Claremont Courier 4.5.13 | United States Senate | Mural

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DUST-UP OVER TICKETS AT THE WILDERNESS PARK/PAGE 4
Friday, April 5, 2013 u One dollar

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Bravo!

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff School officials and theater supporters cheer after former CHS Theater Director Don Fruechte cut the red ribbon on the newly-renovated Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts on Thursday at Claremont High School. Following months of construction, the upgraded performance complex hosted its inaugural performance with an alumni gala on Saturday night. PAGE 5

CHS takes a dive against Damien, St. Lucy’s

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Practice makes perfect for CERT volunteers

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POLICE BLOTTER/ PAGE 4 OBITUARIES/ PAGE 15

SPORTS/ PAGE 18 CALENDAR/ PAGE 20

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Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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READERS’ COMMENTS
1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Ste. 205B Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761 Office hours: Monday-Friday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Owner Janis Weinberger Publisher and Owner Peter Weinberger
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Hard line at park is unjustified

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Dear Editor: On March 28, I was finishing my walk on the Claremont Wilderness Park trail. I arrived to the entrance at 7 p.m. I, along with many others, was stopped and ticketed by a Claremont police officer for leaving the park after 6:30 p.m., the posted time for park closure. I actually hadn’t noticed the sign’s specific closure times, as I was checking out the new parking lot. Previously, I believe there were signs that indicated the park closed at “dusk” in the older parking lot. I have been walking this trail for the decade I’ve been living in Claremont and had never seen a group of police officers lined up to “catch” hikers. I never take a car to the park. I do not walk in the hills in the dark. I was actually hurrying home to avoid being up there in the dark. After being written up for the $50 ticket, I did examine the newly posted sign closely. On April 1, the park closure time changes to 7:30 p.m. I find it particularly irritating that I was issued a ticket 3 days prior to the closure time changing by an hour. Certainly, the ticketing had nothing to do with maintaining my safety or the safety of others. The officers were not friendly. This was not about getting hikers to pay attention to the signs. It was simply a way to “enforce” the new rules and collect money. Dozens of tickets were stuffed under their windshields and their badges. I don’t understand the need to take such a hard line in the opening days of the park’s new rules and parking facility. I object to the size of the fine and to the inflexible and arbitrary way that Claremont is approaching this issue.
Lisa Ponce Claremont

Goodbye, Claremont

Dear Editor: On the afternoon of March 27, I decided to go hiking at the Claremont Wilderness Trail at the top of Mills Avenue. I had not been there for a couple of years and had noticed how beautiful it looked. I also noticed a sign stating that beginning in April, parking permits would have to be obtained to park in the lots. Soon after entering the park, I came upon a 2-foot rattlesnake in the middle of the trail. One female jogger had her headphones on as she stepped no more than a foot away from it. I called her attention to the situation and she responded with a “thank you” and began taking pictures of it with her cell phone. I took it upon myself to stay there and caution hikers and joggers of the situation. Several people wanted to kill the rattler, while others would have been oblivious of its presence. After about 20 minutes, the snake slithered back into the brush. Although I was behind in my 5-mile hike/run, I felt good about possibly preventing someone from receiving a snake bite. When I finished my workout and approached the exit gate, I noticed 50 or more people standing there unable to exit. I looked at my watch and noticed the time was 6:40 p.m. The Claremont police were not allowing anyone to leave until they received a $50 “parking violation” ticket. I was outraged at this and watched as more hikers came down from the hills and got into line. I stayed out of line and spoke to many of the people. I was not alone in the feeling that the park had always been open until dusk. It certainly was not dusk at 6:40 p.m. The Claremont police officers were quick to point out a new sign that read

GOVERNING OURSELVES
Agendas for city meetings are available at www.ci.claremont.ca.us Tuesday, April 9 City Council Council Chamber, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 10 Architectural Commission Council Chamber, 7 p.m. “Park closes at 6:30 p.m.” I did not see the sign on my way in and since I had not been there in over a year, I was still under the impression that it closed at dusk. I now must re-evaluate my act of “humanity,” playing the guardian role to both the rattlesnake and the public. Had it not been for my 20 minutes of being a “Good Samaritan,” I would have been out of the park, completely unaware of the situation. I regret breaking my bond with Claremont. I will miss my visits to the Village, but cannot and will not spent another dime in a city where this type of robbery takes place. Benjamin W. Boetel
Ontario

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City says... ”Park free and spend the night at the Wilderness Park.”
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Claremonters applaud Golden State’s latest water rate hik e.
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Walmart plans new super store in Village West

Claremont Colleges will have free tuition in 2014-15

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The Claremont Courier (United States Postal Service 115-180) is published once weekly by the Courier Graphics Corporation at 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. The Courier is a newspaper of general circulation as defined by the political code of the state of California, entered as periodicals matter September 17, 1908 at the post office at Claremont, California under the act of March 3, 1879. Periodicals postage is paid at Claremont, California 91711-5003. Single copy: One dollar. Annual subscription: $52.00. Send all remittances and correspondence about subscriptions, undelivered copies and changes of address to the Courier, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205B, Claremont, California 91711-5003. Telephone: 909-621-4761. Copyright © 2013 Claremont Courier

one hundred and fifth year, number 21

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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CGU holds public forum before moving on master plan

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he Claremont Graduate University may already be underway with its 20-year master plan, but school officials are electing to take a step back before continuing the university’s move forward.

CGU administrators held the first of 2 neighborhood meetings this week as the graduate university seeks input from residents prior to taking the next step with environmental consultants. A second open meeting will take place on Monday, April 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Tranquada Student Services Center, 757 College Way. In late February, the Claremont City Council unanimously approved an agreement with a consultant to move forward with an Environmental Impact Report for the master plan. “Being at an all-time high it would be testing waters not to continue in that vein,” noted Councilmember Joe Lyons at the February 26 meeting.   But councilmembers had one stipulation. The plan was approved with the added detail that CGU was “encouraged” to make good on its promise to hold a public review of the plan. CGU plans to expand enrollment in its masters program while maintaining enrollment in the PhD program. In order to accommodate the growing numbers, administrators want to expand services while also adding a more cohesive look to the currently muddy borders of the CGU campus. To accommodate the project, an additional 200-plus parking spaces and 626,933 gross square feet will be needed, according to orchestrators of the 20-year master plan. The plan further proposes, among other aspects, to construct a new parking lot between Foothill and Twelfth, build 2 new multi-purpose buildings to replace

existing infrastructure within the same area as the new parking structure, construct a 3-story building with 100 new parking spaces, replace the Jagels building, renovate open space between Harper East, McManus and Stauffer Halls to create a commons area and create a “Campus Walk” connecting the various aspects of the campus beginning on Dartmouth and ending on Eighth.   Additionally, Twelfth Street between College and Dartmouth and Eleventh Street between College and Dartmouth will be privatized. The council added their recommendation for residents concerned that CGU would not be following its promise to meet with the community on college construction plans. Claremont resident Peter Farquhar vocalized the concern on behalf of other residents in his neighborhood. Mr. Farquhar noted that other institutions of the Claremont Colleges, namely Claremont McKenna College and Harvey Mudd, have followed through in adding residents’ voices to the discussions of proposed expansion plans. “Even tonight, Pomona College is holding a neighborhood meeting...that’s one of the reasons why more neighbors are not here tonight at this city council meeting,” Mr. Farquhar pointed out to council on February 26. CGU should be no exception to this process, Mr. Farquhar further asserted. “I realize there will be opportunities for the public to comment on the scope of the environmental concerns later. What I’m pointing out now is now the absence of any preliminary review of the substance on the proposed master plan possibly sets the public up in an adversarial relationship from the very start with the environmental issues,” Mr. Farquhar said. “It’ll likely involve greater costs and delays and needless efforts and disagreement as we go forward.

“[Public input] is far more likely to produce good results for everyone,” he finished. The council agreed, and Brian Desatnik, director of community development, added that city administrators had suggested the meetings to CGU from the getgo. It was his impression that they were planning to hold a few, though none had been planned to his knowledge. The city’s hands were tied as the plan had already been deemed complete in December and, once deemed complete, there is only a certain time frame the city has to hire a consultant for the EIR to comply with the Permit Streamlining Act. “Here, the magic time issue for us is that once that application is deemed complete, then the clock starts to tick,” Ms. Carvalho explained. “The clock has started on us, unfortunately, in this case such that we have to begin this process.” A month later, CGU is heeding the council’s recommendation.   “CGU is interested in maintaining positive relationships with the neighbors located adjacent to the campus,” said Steve Garcia, senior vice president for finance and administration at CGU. “We are following through on earlier commitments.” Feedback at the first meeting primarily centered on parking and traffic flow. CGU officials assured residents of their intention to contract with a traffic engineer to develop a parking study in the hopes of addressing most of the issues raised, according to Mr. Garcia.   Residents will have a second chance to view a presentation on the 20-year master plan and add their opinions. The final community forum will take place on Monday, April 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Tranquada Student Services Center, 757 College Way.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff As the announcer counts down to one, children ages 3 to 5, with several parents in tow, scramble to find as many goodies as they can on Saturday during the annual Spring Celebration in Claremontʼs Memorial Park. It took the youngsters about 30 seconds to grab up all of the candies, but there was plenty of fun to be had at the annual festival, including a petting zoo, magic show and an appearance by the Easter Bunny.

CITY NEWS

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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The signs are posted, but will residents obey the law?

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sers of the Claremont Hills Wilderness Park may have until Monday, April 15 before enforcement of metered parking goes into effect, but hikers are not exempt from the newly-enforced park hours, as many have discovered.
The new park hours, a set of 12 rotating times, were posted to a board near the park entrance early last month. Police chose to strictly enforce those hours with Beginning April 15, Claremont Hillsides Wilderness Park users will need a parking permit if they are parking in the parking lots located on North Mills Avenue. Cars parked in the 2 lots serving the Wilderness Park will need a resident, annual visitor or daily metered permit to avoid citation. Due to a manufacturing problem, the enforcement of the meters and the permits is being delayed until Monday, April 15 until all repairs can be made. Resident parking permits are free with proof of residency. Annual visitor permits are $75 until June 1. Parking permits are available at City Hall and the Hughes Community Center. PARK HOURS April 6 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. May 5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. June 5:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. July 5:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

darkness hours change on a nightly basis,” he continued. “That’s why we have 12 different sets of hours. We wanted to provide as much usage for people as we could, while also mitigating after park hours.” Chief Cooper believes officers need to begin strict enforcement right away because of increased safety issues at the park. A few months ago, police employed the use of another agency’s helicopter as first responders searched for a man lost on the trails after hours. It took 3 hours of searching before the man was found. Not long before that, Chief Cooper said police came to the aid of a woman who ran out of the park after hours, screaming with a small dog in her arms. Without sunlight illuminating the path, the woman was unable to spot a rattlesnake on the COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont Police Corporal Hector Tamayo and Officer Jeff Ting cite a cyclist for be- trail. While she was unharmed, her dog ing in Claremont Hills Wilderness Park after hours on Friday. Police are stepping was bitten by the snake. To avoid further problems along the up enforcement of the park hours as part of the overall changes happening at the wilderness trails, park rangers will not be park, including the new parking lot and no parking zones. taking a half-hearted approach to their enthe debut of the Wilderness Loop’s newly- paying attention to those new signs.” forcement endeavors. Handing out warnexpanded parking lot, which opened on Last December, the Claremont City ings is not a part of the plan, according to March 22. Many hikers are learning the Council adopted a more defined set of Chief Cooper. hard way. park hours to clear up issues of ambiguity “How many warnings can we give?” An estimated 150 parking tickets have with the park’s previous “dawn to dusk” he said. “Our goal is to just get people to been given to those who have violated guideline. The hours, approved with the obey the rules. We are taking a no-tolerpark hours since enforcement began 2 support of the Claremont Wildlands Con- ance approach.” weeks ago, according to Claremont’s servancy, took into consideration changThroughout April, Wilderness Park Chief of Police Paul Cooper, who says the ing daylight hours as the year progresses. hours will be 6 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Hours problem with hikers violating park hours “I understand some people are frus- change again on May 1. Those who viohas become “significant.” trated with the fact that it is still light out late park hours are subject to a $50 fine. “All they have to do is pay attention to when the park closes,” Chief Cooper ac- View the full list of rotating park hours at what they are doing,” said Chief Cooper. knowledged of the park’s 6:30 p.m. close www.couriercitybeat.blogspot.com. “We have tried to put [signs with park time in March despite Daylight Savings —Beth Hartnett hours] all over the place. A lot of people Time on March 10. news@claremont-courier.com continue to use the park, and some are not “There is no perfect system because

Thursday, March 28 It wasn’t a great week for Claremont cyclists. A woman was knocked off her bicycle by a driver coming out of the parking structure in Village West on Thursday afternoon. The driver failed to stop to see if she was okay. Another female cyclist was airlifted to USC Medical Center last week when she lost control of her bicycle near Mountain Avenue and Via Espirito Santos in Claraboya. She had been traveling at unsafe speeds and was unable to stop, according to police. She suffered from abrasions to her elbow and thigh and pain to her shoulder and back. **** El Roble Intermediate School fell victim to a weekend vandal late last month. Sometime between March 23 and March 25, an unknown person threw a softballsized rock through a window on the school’s south side. There are no suspects at this time. Investigation continues. Friday, March 29 Police continue to investigate a lab experiment gone wrong in north Claremont Friday evening. Claremont dispatchers received an emergency call around 6:30

POLICE BLOTTER

Mirror-gazing man gets wrestled to the ground
A man was left in an embarrassing situation on Monday, April 1 when his suspicions ran wild. Police arrived in the 400 block of South Indian Hill Boulevard in response to a suspected vehicle burglary in process. As the story goes, the man had spotted another individual burglarizing his car. Sunday, March 31 Eighteen-year-old Rain Felko of Juno, Alaska walked into the Claremont jail cell barefoot with one sandal on her hand. At least that’s how police found her near North Mills Avenue and Platt Boulevard. Police allege Ms. Felko was mumbling to herself and smelled strongly of alcohol. She was held until sober. Her other sandal has not been located. Monday, April 1 A guitar and keyboard, along with speakers and other electronic equipment, were stolen from Good Shepherd Lutheran Church between Sunday evening and Monday morning. The crook gained entry through an unlocked side door. Stolen loot totals an estimated $3000. Police came to the scene, where the man and the assumed crook were wrestling on the ground. Turns out, it was all a misunderstanding, according to Lt. Ciszek. The supposed burglar was reportedly just inebriated and looking at himself in the car’s side mirror. There was no entry made to the car. Tuesday, April 2 A suspected sprinkler bandit, believed to be responsible for about $300 worth of stolen sprinkler heads in Claremont, may have cut loose his last brass sprinkler. At least for a while. Police arrested 52-year-old Stewart Sanquist on Tuesday, believed to be the man responsible for several extra-dry lawns in Claremont over the past couple weeks. Police caught up with the Montclair resident after locating the recycling center receiving his stolen loot. An employee informed police that Mr. Sanquist had recycled an estimated 50 brass sprinkler heads within a several day period. Mr. Sanquist was arrested at his home. A glass pipe with methamphetamine was found in his pocket.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

p.m. A witness claimed to have heard an explosion and scream for help in the 1900 block of Judson Court. Officers arrived on scene to find 27-year-old Austin Goodwin suffering from burns to his body after a chemical experiment blew up in his face, according to Claremont Lieutenant Mike Ciszek. Mr. Goodwin was allegedly in the process of turning marijuana into hash oil, Lt. Ciszek confirmed. First responders from the Los Angeles County Fire Department were also on scene and treated Mr. Goodwin for his burns before transporting him to Pomona Valley hospital and then the Arrowhead Regional Medical Center for further treatment. Follow-up investigation continues. **** Yelling doesn’t get you anywhere, or at least that’s how the old saying goes. But it wasn’t entirely the case for 51year-old Robyn Taylor, seen screaming at cars as he attempted to hitchhike near the Chevron/McDonalds in south Claremont Friday morning. The screaming fit earned him the attention of the cops, who found the Rancho Cucamonga resident had an outstanding warrant for trespassing. Mr. Taylor secured a ride to jail.

EDUCATION

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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The curtain rises on new and improved CHS theater

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veritable Who’s Who of Claremont descended on Claremont High School on Thursday, March 28 to celebrate the grand opening of the Don P. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts.
The afternoon event began with remarks by local luminaries such as Mayor Opanyi Nasiali, school board member Hilary LaConte, CHS Principal Brett O’Connor and Matthew Lyons, assistant to Assemblyman Chris Holden. CUSD Superintendent Jim Elsasser also spoke, giving thanks to all of those who helped the renovation move from plan to reality, including district staffers, the school board, the Theater Renovation Committee and the community at large. The partnership between the state, district and community is heartening to see, said Mr. Elsasser, who cited a quote by President Franklin D. Roosevelt: “People acting together as a group can accomplish things which no individual acting alone could ever hope to bring about.” Of course, Mr. Fruechte, the founding CHS theater director for whom the upgraded venue was named, was on hand too. “It’s such an honor. Not many people living get to have a building named after them. It doesn’t even resemble the theater it used to be,” Mr. Fruechte marveled. Notable attendees also included City Manager Tony Ramos, Baldy View ROP Supervisor Shelley Adams and school board members Mary Caenepeel and Steven Llanusa. The other unofficial guests of honor were a slew of current and former CSH thespians, excited to see the new digs. One of these was Andrew Lindvall, a 2010 CHS graduate on break from school at St. Olaf College in Minnesota where “it’s so cold your tears freeze.” Mr. Lindvall is majoring in theater, an avocation inspired by his time as a CHS theater student under the tutelage of current theater director Krista Elhai. “Ms. Elhai was one of the first teachers I ever had who would give you the responsibility to do something and expect you to do it,” he said. “There’s an intensity that has prepared me for everything I’ve done thereafter. You don’t just learn art here, you learn occupational skills.” It is the vocational emphasis of the CHS Theatre Department that netted the district a $1.5 million matching Career and Technical Education grant from the State Allocation Board for the Theater Renovation Project. The remainder of the budget came from a $1.5 million bridge loan from CUSD, plus a remarkable $400,000 raised by CHS theater boosters. Mr. O’Connor noted that students who have gone through the CHS theater program have moved on to careers in art, media and entertainment across the country.

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff CHS Theater Director Krista Elhai shares a hug with Teddie Warner following the ribbon-cutting ceremony for the new Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts on March 28. Ms. Warnerʼs child is just one of many Claremont kids taught by Ms. Elhai over the last 2 decades.

Attendees at the ribbon-cutting, including financial donors, look for the chairs they sponsored at the Don F. Fruechte Theatre for the Performing Arts on March 28. For the first time in the CHS theaterʼs 40-year history, attendees can enjoy performances from fixed seats rather than folding chairs.

“To have students leaving with employable skills is good for the school, good for the community and good for the country. This is a program we can be very proud of,” he said. Mr. O’Connor said time has flown since the June 6 groundbreaking for the project. It’s true that considerable work was undertaken over a short period of time. The new theater includes a 1600square-foot lobby with a ticket office and handicap-accessible restrooms plus 3500

square feet of new classroom space to accommodate scene and costume construction, makeup, costume changes and prop storage. The interior of the theater has been stepped, stadium-style, to accommodate more seating and provide a better view of the stage. Anyone who has sat through a 2-hour CHS theater production on a hard folding chair will also be happy to hear that the venue is now graced by 266 permanent, cushioned flip-up seats. Mr. Lindvall reflected on his time in

the old theater, which—with its cramped quarters, insufficient air conditioning and cobbled-together look—his friend, fellow 2010 CHS graduate Sean Moylan, generously characterized as “quaint.” “We did amazing things with what we had,” Mr. Lindvall said. “And now with this building, I know the theater department is going to do even more.” After remarks and a ceremonial ribbon-cutting, the crowd, thankful to get out of the heat and into the cool of an upgraded air conditioning system, headed into the theater for a tour. The set design for the upcoming CHS Theatre Alumni Gala, sheer hanging fabric panels illuminated by stage lights, showed off the stage to best advantage, while brass nameplates gleamed on the armrests of the army of sponsored theater seats. Photographs and ephemera showcasing the storied history of CHS theater are scattered throughout the venue, including a selection of hand-lettered, handdrawn posters from a bygone era. The ticket prices on some of the handbills, including 75-cent admission to a production of The Princess and the Pea, were particularly nostalgia-evoking. One of the centerpieces of the lobby is a framed painting of Mr. Fruechte. Created by CHS alumna Sarah Smith, known as Sally Phelps during her time at the high school, it shows Mr. Fruechte during the early years of his 1963-1994 tenure.
CHS THEATER continues on page 10

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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If it’s bad here in Claremont...
by John Pixley

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n the Page 2 column in the Los Angeles Times 2 or 3 weeks ago, Gale Holland wrote about how absolutely insane the “No Parking” signs are in some parts of LA. She wrote about there being, in many cases, several signs on one pole with arrows pointing in different and sometimes the same directions and with different hours and days in which parking is forbidden. It is more than enough to drive many people crazy and municipal revenue way up.
A short time later, there was a letter in the paper responding to the column. The writer said that the signs are perfectly clear, that no parking from 8 to 11 a.m on Wednesdays to the left means no parking from 8 to 11 a.m on Wednesdays to the left. According to the writer, the problem isn’t bad signs but “bad readers.” The letter writer is clearly someone who works for the city or someone who never smiles and doesn’t have much to do—or both. I say Ms. Holland is right, that the signs are crazy and maddening. Both the column and the letter made me think about when I went up to Mt. Baldy Village a week or so earlier. It was a bright Saturday morning, right after what may well have been the last significant storm of the season, with snow low on the mountain, and I had gotten it into my head to go have breakfast at the Mt. Baldy Lodge. Why not? There was snow and sun, and I have never been to the Mt. Baldy Lodge—or not in years and years and years. It was a nifty mini-getaway, less than half an hour away, to a white, very laid-back back-in-time world, and the cinnamon rolls really are terrific, as I’d heard! (In fact, Mt. Baldy was featured as a weekender in the next day’s Los Angeles Times Travel section.) But the trip up was something of a jolt. The intersection of Mills and Mt. Baldy Road was, to say the least, a real scene. I had heard and read about the crazy parking situation there, but I didn’t realize until that morning just how bonkers it is. No wonder there are new parking lots being put in and new poli-

observer
cies established! Even if it can be argued that the residents here knew what they were getting into when they decided to live next to the Wilderness Park, I can see why they are upset. With car after car after car jammed in along the side of the roads as well as in the parking lot, it reminded me of Pacific Coast Highway on a Saturday afternoon in July. Or, more so, when I was talked into going to an overnight concert out in the desert years ago and there were more people than I thought existed—who were they, and where did they come from?—parked every which way along the dirt road. But, really, come to think of it, it wasn’t unlike the streets near the entrance to Runyon Canyon in Hollywood. I can see that it’s not unusual to have to park several blocks away and have a bit of a hike before getting to this popular trail. I guess the residents on these streets (mostly in apartments, it appears) have garages or parking permits—or I hope they do. Then again, this is pretty much the case all over Hollywood and West Hollywood and lots of other places around LA, like Santa Monica. Often, when I go to a play at one of the dozens of small storefront theaters, I have to park blocks away so I have to try to get there even earlier. When I get a spot nearby, I feel quite lucky. Score! Which brings up those parking tickets and all that revenue the city gets. I’m not like some friends who collect them like frequent flyer miles—one to the point of having their driver’s license suspended—but I have gotten 2 or 3. Getting a parking ticket in LA is like playing a game of chess one can’t win. Try fighting one. It’s always checkmate, usually due to a sign not seen. I once went to an appeal hearing in a warren of offices in an underground mall near city hall, which made me think of going down a rabbit hole with the mad rabbit, to mix

metaphors and literary references. That I don’t remember if I won or not probably means I didn’t. That wasn’t as bad as last summer when, again near LA City Hall, I went to a free outdoor Friday lunchtime concert by the Belle Brigade at the California Plaza on Bunker Hill. I was thinking it was pretty sweet to be seeing a folk-y band that I liked hearing on KCRW up close while munching on a picnic lunch on a nice sunny day. That is until I went to leave the underground parking lot after a bit more than a hour and was charged $43, which they gladly took on my credit card. Ouch! And where were the signs, big signs, this time? Parking in LA is even more crazy when there are events like the Day of the Dead festival at the Hollywood Forever cemetery, the Gay Pride Festival and, when it was going on, the annual Sunset Junction Street Fair. It’s not unusual to have to park many blocks away. My worst parking experience in LA, worse than the $43 fee, was when I went to Sunset Junction about a dozen years ago, back before it got too big for its britches and when it cost something like $3 to get in. I thought I was being clever parking in a nearby store lot, only to find, when I left after the last band played that Saturday night, that my van was towed away. So there we were—me in my wheelchair and my companion—at 11 p.m. on a Saturday night with no vehicle to drive home to Claremont. Luckily, I had been taking the then-new Metrolink trains to Union Station a lot and knew something about the LA buses. And, luckily, with some advice from someone on the street and some walking, we were able to take a bus to the 480 bus to Claremont, with there being no late Saturday trains at the time. (Also luckily, it was a warm August night, and I was okay with no shirt in my overalls.) Unfortunately, even as it was nice to discover that the drivers were friendlier at that late hour, we had to wait an hour in El Monte after missing a connection and didn’t get into Claremont until 4 a.m. Still, it was amazing that we were a block from my house and great to know that getting home from LA late on a Saturday night without a car is actually possible. And that things aren’t so bad in Claremont.
From the Files of Claremont Heritage appears on page 8

What’s all this fuss about happy spring time?

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

Getting a kick out of Lex
Dear Editor: I always look forward to reading Lex in the City by Mellissa Martinez and this week (“Kiss this guy!”) was no exception. I not only learned a new word (mondegreen) but got a real kick out of the article’s examples of misheard lyrics. My family’s favorite mondegreen, and quite a classic, is “there’s a bathroom on the right” (actually “there’s a bad moon on the rise” from CCR’s “Bad Moon Rising”). Great stuff! Many thanks to Ms. Martinez and the COURIER. Cheerfully yours,
John Eichinger Claremont

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READERS’ COMMENTS
since Marilee Scaff and I were principle authors of “Water Issues in the City of Claremont 2005” (posted at www.claremont.ca. lwvnet.org). Lets have that discussion. Together we can get it right!
Freeman Allen Claremont

City council’s gun resolution
Dear Editor: At their March 12 meeting, the Claremont City Council debated a resolution for (1) our mayor to officially join New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's group Mayors Against Illegal Guns (MAIG), and (2) to endorse Sen. Dianne Feinstein’s “assault weapons” ban legislation. As it happens, however, other interesting information has come to light. While launching their Gun Owners Against Illegal Mayors project, Alan Gottlieb, founder of the Second Amendment Foundation (SAF) had this to say about MAIG, and its founder Mr. Bloomberg, “Michael Bloomberg created [MAIG] to further his personal agenda of public disarmament. But, within the [mayoral] ranks of his organization, our research has found several politicians who have been convicted of various serious crimes, thus making it impossible for them to finish their terms.” The SAF found MAIG mayors that have been convicted of all sorts of crimes, including perjury, embezzlement, attempted child molestation, assault, racketeering, assaulting a police officer, bribery, fraud, money laundering and domestic violence charges, while others have engaged in tax evasion, extortion, child pornography and trademark counterfeiting. In short, as a result of their convictions, many of these elitist MAIG mayors are now prohibited from owning firearms themselves. The crimes they were convicted of suggest they are public enemies, rather than the public servants they promote themselves as. Perhaps Mr. Bloomberg should worry about background checks on his MAIG colleagues, rather than on law-abiding gun owners.

Water matters
Dear Editor: In the March 15 COURIER, Tobias Hecht asked “What else could we do with $54 million?” (the appraised value of Claremont’s water system): free day care, hospice service, improve support for teachers... If we had that choice I, too, would be wary of buying the Claremont water system—but we don’t. The money is not available for such things. It is the money now profiting Golden State Water Company, about $8 million per year, that we could save and use to buy the system. How do we do that? The estimated annual saving if we owned our water system as neighboring cities do is about $8 million. That money could be used to purchase 30-year revenue bonds, paid for entirely by water users, worth at least $150 million. There would be no need to raise taxes, or take money from Claremont’s general fund, or raise water rates (unless the system costs more than that $150 million). In coming years we, not Golden State Water Company, would set Claremont’s water rates. That’s the way to keep millions in savings in the community for other needs. Best of all, we will control our own water future. Water does matter. Control of this vital resource will determine our future in critical ways. Let’s have a reasoned weekly discussion of water issues in the COURIER. I’m not a water expert, but I have followed water issues in Claremont

The SAF continued, “[Our] research discovered a far higher rate of criminal activity within the ranks of the Mayors Against Illegal Guns than among the ranks of more than 8 million [American] citizens who are licensed to carry concealed firearms in 49 states.” What’s truly puzzling, is that our city council would even consider associating itself with such an unsavory group of criminals, in the form of MAIG. It is also astonishing, that our city council would accept for consideration such a Constitution-hostile resolution, which would presume to speak for all of Claremont on a national issue, an issue over which the city council has no jurisdiction. Even the timing is troubling. At this moment—when we’re looking at a possible water company purchase, and need to be united as a community—some people have chosen to push this highly divisive wedge issue.
Douglas Lyon Claremont

Fixing the filibuster problem
Dear Editor: Please write to your US Senators to ask them to work with their colleagues to reform the filibuster rules. We believe this can and should be accomplished through consensus—a consensus that will preserve the underlying values of the current rules but will end the abuses of recent decades The Senate’s tradition of full debate on critical and complex national issues is important for our democracy. Quick and unconsidered action is often a mistake. At the same time, particular rules that have the effect of tying the Senate in procedural knots

or that block the Senate from debating a particular bill or subject, are not consistent with this tradition and undermine the basic tenets of representative government. While it may be possible for a simple majority to change the rules of the Senate at the beginning of a congressional session, the prospect of biennial rules changes on partisan votes would fundamentally change the role of the Senate. A better alternative would be for both parties to agree on essential reforms and adopt them using current procedures. It is unacceptable in a democracy to continue the Senate’s recent practices, which allow a small minority of absent Senators to block consideration of a bill or nomination and to obstruct and delay action after cloture is invoked. Over the years, senators of both major political parties have taken different positions on cloture and filibuster procedures, often reflecting their partisan stands on the underlying issues. The League of Women Voters asks you to urge your senators to recognize that they will sometimes be in the majority and sometimes in the minority. The Senate rules should ensure fair procedures for both. At its best, the Senate is unique in its ability to reconcile conflicting national interests and priorities through full and open debate that respects the contribution of each Senator. At its worst, the Senate wastes incredible amounts of time doing nothing, allows Senators to indulge their individual whims, and reinforces partisan rancor. It is time to rise above partisanship and reform the Senate rules in ways that maintain the best traditions, while ensuring openness, accountability, decision-making capability and effective performance.
Ellen Taylor VP, Advocacy LWV of the Claremont Area

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

8

Indians in Yucca: a colorful display on Foothill
by Ginger Elliot

This is a selection from the book Murals of Claremont written by Professor Art Stevens of Scripps College. The book was published in 2002 by Claremont Heritage and is available for purchase at its office at 840 Indian Hill Blvd. —GE

M

ost Claremonters have seen it hundreds, perhaps thousands, of times. Stopping for a red light at Foothill and Indian Hill, or cruising along the former Route 66, your eye wanders to the colorful and pastoral scene on the south wall of the US Bank building.

Created in 1968 and made of Smalti Italian mosaic tiles imported from Moramo,Italy, this mosaic mural depicts the Native Americans of the area using materials from classical Italian tesserae (naturally colored pieces of marble.) Local artist Millard Sheets had revived the ancient art of mosaic mural making and from thousands of these tiny pieces of colored marble, he produced an image of 3 native boys on horseback on what appears to be a scouting mission through the desert flora of southern California.

The 3 main figures are framed on both sides by the convex stylizations of yucca plants in bloom. The shield-shaped white blossoming yuccas with their repeated curved sides impart lightness, an almost floating sensation, to the mural. The curves of the plants find echoes in the shapes of the horses’ tails and rumps and the fan-shaped plants in the foreground. The vivid hues remain as fresh as the day they were applied, illustrating that mosaics are a natural choice for creating permanent exterior murals. By 1968, when he completed this mural, Sheets already had produced numerous murals for many banks at all their southern California branches, using the same imported tesserae. Many of these murals still delight the public in communities from Pacific Palisades to Pomona.

Sumi Foley and John Neiuber artwork on exhibit in Packing House
The Colony at Loft 204 celebrates Earth Day with an April exhibit featuring Sumi Foley as artist of the month. Ms. Foley uses discarded kimonos in her fabric arts using several pieces of fabric to form a meaningful scene. Ms. Foley was raised in Osaka, Japan in the 1960s where she learned sewing and other needlework techniques from her grandmother. See her hope for the future with her series of 3 pieces titled “Nature Heals I, II and III.” On Saturday, April 13 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. The Colony at Loft 204 presents “MadMod Social,” a 1960’sthemed event coinciding with the season premier of the AMC television series Mad Men. The event will feature oldies music to do the twist to, tapas catered by Euro Café and the opportu-

OUR TOWN
nity to dress to the nines for a swanky evening out on the town. Guests are encouraged to dress in ‘60s cocktail attire and pose for photos with RD Foto Studio at the event. Tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Guests must be over 21 years old. Visit www.facebook.com/Loft204 for more information and to RSVP. In conjunction with the gallery’s 1960’s-themed event, John Neiuber is also featured this month with his collection of vintage martini shakers and glasses. Mr. Neiuber and his wife Karen share a passion for mid-century modern cocktail collectibles and have a home lounge dedicated to the theme. The Neiubers’ display at The Colony at Loft 204 includes items from their private collection for display only. Mr. Neiuber will have a custom lamp titled “Modern

World” on display and for sale and Ms. Neiuber will have 3D mosaic tiles on display and for sale. An opening reception will be held during Claremont’s Art Walk today, April 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. Meet the artists, enjoy light refreshments and see a belly dance show performed at 8 p.m. by Casablanca Bar & Grill dancer Adina Dane. The Colony at Loft 204 is located at 532 W. First St. #204, upstairs in the Claremont Packing House. Visit www.loft204.com for more information or contact info@loft204.com.

TBI Yom HaShoah commemoration to feature CMC scholar
In connection with the nationwide theme of this year’s Holocaust Remembrance Week, Temple Beth Israel will welcome Dr. Wendy Lower, recently appointed John K. Roth Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College, as keynote speaker at the annual Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) commemoration on Sunday, April 7 at 4 p.m. Dr. Lower is an internationally-noted

scholar in the field of Holocaust Studies and is the author of Nazi EmpireBuilding and the Holocaust in Ukraine, and The Diary of Samuel Golfard and the Holocaust in Eastern Galicia, in addition to many scholarly articles and journal contributions. Prior to her arrival at CMC, Dr. Lower was associate professor of history affiliated with Clark University’s Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies and was the recipient of a German Research Foundation fellowship and lecturer at the Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet, Munich. While in Munich, Dr. Lower directed the oral history project, “German Witnesses to the Holocaust” for the US Holocaust Memorial Museum. The program will also include contributions from Rabbi Jonathan Kupetz, Cantor Paul Buch, pianist Dr. Randy Polevoi and other members of the TBI community, including Gabriele Silten who is a child survivor of the internment camp a Terezin (Theresianstadt). Temple Beth Israel is located at 3033 N. Towne Ave., Pomona. For further information, contact the Temple office at 626-1277 or tbi@tbipomona.org.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

9

Withholding true costs harms Claremont’s water plan
By Cruz Sembello

S

ince 2006, the California Alliance to Protect Private Property Rights has been California’s leading private property rights organization. Last year, we learned about efforts in Claremont to promote an eminent domain takeover of Golden State Water Company’s local system.

VIEWPOINT
taxpayer expense towards public ownership of Golden State Water. Claremont has been spending on lawyers and consultants and made an unsolicited $54 million offer to buy the water company. This multi-million dollar commitment was made without any explanation of how the city would pay for it or any analysis of how this government expansion could impact other city services. The only publicly available research suggests that a takeover will subject residents to hundreds of millions of dollars in debt and would cause water rates to increase. At the request of Golden State Water Company, Rodney T. Smith, a nationally-renowned and locally-based water economist, conducted a financial study and released the results. The study concludes that Claremont residents would face at least a 30 percent increase in water rates—$462 more annually per household than what is currently charged —if the city acquires and operates the system. The study also shows that the 30 percent increase is a best-case scenario

We sent the city of Claremont a letter requesting that they provide information that would justify the use of eminent domain for this purpose. Local news outlets have also asked for information only to be told that the city does not provide background information of this kind. To this day, any benefit from Claremont’s plan remains a mystery. In a recent Inland Valley Daily Bulletin article, a Claremont city council member was quoted to have said that public ownership “may eventually” lead to lower rates. That cloudy description, and the lack of disclosure, suggests the city’s lack of confidence in a plan that, even if feasible, will also face expensive and significant legal challenges. Nonetheless, city officials march at

based on the city’s $54 million offer for the water system. The final price is almost certain to be much higher. For example, Mr. Smith demonstrated that a $104 million price tag, which would not be surprising, would result in a 71 percent rate increase water rates ($1,103 annually per customer). Recently, our organization sent a mailer to survey Claremont residents. Over the course of a few weeks and by a margin of 3 to one, Claremont residents expressed opposition to a takeover. The strong and immediate response was telling. Those opposed to the plan don’t understand the rationale for seizing a water company if it will not immediately guarantee lower water costs. For people who base decisions on facts and figures, they refuse to support a plan that lacks transparency and a demonstrated benefit. Naturally, there were also emotional responses from people frustrated with the current cost of water service. Claremont is not alone, and the problem isn’t limited to private providers. According to a USA Today analysis, frustration with rising water bills is a national issue as water rates are on the rise throughout California and the US. In fact, water rates have doubled in one in 4 municipalities surveyed.

Several publicly-owned water systems in California have increased rates over 100 percent, including San Diego (nearly 150 percent) and San Francisco (over 200 percent). Sadly, the increasing cost of government regulations, infrastructure improvements, post 9-11 security measures, and public employee pensions and health care costs are driving up water costs for government water systems all over the US. If Claremont acquires Golden State water system, they too will have to contend with this costly reality. Changing the name on the door of the water company won’t change the fact that the cost to maintain and sustain service is increasing. Instead of a costly eminent domain fight, local government would be better served to try and work with Golden State Water Company to address these issues jointly, with community involvement. Taxpayers won’t have to pay hundreds of millions to repay bonds. Instead, they can invest in reliable, quality water for current and future generations. Cruz Sembello is a member of the board of directors of the California Alliance to Protect Private Property Rights.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

10

CHS THEATER continued from page 5

Mr. Fruechte pronounced Ms. Smith “too talented for her own good” and joked that the painting made him feel a bit wistful. “I’d love to have the hair back,” he said. Ms. Elhai agreed it was a good likeness, though she employed a bit of tongue-incheek, questioning its air of serenity. “I think he looks a little mellow. You rarely get to see him that calm,” she laughed. “He’s a little more like an energizer bunny.” After months of being displaced, members of the CHS Theatre Department are eager to channel their energy into performances held in their new headquarters. Senior Justin Hsu said he has already begun painting backdrops in the new scene shop for their next production, You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown, set for April 19 and 20. In the past, he noted, sets had to be built and painted on stage due to lack of space. Justin is expecting to hear whether he got accepted at his 2 top colleges, USC and NYU, in the next few days. While it’s a bit nerve-racking, his experiences as a CHS thespian have served him well. “It’s prepared me as a performer and as a person. I’m ready to go to college and start having a career in the real world,” he said. Other upcoming productions that will give the community a chance to savor the new theater include The Women of Lockerbie (May 2 and 11) and Medea (May 3 and 10). For more information, visit http://chstheatre.cusd.claremont.edu
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

COURIER photo/Steven Felchsundneff Claremont High School graduates Rebecca Whiteside, Kathy Kilsby, Alisa Allen Currier, Shaelynn Parker and Danielle Manter sing a comedic version of “Hey, Big Spender” during the alumni gala Saturday night at the Fruechte Theatre. The women updated the song to thank the donors who helped make the theater renovation possible.

Gala marks new era at CHS theater

F

rom poignant to hilarious, the Claremont High School alumni gala ran the gamut. In celebration of the opening of the Don F. Fruechte Theater for the Performing Arts, the new high school theater played host to performances show-

casing the talent of current and former students.

From Shaelynn Parker’s (CHS, ’74) soulful rendition of “If You Walked into My Life” to Amy Clark’s (CHS ’09) heartfelt performance of “Home” from Beauty and the Beast, residents saw the best of the best from CHS theater on Saturday night at the new Fruechte Theater. Chuck and Muriel Farritor of Claremont, who enjoyed a front-row seat at

the performance, have a deep connection to CHS theater. “We were just delighted with the whole thing,” Mr. Farritor said. “We especially enjoyed Don [Fruechte] and the way he closed the show. He’s so low-key. But he’s lived his whole life just that way.” As part of the Take A Seat campaing, the Farritors purchased 3 seats in the renovated theater in memory of
ALUMNI GALA coninues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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CHS THEATER continued from the previous page

their son Tim, who died at age 35. “Timmy felt the same as all the people who spoke at the show,” Mr. Farritor said. “It was his home away from home.” The highlight of the show for Mr. Farritor? “That Joel was a funny guy,” he said. “But we know him, so I expected him to be funny.” Joel Wilson (CHS ’96), choir director at the high school, gave his comedic best as emcee for the second act. “It isn’t often that someone who isn’t rich or dead gets a building named after them,” Mr. Wilson teased Mr. Fruechte, eyes fixed from the front row. Directed by Krista Carson Elhai (CHS ’78), current CHS theater department director, the gala included performances by alumni and current student who were asked to appear in the one-night-only showstopper. Ms. Elhai is only the second theater director at the high school, following Mr. Fruechte, who opened the original CHS theater in 1971. The success of CHS theater has continued under Ms. Elhai’s tutelage, with students bringing home awards in both regional and state thespian competitions. Former students reminisced, sharing stories of bygone days, often highlighting Mr. Fruechte’s unconventional approach to teaching and his knack for inspiring a love of theater among his students. Tom Park (CHS ’74) recalled an exchange with Mr. Fruechte during a production of Call Me Madame in 1971. “The performances at Garrison were risky in content for conservative Claremont,” Mr. Park related. “I remember Don saying, ‘I don’t know where you are, but you aren’t there yet.’ The CHS theater was a home to explore compassion and feelings and work through all the obstacles of being a teenager.” Bob Fass (CHS ’87) recalled less challenging roles during his years at CHS, including playing a dog and Winnie-the-Pooh, but remarked that his years in high

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Michael Alden, a 1975 graduate of Claremont High School, gives a humorous and moving tribute to his former teacher Don Fruechte on Saturday during the alumni show at CHS.

school theater have had a lasting impact. He fondly recalled Mr. Fruechte’s sarcasm: “Does anyone have a brain cell to loan to Fass? I need just one! Anyone?” Despite Mr. Fruechte’s playful demeanor with students, Sarah Smith (CHS ’68), who went by sallly Phelps during her years at the high school, acknowledged the former theater director’s softer side. “Mr. Fruechte inspired us to be our best selves in our lives,” she said. “I have carried this with me well into my adult life.” Other notable performances included Frank Minano’s [CHS ‘80] duet with his daughter Amanda [CHS ‘11] and another duet from Amanda and Craig Colclough [both CHS ‘00], who met as theater students at the high school and are now married with 3 children. Perhaps Michael Alden [CHS ‘74] put it best when he said, “May this theater continue to serve as a beacon for thespians everywhere, just as Don has throughout his career.” Ms. Elhai and the students of the CHS Theatre Department will return to the Fruechte Theater on April 19 and 20 for a performance of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown. —Kathryn Dunn
editor@claremont-courier.com

Don Fruechte receives a standing ovation as he is recognized Saturday during the inaugural show at the Fruechte Theatre at Claremont High School. The show celebrated 50 years of theater at the school and the influence Mr. Fruechte had on the generations of students that came through the program.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

12

Kindred Spirits: ‘Soul’ proprietors help healing center stay balanced

T

he Claremont healing center Kindred Spirits is all about balance, beginning with the harmonious division of work struck by proprietors Persis and Chuck Newland.

physical realm, the Newlands’ story evokes a sense of destiny. They opened shop in August of 1993, just weeks after getting married, but they weren’t your typical dewy-eyed newlyweds. They met when they were 12, got married when they were 18 Mr. Newland is the resident mineral expert, ready to and went their separate ways recommend the perfect stone or crystal to raise your visoon after. bration. He is also in charge of preparing handmade inWhen Ms. Newland orcense, infusing the smoky sticks with essential oils to ganized a reunion of their honor the natural world, cleanse your aura, draw good Chino High School classmates 22 years later, they fortune or just smell good. picked up where they left off. Ms. Newland is the extrovert of the pair, using her “My mom said, ‘Well, Chuck, it’s like you just went “gift of gab” to deliver intuitive readings that resonate out for a loaf of bread.’” so deeply with clients, they are often moved to tears. Ms. Newland’s first husband had died, leaving be“We buy a case of Kleenex a month,” she said. “Every- hind 4 boys ranging in age from 11-17. one cries here. It’s a release.” “He said, ‘I’ll have some of that,’” she joked. She also guides customers in elemental arts like canWithin weeks, they headed to the courthouse. The dle dressing, leads workshops on connecting with the ink on their marriage certificate was barely dry when inner child and, in her spare time, creates colorful and they went in with 2 other people to open Kindred Spirsymbolic paintings and drawings. its, which was initially located in the Claremont VilThe world of Kindred Spirits—crystal sound baths, lage. Within a year, the Newlands had bought out the shamanic journeys and energetic healing—may sound majority of the business. Within 3 years, they had “out there” to those unused to the esoteric. The New- moved to roomier digs on Foothill Boulevard in the lands’ aim, however, is simple: to provide people with Sprouts shopping center. the knowledge and tools to heal themselves in a world “Reconnecting like that is totally clearing. It takes out of balance. away all your hiding spots,” Mr. Newland noted. “Per“I believe we’re at a tipping point,” Ms. Newland sis knows me almost as good as I know myself. It’s resaid. “I truly believe in the saying, ‘As above, so below.’ freshing and kind of scary.” The most effective way to work on healing the planet is Some people consider the shop itself kind of scary. It by first healing ourselves.” CLAREMONT MOM & POP In keeping with a business specializing in the metacontinues on the next page

Mom & Pop

Claremont

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff The altar in the corner of the meeting room at Kindred Spirits is a space that anyone can leave a photo or memento.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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CLAREMONT MOM & POP continued from the previous page

plays host to any number of events off of the prevailing Judeo-Christian grid, including meditation sessions, Wicca workshops and mediumship. Kindred Spirits regular Janet Whiener notably speaks for Aero, “a nonphysical channeled consciousness” said to be an Atlantian poet on the third Saturday evening of each month. “We’ve had death threats, ‘F—k you, Satan worshippers’ written in acid across 3 windows, a bullet hole in the window,” Ms. Newland said. “We have people underline Bible passages and put it through the door. What we do is send them all the love we can, because we know they’re afraid.” Ms. Newland, by contrast, was raised on a half-acre ranch in Chino in a family for whom contact with the spirit world was an everyday occurrence. “My dad used to talk to our animals. He would go out to our horses and just sing with them,” she said.

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Persis Newland and her husband Chuck have owned Kindred Spirits on Foothill Boulevard since 1993. The store, which Ms. Newland describes as a “healing center,” offers a wide range of spiritually-based products and services.

F

rom the start, her life experiences demonstrated how close the line is between the living and the dead. Ms. Newland had a bleeding ulcer at 8 weeks old and experienced an array of maladies, including tuberculosis, shingles and pneumonia, while very young. “I believe I was born with all of the things that I died of,” she shared. “I had near-death experiences all the time.” She survived, though, and by age 14 was working full-time at a local chicken farm. Today, living in the same home where she grew up, she holds strong to her rural roots. When they’re not tending the store, they grow vegetables, fruits and herbs, and raise chickens to lay cage-free eggs to feed their family, which includes several grandkids. They notably cultivate white sage, known for its spiritually cleansing properties, which they sell at Kindred Spirits. Recently, they have added another product, “Smokeless Smudge,” a tincture of sage and water for dorm- and apartment-dwellers, which has proved to be quite popular. Their property, dubbed Wild Rock Family Farms, is not just a sanctuary for the Newlands; it’s also a haven for turtles. Over the years, they have adopted several California desert tortoises as well as 4 African spur thigh tortoises, which can grow to be 200 pounds. The shelled creatures are not the only unusual presences on the grounds. Ms. Newland’s mother, father and brother all died within the house, and she believes it is lovingly haunted. Her deceased family talks to those who are living, move things and make the electricity flicker, she says. “It’s like Beetlejuice when we get home,” she laughed. Ms. Newland emphasizes that, for her, a spirit is not something to be frightened of but instead someone to be listened to. When she does a reading, she uses tools like tarot cards, color and astrology as meditation points to access information from the spirit world. Tuning into this storehouse of knowledge requires a state of mind she likens to un-focusing your eyes to spot an image hidden in a Magic Eye poster. Often, inspiration comes in the form of symbols that she and her clients must decode. Once, she was giving a reading for a woman who was grieving her mother’s recent death when she received an image of the client’s mother on the other side. She had a bag filled with the letters of the alphabet and had letters

falling from her hand. When Ms. Newland relayed this, the client became very emotional and revealed that she was feeling paralyzed about what to do with a bag full of letters written by her mother. Together, they concluded that she needed to let the bag of letters go in order to move on. Kindred Spirits events coordinator Trish Lonardi, who met Ms. Newland when she was facing some life challenges, said she has found her readings to be transformative. They consequently became friends and eventually the Newlands enlisted her to help organize and promote their growing roster of events. “Persis has this great kind of earthy, motherly spirit about her,” Ms. Lonardi said. “She is an extremely empathetic, loyal and sturdy kind of person.” Ms. Newland says people from every walk of life, many of them “pretty broken,” come into the shop. They have catered to everyone from councilwomen to lawyers to movie stars. “You’re not going to go to your council and say, ‘My psychic told me this,’ though,” Ms. Newland said. “We’re the best-kept secret in town.” After 20 years, the Newlands have no plans to close their doors anytime soon. What they do next, though, is not entirely up to them, they say. “We really believe ‘kindred spirits’ run the place. It’s an entity,” she said. “It’ll say move these rocks here, put this there, and we do it. We give away more than we probably should, but it always comes back. It’s a flow.” There are a number of upcoming events scheduled at Kindred Spirits. On Sunday, April 7 from 2 to 4 p.m., medium Hollister Rand—author of the book I’m Not Dead, I’m Different—will conduct a spirit circle aimed at providing guests with “specific messages from your loved ones in spirit,” followed by a book-signing. Admission is $75. And on Sunday, April 21, author and intuitive Gary Quinn will present a workshop titled “Contacting the Spirit World & Sharpening Your Intuition,” followed by a book signing. Admission is also $75. Reservations are encouraged for both events. Kindred Spirits is located at 813 W. Foothill Blvd. in Claremont. For information, call 626-2434, visit www.uniquelykindredspirits.com or find the shop on Facebook.

—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

14

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15

Ethel M. Stivers
Mother, grandmother, educator
Memorial services for Ethel M. Stivers of Claremont will be held Saturday, April 6, 2013 at 1 p.m. at Claremont United Church of Christ, Kingman Chapel, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont. Ms. Stivers died peacefully on Tuesday, February 26, 2013 at the Claremont Manor Care Center. She was 98. Ms. Stivers was born December 3, 1914 in Chicago, Illinois, the only child of Carl and Anna Reavill Dunlap. She graduated from Lyons Township High School in LaGrange, Illinois, and then went on to earn a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, where she was a member of the Alpha Beta Chapter of the Delta Zeta Sorority. In 1938, Ms. Stivers married Ernest E. “Bud” Stivers in Chicago. She was a former member of Edwards United Church of Christ, SLA Club and PEO Chapter JS, all of Davenport, Iowa. She was later a member of Claremont United Church of Christ in Claremont and PEO Chapter MS in San Bernardino. The family notes that she was much loved by her daughter Barbara Fryer and her husband Don; by her grandson Todd Fryer and his wife Chris; by her grand-

OBITUARIES
daughter Lisa Sanchez and by her greatgrandchildren, Anthony and Samantha Sanchez, all of Fontana. She was preceded in death by her husband in 1972. Graveside services were held in March at Davenport Memorial Park in Davenport, Iowa. Memorial donations may be made to Claremont United Church of Christ, 233 W. Harrison Ave., Claremont CA 91711 or Edwards United Church of Christ, 3420 Jersey Ridge Rd., Davenport IA 52807.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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Students, CERT members collaborate on preparedness drill

P

reparedness was the order of the day on Tuesday when members of the local Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) conducted a training exercise at the site of the old La Puerta Junior High School. CERT trainer Dennis Smith said he picked the spot, which was closed as a middle school in 1978 and continued to be used for a number of subsequent years for adult school classes, because he “knew it would be kind of in a shambles.” Here was the scenario being enacted: A large earthquake has rattled the Los Angeles area. With that reports some middle school students may be trapped at school, and the police occupied with other casualties of the extensive damage throughout the city, CERT volunteers descend on the scene, prepared to help any victims they might find. Six El Roble students, members of the Interact Club that eventually feeds into Rotary, volunteered to be crisis actors for a day in order to lend a sense of realism to the drill. After being assigned a card describing their post-quake condition, the students headed to a makeup station manned by 3 students from the Claremont High School Theater Department. The teens—volunteering their service as a small way to thank the community for their support of the newly-renovated CHS theater—then proceeded to use paint and pigments to mimic the look of burns, cuts and abrasions. As CHS thespian Scotty Jacobson, 18, and his crew applied makeup to 7th grader Alex Moneith, she explained her hypothetical condition to bystanders. “I have massive facial injuries, which is not that different from every day,” Alex laughed. The most gruesome of the wounds was a bone-protruding fracture on the upper arm of 8th grader Sarah Gale, created by

a latex prosthetic edged with lots of fake blood. “I feel like Kevin Ware,” she joked in a grim reference to the University of Louisville basketball player who incurred a horrific leg fracture at a game on Monday night. Once transformed, the youths were led to their designated places. Sarah was instructed to lay adjacent to a felled file cabinet. In another room, 8th grader Carter Abbot was shown a spot where he was to lie, covered with second-degree burns and no longer breathing. In the same room,
CERT TRAINING  continues on the next page

COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) volunteers Yolanda Canzano, Denise Stevenson, Patty Ehrle and Pam Stevenson discuss observations during a mock earthquake exercise Tuesday evening at the former La Puerta Junior High. As part of an exercise, the women were responsible for sizing up the situation to determine if the building was safe and if anyone was inside.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

17

Claremont High School drama student Scotty Jacobson makes up El Roble student Alex Monteith with pretend injuries on Tuesday in advance of the emergency simulation in north Claremont. The students volunteered to help in the CERT training. CERT TRAINING continued from the previous page

COURIER photos/Steven Felschundneff Claremontʼs CERT truck arrives at the simulated earthquake scene on Tuesday at La Puerta. BELOW: El Roble student Lauren Steffen takes her place on the classroom floor during the simulated emergency. The students had to spend over half an hour in the darkened old school during the CERT training.

Alex was asked to take a place near a downed power wire. “We have to make the assumption that it’s dangerous and stay, at minimum, 30 feet away,” Mr. Smith said. “When you see a victim there, it’s very hard, emotionally, not to go to them. But it’s safety first: Don’t put yourself in danger, don’t put your partner in danger.” “Nice to know you care,” Alex quipped. The kids had fun exploring the vacant building which, other than missing and mildewing ceiling tiles and jumbled furniture, was surprisingly in tact. Water came out of the drinking fountain and the electricity was working, providing a real-life example of the saying, “The lights are on but nobody’s home.” With its pre-cordless phones, ancient Apple computers with 13-inch screens and an electric typewriter, the site—which CUSD has declared surplus in preparation for sale—serves as a time capsule. Once Claremont police notified the CERT members to be trained about the “emergency” via rotary call, the lights were flipped off and the students hit their marks. They were surprisingly well behaved, not making a peep during the more than 30 minutes they lay in the mildew-scented dark, waiting for help. When the CERT trainees arrived on the scene, they canvassed the building, located the victims, radioed for help and stretchers as needed and then brought the teens out of the building. Some victims, like Sarah, were able to hobble out of the building with some help while oth-

ers required stretchers. Part of the parking lot had been turned into a makeshift triage center. The CERT emergency response truck, packed with medical and food supplies, was stationed there and 2 generators were powered up to provide electricity to the truck as well as for auxiliary lights. Three tarps were spread on the ground, one for “the walking wounded,” who require care but are not in serious danger, another for those who can stand to wait a bit before treatment and a third for those who require immediate attention. A bit ominously, a black tarp spread some distance away was prepared to serve as a makeshift morgue in case of any deaths. And this faux-catastrophe indeed turned lethal. Having “died” on the scene, Carter was left on the premises. The other fatality was a CERT member who got too close to the downed power line and was “electrocuted.” While the proficiency of the rescuers is still a work in progress, the students realized one thing while lying in a darkened building, imagining they were seriously hurt. In case of such a scenario, it would be infinitely comforting to hear the voice of a caring volunteer saying, “This is CERT. Is anybody in here?” CERT members like Mr. Smith, who aided victims of the 2009 San Diego Station Fire , say helping the community prepare for emergencies is their civic duty. “We all know it’s not a matter of if but when a big emergency—a major earthquake or fire—will happen,” Mr. Smith said.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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COLLEGE SCOREBOARD WOMENS TENNIS
C-M-S 7, P-P 2 C-M-S 7, Depauw 2 C-M-S 7, UCSC 2 C-M-S 8, Caltech 1 Williams 7, P-P 2 Middlebury 7, P-P 2

MENS TENNIS
C-M-S 8, P-P 1 C-M-S 8, Middlebury 1 C-M-S 5, Williams 4 C-M-S 7, Gustavus Adolphus 2 Middlebury 8, P-P 1

WOMENS LACROSSE
COURIER photo/Steven Felschundneff Claremont High School freshman Samantha Duran competes in the girls varsity 500-meter freestyle swim last Wednesday during a co-ed swim meet at Damien High School. Duran won the 500-meter event as well as 200-meter freestyle.

C-M-S 16, Oberlin 6

MENS GOLF
Citrus finished 7th out of 7 at Allan Hancock

Damien, St. Lucy’s relay teams sink CHS

T

he stage was set for a Sierra League encounter against the good-at-allsports Damien/St. Lucy’s schools.

Wolfpack swimmers took to Damien’s pool Wednesday afternoon and squared off against 2 well-conditioned squads. The girls team fell at the last couple of hurdles, dropping the meet to the Regents 93-77. Claremont boys were unable to keep it close, and lost to the Spartans 97-73. Damien came into the meet on the back of only 2 losses in their last 100 swim meets. The Spartans’ consistency has been remarkable considering the competition, with the streak dating back to a decade ago. St Lucy’s is also strong this year, but slightly less so than their male counterparts. Still, the Regents will challenge for the title for 2 more seasons before they and

the Spartans switch divisions. Claremont head coach Courtney Eads expressed confidence in her boys and girls squads after the meet, even with the loss. “We beat South Hills in our first league meet,” she noted. “I thought we had a great chance to win the meet, especially with our girls team. Damien has an extremely tough group of athletes. I believe we can still challenge for CIF spots.” The Lady Wolfpack looked impressive during the first half of the meet. Samantha Duran excelled in the 200-yard freestyle race, posting an important early win for Claremont. Mary Hanna, Fernanda Suarez and Melissa Oei all placed high in their respective events, as Claremont went into the final third of the meet’s events tied on 55 points. For the boys, Luke Miller won the 50yard freestyle. Ben Jardine followed up by placing first in the 200-yard individual medley, beating his competitors by a wide margin. Dylan Tarazona showed his speed

off the starting blocks by smoking Damien swimmers in the 50-yard freestyle. Miller also won the 500-yard free, and Duran won the same long-distance race for the Lady Pack. However, the relay teams could not pick up points. Coach Eads noted that she would need to make a number of changes before the next meet. “The boys lost steam after the break, as did the girls. We knew the meet was well within reach, but we did not have as many good second-half performances as we had hoped. I have a lot of work to do in putting people where they are strongest, but I will let my swimmers have a lot more say in who swims which races.” Claremont gears up for today’s meet against Chino Hills at home at 3:15 p.m. The Pack expect to bounce back with aplomb, and hope that the tactical reshuffle pays dividends in the water.
—Chris Oakley sports@claremont-courier.com

WOMENS WATER POLO
C-M-S 13, La Verne 2 P-P 9, Occidental 7

SOFTBALL
Redlands 2, C-M-S 1 Redlands 14, C-M-S 5 C-M-S 7, Whittier 3 Whittier 4, C-M-S 3 P-P 8, La Sierra 5 La Verne 3, P-P 2 La Verne 4, P-P 0 Redlands 6, P-P 1 Redlands 7, P-P 2 Citrus 8, Bakersfield 0 Citrus 14, East LA 2 Grossmont 4, Citrus 0 Citrus 17, Santa Monica 3

BASEBALL
C-M-S 9, Pacifica 8 P-P 5, La Verne 4 La Verne 6, P-P 1 P-P 15, La Verne 4 Mt SAC 6, Citrus 4 Citrus 9, Bakersfield 0 Citrus 10, West LA 0

BOYS VOLLEYBALL Wolfpack boys volleyball went 5-0 in the Pacific League after 2 big wins last week. Claremont swept Crescenta Valley in 3 sets, then narrowly defeated Burroughs 3-2. Stephen Zetterberg, Stan Reeder and Joey Davis were each in double-digits in kills, and Lane Giammalva notched 32 assists against Burroughs. Scores from this week’s games against Hoover and Burbank will feature in next Friday’s COURIER. BOYS TENNIS Another undefeated team, Claremont boys tennis, had a stellar last week of March. The Pack overpowered Chino Hills 144, and then beat Charter Oak 12-6. The wins put Claremont 4-0 in the Sierra League, with 6 matches remaining in the season. CHS will take on Ayala this Wednesday, April 10 at 3:15 p.m. at home. BOYS GOLF Claremont boys golfers suffered their first hiccup of the season, losing by 10 strokes to Damien. However, the Pack bounced back with a win against South Hills, 186-212, and had a victory by wide margin against Hacienda Heights Wilson, 198-234. Against the Huskies, Claremont shot its lowest score in 3 years, with 4 shooters in the 30s, with Adelbert Wang finishing 1below-par at 34. Ben Whitham shot an even 35 in the rout of Wilson. The Wolfpack have next week off.

BASEBALL Claremont won in walk-off fashion against Ayala last week, winning 6-4. Down by 2 with their backs against the wall, the Wolfpack’s Josh Chua hit a 2 RBI single to tie the game at 4. Nick Costello then smacked a dramatic 2-run home run to win the game. Andrew Bernstein picked up the victory, throwing 3 scoreless innings in relief. Claremont will feature in the Centennial Tournament beginning today.

WOMENS TRACK & FIELD
C-M-S finished 15th out of 22 at CalNevada Championships

Athlete of the month
Nick Costello has been lighting up the statistics columns for Claremont Wolfpack baseball all season, but during the last 2 weeks Costello was absolutely unstoppable. The 6-foot, one-inch, 180-pound senior shortstop is hitting at a .457 clip with 15 runs batted in and almost no errors at the game’s toughest position. Costello smacked a double and a home run against Chino Hills 2 weeks ago, and then cranked a 2-run homer to win the game against Ayala. In both games, Claremont came from behind in the final inning to win. Costello also hit a home run against Damien earlier and only has 2 errors in 2013. His timely hitting and leadership as one of Claremont’s middle infielders helped vault the Wolfpack to second place in the Sierra League. Follow @COURIER91711 on twitter to keep up with the latest score and sports updates. —Chris Oakley
sports@claremont-courier.com

MENS TRACK & FIELD
C-M-S finished 8th out of 21 at CalNevada Championships P-P finished 19th out of 21 at CalNevada Championships

Friday, April 5 to Saturday, April 13

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

20

YOUR WEEK IN 9 DAYS

CALENDAR
5

Art Walk
See our map for a walking tour of participating Village art galleries

Performing arts
Candlelight Pavilion to host exciting spring line up; plus IVRT

Page 23
at 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. Fraser Pemberton leads the group. Bring binoculars and meet at the entrance. There is no charge to enter the garden with the Audubon group. Families are welcome. COMIC BOOK COLLECTIBLES SHOW featuring art dealers, collectors, publishers, artists, writers, giveaways and live music. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free admission. 532 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE Wendy Lower, PhD, of Claremont McKenna College, speaks at the annual Yom HaShoah (Holocaust Remembrance Day) commemoration. 4 p.m. Temple Beth Israel, 3033 N. Towne Ave., Pomona. 626-1277.

Page 26
Voters, Pomona College and the Interfaith Sustainability Council followed by a dialogue with the audience. 6 to 7:30 p.m. Claremont Public Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave. ENTERPRISE & SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY As the first woman president of Ireland, President Mary Robinson elevated the country to a new level of international status by fighting for controversial changes and bridging religious, social and economic groups. She was also the first woman to chair the United Nations Commission for Human Rights, and is the founder of the Ethical Globalizations Initiative. President Robinson continues her campaign for worldwide democracy as president of the Mary Robinson Foundation—Climate Justice, a center for thought leadership, education and advocacy on the struggle for global justice. In 2005, she was listed as one of Time’s top 100 men and women whose “power, talent, or moral example is transforming the world,” and in 2009 she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama. Currently, President Robinson is working on her memoir, Everybody Matters: My Life Giving Voice, which will chronicle her career. 7:30 p.m. Event is free, but a ticket or RSVP is required. Scripps College’s Balch Auditorium, 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-8103. ASK THE GURU Tom Deno serves as session coordinator for “Guru Night.” Submissions will begin to be accepted at this meeting for the 2013 photo contest. Hosted by the Claremont Senior Computer Club. 7:30 p.m. Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. 399-5488.

April Friday

SCHOLARS and activists will discuss “The Americas After Chávez,” a symposium on the legacy of the recently-deceased president of Venezuela, Hugo Chávez, and his impact upon Venezuela, Latin America and the global South. 2 to 9 p.m. Pomona College’s Smith Campus Center, Room 201, located at 170 E. Sixth St., Claremont. MEDITATION “Land of Enlightened Wisdom: 21 Praises to Tara Sadhana and Meditation.” Geshe Sherap will lead a group in chanting and the Sadhana of Tara in Tibetan and English. For ages 16 and older. 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Land of Enlightened Wisdom, 1317 N. Park Ave., Pomona. 755-1935.

April Saturday

6

VILLAGE WALKING TOUR with a Claremont Heritage guide. The 2-hour tour begins at 10 a.m. in front of the historic Claremont Metrolink Depot located at 200 W. First St., Claremont. $5. See the Village area and historic Victorian, college and commercial buildings. The tour ends at the restored College Heights Packing House. RECYCLING Children of all ages and their families are welcome to join in an educational program answering the questions of where garbage goes after it’s picked up and what things can be recycled. This event is presented by Full Spectrum Educational Services and cosponsored by the Friends of the Claremont Library. 2 to 2:45 p.m. Claremont Library, 208 N. Harvard Ave. 621-4902. CABARET AERIAL CIRCUS An aerial circus show plus belly dancing, henna tattoos and more. Dress in 1920s flapper style. There will be an after-party with dancing until midnight. The event begins at 9 p.m. $15 cash at the door. Pilates Studio M, 548 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 625-3333.

April Monday

8 9

WATCH & CLOCK Show and Sale hosted by the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors Chapter 81. 8:30 to noon. $5. Palomares Park Senior Center, 499 E. Arrow Highway, Pomona.

April Sunday

BIRD WATCHING Pomona Valley Audubon will lead a 2-hour walk at 8 a.m. at the Santa Ana Botanic Garden, located

7 April Tuesday

SUSTAINABILITY DIALOG Marlyn Hemple, publisher of the Population Press, discusses “Overshoot! The Fierce Urgency of Now.” 7 to 8:30 p.m. Hahn Building, 420 N. Harvard Ave., Claremont.

UNITED NATIONS Mel Boynton, president of the Southern California United Nations Association, will describe the inner workings of the 70-year-old organization and how the United Nations system works. A buffet lunch is available at 11:30 a.m. for $12. Dessert and coffee is available for $5. The University Club meets each Tuesday in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. AFTER WORK a series of informational lectures and social mixers, held throughout the community for persons still in the work force, new to or enjoying retirement. “Great Rinds, Great Minds: Entertaining with Cheese.” Learn how to entertain with cheese and wine. Start the evening with an assortment of cheeses paired with complementary wines. Lydia and Marnie Clarke, proprietors of the Cheese Cave, will conduct the tasting. Sponsored by the city of Claremont’s Committee on Aging. 5:30 p.m. $10. Pomona College’s Seaver House, 305 N. College Ave., Claremont. Register by calling 399-5488. THEOLOGY Rachel Adler discusses “A Feminist Renewal of Jewish Law.” Ms. Adler was one of the first theologians to integrate feminist perspectives and concerns into the interpretation of Jewish tests and the renewal of Jewish law and ethics. Her essay, “The Jew Who Wasn’t There,” first published in 1971, is generally considered the first piece of Jewish feminist theology. She now serves as the David Ellenson Professor of Modern Jewish Thought and Feminist Studies at Hebrew Union College of Los Angeles. The public is invited. Free of charge. 7 p.m. Pilgrim Place’s Decker Hall, located at 625 Mayflower Rd., Claremont. SUSTAINABILITY DIALOG “Perspectives for a Sustainable Future: Economic, Social and Environmental.” Hear about the perspectives and goals of Sustainable Claremont, the League of Women

April Wednesday

10

RECORDS Jack White’s Third Man Records will be parking rolling records store in the Rhino Records lot from 4 to 7 p.m. Pick up Third Man releases fresh off the road and a chance to purchase some rarities. In addition, Rhino Records will be offering 10 percent off purchases all day in their store. Rhino Records, 235 Yale Ave., Claremont 626-7774. SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPING with California Native Plants presented by Antonio Sanchez, nursery production manager at Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden. Learn how to reduce irrigation, eliminate pesticide and fertilizer use and reduce maintenance and waste in the garden. Bring plants or seeds to share, if you have them. 7 p.m. Free admission. 7 p.m. Pilgrim Place’s Napier Center, 660 Avery Rd., Claremont. For more information, visit www.sustainableclaremont.org.

April Thursday

11

VISUAL ACOUSTICS The Modernism of Julius Shulman, a film directed and produced by Eric Bricker. Claremont Heritage presents the fourth film in the 2013 Claremont Modern Film Series. 7 to
9-DAY CALENDAR continues on the next page

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

21

9-DAY CALENDAR continued from the previous page

9 p.m. $10 general admission or $5 for Claremont Heritage members, students and seniors. Claremont School of Theology students and faculty receive free admission. Purchase tickets at the door. Claremont School of Theology’s Mudd Theater, located at 1325 N. College Ave., Claremont. 621-0848 or info@claremontheritage.org. BIRD IDENTIFICATION The Pomona Valley Audubon Society will hold its monthly meeting and bird identification at 7 p.m. followed by refreshments, a short business meeting and the evening program. President Dan Guthrie will present the program “Birding and Conservation in Bolivia.” This program is open to the public and free of charge. Hughes Community Center’s Padua Room, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont.

April Friday

12

LECTURE Geographer Tad Mutersbaugh of the University of Kentucky will look at the practices of organic and fair-

trade coffee production in Oaxacan indigenous villages in a lecture titled “Certified Lives: Producing Transparency in Fair-Trade Organic Coffee.” Noon. Pomona College’s Oldenborg Dining Hall, located at 350 N. College Way, Claremont. For more information, email tammi.rendon@pomona.edu. ARTOON The newest Claremont Museum of Art education project has given voice to a generation of middle school students through the art of cartooning. Over 40 El Roble Intermediate School students participated in a series of ARToon after-school classes. Now, all of the ARToonistas’ original cartoons will be printed onto vinyl and installed on the 8 foot-by-24 foot art wall located on the east entrance patio adjacent to the Claremont Packing House. Join the student artists, their parents, El Roble faculty and the Claremont community as they celebrate the unveiling of the ARToon student cartoons on the art wall. 6 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. The art wall exhibition will remain in place through August. Claremont Packing House patio, located at 532 W. First St., Claremont.

April Saturday

13

INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL International students from The Claremont Colleges showcase their cultures and cuisines with food and performances from around the world. Activities include arts, crafts, face painting, authentic international foods, live world music and performances. Hosted by International Place of The Claremont Colleges. Noon to 4 p.m. Claremont McKenna Quadrangle, 390 E. Ninth St., Claremont. Contact 6074571 or visit www.iplace.claremont.edu. FOSSIL FEST A behind the scenes view of the Alf Museum plus tours of the fossil preparation laboratory. Attend talks on the latest in paleontological research, participate in craft activities and make a footprint replica. 1 to 4 p.m. $3 special admission. All activities are included and children under the age of 4 attend for free. Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, 1175 W. Base Line Rd., Claremont. 624-2798 or www.alfmuseum.org. AUTHOR TALK Noted prison expert and author David Werner, a professor at University of La Verne, will speak at the annual din-

ner hosted by Pax Christi of the Pomona Valley and the Peace with Justice Center. His topic will be “Prison – Accident, Success or Failure?” Our Lady of the Assumption Church, 435 Berkeley Ave., Claremont. $25 general admission and $15 students. Vegetarian options available. Dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. RSVP to Nick Parra at 455-8293, or Connie Weir at 596-4460. SOLITARY CONFINEMENT “Stop the Torture,” a symposium on solitary confinement in California hosted by the Scripps College Core program. From 1 to 4:30 p.m., presentations will be given by legal and other experts and family members of prisoners in solitary. At 7 p.m., a film screening of Herman’s House will be shown with an appearance by the director. Scripps College’s Humanities Auditorium, located at 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. Free. 607-8018. A NIGHT IN THE ‘60s Dress in ‘60s cocktail attire, pose for pictures with RD Foto Studio, do the twist to oldies classics and eat tapas from Euro Café. A display by Claremont Heritage president John Neiuber will be on exhibit featuring mid-century modern martini shakers and glasses. 7:30 p.m. $12 in advance or $15 at the door. The Colony at Loft 204, 532 W. First St. #204, Claremont Packing House.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

22

“Fresh Cut Roses” by Tom Skelly on exhibit at the Claremont Community Foundation Art Gallery.

Tom Skelly on exhibit at Claremont Community Foundation
Artist Tom Skelly is a longtime resident of Claremont. After graduating with an MFA from the Claremont Graduate University in 1979, he began exhibiting and teaching. Most significantly, he designed and implemented a multi-disciplinary arts program at the California Institution for Men in Chino. During his 30-year artist residency, he developed an award-winning inmate arts crew that created community beautification projects throughout southern California. He has worked with nonprofit groups, schools, libraries, senior centers, police departments and municipalities to improve the quality of work environments and public neighborhoods. In 2010, his Arts In Corrections program did not survive the budget cuts but he continues working as a studio artist. Additionally, he remains active in the Claremont community by serving on public art committees and hosting a radio program at KSPC 88.7FM since 1985. His radio program features movie music and interviews with film composers. It airs on Sunday evenings from 7 to 10 p.m. Mr. Skelly also teaches a course at UCLA called Art Programs in Correctional Institutions: Theory, History and Practice. Mr. Skelly’s current exhibition at the Claremont Community Foundation features 21 pieces of art created in the 1980s and also within the past couple of years. The exhibition bookends his work as a resident artist in the prison system while pointing to new directions. Many peoTom Skelly ple ask Mr. Skelly how working in a prison has influenced his art. The paintings and drawings on display begin with a rather abstract approach that sows an embryonic path for the subsequent years. In the more recent work, we see comfort images such as trains, fishing at a lake, boats and paint by numbers. Upon closer examination, it becomes apparent that the rules of realism allow the images to evolve beyond their obvious roles as ambient art. The Tom Skelly art exhibition is on display for the month of April at the Claremont Community Foundation Art Gallery, located at 205 Yale Avenue in Claremont. The opening reception will be on Friday, April 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Regular gallery hours are Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information, call 398-1060.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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57 UNDERGROUND: 300-C S. Thomas St., Pomona Arts Colony. Friday through Sunday, noon to 4 p.m., second and last Saturdays, noon to 9 p.m. 57 Underground features contemporary works by member and guest artists. 397-0218. —Through April 27: Two mid-career women artists from the Inland Empire are featured this month at 57 Underground. Mary Hughes has exhibited all over the region, establishing herself as a painter of darkened and elusive dreamscapes, in which forms appear and disappear from behind seemingly arbitrary and random patterns of paint, and recognizable objects move from background to foreground depending on the viewer’s focus. Yi-li Chin Ward has had a career notable for her consistent and persistent interpretations of the female form. Ms. Chin’s paintings are economical of line, and seem not at all that particular. Yet, if one spends the time with them, one sees that they are very particular, and very specific about thought and emotion. Closing reception: Saturday, April 27 form 5 to 9 p.m. AMOCA MUSEUM: 399 N. Garey Ave., Pomona. 865-3146. Wednesday through Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. www.amoca.org. 865-3146. —Through May 5: “Friendship Forged in Fire: British Ceramics in America,” featuring British pottery in a thematic and chronological order, from the industrial potteries of the Victorian era, to the Arts and Crafts movement, to the traditionalist approach of Bernard Leach and his followers. Modern ceramic artists will be represented by the works of Lucie Rie, Hans Coper and Ruth Duckworth. The largest segment of the exhibition will display contemporary innovations of “post-modern” ceramic art being created in Great Britain today. —Saturday, April 13: Free Admission Day sponsored by Southern California Edison. BUDDHAMOUSE EMPORIUM: 134 Yale Ave., Claremont. Open daily from 10:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. 626-3322. —Through April 30: Katie Selke’s “Floating Scapes” is a group of paintings created out of the artist’s concern about climate change and recent natural disasters. Opening reception: Friday, April 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. Meet the artist and enjoy complementary refreshments. CLAREMONT COMMUNITY FOUNDATION ART GALLERY: 205 Yale Ave., Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 398-1060. —Through April 30: An exhibit of paintings and drawings by Tom Skelly will be on display for the month of April. Mr. Skelly received his MFA from Claremont Graduate University. Upon graduating he began exhibiting and teaching painting, drawing and design. He is a Claremont local who is active in the community and hosts a program on the Claremont radio station KSPC 88.7FM. Opening reception: Friday, April 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. CLAREMONT FORUM GALLERY: 586 W. First St. in The Packing House. 12 to 7 p.m. 626-3066.

GALLERIES

—Through April 30: Claremont High School presents “Alternate Takes,” an International Baccalaureate visual arts and Advanced Placement photography exhibition. Opening reception: Friday, April 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. Free refreshments, snacks and stimulating conversation. Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project, located at 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. THE COLONY AT LOFT 204: 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House. Open Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.loft204.com. —Through, April 27: The Colony celebrates Earth Day this month, featuring Sumi Foley as artist of the month. Ms. Foley uses discarded kimonos in her fabric arts. See her hope for the future with her series of 3 pieces titled “Nature Heals I, II and III.” In conjunction with The Colony’s 1960s event on Saturday, April 13, John Neiuber is also featured with his collection of vintage martini shakers and glasses. The display includes items from the Neiuber private collection (for display only). Mr. Neiuber will have a custom lamp on display and for sale and his wife Karen will have 3D mosaic tiles on display and for sale. Participants in The Colony this month include stained glass/mosaics by Jenifer Hall, watercolors by Arwen Allen, oil paintings by Vicki, limited edition prints by Melody Grace Cave, “Dusty Road” collection photography by Barbara Sammons, plus a boutique by Clare Miranda and oddities by Sarah Toribbio and friends. Show your COURIER support—Claremont COURIER hoodies, mugs and recent editions of the newspaper are available exclusively at The Colony at Loft 204. Opening reception: Friday, April 5 from 6 to 9 p.m. Meet the artist, enjoy light refreshments and see a belly dance show. Performance begins at 8 p.m. —Saturday, April 6: “Metaphorically Speaking.” Learn how to create strong and cliché-free imagery, metaphors and word pictures. Free workshop. 1 to 2 p.m. Open forum from 2 to 3 p.m. —Monday, April 8: Beginning belly dance class with Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill. Learn basic upper and lower body isolations, footwork and important stretching techniques. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Tuesday, April 9: Workout belly dance class with Jacki Torres of the Renaissance Pleasure Faire. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Wednesday, April 10: Intermediate belly dance class. Time to get technical—work on isolation drills and movement combinations while diving deeper into belly dance technique. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a yoga mat and water bottle. 7 to 8 p.m. $10. —Saturday, April 12: “MadMod Social.” Indulge in an evening in the 1960s featuring oldies music plus retro-inspired food and drink. Catering provided by Euro Café. Dress in ‘60s cocktail attire— RD Foto Studio will be on site for portraits. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $12 in advance or $15 at the door. Tickets are only available at The Colony at Loft 204. For more information, email info@loft204.com.

ART WALK

Bonita Avenue

Second Street Indian Hill Blvd. Yale Avenue

1

Harvard Avenue First Street

5

2 3 4

Claremont Art Walk takes place the first Friday of each month between 6 and 9 p.m. and exhibits studio and fine art. Use this walking tour map as a guide to this monthʼs participating galleries.

1. Buddhamouse Emporium
6 to 8 p.m. 134 Yale Ave., Claremont Meet the artist and enjoy light refreshments. Featured artist: Katie Selke. Claremont Forum/Prison Library Project 5 to 7 p.m. 586 W. First St., Claremont Packing House Claremont High School presents “Alternate Takes” featuring International Baccalaureate visual arts and Advanced Placement photography. Enjoy refreshments, snacks and conversation. See the complete story and a photo gallery on www.claremont-courier.com.

2.

6 to 9 p.m. 532 W. First St., #204, Claremont Packing House A belly dance performance by Adina Dane of Casablanca Bar & Grill will take place at 8 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. Featured artists: Sumi Foley and John and Karen Neiuber.

3. The Colony at LOFT204

6 to 10 p.m. 532 W. First St., #219, Claremont Packing House Live musical performances by Jeffertittiʼs Nile, Kirun and Drab Majesty. Live painting and performance art by PermaDirty Project Space resident artists Kevin Alexander, Junior Mora and Andrew Thomas.

4. PermaDirty Project Space

6 to 8 p.m. 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont Artist reception and refreshments. Featured artist: Steve Comba.

5. Square i Gallery

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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GALLERIES
dA CENTER FOR THE ARTS: 252 S. Main St., Pomona Arts Colony. Wednesday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., Thursday 12 to 9 p.m. 3979716. —April 13 through 27: Trilateral Exchange—The MFA Candidate Exchange. Opening reception: Saturday, April 13 from 6 to 10 p.m. Panel discussion: Saturday, April 27 from 5 to 6 p.m. moderated by curator Conchi Sanford. Participants include California State University San Bernardino, Claremont Graduate University and California State University Fullerton. FIRST STREET GALLERY ART CENTER: 250 W. First St., Suite 120, Claremont. Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: 626-5455. —Through April 12: “Found in Translation,” an investigation into the role of technology as a catalyst for human connectivity featuring Charles Long. GALLERIA BERETICH: The home and studio of Barbara Beretich, 1034 Harvard Ave., Claremont. 6240548. www.galleriaberetich.com. —Open Sundays from noon to 3 p.m.: Visitors welcome anytime, appointments appreciated. Featuring California art, paintings and sculptures from local and national artists since 1976. GALLERY SOHO: 300-A S. Thomas St., basement level, Pomona Arts Colony. Thursday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. —April 11 through 28: 32nd Annual Open Juried Show. Art take-in: Saturday, April 6 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Opening reception: Saturday, April 13 from 6 to 9 p.m. Awards reception: Sunday, April 28 from 2 to 4 p.m. IRENE CARISON GALLERY: The University of La Verne, Miller Hall, 1950 Third St., La Verne. 5933511 ext. 4281. —Through April 5: Mitch Dobrowner’s “Vital Firmament.” —April 15 through May 24: “Geolocation: Desertscapes” by Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman. Opening reception: Thursday, April 25 from 6 to 8 p.m. LAMY AVERY GALLERY INTERNATIONAL: 445 W. Foothill Blvd., Suite 104. Open Friday and Saturday 3 to 7 p.m. and by appointment only. 263-0877 or lamyavery galleryinternational.com. LATINO ART MUSEUM: 281 S. Thomas St. Suite 105, Pomona. www.lamoa.net. 620-6009 or 4842618. —April 5 through 27: Solo exhibit featuring Oscar Londoño. MALOOF FOUNDATION FOR ARTS & CRAFTS: 5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma. 980-0412, info@mal ooffoundation.org or www.maloof foundation.org. —Tours: Docent-led tours are offered on Thursdays and Saturdays at 1, 2 and 3 p.m. and feature Sam Maloof’s handmade home, furniture and the extensive Maloof collection of arts and crafts. Due to limited capacity, ad-

vance reservations are strongly recommended for all tours. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $5 for students. The Discovery Garden is open to visitors on Thursdays and Saturdays between noon and 4 p.m. at no charge. Check in at the Foundation Bookstore. The garden features drought-tolerant plants native to California and other parts of the world. —Sunday, April 7: “Music at the Maloof” featuring Ambrosia String Quartet in celebration of the new exhibition “With Strings Attached: Art in the Craft of Sound.” 1 to 4 p.m. —May 30 through October 27: “With Strings Attached: Art in the Craft of Sound.” There are nearly 40 musical instruments in the exhibition, representing a broad cross-section of cultures and traditions. The performances give us an opportunity to bring to life for audiences a number of the instruments, some of which are not often heard. PEGGY PHELPS & EAST GALLERY: Claremont Graduate University, 251 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 621-8071. —Through April 5: “Three Squares a Day” MFA thesis exhibition by Suzanne Gibbs. —Through April 5: Leslie Love Stone’s “Kind of Blue.” —April 8 through 12: “Between You and Me” Elisabeth Joung’s MFA thesis exhibition. Opening reception: Tuesday, April 9 form 6 to 9 p.m. Peggy Phelps Gallery. —April 8 through 12: “Wayward” featuring Jacob Fowler and Nicole James. Opening reception: Tuesday, April 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. PERMADIRTY PROJECT SPACE: 532 W. First St., Unit 219, Claremont. Open Thursday through Sunday. For more information email itspermadirty@gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/permadirty. —Through May 3: “Intertwine Originals,” an exhibition celebrating 7 emerging artists who got their start in the Inland Empire and Chaffey College community. The artists exhibiting are some of the original resident artists of PermaDirty Project Space and intertwined in many different ways with each other and PermaDirty since it opened one year ago. —Friday, April 5: Jeffertitti’s Nile, Kirun and Drab Majesty perform at PermaDirty with live painting and performance art by resident artists Kevin Alexander, Junior Mora and Andrew Thomas. Refreshments will be available. 6 to 10 p.m. —Sunday, April 7: Artist statement and portfolio review workshop. Get one-on-one feedback from Cynde Miller, founder of PermaDirty Project Space and from members of the PermaDirty program. Noon to 3 p.m. —Wednesdays: Meditation group with Johnathan Thomas. 7 to 8 p.m. $5. RSVP to www.whole-personhealing.com. —Thursdays in April: Autism interaction workshop in collaboration with Empower Autism Now, Autism Spec-

trum Integrated Services and Inclusion Films. This program is for adults on the autism spectrum. Participants will learn to develop confidence and self-awareness. Students use movement to learn about the power of body language and what that tells others about us in day-to-day life. Workshops are held on Thursdays in April from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Neurotypical adult volunteers are requested to interact socially with workshop participants so they may practice the skills learned in the workshop in the context of a social setting. Send inquiries about becoming a workshop participant or volunteer by contacting Arman Khodaei at arman@ar mankhodaei.com or Natalia Hawe at itspermadirty@gmail.com. —Saturdays: Saturday Morning Cartoons, cartooning workshop led by resident artist Jimmy Purcell. Learn tips and tricks of cartooning while we watching cartoons. A donation is requested; bring your own supplies. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —Sundays: Life drawing workshop with resident artist Quinn Salazar. Three hours of uninstructed drawing and painting of a nude model. Bring your own supplies to work with; seating will be provided. 3 to 6 p.m. $10. RSVP required: 618-4395. PETTERSON MUSEUM OF INTERCULTURAL ART: 730 Plymouth Road, Pilgrim Place. Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 2 to 4 p.m. Contains collections of international fine art, folk art and material culture from 10,000 B.C. to the present, contributed by Pilgrim Place residents and community friends, covering every continent. 399-5544. —April 20 through July 28: “Celebrating the Arts of Polynesia and Micronesia.” Opening reception: Saturday, April 20. Enjoy an all-day event featuring music, dance, food and crafts from the region. POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART: 330 N. College Ave. Open Tuesday through Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. Art After Hours on Thursday, 5 to 11 p.m. Admission info: 621-8283 or www.pomona.edu/museum. —Through April 14: “Nuance of Sky: Edgar Heap of Birds Invites Spirit Objects to Join His Art Practice” unites the work of Hock E Aye Vi Edgar Heap of Birds with historic American art works from the collection of the Pomona College Museum of Art. —Through April 14: “Project Series 45 – Kirsten Everberg: In a Grove” consists of a new suite of 4 paintings and 4 drawings based on Akira Kurosawa’s film Rashomon (1950). —Through April 14: “Art and Activism in the US: Selections from the Permanent Collection” showcases American artists of the 20th and 21st centuries who have made their art work an integral part of their political activism. RANCHO SANTA ANA BOTANIC GARDEN: 1500 N. College Ave., Claremont. The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4

p.m. Closed January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. Admission to the garden is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors (65+) and students with valid ID, $4 for children 3 to 12, no charge for children under 3 and members. 625-8767 or www.rsabg.org. —April 15 through 19: California Native Plant Week Sunset Walks. 5 to 6 p.m. Guided walking tours conclude with a view of the sunset. Free with garden admission or membership. —Through June 9: “Where They Grow Wild,” an exclusive display of original artworks from Rancho Santa Ana Botanic Garden’s archival collections, complementing the “When they were Wild” collaborative exhibition with the Huntington and the Theodore Payne Foundation. RUTH CHANDLER WILLIAMSON GALLERY: 1030 Columbia Ave., on 11th and Columbia, Scripps College campus. Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. during exhibitions. Free admission. 607-3397 or www.scripp scollege.edu/williamson-gallery/. —Through April 7: “Denatured Nature,” Scripps College Ceramic Annual—the longest-running exhibition of contemporary ceramics in the United States. SQUARE i GALLERY: 110 Harvard Ave., Claremont. Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. or by appointment. Square i is an annex of the Artist Trait Gallery. Exhibits rotate approximately every 6 weeks. Call 621-9091 or e-mail info@squareigallery.com. —Through April 30: This month’s featured artist is Steve Comba exhibiting “Small Worlds.” His journey as a painter, ranged form abstracted minimalist explorations of the object as primary structure, with only those essential elements such as color and scale as the key communicator of meaning to tell stories through recognizable images. Opening reception: Friday, April 5 from 6 to 8 p.m. Meet the artist during the event. Refreshments will be served.

In celebration of National Jazz Appreciation Month, the second annual Jazz Roundtable will be aired on DJ Larry the Fox's show, "All that Jazz" at 5 p.m., Saturday, April 6 (rebroadcast at 1 a.m., Sunday, April 7) on KSPC Claremont 88.7 FM and www.kspc.org. Larry the Fox leads a discussion of various jazz topics with noteable jazz artists and will give an insight into their latest releases, some of their unusual experiences and reveal their sense of humor. The participants are Bruce Babad, Bill Cunliffe, Bruce Forman, Luther Hughes, Tom Meek and Larry the Fox.

OUR TOWN KSPC to host jazz roundtable

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RESTAURANT ROW

CALL MARY TODAY: 621-4761

NIGHTLIFE
CASA DE SALSA: 415 W. Foothill Blvd. This is a restaurant that offers weekly live entertainment. 445-1200. —Thursday: Michael Ryan and Friends. 6 to 9 p.m. —Friday through Sunday: Romantic guitarist Vicente Victoria. 5 p.m. to closing. —Sunday: Mariachi San Pedro. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. ESPIAUS RESTAURANTE Y CANTINA: 109 Yale Ave., Claremont. Cantina remains open until flow of customers slows down. 621-1818. EUREKA! GOURMET BURGERS & CRAFT BEER: 580 W. First St., Claremont. Open daily from 11 a.m. to midnight Sunday through Thursday and closes at 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday. “Hoppy” Hour daily from 2 to 6 p.m. 445-8875. —Mondays: Local Mondays featuring $3 Dale Bros. Brewery pints. —Tuesdays: 50 percent off all wines by the glass. —Wednesdays: Steal-the-Glass craft beer of the week. Meet the brewer first Wednesday of every month. —Thursday, April 18: All Tito’s Vodka drinks $2 off and Eureka! Thursday Night Music featuring The Black Tongued Bells. THE FOLK MUSIC CENTER: 220 Yale Ave., Claremont Village. —Open Mic night, the last Sunday of every month. Sign-up begins at 6 p.m.; performances run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Admission is $1. Info: 624-2928 or www.folkmusiccenter.com. —Saturday, April 20: The Dustbowl Revival is a Venice, California-based roots collective that merges old school bluegrass, gospel, jug band, swamp blues and hot swing of the 1930s. Performance at 7:30 p.m., doors open at 7 p.m. $10. FLAPPERS COMEDY: 540 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. 18+. Show times: Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. —April 5 and 6: Deven and Joel Comedy Duo have been performing from coast to coast since 1998. This comedy couple is best known for their satire and music parodies. —April 12 and 13: Justin Worsham has been de-

scribed as, “the voice that lives in every man’s head,” and “the nicest, funniest guy around.” Justin entertains audiences of all ages and sizes with his clean, energetic and improvisational comedic style. FOX THEATER POMONA: 301 S. Garey Ave., Pomona. www.foxpomona.com. —Friday, April 19: Bullet for My Valentine. —Thursday, April 25: Crystal Castles. HIP KITTY JAZZ & FONDUE: 502 W. First St., Claremont Packing House. Tuesday through Sunday, 5:30 p.m. to 2 a.m. Live jazz every night. Admission: 2-drink minimum. Info: 447-6700 or www.hipkittyjazz.com. —Friday, April 5: Flattop Tom and his Jump Cats (swing). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, April 6: Ginger and the Hoosier Daddys (rock ‘n roll). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Sunday, April 7: Solid Ray Woods (soul). 7 p.m. —Tuesday, April 9: Ladies Night (female DJs). 9 p.m. —Wednesday, April 10: Open Jam Night with Geno’s Standard Band. (jazz). 8 p.m. —Thursday, April 11: The Jazz Aficionados at 7 p.m. and Beat Cinema (DJ) at 10 p.m. —Friday, April 12: Reno Jones (blues). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. —Saturday, April 13: Nutty (swing/lounge). 8 p.m. $5 cover charge. HOTEL CASA 425: 425 W. First St., Claremont. Call 624-2272 or visit www.casa425.com. THE PRESS RESTAURANT: 129 Harvard Ave., Claremont Village. Thursday through Saturday until 2 a.m. Live DJ every Thursday at 11 p.m. 21+ after 9 p.m. Standing room only after 9:30 p.m. No cover. 625-4808. —Friday, April 5: Mr. Squeeze and the Medicine Show (Americana). 10 p.m. —Saturday, April 6: Soul Track Mind (funk/ soul/jazz). 10 p.m. —Tuesday, April 9: King Trivia Night. Answer trivia questions for a chance to win beer. 9:30 p.m. —Wednesday, April 10: Half-off Wine Wednesday. 11 a.m. to closing. —Thursday, April 11: Homero y Una Noche (jazz). 8 p.m. —Friday, April 12: Mario Rojas and a Saturday Night Pink. 10 p.m. —Saturday, April 13: Freakstar. 10 p.m. PIANO PIANO: 555 W. Foothill Blvd., Clare-

mont. Live dueling piano show times: Wednesday and Thursday, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. 21+. $5 cover charge on Fridays and Saturdays after 8 p.m. (no cover charge with student ID). 547-4266. —Tuesdays: Taco Tuesday with $1 tacos, $2 Coronas and $3 margaritas. Rock the mic or jam with the band. —Wednesdays: “Rockstar Karaoke.” Rock the mic or jam with the band. $2 Bud Lights and $4 Vodka Rockstars. 9 p.m. WALTER’S RESTAURANT: 310 Yale Ave., Claremont. VIP and fire pit lounge open from 7 to 10 p.m. 767-2255. —Fridays: Gypsy Kings-style Spanish Guitar. Enjoy the authentic sounds of Kimera during your dinner/appetizers and drinks in the VIP lounge. 7 to 10 p.m. WINE MERCHANTS: Claremont Packing House, 540 W. First St., Claremont. 445-9463. Mondays call, Tuesday through Thursday: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 11 a.m. to 12 a.m., Sunday: 12 p.m. to 7 p.m.

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Candlelight Pavilion boasts ‘sweet’ spring lineup
The Candlelight Pavilion’s season is heating up along with the weather with a slate of performances sure to put a smile on your face. The venue’s current show is the musical Sweet Charity. While working at the seedy Fandango ballroom, Charity Hope Valentine finds it difficult to find the man of her dreams but, being the eternal optimist, she stays hopeful that someday her ideal man will materialize. Inspired by the book by Neil Simon, music by Cy Coleman and Dorothy Fields and Bob Fosse-inspired dances, this groovy 1960s musical includes songs like “Big Spender,” “If My Friends Could See Me Now,” “There’s Gotta Be Something Better Than This,” “Baby, Dream Your Dream” and “Rhythm of Life.” Showtimes are Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings through May 5, with dinner seating at 6 p.m. and curtain at 8:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees with luncheon seating at 11 a.m. and curtain at 12:45 p.m.; and Sunday evenings with dinner seating at 5 p.m. and curtain at 7:15 p.m. Tickets, which include a meal, range from $53 to $68, depending on time and seating section. Children’s tickets range from $25 to $30. Appetizers, desserts, beverages and waiters gratuity are additional. Also coming up is another installment of the Candlelight Pavilion’s popular Big Band Nights, featuring the Citrus College Big Band, on Friday, April 12. Dinner seating is at 6 p.m. and curtain is at 8:15 p.m. Tickets range from $40 to $45. Another musical, The Full Monty, inspired by the popular film about a community of blue-collar men who dare to take it all off, will run from May 10 through June 16. (Note: The Full Monty contains mature subject matter.) The following weeks of the Candlelight’s season are a music-lovers delight, including the following tuneful shows: “The Long Run: Experience the Eagles” (May 14-15); “Jumping Jack Flash: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Rolling Stones” (May 22); “Ticket to Ride: Tribute to the Beatles” (May 28-29); “James Garner’s Tribute to Johnny Cash” (June 4-5) and “Rocky Mountain High: Tribute to John Denver” (June 11-12). Tickets are $20 for these shows. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. with 7:30 p.m. curtain. No meal is included, but desserts and beverages are available for purchase. The Candlelight Pavilion Dinner Theatre is located at 455 W. Foothill Boulevard in Claremont in the Old School House complex. For more information, call the Candlelight Pavilion at 626-3296 or visit www.candlelightpavilion.com.

Inland Valley Repertory to present ‘Cabaret’ at Candlelight
Inland Valley Repertory Theater continues its 2013 season on Tuesdays and Wednesdays at the Candlelight Pavilion with their production of Cabaret, opening on Wednesday, April 17. Based on a book by Christopher Isherwood, the decadent and jazzy musical is set in 1931 Berlin as the Nazis are rising to power. The story revolves around nightlife at the seedy Kit Kat Klub and follows the English cabaret performer Sally Bowles and her relationship with the American writer Cliff Bradshaw. A bittersweet sub-plot involves the doomed romance between German boarding house owner Fräulein Schneider and her elderly suitor Herr Schultz, a Jewish fruit vendor. Overseeing the action is the Kit Kat Klub’s magnetic Master of Ceremonies. Cabaret boasts an award-winning score by John Kander and Fred Ebb and features songs like “Wilkommen,” “Maybe This Time,” “Money, Money” and “Cabaret.” The role of Sally Bowles is played by Tomasina Abate, who received a Stage Scene LA award for her performance as Velma Kelly in IVRT’s 2010 production of Chicago. Southland theater performer John LaLonde stars as the Emcee. The production, which features an onstage “allfemale band,” is directed by 2-time Ovation Awardwinner Cate Caplin, and musically directed by Ronda Rubio. Performances of Cabaret begin at 7:30 p.m. and will be held on Wednesday, April 17, 24 and May 1, and on Tuesday, April 23 and 30. There will also be an additional matinee performance on Wednesday, May 1 at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $30 and can be purchased online at www.ivrt.org or by calling the box office at 626-1254.

MOVIE LISTINGS
LAEMMLE’S CLAREMONT 5 THEATRE: 450 W. Second St., Claremont. 621-5500 or visit www.laemmle.com for movie listings. General admission $11; students with ID $8.50; children under 12 $8; seniors 62+ $8; bargain price $8 on Monday through Friday for all shows prior to 6 p.m. and Saturday, Sunday and holidays prior to 2 p.m. —Now playing: From Up on Poppy Hill [PG], Admission [PG13], Renoir [R], Spring Breakers [R], No [R], Starbuck [R], On the Road [R]. —Sunday, April 7: La Fille Mal Gardee [NR]. 2012-2013 Emerging Pictures presents its Ballet in Cinema series featuring the Bolshoi and the ballet companies of The Royal Opera House, La Scala, The Paris Opera and more. 10 a.m.

COURIER CROSSWORD

Crossword by Myles Mellor. Puzzle #205

Across
1. Drone, e.g. 5. Poetic foot 9. Porky D ____ Police and Fire Memorabilia Show 14. A holly 15. Cambodia currency 16. Protective covering 17. Lowest female voice 19. Finish at 20. On the ocean 21. One who hasn't turned pro? 23. "A Chorus Line" number 24. "I'm impressed!" 27. Hanging ends 29. Get to the point 34. Dress (up) 35. Big name in oil 36. Thing referred to

38. Land unit 40. Work time period 42. Entree add on 43. Capital of Taiwan 45. Loose lady 47. Zuyder ___ 48. Dog 51. Chaise 52. Later 53. Another name intro 56. M.I.T. part: Abbr. 58. Goal scorer for the CHS girl's soccer team, Karen _____ 62. Doubter 64. Making unhappy 67. Japanese verse form 68. All right! 69. Biblical brother 70. Get ready for something bad

71. Top of the head 72. Intersecting vessels

Down
1. Insulation material 2. More than some 3. Periscope part 4. Degree 5. Roth ___ 6. Distress 7. Carpal or tarsal 8. Fair 9. Dexterity 10. Triumph 11. Prefix with European 12. Broadway brightener 13. Sea eagle 18. Indian side dish 22. Reserved 25. Napoleon, e.g. 26. Carve in stone 28. Be rude to 29. Imogene and family 30. Language branch that includes Hungarian 31. Mechanically lift 32. Grab 33. Church V.I.P. 34. Make lace 37. Honorarium 39. Beowulf, for one 41. Hopper 44. Upright 46. Figure of speech 49. Aromatic herb 50. Having even less substance 53. Makes a scene? 54. Burma coinage 55. Author Rice 57. Bangladesh money 59. Go up 60. Pest 61. Fever 63. I Like ___ 65. "Who ___?" (slangy query) 66. One way to change color

Answers to last weekʼs puzzle #204

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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Families will have a ball at Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella
Image courtesy of E.Y.Yanagi and Inland Pacific Ballet

Inland Pacific Ballet is bringing back its family-friendly ballet, Cinderella, with performances set for Saturday and Sunday, April 20 and April 21, at Bridges Auditorium. The original production includes a spunky Cinderella, a pair of hilarious stepsisters and a radiant fairy godmother who sends Cinderella to the ball in a carriage fit for a fairy princess. As the clock strikes midnight, Cinderella must hurry home,

leaving the handsome Prince with a glass slipper as the only clue to finding his true love. Choreographed by DJ Gray, Clinton Rothwell and Laurence Blake, Cinderella boasts magnificent costumes, including exquisite ball gowns by Carmen Creations of Los Angeles. Cinderella’s world was created by scenic designer Daniel C. Nyiri, a 3-time winner of the Inland Theatre League Award, while her glittering coach was designed and built by IPB co-director Kevin Myers. Adding to the magic is the score, which is a sound collage featuring waltz king Johann Strauss’ for Cinderella plus selections by composers such as Benjamin Britten, Charles Gounod and Jules Massenet.

“We wanted our Cinderella to be very entertaining and strike a fun balance between humor and classicism,” noted artistic director Victoria Koenig. A perfect introduction to ballet for young audiences, IPB's Cinderella captures the delightful romance and magic of this classic fairy tale story. Performances will be held on Saturday, April 20 at 1 and 7 p.m. and on Sunday, April 21 at 1 p.m. General admission tickets are $28, $24 for seniors and $20 for children. Premium seats are $38 (all ages). Bridges Auditorium is located at 450 N. College Way in Claremont. For tickets, call 6071139 or visit www.ipballet.org.

PERFORMING ARTS
ALLEN THEATRE: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. 607-4375. —April 11 through 14: Krunk Fu Battle Battle directed by Joyce Lu. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. ANDRE WATTS RECITAL HALL: Claremont Community School of Music. 951 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. 624-3012. BALCH AUDITORIUM: 1030 Columbia Ave., Claremont. 607-2671. —Friday, April 5: Friday Noon Concert featuring Danielle Ondarza (horn), Stephen Klein (tuba), Maria Perez Goodman (piano) and Jason Goodman (percussion). 12:15 p.m. —Friday, April 12: Friday Noon Concert featuring Eric Lindholm and Genevieve Feiwen Lee. 12:15 p.m. —Friday, April 19: Friday Noon Concert featuring Rachel V, Huang on violin and Hao Huang on piano. Beach, Sonata in A minor, Op. 43. 12:15 p.m. BOONE RECITAL HALL: 241 E. 10th Street, Claremont. —Sunday, April 7: Senior recital featuring Jeffrey Steitz on piano. Music by Barber, Chopin, Shostakovich and more. 3 p.m. —Tuesday, April 9: Student recital with performances by students of Scripps music department. 7:30 p.m. BRIDGES AUDITORIUM: 450 N. College Way, Pomona College. Box office hours: Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 607-1139. Tickets may be purchased online at www.pomona.edu/bridges. Military discounts are available through box office for most shows. —April 20 and 21: Inland Pacific Ballet’s Cinderella is an enchanting version of the classic story featuring music of the famous waltz king, Johann Strauss. $29 to $39 with discounts for seniors and children. Two performances on Saturday, April 20 at 1 and 7 p.m. and one performance on Sunday, April 21 at 1 p.m. —Saturday, May 4 at 9 p.m. and Sunday, May 5 at 11 a.m.: The nationally recognized CCBDC’s annual Spring performance Claremont Colleges Ballroom Dance Company Spring Concert. One of the largest shows of its kind in the

country, showcasing over 100 dancers performing ballroom, Latin and social dancing styles. $20 general admission, $10 seniors/alumni/faculty/staff. For student or group pricing contact: leadership@claremontballroom.org. —Saturday, May 11: Theater Experience of Southern California presents Annie. The performing group have been performing musicals since 1990, featuring an average cast of 150 actors for each show, professionally directed and supported by live musicians, musical directors and choreographers. The show is based on the popular Harold Gray comic strip Little Orphan Annie, with music by Charles Strouse, lyrics by Martin Charnin and the book by Thomas Meehan. A spunky orphan girl finds a home with a New York millionaire during the Depression, but must dodge the clutches of her evil orphanage mistress. 2 p.m. —Sunday, May 12: Emmy-nominated political comedian Bill Maher, called “one of the establishment’s most entertaining critics” by The New York Times, will perform at Pomona College’s Bridges Auditorium presented by AEG LIVE. Mr. Maher, who has garnered 23 Emmy nominations over 18 years, is the host of HBO’s television series Real Time, which features Maher’s funny, sociopolitical commentary and a roundtable of guests, including Arianna Huffington, Ben Affleck, Michael Moore and Robin Williams, among numerous others. He has described himself as a libertarian and “as a progressive, as a sane person.” Maher’s 2008 film Religulous (directed by Larry David), a satirical skewer of organized religion, is the seventh highest grossing documentary of all time. He is formerly the host of the Comedy Central and ABC late night talk show Politically Incorrect. Maher has written 4 bestsellers, most recently The New New Rules: A Funny Look at How Everybody But Me Has Their Head Up Their Ass (2012), Does Anybody Have a Problem with That? Politically Incorrect’s Greatest Hits (2010) and New Rules: Polite Musings from a Timid Observer (2005). His most recent HBO stand-up special was Bill Maher: But I’m Not Wrong (2010). Mr. Maher is a frequent commentator on CNN, MSNBC and HLN cable networks. Tickets cost $50.25 and $70.25, with additional online fees. Performance begins at

8 p.m. Tickets may be purchased by visiting www.pomona.edu/bridges or calling 607-1139. BRIDGES HALL OF MUSIC: Pomona College, 150 E. Fourth St., Claremont. 607-2671. —Saturday, April 6: West African Music and Dance presented by the CalArts African Music and Dance Ensemble directed by Yeko LadzekpoCole and Andrew Grueschow. The performance features traditional repertoire from the Ewe and Dagomba people of Ghana, Togo and Benin, West Africa. 8 p.m. —Sunday, April 7: Vocal chamber music with Gwendolyn Lytle, Cynthia Fogg, Tom Flaherty and Genevieve Feiwen Lee. Music by Arum, Brahms, Gonzales-Medina, Flaherty and Walker. 3 p.m. —Saturday, April 13: “Reflections from the Piano” featuring Barry Hannigan on piano. Music by Bonds, Burnson, Duckworth, Silverman and Schoenberg. 8 p.m. CANDLELIGHT PAVILION: 455 W. Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening shows: dinner at 6 p.m., performance at 8:15 p.m.; Sunday evening shows: dinner at 5 p.m., performance at 7:15 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday matinees: lunch at 11 a.m., performance at 12:45 p.m. 626-1254, ext.1 or www.candlelightpavilion.com. —Through May 5: Sweet Charity. GARRISON THEATER: 241 E. Tenth St., Claremont. Scripps College Performing Arts Center. 607-2634 or visit www.scrippscollege.edu. —Thursday, April 11: The Rembrandt Club gather to view “From Ballet to Bollywood: Scripps Dance Concert Preview” with new choreography developed by Scripps dance majors, minors and faculty. A tea and coffee will follow in Lee Pattison Court, adjacent to Garrison Theater. —Friday, April 12 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 13 at 2 and 8 p.m.: “Scripps Dances,” Scripps College Dance Department’s annual spring concert of original dance works choreographed by students and faculty. $10 general admission or $5 for faculty, staff and seniors. HAUGH PERFORMING ARTS CENTER: 1000 W. Foothill Blvd., Glendora. Discounts available for students, seniors and youth. 626-963-

9411 or www.haughpac.com. —April 12 through 14: Legally Blonde: The Musical presented by Citrus Musical Theatre Workshop. $18 to $20. LEWIS FAMILY PLAYHOUSE: 12505 Cultural Center Drive, Rancho Cucamonga. Call 477-2752 or visit www.lewisfamilyplayhouse.com. —Through April 14: Mainstreet Theatre Company presents The Phantom Tollbooth. $14-$16. —Saturday, April 27: Claddagh – An Explosion of Celtic Dance & Passion $28-$35. —Sunday, April 28: Bob & Bing – The Road Back to Cucamonga! $18.50$23. MUDD THEATER: 1325 N. College Ave., Claremont. 621-5330. —Tuesday, April 9: SoulScapes, an improvisational presentation by national ministry Music Serving the Word, features Bob Ravenscroft’s keyboards, Dwight Kilian’s upright bass and Rob Moore’s drums in breaking the traditional labels of jazz and classical music. Their improvisational artistry creates a contemplative SoundScape for the spoken word of Rev. Richard Parrish. Mario Barnabe completes the experience with visuals that complement the musical score and bring focus to Scripture and Christian spirituality. He projects video clips during the performance that create a contemplative space surrounding the music and spoken word. 4 to 5 p.m. All are welcome. For more information call 447-2500 or visit www.cst.edu. SEAVER THEATRE COMPLEX: Pomona College, 300 E. Bonita Ave., Claremont. The box office is available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and one hour prior to curtain times. Call 607-4375 or e-mail seaverboxoffice@pomona.edu. —May 2 through 5: Pomona College Spring Dance Concert with artistic direction by Laurie Cameron. Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m.
Jenelle Rensch covers the calendar, arts and entertainment. Deadline: Thursday at 5 p.m., one week before publication. Include date, time, address, a contact phone number and fee for admission (if applicable). Email: calendar@claremont-courier.com. Phone: 621-4761. Fax: 621-4072. Address: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd., Suite 205-B, Claremont, 91711. There is NO guarantee that items submitted will be published.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

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How do you spell success? S-O-P-H-I-E

E

l Roble 8th grader Sophie WillardVan Sistene was selected as a finalist in the Inland Valley Regional Spelling Bee, held March 23 at Mt. San Antonio College.
While Sophie did not move past the finals for a spot in the Scripps National Spelling Bee in Washington, DC, she did an incredible job, according to Sue Hensley, El Roble English teacher and spelling bee coordinator. “She has that natural ability to memorize the spelling of words she has seen only once or twice, as well as the intuitive knowledge of how letters are situated in words she has never even seen before,” Ms. Hensley noted. Ms. Hensley is a self-professed word and spelling nut, and grew up in a family of avid Scrabble players. “I was the type of person that would notice typos in a newspaper and write to the editor,” she said, adding that she has continued the Scrabble tradition with her own family today. There is a lot of preparation for students who are signed up for the El Roble bee. Ms. Hensley invites students to take a preliminary written test and selects the top 15 scorers to participate in the school’s oral spelling bee. Then, it’s cram time. “I meet with the finalists for several weeks before the bee and we play games, have practice sessions and go over tips like knowing root words, etymologies and language of origin,” she said. Sophie aced the El Roble bee as well as her first word in the Inland Valley competition: homonym. Unfortunately, nerves got the best of her when it came to her second word, “abdicate,” which she said she misspelled even though she knew how to spell it.

“She is an amazing speller and knew how to spell every word that was used for the remainder of the bee,” a proud Ms. Hensley pointed out. How did Sophie get to be such a spelling whiz? “She’s a natural speller but she also put a lot of hard work into it. After she was done with homework each night, she would study for the spelling bee,” Sophie’s mother, Mary Cay Van Systine, said. “We were really proud when she won the El Roble spelling bee. It was just the frosting on the cake when she went onto regionals and finals.” Sophie’s innate gift for spelling is nurtured by her voracious reading. Between school and the associated hours of homework and her art and piano lessons, she doesn’t have much free time. When she does, though, Sophie uses it to read. “There are lots of spelling words I know from books,” she said. Like any self-respecting bookworm of her generation, Sophie has read all of the Harry Potter and Hunger Games books. She is currently reading another popular book, Ink Heart, and is waiting impatiently for the release of the third book in the Divergent series. In school, her English teacher, Katherine Hertenstein, “has us reading a lot and writing about what we’re reading.” The students are currently in the thick of Harper Lee’s classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. Good spelling is useful in any profession, and Sophie is already pondering what she might like to do with her promising future. “I really like acting and theater and art, so I might want to do something with art or performing. I also am really interested in math and science,” she said.
—Sarah Torribio storribio@claremont-courier.com

Photo special to the COURIER Sophie Willard-Van Sistene, right, and El Roble English teacher and spelling bee coordinator Sue Hensley celebrate Sophieʼs success at the Inland Valley Regional Spelling Bee.

Explore public utilities at Democratic Club meeting
The Democratic Club of Claremont will hold its April luncheon on Friday, April 12. Speaker John Grula will discuss “Electric Utilities Performance: A Case Study of Community-Owned vs. Investor-Owned Utilities and Their Regulatory Oversight by the PUC.” Mr. Grula has a PhD in evolutionary genetics. He has been a project manager at a biotech company and has been the astronomy librarian at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena for 15 years. He is also a contributing writer for the Pasadena Weekly. The meeting will take place at Casa de Salsa, 415 Foothill Blvd., Claremont. Lunch and conversation will be from noon to 1 p.m., with the talk and discussion from 1 until 2 p.m. The cost of the meal, taxes and tip will be $16. Everyone is welcome.

OUR TOWN
lar hours that weekend and receive discounts and prizes plus participate in demonstrations and special events. Three Claremont locations will be participating in the crawl: Bourgee Boutique, Colors 91711 and Phebie’s NeedleArt. For more information on the yarn crawl, visit www.yarncrawlla.com.

Chaparral student urges residents to ʻRock the Fourthʼ
Elaine Ulmer, a second grade student at Chaparral Elementary School, was selected as the winner of this year's Fourth of July Celebration Theme Contest. According to Elaine’s wishes, “Claremont Rocks the Fourth” this star-studded Independence Day. Elaine was selected from among more than 40 entries submitted by K-6 grade students, according to a city press release. As the winner, Elaine will lead the Fourth of July festivities with the flag salute and hold a place of honor in the afternoon parade. Her day will end with a bang at the fireworks show thanks to complimentary tickets. For more on Claremont’s Fourth of July Celebration, visit www.Claremont4th.org.

Scripps College performance of dances from ballet to Bollywood
The Scripps College Fine Arts Foundation presents “Scripps Dances: From Ballet to Bollywood,” a free narrated preview of choreography by Scripps College dance majors/minors and faculty. The production offers insight into the diversity of their dances and their unique movement signatures. A reception will follow the performance with an opportunity to meet the dancers and enjoy refreshments in the lobby. Full concert performances will be held at Garrison Theater on Friday, April 12 at 8 p.m. and Saturday, April 13 at 2 and 8 p.m. Admission is $10.

String quartet performance kicks off new Maloof exhibition
The classical string quartet Ambrosia will perform at the Maloof Foundation on Sunday, April 7 from 1 to 4 p.m. The concert, which celebrates the opening of the exhibit “With Strings Attached: Art in the Craft of Sound,” is the first of 5 intimate musical performances scheduled for the Maloof between now and the end of October. Ambrosia’s featured musicians include Colleen Coomber and Laura Rosky-Santoni on violin, Cathy

Get crawling, knitters
Claremont’s knitters and needle artists invite the community to join in on the second annual Los Angeles County Yarn Crawl, taking place Thursday, April 11 through Sunday, April 14. Travel to participating yarn stores during their regu-

Biagini on cello and Carrie Holzman on viola. Members have performed all over the world, including appearances in Spain, France, Italy and the United Kingdom, as well as with symphonies and chamber orchestras in the United States. A collaboration between the Sam and Alfreda Maloof Foundation for Arts and Crafts and the Folk Music Center Museum in Claremont, “With Strings Attached” is on view through October 27. The exhibit features more than 30 hand-crafted musical instruments from around the world, both familiar and exotic, along with a selection of unique music stands created by legendary woodworker Sam Maloof. Visitors will see a Peruvian Charango with an armadillo back, a sitar from India and a Balalika from Russia as well as unique types of violins, guitars, lutes, banjos and harps. Musicians slated to appear in the coming months include koto musician Yukiko Matsuyama (May 19), violin maker Jim Brown (July 14); oud virtuoso John Bilizikjian (September 15); and the African kora and classical guitar duo Amadou and Ryoji (October 27.) “The performances give us an opportunity to bring to life for audiences a number of the instruments, some of which are not often heard,” noted exhibition organizer John Scott. Musical events will be staged in the courtyard of the Maloof residence (5131 Carnelian St., Alta Loma), one of 2 California sites to be designated as a National Register of Historic Places Artist Home. Open house tours with docents will begin at 1 p.m. Musical performances begin at 2 p.m. and are followed by a reception. Tickets covering the house tour, performance and refreshments are $30 each or 2 for $50. Maloof Foundation member and student prices are $20/each and $25/pair. Proceeds benefit the not-for-profit Maloof Foundation’s mission of educating and inspiring the community through the creative legacy of Sam and Alfreda Maloof. For information, visit malooffoundation.org or call 980-0412.

Claremont COURIER/Friday, April 5, 2013

29

T

he first step in making a difference is making some noise, and Fair Trade Claremont and Traffick Free Pomona don’t plan on keeping quiet. The 2 social justice groups are joining forces once again on Tuesday, April 9 to host a free screening of Not My Life, a documentary focused on the global reach of today’s continued slave trade. Filling up the seats of the Laemmle Theatre is the initial step in their battle towards a slave-free world. “Raising awareness is the first step to eradicating human trafficking,” said Tamiko Chacon, pastor of social justice at Pomona First Baptist, one of the event sponsors. The more awareness that exists, the more our eyes are open to what trafficking looks like and how we can get involved.” Not My Life seeks to give a face to the widespread issue of human trafficking. In the film narrated by award-winning actress Glenn Close, filmmaker Robert Bilheimer travels to 5 different continents in his effort to depict the realities of children stuck in forced labor, domestic servitude, begging, sex tourism, sexual exploitation and child soldiering. The resulting documentary is understandably hard to watch, Mr. Bilheimer acknowledges. “It is impossible to spend 4 years among the victims and survivors of these crimes—virtually all of them children—and emerge with anything other than a sense of sheer and utter horror,” the director wrote in a statement. While a tough subject to digest, Ms. Chacon found the film’s broad depiction of defining human trafficking particularly poignant. In one part of the documentary, the filmmaker introduces the audience to a young girl

Documentary film shows hard realities of slave trade

OUR TOWN
Claremont High School classes offer Prius raffle tickets
The Claremont High School Classes of 2013 and 2015 are selling tickets for the upcoming Claremont Educational Foundation’s Prius Raffle to be held on April 21. Tickets are $20 each. Contact claremonthigh2013@gmail.com or call JoAnne Williams at 556-7271 for details.

who has been sold into sex slavery in the United States. “Victims [of human trafficking] could be right next door,” Ms. Chacon recognized. “There have been victims forced into slavery, into domestic service, literally in upper middle class neighborhoods. Learning how to spot the signs is another important key.” Helping victims of human trafficking has become a passion project for the social justice ministry of the local Baptist church in recent years. Last January, the group held a screening of a human trafficking documentary at Claremont First Baptist. They were surprised to see a full house, nearly 200 people, in attendance. They hope to repeat their success with a new, amped up venue. “When you think of the center of Claremont, you think the Village,” Ms. Choco said, adding that the Laemmle has a history of supporting nonprofits and documentary filmmaking. “We thought if we did this in a theater, hopefully we would reach more members of the community, and that was our goal, to help raise more awareness.” Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the movie, about 80 minutes long, will begin at 7 p.m. Seats are free, but space is limited. The Claremont Laemmle Theater is located at 450 W. Second St. in Village West Public Plaza. Entrance to the screening is free, but a limited number of seats are available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Find out more about the film at www.notmylife.org. For more on the sponsoring organizations, visit www.traffickfreepomona.org or www.facebook.com/ fairtradeclaremont.
—Beth Hartnett news@claremont-courier.com

University Club installs new officers, president
Celeste Palmer, Claremont author and frequent speaker, is the new president of the Claremont University Club. She and other officers just elected will serve for 12 months ending March 31, 2014. The other officers are Michael Pichler of Upland, vice president; Gene Smith, Upland, immediate past president; John Felton, Claremont, treasurer; Anne Sonner, Walnut, secretary; Ted Nall, Claremont, historian. New committee chairs, all of Claremont, are Ellen Litney, club services; Bill Waggener, marketing; and Nancy Magnusson, membership. The University Club meets for lunch, conversation and a program every Tuesday at noon in the Hughes Community Center, 1700 Danbury Rd., Claremont. The meetings are open to the public.

909.621.4761
Friday 04-05-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

30

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

CLASSIFIEDS
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It's a Zoe TeBeau Estate Sale
in Claremont (Claraboya area)

rentals............30 legals...............31 services...........33 real estate.......36
RENTALS
Condo for rent
BEAUTIFUL 2 bedroom Highpoint condo with view. Community pool. $2350 monthly. www.curtisrealestate.com. 626-1261. CLUB Terrace, 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom, 2-car garage. Fresh paint, community pool. No pets. $1950 monthly. WSPM 6215941.

Townhome for rent
CLAREMONT: Single story triplex, one bedroom, one bathroom, with garage. Washer and dryer hookups. Water, trash and gardener included. No pets, smoking. $995 monthly. 624-3756.

April 5 - April 7th 8:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. daily
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Home is full of beautiful furnishings and decorative accessories— more like packed full! The entire contents of the home include formal and informal beautifully decorated rooms. China, crystal, lighting, mirrors, 42" flat screen TV's, Bose stereo equipment, patio furnishings, garden decor and plants. An unbelievable amount of lovely ladies clothing, shoes and accessories. Baskets full of costume jewelry. Everything is stylish and many have tags still on! Kitchen, garage and patios are packed as well. Lovely patio furniture and plants. Hundreds of DVD's and CD's. Cars! 2000 S-Style Jaguar 3.0 and 1992 Mercedes Benz 300E. See photos: www.estatesales.net/estate-sales/409161.aspx

REAL ESTATE
House for sale
TWO 5 bedroom homes in pre-foreclosure starting at $1000 per month! Stop renting and own! Bad credit ok! Income verification only! Just take over payments! Call 1866-949-7345. (Cal-SCAN)

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MY computer works. Computer problems? Viruses, spyware, email, printer issues, bad internet connections. Fix it now! Professional, U.S. based technicians. $25 off service. Call for immediate help. 1-888865-0271. (Cal-SCAN) HIGHSPEED internet everywhere by satellite! Speeds up to 12mbps! 200 times faster than dial-up. Starting at $449.95 a month. Call now and go fast! 1888-718-6268. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE on cable TV, internet, digital phone, satellite. You’ve got a choice! Options from all major service providers. Call us to learn more! Call today, 888-706-4301. (Cal-SCAN) START now! Open a Red Hot Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox, Discount Party, $10 Clothing Store, Teen Store or Fitness Center from $55,990. Worldwide! www.drss25.com. 1877-807-5591. (Cal-SCAN) DISH Network. Starting at $19.99 a month for 12 months and high speed internet starting at $14.95 a month (where available). Save! Ask about same day installation! Call now! 1888-806-7317. (Cal-SCAN) AT&T U-Verse for just $29 a month! Bundle and save with AT&T internet, phone, TV and get a free pre-paid Visa card (select plans). Hurry, call now! 800-319-3280. (Cal-SCAN) SAVE money on auto insurance from the major names you know and trust. No forms. No hassle. No obligation. Call Ready For My Quote now! Call 1-888-706-8325. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Help wanted
DRIVERS: Top pay and CSA friendly equipment. Class A CDL required. Recent CDL graduates wanted. Call 877-2588782. www.ad-drivers.com. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Daily or weekly pay. Hometime choices. One cent increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. Three cent per mile enhanced quarterly bonus. CDL-A, 3 months OTR experience. 800-4149569. www.driveknight.com. (Cal-SCAN) INSTRUCTOR/ Attendant/ CNA positions available. Seeking energetic individuals to assist disabled adults. Full-time, part-time, weekends and overnights available. Email resume to icr.job@icr3899.com or call 5993184 ext. 540 for information. IMMEDIATE opportunity: Entry-level oil and gas industry workers needed. No experience necessary. $64,000$145,000 per year, starting salary. Call 24-hour free recorded message for details, 1-800-985-9770. (Cal-SCAN) DRIVERS: Inexperienced? Get on the road to a successful career with CDL training. Regional training locations. Train and work for Central Refrigerated. 877-369-7091.
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Antiques
AMERICAN and European antiques, furnishings, home and garden decor. New shipment weekly! The Ivy House. 212 W. Foothill Blvd. 621-6628. A barn and house full of antiques, furniture and smalls. Refinishing too! La Verne. 593-1846. Kensoldenoddities.com.

FOR SALE AND IMMEDIATE REMOVAL FROM SITE:
Historic Pitzer Ranch Foremanʼs River Rock Residence located at 926 E. Base Line Road, Claremont, is available for sale. Leave a message at 949.341.1207 for a viewing appointment. All appointments must be made in advance, as a release of liability will be required prior to entry due to the physical condition of the building. All viewing appointments will be held on April 12 between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. All CASH only offers (minimum $5.00) to be received NO LATER THAN 5:00 p.m., April 19, 2013 with building removal from site required NO LATER THAN APRIL 22, 2013.

House for rent
CLAREMONT: $2000 monthly. Charming neighborhood. Three bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, den, front porch. Newly renovated, plenty of parking. Contact 477-1375. CLAREMONT: $2300 monthly. Great neighborhood. Four bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, pool, hot tub, master suite, walk-in closet, completely renovated, plenty of parking. Contact 477-1375. SAN Antonio Heights home for rent. Ten minutes from Village. Two bedrooms, one bathroom, large kitchen, great schools, pets okay. $1895 monthly, yard service and water included. Call Kevin, 714-402-0034. ALTA LOMA: Four bedroom, 2 bathroom, 1828 sq. ft. house. Large living room with fireplace. Large covered patio. $2195 monthly. Call Paul Lazo, 909753-9721. CBTC. IMMACULATE 4 bedroom, 2 bathroom, 1787 sq. ft. home in Claremont. Walking distance to Colleges and Village. Drought resistant landscaping. $2395 monthly. Call Herman Jannsen, 626-487-2625. CBTC. CLAREMONT: newly renovated 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom, pool home. Walk to schools and parks. $2100 includes gardener and pool service. Small pets ok. Available now. Call agent, 4553203. CLAREMONT: 3 bedroom, one bathroom. Walk to Village, park. Detached garage, hardwood floors, fireplace. $1750 monthly. Call 6246547.

Donations
DONATE your car. Fast, free towing. 24-hour response. Tax deduction. United Breast Cancer Foundation. Providing free mammograms and breast cancer information. 888-792-1675. (Cal-SCAN) DONATE your car, truck or boat to Heritage for the Blind. Free 3 day vacation, tax deductible, free towing, all paperwork taken care of. 888-902-6851. (Cal-SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT
Instructors Wanted
Foothill Country Day School is seeking part-time instructors for summer and school year Enrichment Programs. Summer programs operate from June 17 to July 19 and instructors must be available from 12:30-2:00 p.m. each day. School year instructors must be available from 3:30-5:00 p.m. Successful candidates will have education and experience that distinguishes them as an expert in their field, which could include Bachelor's or Master's degrees. All employees will be background checked and fingerprinted. Instructors are needed for a variety of classes and experts are encouraged to suggest new subjects that might interest students in grades K-8. We are currently seeking instructors for: Swimming (Water Safety Instructor or YMCA cert required), LEGO Engineering, Ceramics, French, Improvisation and Audition Technique (theatre), Zumba, and Circus Arts. Pay range: $20 - $27 per hour. Apply: 1035 W. Harrison, Claremont CA 91711

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“MANY a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.” —Mark Twain. Advertise your business card sized ad in 140 California newspapers for one low cost. Reach over 3 million plus Californians. Free brochure. elizabeth@cnpa.com. 916-288-6019. (Cal-SCAN)

For sale
CASH paid for Diabetic strips! Don’t throw boxes away, help others! Unopened/unexpired boxes only. All brands considered! Call anytime! 24-hours a day, 7-days a week. 888491-1168. (Cal-SCAN) TWO matching couches. Jade green with accenting leaf print. $500. Excellet condition. 276-1690.

Selling, Buying or Renting? Advertise in the Claremont Courier! Call Jessica, Courier Classifieds at 621-4761.

LEGAL TENDER
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 110069404 Doc ID #000710205982005N Title Order No. 11-0056514 Investor/Insurer No. 2093940 APN No. 8309-007-015 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 04/12/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by MARK R WALSH, AN UNMARRIED MAN, dated 04/12/2005 and recorded 4/20/2005, as Instrument No. 05 0914891, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 05/06/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 264-266 W 12TH ST, CLAREMONT, CA, 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $509,238.62. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-281-8219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 11-0069404. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 03/16/2012 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 By: Trustee's Sale Officer RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. A-4375628 04/05/2013, 04/12/2013, 04/19/2013

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. No. 1368352-25 APN: 8702-001-131 TRA: 010069 LOAN NO. Xxxxx4386 REF: Navarro, Pilar IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, Dated: May 19, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 25, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded on May 23, 2007, as Inst. No. 20071250108, in book XX, page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by: Edward Acosta and Blanca Acosta, husband and wife, and Pilar Navarro, a married woman as her sole and separate property, all as joint tenants, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a State or National Bank, a check drawn by a State or Federal Credit Union, or a check drawn by a State or Federal Savings and Loan Association, Savings Association, or Savings Bank specified in Section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in Civic Center Plaza, 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 1332 S. Diamond Bar Blvd. Unit A, Diamond Bar, CA 91765. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the Trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $281,051.49. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The Beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the County where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the County recorder’s office or a Title Insurance Company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or more times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a Court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1368352-25. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information: (619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: March 27, 2013. (04/05/2013, 04/12, 04/19) R-428344 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE APN: 8671-039-002 Trustee Sale No. 1377208-31 TRA:2730 REF: BENNETT, ANDREW P. UNINS Property Address: 2417 BONNIE BRAE AVENUE, CLAREMONT CA 91711 IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED June 21, 2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER On April 25, 2013, at 11:00am, CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded June 29, 2004, as Inst. No. 04 1655346, in book XX, page XX, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA executed by: ANDREW P. BENNETT AND SARAH L BENNETT, HUSBAND AND WIFE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK DRAWN ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, SAVINGS ASSOCIATION, OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THIS STATE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA POMONA CALIFORNIA all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: COMPLETELY DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2417 BONNIE BRAE AVENUE CLAREMONT CA 91711 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition, or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $457,350.37. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (714)730-2727 or visit the Internet Web Site WWW.LPSASAP.COM using the file number assigned to this case 1377208-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR SALES INFORMATION: (714)730-2727 CALWESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION 525 EAST MAIN STREET P.O. BOX 22004 EL CAJON CA 92022-9004 Dated: March 25, 2013 CAL-WESTERN RECONVEYANCE CORPORATION By: Authorized Signature A-4373099 04/05/2013, 04/12/2013, 04/19/2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, April 5, 2013
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Pursuant to the California Self-Service Storage Facility Act, (B&P Code 21700 et.seq.), the undersigned will sell at public Lien Sale at the following location and at time shown, personal property including, but not limited to: furniture, boxes, clothing, business items, toys, tools and/or other household items, unless otherwise noted. Date: April 16, 2013 Time: 10:00 a.m. Location: Evergreen / Claremont Self Storage 454 W. Baseline Road Claremont, CA 91711 Unit(s) for Auction: Alice Donahoe Arthur Schaertel All sales are subject to prior cancellation. Owner reserves the right to bid. Terms, rules and regulations are available at the time of the sale. Seller reserves the right to refuse any bid or pull property from sale. Publish on March 29, 2013 and April 5, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013062532 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as THE QUACKENBOS COMPANY, 675 W. Foothill, Suite 302, Claremont, CA 91711. Nicholas C. Quackenbos, 723 Gettysburg, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Nicholas C. Quackenbos This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/28/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: April 5, 12, 19 and 26, 2013 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF PAUL PARRY Case No. KP015181 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of PAUL PARRY A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Reginald Parry in the Superior Court of California, County of LOS ANGELES. THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that Reginald Parry be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on April 25, 2013 at 8:30 AM in Dept. No. A located at 400 Civic Center Plaza, Pomona, CA 91766. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: VICTORIA P STAPLETON ESQ SBN 93907 STAPLETON & STAPLETON 401 E ROWLAND AVE COVINA CA 91723 CN883460 Publish: April 5, 12 and 19, 2013

31

NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (Division 6 of the Commercial Code) Escrow No. 24949-KK (1) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to creditors of the within named Seller(s) that a bulk sale is about to be made on personal property hereinafter described. (2) The name and business addresses of the seller are: ABRAMS FOOD INDUSTRIES, LLC, 939 W. HUNTINGTON DR, MONROVIA, CA 91016 (3) The location in California of the Chief Executive Office of the seller is: 1315 S. VALLEY VISTA DR, DIAMOND BAR, CA 91765 (4) The name and business address of the buyer(s) are: JALARAM TORRANCE INC, 12990 CAMBRIDGE CRT, CHINO, CA 91710 (5) The location and general description of the assets to be sold are: TENANT IMPROVEMENTS AND FURNITURE & FIXTURES of that certain business located at: 939 W. HUNTINGTON DR, MONROVIA, CA 91016 (6) The business name used by the seller(s) at the said location is: PHILLY'S BEST (7) The anticipated date of the bulk sale is APRIL 24, 2013, at the office of FORTUNE ESCROW, INC, 302 W. FOOTHILL BLVD, GLENDORA, CA 91741, Escrow No. 24949-KK, Escrow Officer: KELLY KING (8) Claims may be filed the same as “7” above. (9) The last date for filling claims is: APRIL 23, 2013 (10) This Bulk Sale is subject to Section 6106.2 of the Uniform Commercial (11) As listed by the Seller, all other business name(s) and addresses used by the Seller within three years before such list was sent or delivered to the Buyer are: NONE JALARAM TORRANCE INC, Transferees LA1288550 COURIER 4/5/13

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ANIMALS
Found pet
FOUND: Tortoise with a multicolor shell, looks like a desert tortoise. Was found on Twelfth St. between Berkeley and Oxford. 6425822.

BULLETINS
Health
ATTENTION Sleep Apnea sufferers with Medicare. Get CPAP replacement supplies at little or no cost, plus free home delivery! Best of all, prevent red skin sores and bacterial infection! Call 888-699-7660. (Cal-SCAN) DO you know your testosterone levels? Call 888-9042372 and ask about our test kits and get a free trial of Progene All-Natural Testosterone Supplement. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
CANADA Drug Center es tu mejor opcion para ordenar medicamentos seguros y economicos. Nuestros servicios de farmacia con licencia Canadiense e Internacional te proveeran con ahorros de hasta el 90 en todas las medicinas que necesites. Llama ahora al 1-800-385-2192 y obten $10 de descuento con tu primer orden ademas de envio gratutio. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Health
CANADA Drug Center is your choice for safe and affordable medications. Our licensed Canadian mail order pharmacy will provide you with savings of up to 90 percent on all your medication needs. Call today, 1-800-273-0209, for $10 off your first prescription and free shipping. (Cal-SCAN)

BULLETINS
Personals
MEET singles right now! No paid operators, just real people like you. Browse greetings, exchange messages and connect live. Try it free. Call now, 1-800945-3392. (Cal-SCAN)

ANIMALS
Animal Shelters Inland Valley Humane Society 623-9777 Upland Animal Shelter 931-4185 H.O.P.E Upland 1800-811-4285 West End Animal Shelter 947-3517

Events
RITCHIE Bros. Unreserved Agricultural Equipment Auction. 9 a.m., Wednesday, April 10, Salinas, CA. Large equipment selection, no minimum bids, everyone welcome. Call 559752-3343 or visit www.rbauc tion.com. (Cal-SCAN)

Bear Sightings
REPORT local bear sightings! Contact Jessica at 621-4761 or classified@claremont-cou rier.com.

Personals
CHAT with local men. Local men are waiting for you! Call Livelinks now. 800-291-3969. Women talk free! (Cal-SCAN)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 046834 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as California Shaved Ice, California Sno, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Michael Zaid Sweis, 1174 Whitman Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Michael Zaid Sweis This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/08/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 044068 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Inland Energy Service, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: P.O. Box 995, Claremont, CA 91711. Alan Medak, 809 N. Indian Hill Blvd., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 02/11/13. /s/ Alan Medak This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/06/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 2013 Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES If an application for a premises to premises transfer or original license at a premises located in a census tract with undue concentration of licenses, the following notice must be published once a week for three consecutive weeks pursuant to Government Code Section 6063, in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication. The publication must be in the city in which such premises are situated, or if such premises are not in a city, then publication shall be made in a newspaper of general circulation other than a legal or professional trade publication nearest the premises. Affidavit of publication shall be filed with the following office: Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control 222 E. Huntington Dr. Ste 114 Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 256-3241 NOTICE OF APPLICATION TO SELL ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES Date of Filing Application: March 15, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: P POST INC. The applicants listed above are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 211 W 1ST ST CLAREMONT, CA 91711-4702 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 – On-Sale Beer And Wine – Eating Place CLAREMONT COURIER, 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Ste 205B, Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-4761. Publish: March 22, 29 and April 5, 2013

LEGAL TENDER

legalads@claremont-courier.com 909.621.4761
sonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $527,784.48. It is possible that at the time of sale the opening bid may be less than the total indebtedness due. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept cashier's checks drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Said sale will be made, in an ''AS IS'' condition, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession or encumbrances, to satisfy the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, advances thereunder, with interest as provided, and the unpaid principal of the Note secured by said Deed of Trust with interest thereon as provided in said Note, plus fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on a property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 1-800-2818219 or visit this Internet Web site www.recontrustco.com, using the file number assigned to this case TS No. 10-0116083. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. DATED: 12/14/2010 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. 1800 Tapo Canyon Rd., CA6-914-01-94 SIMI VALLEY, CA 93063 Phone: (800) 281 8219, Sale Information (626) 927-4399 RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A. is a debt collector attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. AFN4371035 03/22/2013, 03/29/2013, 04/05/2013
NOTICE OF PROBATE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY WITH COURT CONFIRMATION CASE NO:KP 012712 SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF LOS ANGELES, In the matter of the Estate of Rose Gail Overby, Decedent Notice is hereby given that the probate sale of real estate with confirmation will be held on or after April 2, 2013 in dept. A, at Superior Court of California, Pomona district, probate division, located at 400 civic center Dr. Pomona CA. The property will be sold to the highest and best bidder and subject to confirmation by said superior court all rights, title and interest of said decedent at the time of death, and all rights, title and interest in the estate has additionally acquired, in and to all the certain real property situated in the county of Los Angeles, state of California, described as follows Real property located at 209 Pony Express Rd. San Dimas CA. Legally described as: TR51284 LOT 11, APN: 8390-026-014 Commonly known as 209 Pony Express Road, San Dimas CA 91773-2779 Terms in the sale are cash in lawful money of the United States on confirmation of the sale of part cash and balance upon such terms and conditions are agreeable to the personal representative. A minimum of five percent (5%) of the amount bid to be deposited with bid. Bids or offers are to be in writing and must be submitted to Law Office of James M. Powell 1894 Commercenter Dr. W. Suite 108 San Bernardino, CA 92408 anytime after the first publication hereof and before the date of sale. Dated: March 20, 2013 Sheri Overby, Personal Representative The Estate of Gail Rose Overby James M. Powell Attorney for Personal Representative Publish: March 29 and April 5, 2013

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, April 5, 2013
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 053808 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Vision Source Sales, 135 Marywood Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. Amanda O’Connell, 135 Marywood Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/01/2013. /s/ Amanda O’Connell This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 053796 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as FAUX-CAL POINT FINISHES, 1361-A E. Grand Ave., Pomona, CA 91766. Brian T. Clark, 857 S. College Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above in January, 2002. /s/ Brian T. Clark This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 056817 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as DiGiusto Consulting, 2280 Forbes Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. David DiGiusto, 2280 Forbes Ave., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 03/01/2013. /s/ David DiGiusto This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/21/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2013 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 053923 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as LORDSBURG TAPHOUSE & GRILL, 2335 “D” St., La Verne, CA 91750. Mailing address: 2348 5th St., La Verne, CA 91750. Michael R. McAdams, 2348 5th St., La Verne, CA 91750. Britt M. McAdams, 2348 5th St., La Verne, CA 91750. This business is conducted by a Husband and Wife. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Michael R. McAdams This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/18/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2013

32

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 050027 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as DENT EVO, 1038 Moab Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. Joseph Garcia, 1038 Moab Dr., Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious name or names listed above on 01/01/2013. /s/ Joseph Garcia This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/13/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 22, 29, April 5 and 12, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S No. 1284104-31 APN: 8281-002-044 TRA: 010049 LOAN NO: Xxxxxx5229 REF: Perez, Estela B IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED March 11, 2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On April 11, 2013, at 9:00am, Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, as duly appointed trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust recorded March 18, 2005, as Inst. No. 05 0624342* in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, executed by Estela B. Perez, A Married Woman, will sell at public auction to highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the financial code and authorized to do business in this state: Behind the fountain located in civic center plaza, 400 civic Center Plaza Pomona, California, all right, title and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in the property situated in said County and State described as: Completely described in said deed of trust The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 24361 Vista Buena Dr Diamond Bar CA 91765-1836 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be held, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, condition or encumbrances, including fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to pay the remaining principal sums of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $339,239.36. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1284104-31. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)5901221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 92022-9004 Dated: March 06, 2013. (R427054 03/22/13, 03/29/13, 04/05/13)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 056370 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Massage Amber, 630 South Indian Hill Blvd. #7, Claremont, CA 91711. Mailing address: 690 San Jose Ave. #16, Claremont, CA 91711. Maria Elizabeth Marrufo, 690 San Jose Ave. #16, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Maria Elizabeth Marrufo This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/21/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 29, April 5, 12 and 19, 2013 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee Sale No. : 20110033500474 Title Order No.: 110195039 FHA/VA/PMI No.: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 11/17/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEx West, L.L.C., as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 11/30/2005 as Instrument No. 05 2912453 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of LOS ANGELES County, State of CALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: GEORGE S. ANAYA AND SARAH E. ANAYA, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 04/18/2013 TIME OF SALE: 11:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: BY THE FOUNTAIN LOCATED AT 400 CIVIC CENTER PLAZA, POMONA, CA 91766. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 622 SILVERDALE DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CALIFORNIA 91711 APN#: 8367-008-014 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $491,533.36. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder 's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-730-2727 for information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case 20110033500474. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: AGENCY SALES and POSTING 2 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 714-730-2727 www.lpsasap.com NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 03/25/2013 NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. 15000 Surveyor Boulevard, Suite 500 Addison, Texas 75001-9013 Telephone: (866) 795-1852 Telecopier: (972) 661-7800 A-4372359 03/29/2013, 04/05/2013, 04/12/2013

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE TS No. 100116083 Doc ID #0001705563392005N Title Order No. 10-8-428135 Investor/Insurer No. 1704094444 APN No. 8313-010-060 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED, IF REQUIRED BY THE PROVISIONS OF SECTION 2923.3 OF THE CALIFORNIA CIVIL CODE. YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 06/20/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Notice is hereby given that RECONTRUST COMPANY, N.A., as duly appointed trustee pursuant to the Deed of Trust executed by SHEILA P WALKER, A SINGLE WOMAN, dated 06/20/2007 and recorded 6/27/2007, as Instrument No. 20071538843, in Book N/A, Page N/A, of Official Records in the office of the County Recorder of Los Angeles County, State of California, will sell on 04/25/2013 at 9:00AM, Doubletree Hotel Los Angeles-Norwalk, 13111 Sycamore Drive, Norwalk, CA 90650, Vineyard Ballroom at public auction, to the highest bidder for cash or check as described below, payable in full at time of sale, all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust, in the property situated in said County and State and as more fully described in the above referenced Deed of Trust. The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 602 ASBURY DRIVE, CLAREMONT, CA, 91711. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The total amount of the unpaid balance with interest thereon of the obligation secured by the property to be sold plus rea-

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 2013 052863 The following person(s) is (are) doing business as Planning Cloud Nine, 522 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Apt. 103, Claremont, CA 91711. Niña Villarin Gruezo, 522 S. Indian Hill Blvd., Apt. 103, Claremont, CA 91711. This business is conducted by an Individual. Registrant has not yet commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed herein. /s/ Niña Gruezo This statement was filed with the RegistrarRecorder/County Clerk of Los Angeles County on 03/15/13. NOTICE- In Accordance with subdivision (a) of section 17920, a Fictitious Name Statement generally expires at the end of five (5) years from the date on which it was filed in the office of the County Clerk, except, as provided in subdivision (b) of section 17920, where it expires 40 days after any change in the facts set forth in the statement pursuant to section 17913 other than a change in the residence address of a registered owner. A new Fictitious Business Name Statement must be filed before the expiration. The filing of this statement does not of itself authorize the use in this state of a Fictitious Business Name in violation of the rights of another under federal, state, or common law (see Section 14411 et seq., Business and Professions Code). PUBLISH: March 22, 29, April 5 and 12, 2013

SERVICES
Acoustical
QUALITY Interiors. Acoustical contractor, specializing in acoustic removal, texture, painting, acoustic re-spray and drywall repairs. Lic.602916. 909-624-8177.

Friday 04-05-13

CONTACT US
1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

33

Bathroom Remodeling
A Bath-Brite authorized dealer. Bathtubs and sinks. Showers, tile, countertops. Refinish - Reglaze - Restore Porcelain, ceramic, fiberglass. Quick and affordable. Please call 945-7775. www.bath-brite.com

Concrete
JDC CONCRETE 909-624-9000 Driveways/walkways, block walls, pavers, bricks, stone veneer, concrete staining, drainage. Lic.894245 C8, C29.

Electrician
ASA ELECTRIC
Residential and commercial. New installations, repairs and more!

Furniture Restoration
KEN'S Olden Oddities.com. Taking the time to care for Courier readers complete restoration needs since 1965. La Verne. Call 909-593-1846.

Handyman
A-HANDYMAN New and Repairs Inside, outside, small, large, home, garage, yard, ONE CALL DOES IT ALL! 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Lic.323243 30 years experience! Claremont area.

951-283-9531
Claremont resident. Lic.860606

Antiques
ANTIQUES wanted. Fair prices for the following old items: Hollywood, comics, toys, watches, medals, coins, badges, jewelry, postcards, books, magazines, military, photos, tools, sports, fishing, Disneyland, medical, historic documents, autographs, holiday decorations and other interesting items. 909-2389076. micklet@earthlink.net.

Gardening
EXPERIENCE our award winning maintenance! We create a customized maintenance program for your property and lifestyle needs. Sprinkler repairs and low voltage lighting. Call Alan Cantrall, 909-224-3327. Lic.861685 and insured.

Contractor
WENGER Construction. 25 years experience. Cabinetry, doors, electrical, drywall, crown molding. Lic.707381. Competitive pricing! 951-640-6616.

Caregiver
CAREGIVER/Personal Assistant. Experienced, compassionate and caring. CPR and First Aid certified. References. Barbara, 949-228-2128.

Serving Claremont Since 1995.
Residential, Commercial. Recessed lighting and design, breaker replacement, service panel upgrades, ceiling fans, trouble-shooting, landscaping lighting, pool and spa equipment replacement. Free estimates 24-hours. References. 909-900-8930 909-626-2242 Lic.806149

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New and repairs.

HANDYMAN Service. "Your small job specialist." Steve Aldridge. Day: 909-455-4917. Evening: 909-625-1795.

Carpentry
SEMI-RETIRED finish remodeler. Does kitchens, porches, doors, decks, fences, painting and more. Call Paul, 909919-3315.

909-599-9530
Serving Claremont for 30 years! Lic.323243

Hauling
Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate* MANUELS Garden Service. General cleanup. Lawn maintenance, bush trimming, general maintenance, tree trimming and removal. Low prices and free estimates. Please call 909-391-3495 or 909-239-3979. GARDEN Maintenance. Mowing, hand pull weeding, trimming, sprinkler work and cleanups. David, 374-1583.

AC/Heating
DOUG CHAPLINE Heating & Air Conditioning
Since 1979 - Prompt repairs, serious service. Free estimates for complete installations and equipment change outs. Competitive rates. Visa, MC accepted. Lic.C20-383912. Call 626-3933.

SAMEDAY-HAULAWAY
Free estimates. Senior discount! WE HAUL IT ALL CHARLIE! 909-382-1210 sameday-haulaway.com

KOGEMAN CONSTRUCTION
Room additions. Kitchen/bath remodeling. Custom cabinets. Residential/commercial. 946-8664 Lic.B710309 Visit us on Facebook!

Carpet Service
ANDERSON Carpet Service. Claremont resident serving Claremont since 1985. Powerful truck mounted cleaning units. Expert carpet repairs and stretching. Senior discounts. 24-hour emergency water damage service. Please call 621-1182. HACIENDA Carpet, upholstery and tile cleaning. Special: with any carpet cleaning, 20 percent off tile cleaning. Senior discounts. Since 1970. 909-985-3875.

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small! Old home rewiring specialist. 24-hour emergency service.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Same Day One call does it all! Garage, yard, home, moving!

Drywall

909-982-8910
* Senior Discount * Lic.359145

909-599-9530

House Cleaning
CHRISTIAN lady will clean homes, offices, windows. Bonded. Licensed. Excellent references. 21 years. Yolanda, 909-621-2162. 20 YEARS experience. Free estimates. Excellent references. Tailored to your individual needs. Call Lupe, 525-3273. CAROUSEL Quality Cleaning. Family owned for 20 years. Licensed. Bonded. Senior rates. Trained professional services including: baseboards, ovens, windows. Fire/water damage. Hauling. Move in/out. 10 percent discount to Claremont College staff and faculty. Robyn, 621-3929.

Fences & Gates
*REDWOOD OR CEDAR *ORNAMENTAL IRON *BLOCK WALLS Installations and Repairs Since 1980. Lic.557151. C.F.Privett 909-621-5388

SAME DAY SERVICE Free service call with repair. Only $49.50 diagnostic fee without repair. All repairs—All brands Edison and Gas Company rebates. Great prices. Friendly service. We're local. 909-398-1208 www.novellcustom.com Lic.958830

Chimney Sweep
Gash Chimney Sweep
Dust free chimney cleaning. Repairs, chimney covers, spark arrestors, masonry and dampers. BBB. Please call 909-467-9212.

THOR McAndrew Construction. Drywall repair and installation. Interior plaster repair. Free estimates. CA Lic.742776. Please call 909-816-8467. ThorDrywall.com.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran New, repairs. ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Girl Friday
I’M here to help! Housekeeping, shopping, errands. Pet, plant, house sitting. Jenny Jones, 909-626-0027, anytime!

Electrician
CALL Lou. Flush lights, service changes, repairs, service calls, outdoor lighting and room additions. Lic.258436. Call 909-2417671, 909-949-8230. SPARKS ELECTRIC Local electrician for all your electrician needs! 626-890-8887 or 909-2512013. Lic.922000

STEVE’S HEATING & Air Conditioning
Serving your area for over 25 years. Repairs all makes/models. Free service call with repair. Free estimate on new units. MC/Visa. 100 percent financing. Senior discounts. Lic.744873 909-985-5254

Quality Fireplace & BBQ Chimney sweeping.
Complete fireplace, woodstove installation, service and repair. Spark arrestor supply and installation. Call 920-6600. 392 N. 2nd Ave., Upland.

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Lic.323243

Fictitious Name
A FICTITIOUS Name Statement (D.B.A.) is required if you’re in business. You are required to file and publish a DBA in the local newspaper. You must renew every five (5) years. You must republish if any changes have been made to your business. If your business is in LA COUNTY, The Courier will provide the legal form, file it with the L.A. County Clerk, publish the Statement and provide you with proof of publication. Only $95.00 to publish plus a $26 county fee. Claremont Courier: 1420 N. Claremont Blvd, Suite 205B Claremont. Call Vickie, 621-4761. DOT Will Do It! A full-service errand business. Dorothy "Dot" Sheehy. www.dotwilldoit.com. 909-621-9115 or 909-782-2885.

Irrigation
SPRINKLER SYSTEMS
INSTALLATIONS EXPERT REPAIRS DRIP SYSTEM SPECIALISTS C.F.PRIVETT, LIC.557151

Concrete
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly Stamped, broom, color finishes. Slate, flagstone, planters, walls and walkways.

Handyman
SMALL repair jobs, fencing, gates, brick block, concrete cutting, breaking and repair. 25 years in Claremont. Paul, 909-753-5360.
Claremont Handyman Service

Aikido

Programs for adults and children. Established 1983. Call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

MOR ELECTRIC & HANDYMAN SERVICES Free estimates and senior discounts. 909-989-3454 Residential * Industrial * Commercial. We do it all. No job too big or small! 24/7 emergency services. Reasonable and reliable. Lic.400-990 30 years experience.

909-621-5388 Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured No job too big or small!

Carpentry, repairs, gates, lighting, small painting projects. Odd jobs welcome! Free consultations. 909-921-6334

24-hour emergency service. 909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145

SERVICES
Irrigation
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Friday 04-05-13

tax help • antiques • house cleaning • landscaping pet care • roofing • elder care • computer services
Although paid advertisements may appear in Claremont COURIER publications in print, online or in other electronic formats, the Claremont COURIER does not endorse the advertised product, service, or company, nor any of the claims made by the advertisement.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

34

Landscaping

Painting

Plastering & Stucco
PLASTERING by Thomas. Stucco and drywall repair specialist. Licensed home improvement. Contractor Lic.614648. 984-6161. www.wall-doctor.com.

Sprinklers & Repair
ADVANCED DON DAVIES Veteran, Mt. Sac, Cal Poly
New, repairs. Professional. All sprinkler repairs.

Tutoring
AFFORDABLE K-5 Reading Tutor. Retired teacher. 35 years. Multiple strategies, resources. Individual, group. Janice, 909-596-1266.

Call 909-599-9530 Now Cell: 626-428-1691

Landscape Lighting
ENJOY your yard after dark! We offer expert design installation and repair of low voltage lighting. Alan Cantrall Landscaping. 909-224-3327. Contractor Lic.861685.

Eco-friendly landscaping. We will get you a $3000 grant to remove your lawn! Why mow when you can grow? From the creators of The Pomona College Organic Farm. Specializing in native and edible landscapes. 909-398-1235 www.naturalearthla.com Lic.919825 *$1.50 sq. ft. rebate*

Plumbing
STEVE’S PLUMBING 24-hour service* Low cost! Free estimates. All plumbing repairs. Complete drain cleaning, leak detection, water heaters. Your local plumber for over 25 years. Senior discounts. Insured, Lic.744873. * 909-985-5254 *

Call 909-599-9530 now Cell: 626-428-1691
WASTING WATER? Poor Coverage? Sprinkler repair. Installations and modifications. C.F. Privett 621-5388 Lic.557151 CHARLES' Landscape & Sprinkler Service. 30 years experience. Claremont native. 909-217-9722. DURUSSEL Sprinklers. Install, repair, automate. Since 1982. Free estimates. Lic.540042. Call 909-982-1604.

Upholstery

RESIDENTIAL/Commercial. Quality work at reasonable prices. Free estimates. Lic.541469. 909-622-7994. COLLINS Painting & Construction Company, LLC. Interior, exterior. Residential and commercial. Contractors Lic.384597. 985-8484.

Landscaping
DLS Landscaping and Design. Claremont native specializing in drought tolerant landscaping, drip systems and lighting. Artistic solutions for the future. Over 35 years experience. Call: 909-225-8855, 909-982-5965. Lic.585007.

Hayden’s Services Inc.
Since 1978 Bonded * Insured NO JOB TOO BIG OR SMALL! 24-hour emergency service.

GREEN SIDE UP LANDSCAPING
Landscape design and construction. New, re-landscaping and repairs. Concrete, block walls, masonry, BBQ, patio covers and fountains. Planting, irrigation, drainage, lighting and ponds.

SUNSET GARDENS LANDSCAPING. C-27 Lic.373833. Drought resistant landscapes. Turf removal. Irrigation specialist. Naturescapes. Desertscapes. Rockscapes. Masonry. Call John Cook, 909-231-8305. Claremont.

STEVE LOPEZ PAINTING
Extensive preparation. Indoor, outdoor, cabinets. Offering odorless green solution. 33-year master. Lic.542552

PINK UPHOLSTERY 48 years of experience. Up to 30 percent discount on fabric. Free pickup and delivery. Please call 909-597-6613.

Tile

Weed Abatement
JOHNNIES Tree Service. Weed abatement and land clearing. Disking and mowing. Tree trimming and demolition. Certified arborist. Please call 909-946-1123 or 951-522-0992. Lic.270275. TIRED of dealing with weed problems on your lot or field? Help control the problem in an environmentally safe manner. To receive loads of quality wood chips. Please call 909-214-6773. Tom Day Tree Service.

909-982-8910
* Senior discount * Lic.359145 RENES Plumbing and AC. All types residential repairs, HVAC, new installation, repairs. Prices to fit the working family’s budget. Lic.454443. Insured professional service. 909-593-1175. Regrout, clean, seal, color grout. 909-880-9719, 1-888764-7688.

Learn Japanese

Please call 909-989-9786.

Tree Care
BAUER TREE CARE
30 plus years in Claremont. Ornamental pruning specialist of your perennials. 909-624-8238 MGT Professional Tree Care. Providing prompt, dependable service for all your tree care needs. Certified arborist. Matt Gray-Trask. Call 946-7444. TOM Day Tree Service. Fine pruning of all trees since 1974. Free estimate. 909-629-6960.

Call 909-992-9087 Lic.941734 GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING CO.
Landscaping contractor for complete landscaping, irrigation, drainage, designing and gardening. Lic.520496 909-621-7770

TAUGHT by Sumi Ohtani at the Claremont Forum in the Packing House. Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons and evenings, for different levels. Tutoring available. Information: 909626-3066.

AFFORDABLE. Traditional or green options. Custom work. No job too big or too small. 20 years of Claremont resident referrals. Free estimates. Lic.721041. 909-9228042. www.vjpaint.com.

Patio & Decks
ADVANCED DON DAVIES
New, refurbish and repair. Concrete, masonry, lighting, planters and retaining walls.

Service and repair. Drain cleaning, leak detection, gas lines, water heaters, installation of plumbing fixtures, bathroom remodels. Fully insured and bonded. All work guaranteed.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Veteran Weed eating, mowing, tractor fields, manual slopes, hauling.

Painting
ACE SEVIER PAINTING Interior/Exterior BONDED and INSURED Many references. Claremont resident. 35 years experience. Lic.315050 Please call: 624-5080, 596-4095.

909-260-4376
www.ThePlumbersConnection.net

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691

Lic.839835

Window Washing
NACHOS Window Cleaning. For window washing, call Nacho, 909-816-2435. Free estimates, satisfaction guaranteed. Resident of Claremont.

ADVANCED DON DAVIES
Mt. Sac, Cal Poly New, refurbish or repair. Design, drainage, concrete, slate, flagstone, lighting, irrigation, decomposed granite. 909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691 Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

909-599-9530 Cell: 626-428-1691
Claremont area 30 years! Lic.323243

EXCEL PLUMBING
Family owned and operated. 30 plus years experience. Expert plumbing repairs and drain cleaning. Water heaters, faucets, sinks, toilets, disposals, under slab lead detection, sewer video inspection. Licensed, bonded and insured. Lic.673558. 909-945-1995

Tutoring
PRIVATE tutor available for afterschool and weekend homework help. Secondary teaching credential in English Language Arts. Will work with your student on any subject. Fee negotiated at first meeting. 909-261-3099. HELP your child achieve success in school. Family man, currently completing graduate work in education, available for homework help and tutoring in your home or in my Claremont home. Evenings or weekends. $20 hourly. 626-466-8391, rcmsangab@gmail.com. Free initial consultation. PRIVATE tutor. Reading, writing and vocabulary. Experienced teacher over 40 years. Contact Allen, agross91768@yahoo.com or 909-629-6007.

Pilates

Yoga

KPW PAINTING
Older couple painting, 40 years experience! Competitive rates. Small repairs. No job too small. References available. We work our own jobs. Carrie or Ron

Roofing
GORDON Perry Roofing. Reroofing, repairs of all types. Free estimates. Quality work. Lic.C39588976. 909-944-3884. DOMINICS Roofing. Residential roofing and repairs. Free estimates. Lic.732789. Call Dominic, 951-212-9384.

DANS GARDENING SERVICE
Sprinklers installed, repaired. Clean-up, hauling. Sod, seed, planting, lighting, drainage. Free written estimates. Insured. References. Since 1977. Lic.508671. Please call 909-989-1515.

909-615-4858
Lic.778506 D&D Custom Painting. Bonded. Lic.423346. Residential, commercial. Interior or exterior. Free estimates. 909-982-8024. YOUR neigborhood classical Pilates studio. 665 E. Foothill Blvd. Unit M., Claremont, Ca 91711. Call for a free demo! 909-730-1033.

RESTORATIVE YOGA
Classes and workshops. Susan Perry 35 year yoga practitioner. Weekly classes held at Musubi Dojo. Please call 624-7770. perry@aiki.com. www.musubidojo.org.

909.621.4761
Friday 04-05-13

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

35

SERVICES
AUTOMOTIVE

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMPUTERS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HEALTH & WELLNESS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Options In-Home Care is built on integrity and compassion. Our friendly and professional staff provides affordable non-medical home care service, tailored care for our elderly clients, including personal hygiene, Alzheimer & dementia care, meal prep, bathing and light house keeping. For your convenience our Operators and Case Managers are available 24/7! Now offering VA benefit support assistance. Office #: 909-621- CARE(2273) Fax #: 909-621-1114 Website: www.optionsinhomecare.com

909-262-4633

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

909-621-5626
HOUSE CLEANING SPECIALTY SERVICE SPECIALTY SERVICE

Cleaning Service
Call for a free estimate: House or Business!

Free E-Waste drop-off facility!

909.234.5766
Are you having a garage sale?
Place your ad in the Claremont COURIER Classifieds! 909-621-4761

Kandi Ford

10% OFF first-time customers & senior citizens!

AGE R A G LES SA

REALTORS!
Place your ads in the most widely read real estate section in the area.

Claremont COURIER Classifieds, 621-4761

Ask for Jessica!

Claremont COURIER Classifieds

36

909.621.4761
Friday 04-05-13

REAL ESTATE

Mason handled 2 transactions for us this year and we were very pleased to have worked with him. His knowledge of the area was great, which was important to us, and he was always available to answer our questions. A big plus these days—he answered phone calls promptly and was available by email as well. Both transactions went extremely well and we would recommended him to anyone interested in buying or selling a home in this area.

CONTACT US 1420 N Claremont Blvd. Suite 205B Claremont, CA 91711 Ph: 909.621.4761 • Fax: 909.621.4072 classified@claremont-courier.com Business Hours: Monday-Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

—Rick & Diana T.
To read more of what my clients are saying, please visit MasonProphet.com and click on "Testimonials," or find me on Yelp.com.

Mason Prophet

Broker Associate, CRS, GRI, ABR, e-PRO, SRES

909.447.7708 • Mason@MasonProphet.com

www.MasonProphet.com DRE# 01714034

M ALKA RINDE REAL ESTATE
1876 Morgan Avenue, Claremont CA 91711

EXPERIENCE MATTERS...
Celebrating Over 25 Years Selling Real Estate in the Area

MALKA RINDE Broker - Owner

Bus: 909-625-2407 Fax: 909-621-2842 www.malkarinde.com

(909) 260-5560
www.callMadhu.com
500 West Foothill Boulevard Claremont
DRE#00979814 Now representing... Call me for a FREE Market Analysis of your home. I have many buyers looking for homes in Claremont.

Legal ease. Keep it local.
We can publish your LA County legal.

Call Vickie, 621-4761
legalads@claremont-courier.com

ourier C
Claremont
claremont-courier.com

Claremont COURIER Classifieds/Friday, April 5, 2013

37

OPEN HOUSE DIRECTORY
Sunday, April 7
1-3 p.m. 619 Occidental Drive, Claremont. Don Kendrick Real Estate. 2-5 p.m. 4524 Rhodelia Ave., Claremont. Wheeler Steffen Sothebyʼs International Realty.

Claremont Real Estate Market Snapshot

March
Number of Homes Sold Number Sold > $750,000 Number Sold < $750,000 Highest Sale Price Lowest Sale Price Average List Price Average Sold Price Average Days On Market

2013 28 3 25 $1,250,000 $160,000 $505,466 $501,921 58

2012 32 4 28 $1,500,000 $205,000 $495,981 $469,349 100

Change From Previous Year -13 -25 -11 -17 -22 2 7 -42 percent percent percent percent percent percent percent percent

Through my affiliation with Wheeler Steffen Sotheby’s International Realty, I am able to offer local, national and international marketing programs that are unparalleled in the industry. These programs complement my extensive working knowledge of the local market, allowing me to provide my sellers’ properties maximum exposure to attract the most qualified buyers. If you are considering selling, please contact me and I will help you determine the optimum sales price for your home. I currently have several anxious buyers looking for Claremont properties.

Madhu Sengupta

March continues Claremont’s rise in home prices. The inventory remains low as there are less than 50 homes on the market throughout the city. We are noticing homes are selling much closer to their asking prices (within 1 percent on average) compared to a 5 percent difference on average, this time last year. Homes continue to sell nearly twice as fast as they did the prior year. Inventory between $750,000-$1,000,000 remains scarce.
Information provided by Ryan Zimmerman, Wheeler Steffen Sotheby's International Realty, ryan.zimmerman@sothebysrealty.com

909.260.5560

GEOFF T. HAMILL
BROKER ASSOCIATE, ABR, CRS, E-PRO, GRI, SRES

GEOFF IS #1 IN CLAREMONT SALES & LISTINGS SINCE 1988

909.621.0500
OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2 - 5 PM

Geoff@GeoffHamill.com
NEW LISTING! NEW LISTING!

Tell a Friend...
New Listing!
4524 Rhodelia Avenue, Claremont STUNNING CUSTOM CONTEMPORARY. $825,000. Mid-century home with high volume ceilings, walls of glass and picturesque views. Over 1/3 acre of parklike grounds and large heated swimming pool. Approximately 3,150 sq. ft., featuring 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. Dramatic entry through antiqued copper clad double doors lead into an impressive living room with atrium and extensive built-ins. Newer renovated kitchen with granite counters and breakfast nook. Adjacent formal dining room. Master suite with sitting area, newly renovated bathroom and walk-in closet. Prime locale on cul-de-sac street near Claraboya, foothills and hillside trails. (R4524) HISTORIC CLAREMONT VILLAGE ESTATE. On 3 prime city lots on over 2/3 acre, this Italian Renaissance style home has original embellishments plus upgrades! Main residence has 5 bedrooms plus a parlor and den. Guest/chauffer's quarters over garage. Custom built circa 1922 by and for the original owner, David Crookshank, a local commercial contractor and important citrus grower. Later owned by the Baum family; L. Frank Baum was the author of The Wizard of Oz, his son and family lived in the home for many years. Formal entry hall, grand scale rooms, high ceilings, crown moldings, mahogany woodwork, hardwood floors, elevator, built-ins, newer tile roof, retrofitted foundation, copper gutters, plus an attic and basement. (C1105) PRESTIGIOUS BLAISDELL RANCH CUSTOM HOME. $850,000. Coveted northeast Claremont estate home near the Claremont foothills, wilderness park and hillside trails. Great one story open floor plan with 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, a large gourmet kitchen plus living, dining, family and game rooms. Perfect for entertaining and family friendly living. Attached 3-car garage with direct access. Situated on approximately1/2 acre park-like grounds with tall mature shade trees, grassy lawn areas, swimming pool and spa. (D939)

"Best Possible Price Achieved, Every Time!"

COMING SOON:
• Architect-Designed Mid-Century on Secluded 1/2 Acre $795,000 • Charming Claremont Home $438,000 • Nice Home in Condit District $425,000 • Vintage 2-Story Colonial in Historic Neighborhood $398,000 • Newer Alta Loma Executive Home $475,000

SALE PENDING!

NEW LISTING!

NEW LISTING!

SELLERS:
PRIME NORTH CLAREMONT GARNET MODEL $638,000. Best locale across from Higginbotham Park and Claraboya foothills! Immaculate one story, approximately 2,600 sq. ft., 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom home in coveted north Claremont neighborhood. Great floor plan shows bright and airy! Formal entry foyer opens to a huge living room and separate formal dining room. Cheerful kitchen with breakfast nook eating area. Adjacent spacious family room with fireplace and access to backyard with pool and spa. Master bedroom affords a large walk-in closet. (M618) CLARABOYA CONTEMPORARY SHOWCASE VIEW HOME. $1,250,000. Panoramic valley, city, canyon and mountain views! Newly rebuilt and expanded in 2001. This classic one story residence has an open floor plan with architectural built-ins. Brazilian maple floors, high ceilings, whole house speaker system and dual pane windows. Double door entry formal, foyer, library, formal living family room with fireplace and built-in entertainment center, formal dining room, chef's kitchen with cook's island, stone counters, stainless steel appliances and eating area. Luxurious master suite with adjacent office/studio retreat with bathroom, spa jetted tub, separate shower and walk-in closet. Over 1/3 acre landscaped grounds and patio areas. (M2556) OLD CLAREMONT VILLAGE FRENCH TRADITIONAL CLASSIC. $675,000. Absolutely gorgeous one story home plus guest quarters in a picturesque setting. Perfectly located on one of the nicest blocks and most coveted streets in the heart of the old Claremont Village. Unique architectural elements throughout. Three bedrooms, den and 3 bathrooms. Large living room with fireplace, formal dining room. Gourmet renovated kitchen. Beautiful oak hardwood flooring. Newer roof. Updated electrical and copper piping. Beautiful gardens in a private setting features custom patio areas, spa and numerous fruit trees. Convenient to Claremont Colleges, Village shopping, gourmet grocery stores and fine schools. (T545)

“I have motivated and qualified buyers looking for a Claremont home”
Please call today for a FREE complimentary market analysis of your property. Thank you!
D.R.E. #00997900

For more information, photos and virtual tours, please visit www.GeoffHamill.com or call 909.621.0500

REAL ESTATE

(909) 626-1261
www.curtisrealestate.com

Visit www.curtisrealestate.com for MLS, community info and more!

CLAREMONT CLUB TERRACE Immaculate 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom condo. Approximately 1563 sq. ft. with vaulted ceilings, sky lights, laminate flooring and private balcony off master bedroom. Lots of storage. Community pool and spa. $435,000. (A1831)

STARTING AT

FOR LEASE...WE HAVE A VARIETY OF HOUSES AND CONDOS $1,525. PLEASE CONTACT US FOR DETAILS. Congratulations to...

Corinna Soiles
Carol Curtis, Broker
107 N. Harvard, Claremont CA 91711

Top Salesperson for the First Quarter!
Sales Associates: John Baldwin, Craig Beauvais, Maureen Mills, Nancy & Bob Schreiber, Patricia Simmons, Corinna Soiles, Carol Wiese

Continuing the family tradition in the Claremont Village since 1947

(909) 626-1261 www.curtisrealestate.com

Best rates for LEGALS. Call Vickie: 909-621-4761, Claremont COURIER.

Your Local Real Estate Resource

W NE

NG I ST LI

W NE

NG I ST LI

YOU CAN SEE FOREVER
This spectacular single level Claraboya home is a work of art! Open the double entry doors to see a sweeping vista before you, from the impressive interior to the delightful outdoors that seem to go on forever as you take in breathtaking views. There is a library for reading, living room with ambient fireplace for formal gatherings and master suite with remodeled master bathroom. Gourmet dream kitchen features granite counters and custom cabinetry with an antique finish. The kitchen opens to the intimate family room allowing for connection between those in the kitchen and the rest of the family and friends who have the opportunity to enjoy the magnificent views this home affords. Other luxurious appointments include the sparking pool and lovely patio areas. With more upgrades than can be listed, please call for an appointment to see this amazing home, 909-398-1810. $1,195,000. (V2272)

CLARABOYA MAGNIFICENCE
Understated elegance from the exterior to the interior of this home is what will capture and delight you. Perfectly situated to showcase the panoramic views that have made Claraboya so highly desirable. Large living room with fireplace, high ceilings, ample windows and French doors. The cozy fireplace in the family room creates an informal and relaxed space for intimate gatherings. There are 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. The master bedroom has incredible views and boasts French doors that open to the expansive deck that wraps around the back of the house. It is the perfect place to watch the sunrise as well as the city lights twinkle in the evening. The lower level of the lot is spacious and provides the perfect relaxation spot under tall trees. This property has been beautifully refurbished and offers fresh paint and new carpet, truly move-in ready. Hurry, this home will not last. 909-398-1810. $899,000. (V2748)

PRIVATE ESCAPE
Retreat to your own private backyard where you will enjoy balmy evenings under the covered patio surrounded by lush grass. This 4 bedroom home has been meticulously cared for over the years. It features a cozy fireplace, breakfast bar in the kitchen and RV parking. Commuter friendly: close to freeways, schools, shopping and restaurants. $465,000. 909-398-1810. (F4572)

NOT JUST ANOTHER HOME
Itʼs easy to see this winsome home has just the right touch of a fantastic floorplan combined with ample living spaces. Located in the Mountain View community, you will fall in love with the classic styling and bright open feeling that welcomes you with warmth and a touch of elegance. Come see this 4 bedroom home today. $439,000. 909-3981810. (M2281)

FRENCH CHATEAU
Immerse yourself in The Manior Residence, reminiscent of a classic Brittany styled French Chateau. Wood and travertine flooring, an elevator, game room, teen loft and 5-star energy rating and more! A kitchen that Julia Child would have adored. Hand laid stone façade is the first blush of the exotic grounds which include a pool pavilion and a guest casita. 909398-1810. $3,195,000. (S1015)

STONE CANYON VIEW ESTATE
Stunning home on a quiet cul-de-sac boasts high ceilings and custom flooring. Gorgeous kitchen includes granite counter, professional grade stainless steel appliances, pantry and nook area which adjoins to the family room for a true great room effect. Enjoy the outdoor pool, spa, patio, outdoor kitchen and views! 909-398-1810. $1,488,000. (T4441)

CLAREMONT CONTEMPORARY
Clean lines and bright open spaces connect the outdoors to the indoors in this home behind private gates of the Griswold’s community. Solid wood floors and plantation shutters accent the vaulted ceilings, cheery kitchen and master suite. Private yard offers relaxation in a tranquil environment. 909-398-1810. $390,000. (V406)

PANORAMIC VIEWS
North Claremont Stone Canyon Estate home. Enjoy high ceilings, wrought iron staircase, French doors and designer glass windows. The kitchen features black pearl countertops and cutting edge stainless steel appliances. Upstairs master suite showcases a 3 sided fireplace and bathroom. 909-398-1810. $1,300,000. (C4471)

ONE-OF-A-KIND MASTERPIECE
Northeast Claremont home. Iron and glass door entryway. Master bedroom has 2 fireplaces, crystal chandeliers and sconces. Gourmet kitchen with 2 islands. Yard has covered patio, outdoor kitchen, outdoor fireplace, salt water pool, spa, fire ring and orchard. Home has solar. 909-398-1810. $2,498,000. (B808)

TIMELESS ROMANTICISM
Elegant living room with custom fireplace and coffered ceilings, spacious family room with wet bar plus a billiard room. Kitchen has professional grade appliances, granite counters and butler's pantry. Master suite has private courtyard with fireplace. Pool, spa, patios and orchard. 909-398-1810. $2,498,000. (B659)

If you or someone you know are struggling with your mortgage don't wait until it is too late. There are options and solutions for you. Call me today!

w w w. c b t c s o c a l . c o m

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated

The Real Estate Company
CLAREMONT Beautiful 3 bedroom Claremont home. Gated courtyard, double door entry. Step down living room with vaulted ceiling and distressed hardwood floors. Adjoining dining room also has vaulted ceiling. Kitchen with tiled flooring and counters with a breakfast bar. Family room with brick fireplace, wood floors and sliding dual-pane door to back patio. Spacious master bedroom suite with vaulted ceiling and mirrored closet. Adjoining full bathroom with tile flooring and oval tub/shower. Two additional bedrooms with mirrored closets and ceiling fans. Newly installed carpeting in all bedrooms. Full hall bathroom with tile floors and granite counter. Home upgraded with dual-pane windows and door. CAD/FAH system. Spanish tiled roof, circular driveway. Three car garage. Great location, walk to award-winning Chaparral Elementary School and shopping. $465,000. (Clar 1553M)

PENDING

PENDING

LA VERNE Pending sale on this beautiful end-unit, 2 story condominium pleasantly located in a quiet complex in northwest La Verne. With notable view of the foothills and mountains. This high quality home has been upgraded and lovingly cared for. You'll note a custom brand new bathroom upstairs, new flooring, a spacious layout, lots of storage and a peaceful courtyard and patio. San Dimas Canyon Park is very near with numerous amenities; softball and soccer fields, a dog park, a small zoo and complete horse accommodations and riding trails. $297,000. (LaV4676C)

PENDING

FOR LEASE

POMONA Beautiful home centrally located near downtown Pomona. This quaint 2 bedroom, one bathroom home has had many recent upgrades including: a remodeled kitchen with granite counters, remodeled bathroom, copper plumbing, tankless water heater, refinished hardwood floors, new landscaping and much more! $159,000. (Pom940L)

SAN GABRIEL Great opportunity! This quaint property
features 2 bedrooms, one bathroom and has had many updates. It also includes a guest unit at the rear of the property. In the last 5 years this property has undergone a new roof, electrical updates, a bathroom remodel and updated flooring. The guest unit has a ton of potential for a buyer who is willing to put some work into it. Must see to appreciate. $360,000. (San1841M)

ONTARIO This 6 bedroom home has a great kitchen with a center island and office nook. The master bedroom has vaulted ceilings, his and her walk-in closets and a huge bathroom with double sinks. One of the other 5 bedrooms has a walk-in closet and adjoining bathroom. Another bedroom is located on the lower level near a full bathroom. The home has large scale tile on the first level and lush carpeting on the second. There is a good size laundry equipped with a sink. The back yard is a good size, there is an attached 3-car garage. $2400 monthly. (Ont638H)

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FOR LEASE

CLAREMONT Lovely Club Vista townhome. Great location within complex, west of Annhurst. Beautiful hard wood flooring throughout the downstairs living room, dining room, kitchen and staircase. Two large bedrooms upstairs. Newer range and microwave oven. Cozy patio opens to quiet green belt. One car attached garage and one car port. The best of Claremont just a few steps away. Standard sale. This is a PUD. $278,500. (Clar755L)

CLAREMONT Great 2 bedroom, 2 1/2 bathroom town-

Property Management from a name you already trust. Call us today for a free market evaluation. 909-621-6761

home with granite counters, vaulted ceilings, a fireplace, covered patio, 2-car attached garage and 2 master bedrooms with full tubs. The balcony overlooks the association pool and hot tub. Washer, dryer, refrigerator, stove and microwave included. This complex is close to the Claremont Colleges, the Village, the Metrolink, shopping and much more! $1850 monthly. (Clar521W)

TOP Producer
March 2013
Charlene Bolton & Collette Albanese

TOP Lister
March 2013

Tea Robertson
909-621-6761 1-800-420-9939

2 5 0 We s t F i r s t S t r e e t , S u i t e 1 0 0 , C l a r e m o n t , C A

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