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Agenda – Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services – April 8, 2013

REPORTS Item No. 2 Crime Reduction Strategy

WINNIPEG PUBLIC SERVICE RECOMMENDATION: This report be received as information.

Agenda – Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services – April 8, 2013

DECISION MAKING HISTORY: STANDING COMMITEE RECOMMENDATION: On March 11, 2013, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services granted a further extension of time of up to 60 days for the Winnipeg Public Service to report back on the matter. On February 19, 2013, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services granted a further extension of time to its March 11, 2013 meeting for the Winnipeg Public Service to report back on the matter. On January 14, 2013, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services granted an extension of time to its February 19, 2013 for the Winnipeg Public Service to report back on the matter. On October 1, 2012, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services laid over the matter to its meeting on January 14, 2013. On March 9, 2012, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services received as information the Winnipeg Public Service verbal report on the Crime Reduction Strategy. Further on March 9, 2012, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services requested the Winnipeg Public Service to provide an annual report on the matter starting in October 2012.

ADMINISTRATIVE REPORT
Issue: Critical Path: Violent Crime Reduction Strategy Update Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services

AUTHORIZATION
Author R. Yuen Department Head Chief Devon Clunis CFO n/a CAO D. Joshi COO

RECOMMENDATION
This report be received as information.

REASON FOR THE REPORT
At its March 9, 2012 meeting, the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services requested the Winnipeg Police Service (WPS) to provide an annual report on the status of the Violent Crime Reduction Strategy (VCRS).

HISTORY
On March 9, 2012, the WPS provided the Standing Policy Committee on Protection and Community Services a verbal report outlining the details and progress of the Violent Crime Reduction Strategy. VCRS Highlights Include: • • • • • Uses the latest in policing techniques, including Intelligence-led policing and Offender Management System Uses predictive policing through crime analysis Identifies hotspots and high value targets, and focuses resources for efficient/effective usage Uses multi-pronged approaches including programs such as Crimestoppers and community involvement Uses media in criminal exposure

Target Criminal Activity: • Conduct compliance checks on released individuals • Clear outstanding warrants • Increase presence around high-risk venues

Increase Street Presence: • Deter criminal activity with visible presence • Enhance perception of safety through visible presence • Augment visible presence with Cadet Unit • Add presence with Community Relations Unit as well as provide education and social development components • Increase foot patrol • Increase bike patrol • Host community street parties to integrate with, and educate communities Build/Maintain Relationships: • Cadets contribute to build relationships with communities • School Resource Officers build relationships with students, targeting at-risk youths • Provide presentations and programs to schools and communities • Aboriginal Liaison and Diversity Relations Officers proactively establish relationships with Aboriginal peoples and newcomers • Maintain relationships with Downtown, West End and Exchange BIZ groups • Provide Crime Prevention through Environmental Design education to businesses and residences • Establish/maintain “Broken Windows” strategies and partnerships • Establish/maintain relationships with agencies such as MLCC, Manitoba Housing Security, Manitoba Justice and Patrol groups

Strategies for Violent Crime Reduction Include: Downtown Police District Development and Implementation of overall Downtown Safety Plan 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Two (2) Foot Patrol Constables assigned to walk Portage Avenue Eight (8) additional Foot Patrol Officers were assigned to Downtown in January 2012. Further resources will be added to the Foot Patrol Unit later in 2012. Two Bike Patrol officers were assigned to patrol hot spots in the downtown area summer 2011. Enforcement/Education in and around bars, including beat patrol, license inspections with Manitoba Liquor Control Commission 6. Continue relationships with Downtown Biz, West End and Exchange Biz groups 7. Using Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, Downtown Officers are improving safety in the Downtown. North End Police District 1. Suppression Strategy – officers use Crime Analysis and Intelligence to identify “high value targets” – inclusive of people and locations within the targeted boundaries and zones 2. Broken Windows Partnership Strategy a. Division #13 Members work with the Multi-Unit Dwelling Task Force (Health Inspectors, Fire Inspectors, Safer Communities, etc.) to address problems within Multi-Unit Dwellings. b. Division #13 Members work with MLCC Inspectors to address liquor abuse in the targeted area. c. Division #13 Members work with the community to identify High Value Targets.

3. High Visibility Beat Strategy – Members are assigned specifics beats as determined by intelligence. 4. High Visibility Patrol Strategy a. Overlap projects utilized to increase visibility and suppression intensity in the targeted areas. b. Street Crimes Unit to Patrol in the targeted area and address the suppression file.

SIGNIFICANT IMPLEMENTATIONS over 2012 toward the VCRS Divisions 11 and 13 have implemented an “89” cruiser. This equates to one extra cruiser operating 24 hours a day, 7 days a week in each of the highest crime areas for each of these districts. Utilization of the Manitoba Integrated Warrant Apprehension Unit which targeted violent offenders and arrested 763 persons and detained 603 of them in custody. Directed Patrols conducted by the Street Crime Unit routinely with expanded patrols on weekends from May to September. Expanded officer deployment to the Street Crime Unit conducting duties associated to the Gang Response and Suppression Plan Targeted approach to Gangs by the Street Crime Unit Expand the 8 Officer Foot Patrol to a 16 Officer Downtown Beat Unit Service wide implementation of automated files available to all Uniform Operations members in the field that outline Subjects / Locations etc. of interest. This system is predicated on Suppressing Crime through Proactive and Intelligence-led Policing efforts.

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Violent Crime Reduction Effectiveness: In order to measure the effectiveness of the VCRS, we analysed the incidents of crime before and after the implementation of the VCRS, the incidents of crime between strangers and all crimes, and the change in crime of the targeted areas versus the remainder of Winnipeg. Stranger crimes involve offences where the accused has no relationship with the victim; all crimes include stranger crimes and crimes where the accused has some sort of relationship to the victim. Because many of the public crimes involve strangers and indoor crimes involve people with a known relationship, we expect the VCRS to have a more robust effect on stranger crimes.

All Violent Crimes – Downtown The targeted areas downtown include the districts surrounding Portage Avenue, comprised of the University District, the Retail District, the Sports and Entertainment District, and the Commercial District.

In 2011, the Portage Avenue districts saw 422 violent crimes; 361 violent crimes occurred in 2012—a reduction of 14.5%. By contrast, the larger District #1 saw a reduction of 9.0% in violent crimes, and the entire city of Winnipeg experienced a reduction of 3.4% in violent crimes. Since our targeted area within the Portage Avenue Districts experienced a considerably more robust drop in violent crimes than the whole of District #1 and all Winnipeg, we can infer a degree of success from the VCRS.

Portage Ave Districts
2011 All Violent Crimes* Assault 1 Assault 2 Assault 3 Other Assaults Point/Discharge Firearm All Assaults Sexual Assault 1 Sexual Assault 2 Sexual Assault 3 All Sexual Assaults All Robberies All Homicides All Attempted Murders Others Total Violent Crimes 201 74 1 1 0 277 34 0 0 34 107 3 0 1 422 159 66 2 3 0 230 24 1 0 25 106 0 0 0 361 0% -26.5% -0.9% -100% 0% -100.0% -14.5% -20.9% -10.8% 100.0% 200.0% 0% -17.0% -29.4% 1111 634 63 4 3 1815 219 3 0 222 771 15 4 5 2832 2012 Change 2011

District #1
2012 1051 551 55 4 1 1662 190 4 0 194 704 12 2 4 2578 Change -5.4% -13.1% -12.7% 0.0% -66.7% -8.4% -13.2% 33.3% 0% -12.6% -8.7% -20% -50% -20% -9.0%

All Winnipeg
2011 3026 1465 118 8 24 4641 644 11 0 655 1720 41 5 13* 7075 2012 2974 1400 96 6 23 4499 610 8 0 618 1670 30 6 14 6837 Change -1.7% -4.4% -18.6% -25.0% -4.2% -3.1% -5.3% -27.3% 0% -5.6% -2.9% -26.8% 20% 7.7% -3.4%

Stanger Crimes – Downtown In 2011, the Portage Avenue districts saw 343 violent stranger crimes; 270 violent stranger crimes occurred in 2012—a reduction of 21.3%. By contrast, the larger District #1 saw a reduction of 7.2% in violent stranger crimes, and the entire city of Winnipeg experienced a reduction of 7.7% in violent stranger crimes. Again, since our targeted area within the Portage Avenue Districts experienced a larger drop in violent crimes than the whole of District #1 and all Winnipeg, we can infer a degree of success from the VCRS.

Portage Ave Districts
2011 Violent Stranger Crimes* Stranger Assault 1 Stranger Assault 2 Stranger Assault 3 Other Stranger Assaults Point/Discharge Firearm All Stranger Assaults Stranger Sexual Assault 1 Stranger Sexual Assault 2 Stranger Sexual Assault 3 All Stranger Sexual Assaults Stranger Robberies Stranger Homicide Stranger Attempted Murder Others Total Violent Stranger Crimes 158 63 1 1 0 223 20 0 0 20 96 4 0 0 343 107 49 1 3 0 160 16 1 0 17 93 N/C 0 0 270 -32.3% -22.2% 0% 200% 0% -28.3/% -20% N/C 0% -15.0% -3.1% -100% 0% 0% -21.3% 547 364 30 2 3 946 125 1 0 126 561 7 1 5 1646 2012 Change 2011

District #1
2012 490 318 17 4 1 830 109 3 0 112 575 8 1 1 1527 Change -10.4% -12.6% -43.3% 100% -66.7% -12.3% -12.8% 200% 0% -11.1% 2.5% 14.3% 0.0% -80% -7.2%

All Winnipeg
2011 1283 947 71 6 22 2329 384 6 0 390 1267 18 6 14* 4024 2012 1202 865 37 6 6 2116 380 5 0 385 1190 16 2 4 3713 Change -6.3% -8.7% -47.9% 0.0% -72.7% -9.1% -1.0% -16.7% 0% -1.3% -6.1% -11.1% -66.7% -71.4% -7.7%

Looking within the Portage Avenue Districts, All Violent Crimes dropped by 14.5% versus a 21.3% reduction when measuring only violent stranger crimes. The greater reduction of stranger crimes vis-àvis all crimes also attributes a degree of success to the VCRS.

All Violent Crimes – North End The targeted area in North End Police District includes the area bound by McGregor St to the west, Dufferin Ave to the south, Salter St to the east and Burrows Ave to the north.

Focussing on the target area in District #3, 2011 saw 265 violent crimes; 215 violent crimes occurred in 2012 – a reduction of 18.9%. By contrast, the larger District #3 saw a reduction of 7.4% violent crimes and the entire city of Winnipeg experienced a reduction of 3.4% in violent crimes. Since our targeted area experienced a considerably more robust drop in violent crimes than the whole of District #3 and all Winnipeg, we again can infer a degree of success due to the VCRS. Target Area
2011 All Violent Crimes* Assault 1 Assault 2 Assault 3 Other Assaults Point/Discharge Firearm All Assaults Sexual Assault 1 Sexual Assault 2 Sexual Assault 3 All Sexual Assaults All Robberies All Homicides All Attempted Murder Others Total Violent Crimes 91 64 11 0 2 168 19 2 0 21 73 3 0 0 265 86 56 5 0 0 147 14 0 0 14 54 0 0 0 215 -5.5% -12.5% -54.5% 0% -100% -12.5% -26.3% -100% 0% -33.3% -26.0% -100% 0% 0% -18.9% 883 527 45 1 21 1477 185 4 0 189 552 18 6 6 2248 854 533 21 1 6 1415 154 3 0 157 495 8 4 3 2082 -3.3% 1.1% -53.3% 0.0% -71.4% -4.2% -16.8% -25.0% 0% -16.9% -10.3% -55.6% -33.3% -50.0% -7.4% 3026 1465 118 8 24 4641 644 11 0 655 1720 41 5 13 7075 2974 1400 96 6 23 4499 610 8 0 618 1670 30 6 14 6837 -1.7% -4.4% -18.6% -25.0% -4.2% -3.1% -5.3% -27.3% 0% -5.6% -2.9% -26.8% 20% 7.7% -3.4% 2012 Change 2011

District #3
2012 Change

All Winnipeg
2011 2012 Change

Stranger Crimes – North End In 2011, the North End target area saw 142 violent stranger crimes; 100 violent stranger crimes occurred in 2012—a reduction of 29.6%. By contrast, the larger District #3 saw a reduction of 15.2% in violent stranger crimes, and the entire city of Winnipeg experienced a reduction of 7.7% in violent stranger crimes. Again, since our targeted area within the North End experienced a larger drop in violent stranger crimes than the whole of District #3 and all Winnipeg, we can infer a degree of success from the VCRS.

Target Area
2011 Violent Stranger Crimes* Stranger Assault 1 Stranger Assault 2 Stranger Assault 3 Other Stranger Assaults Point/Discharge Firearm All Stranger Assaults Stranger Sexual Assault 1 Stranger Sexual Assault 2 Stranger Sexual Assault 3 All Stranger Sexual Assaults Stranger Robberies Stranger Homicide Stranger Attempted Murder Others Total Violent Stranger Crimes 34 41 2 0 0 77 8 1 0 9 54 2 0 0 142 32 32 2 0 0 66 9 0 0 9 25 0 0 0 100 -5.9% -22.0% 0.0% 0% 0% -14.3% 12.5% -100% 0% 0.0% -53.7% -100% 0% 0% -29.6% 289 287 20 1 15 612 103 2 0 105 379 6 5 1 1108 2012 Change 2011

District #3
2012 277 272 5 1 3 558 72 1 0 73 307 2 0 0 940 Change -4.2% -5.2% -75.0% 0.0% -80.0% -8.8% -30.1% -50.0% 0% -30.5% -19.0% -66.7% -100% -100% -15.2%

All Winnipeg
2011 1283 947 71 6 22 2329 384 6 0 390 1267 18 6 14 4024 2012 1202 865 37 6 6 2116 380 5 0 385 1190 16 2 4 3713 Change -6.3% -8.7% -47.9% 0.0% -72.7% -9.1% -1.0% -16.7% 0% -1.3% -6.1% -11.1% -66.7% -71.4% -7.7%

Looking within the North End Target Areas, all violent crimes dropped by 18.9% versus a 29.6% reduction when measuring only violent stranger crimes. The greater reduction of stranger crimes vis-àvis all crimes also attributes a degree of success to the VCRS.
* Because data gathering occurred over multiple time periods, small fluctuations in totals may occur.

CONSULTATION In preparing this report there was consultation with:
Street Crime Unit

FINANCIAL IMPACT

Financial Impact Statement
Project Name: Violent Crime Reduction Strategy

Date:

February 19,2013 2013

First Year of Program

2013

2014 $ $ $ $

2015 $ $

2016 $ $

2017 -

Capital
Capital Expenditures Required Less: Existing Budgeted Costs Additional Capital Budget Required $ $

Funding Sources:
Debt - Internal Debt - External Grants (Enter Description Here) Reserves, Equity, Surplus Other - Enter Description Here Total Funding Total Additional Capital Budget Required Total Additional Debt Required $ $ $ $ $ -

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Current Expenditures/Revenues
Direct Costs Less: Incremental Revenue/Recovery Net Cost/(Benefit) Less: Existing Budget Amounts Net Budget Adjustment Required $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ -

Additional Comments: This report is for information only.

original signed by Ron Smolik Feb 19/13 Controller-Winnipeg Police Service

SUBMITTED BY Department: Division: Prepared by: Date: File No. Winnipeg Police Service Organisation Development & Support: Division #32 Ray Yuen, S1003 2013/02/08