85 PERCENTAGE 29.91% of the employees given rating for improvement in interpersonal relations as Good.71% of the employees given overall rating for trainers as Good.41 64.88% of the employees given rating for improvement in interpersonal relations as Excellent and 4.

ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.24% of the employees given rating for improvement in decision making skills as Excellent and 3.82 3.53 0 0 100 www. majority of 64.53 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be identified from the above table that.53% of the employees given rating for improvement in decision making skills as Fair.in 160 . majority of 62.65 78.2 Issue 4.41% of the employees given rating for improvement in problem solving abilities as Excellent and 5. April 2012. 28.35 3.org.35% of the employees given rating for improvement in decision making skills as Good.88% of the employees given rating for improvement in problem solving abilities as Fair. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be understood from the above table that.71% of the employees given rating for improvement in problem solving abilities as Good. TABLE 15: RATING TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT IN TEAM EFFECTIVENESS Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 15 67 3 0 0 85 Percentage 17. TABLE 14: RATING TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT IN DECISION MAKING SKILLS OPINION EXCELLENT GOOD FAIR BAD POOR TOTAL SAMPLE SIZE 24 53 3 0 0 85 PERCENTAGE 28.24 62. 29.zenithresearch.

18 52. majority of 78.59 87. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be observed from the above table that. majority of 52.71 0 0 100 INFERENCE: It can be analysed from the above table that. 41.65% of the employees given rating for improvement team effectiveness as Excellent and 3.06 2.94% of the employees given rating for improvement in coordination among the employees as Good.53% of TABLE 16: RATING TOWARDS IMPROVEMENT IN COORDINATION AMONG THE EMPLOYEES Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 35 45 4 0 0 85 Percentage 41.in 161 .ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol.35 0 0 100 www.71% of the employees given rating for improvement in coordination among the employees as Fair.2 Issue 4.org. April 2012.94 4. 17.zenithresearch.82% of the employees given rating for improvement team effectiveness as Good. TABLE 17: OVERALL RATING FOR TRAINING & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES Opinion Excellent Good Fair Bad Poor Total Sample Size 9 74 2 0 0 85 Percentage 10.18% of the employees given rating for improvement in coordination among the employees as Excellent and 4.

3. No. S. “Banking and Financial Services”. 4. “Perspectives of Indian Banking system” Indian Economic Panorama. Ramappa. 8. 6.org. 7. A. Limited. 1989.35% of the employees given overall rating for training and development programmes as Fair..An empirical investigation”.. Vol. “The Role of Commercial Banks in India’s Developing Economy”.K. p. NIBM.101. August 1977. There might be a sense of bias crept in answers given by the respondents. with Special Reference to the Rayalaseema Region of Andhra Pradesh”.06% of the employees given overall rating for training and development programmes as Good. Maheshwari. ISSN 2231 5780 INFERENCE: It can be interpreted from the above table that. p. Kalyani Publishers.23. Ludhiana. 1996. 1978. Anantapur.1263. Madhu Lincoln.Paul. Dr. 1999. New Delhi. Economic Research and Planning Department. NewDelhi. Saxena. 1. p. S.in 162 . “Promotion of priority sector advances :Small scale industries”.R.” Pigmy Economic Review.N. Maheshwari.33. 2008.1. majority of 87.University. 2001. Delhi. A few respondents were hesitant to give details.139.1974. Project report. 10.Gnanadoss. 9. p. 2. Certain limitations are likely to be there in the study.62. “Corporate governance in Banking system .104. S. Economic and Political Weekly. Kalyani Publishers.2 Issue 4.N. “Performance of Regional Rural Banks. 10. Manglam Publications.1-7.Paul. meticulous care has been taken in each and every aspect of study. 2004. R. Sharma.P. Sultan Chand and Company Pvt. 5. April 2012. Ludhiana. p.59% of the employees given overall rating for training and development programmes as Excellent and 2. www. Project report. p.R. A. p. REFERENCES 1. RBI. Pune. LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY In a study of this magnitude though. B.12. Abhiman Das and Saibal Ghosh. P. R.zenithresearch. 2001. Chandran. Special Banking Issue.N. 3. Rama Krishna and Venu Gopal Rao. “Banking and Financial Services”. NIBM. Vasudevan. “A Study of Non-performing assets of Bank of India (A management perspective)”. p. 2. 11. Some respondents were not aware of certain procedures and aspects of HRM. 2001. “Concentration of Banking in Major Cities.1.ZENITH International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research Vol. V. p. Pune. “Report of the Committee on Technology Upgradation in the Banking Sector”. S. “HRM Practices in Public Sector Banks and Private Sector Banks”.