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The Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Volume 32 Number 2

Affiliated with the Southwest Conference on Language Teaching, the Central States Conference and the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages

IN THIS ISSUE
Dear World Language Colleagues, What an amazing week! The CCFLT Spring Conference, February 21-23, 2013 was an amazing experience. From our Thursday evening 2-hour sessions to the general session Keynote address, from our wine and cheese receptions to our Awards Luncheon, from the incredible (almost professional!) student singers from Fossil Ridge High School, from the on-target, well-presented sessions to the outstanding talent and leadership of Colorado foreign language teachers, it was the crme de la crme of conferences! Thank you all for attending, for presenting and for stepping up to the challenge of leadership in Colorado! And, most especially, thank you to the Board of Directors for CCFLT who worked tirelessly for an entire year to make sure that everything was in place and ran smoothly --- you Colorado Conference are very simply THE BEST! Then February 27, 2013, Toni Theisen, ACTFL president, Noah Geisel, ACTFL Teacher of the Year, Janine Erickson, Teachers Past ACTFL President and Debbie Cody and myself had the privilege of advocating for foreign languages Affiliated with the Southwest to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee at our State Capitol. Conference on Language Teaching, the Please take a moment to read through our presentation in this newsletter. Central States Conference and the Council on the of And be prepared for GREAT things American to happen, because weTeaching are not done Foreign Languages yet! I also want to take this opportunity to thank all of you for the opportunity to serve as your CCFLT president. This has been a great learning experience for me and has given me the chance to connect with Colorado teachers and teachers from all over the world at our regional and national conferences. I have brought back so many of your ideas and foresights to my district and to the state committees I have served on. Working with the two Boards during my tenure has been such a pleasure and just plain fun! When I ran for the Board in 2007 I thought that I would be giving back to an organization that has given me so much throughout many years. The truth is that I gained so much more than I gave and for this I thank all of you. Thank you for your support, suggestions, and guidance as I made this journey. It is teachers serving students who are at the heart of CCFLT. Le monde est un livre dont chaque pas nous ouvre une page. Alphonse de LAMARTINE, Voyage en Orient VIII The world is a book; each step opens a page for us. Ill see you next year at the CCFLT 52nd Annual Spring Conference! Anna Crocker President 2010-2011, Co-President 2012-2013

Co-Presidents Letter Co-Presidents Letter Board of Directors President Elect Letter Fall Conference Flyer Thank You!

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of Foreign Language

Genevieve Overman Service Award 2013 TOY


TOY Nomination Form TOY Nomination Form CCFLT Awards Why Serve? Election Results Presentation to House and Senate Technology ACTFL Awards 2014 Spring Conference

Register Online for the Fall Conference (Coming Soon)

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I certainly hope you thoroughly enjoyed yourself at our Spring Conference! We have heard so many compliments on the sessions, food, keynote and new layout. If you werent with us this year, you picked a bad one to miss! There was something for everyone. Our keynote speaker, Yo Azama, alone was worth the price of registration. We elected several new members to the CCFLT board, and I want to personally welcome them all. They are dedicating their own time to serve you. Please thank them as you see them throughout the coming year. CCFLT could not do all it does without members willing to sacrifice their time and work on our behalf. We gave out many awards this year. Congratulations to our recipients! Unfortunately, a few went unclaimed. This year, make it a priority to nominate someone for one of our many awards, encourage your colleagues to apply for all our grants and awards, nominate yourself for an award or apply for a grant. It s easy to do. All grants and awards forms and information is in this newsletter and on our website at www.ccflt.org. I have again enjoyed my year as co-president. We have been busy, but productive and always knew the board had our back. They were there with encouragement, help and a lively sense of humor (which I love!). No one knows how much work goes into a successful year with CCFLT like a dedicated board member. They truly worked tirelessly, and I am very thankful for each one of them. I wish you much continued success as we head toward the end of another school year. I also wish you a restful and rejuvenating summer. Debbie Cody Co-President codydebbie@hotmail.com

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Officers Debbie Cody, Co-President Anna Crocker, Co-President Cristin Bleess, President-Elect South High School Jefferson County Castle View HS codydebbie@hotmail.com acrocker@jeffco.k12.co.us bleessccflt@yahoo.com

Elementary and Secondary Representatives Congress of Foreign Language Teachers Published Quarterly August, October, January, April www.http:ccflt.org Julie Doyle, Editor julieannedoyle@live.com Have a question about dues? Please email Kristen Boehm CCFLT Executive Secretary: execsec@ccflt.org Advertising rates and policies: You are invited to advertise in the CCFLT Newsletter. Commercial ads, which support the mission of CCFLT and are of interest to the profession, including tour and book ads, are accepted for the following rates: Size of ad Charge Size of Copy Full Page $250 (7 X 9) Half Page $125 (7 X4) Half page $125 (3 X 9) Quarter Page $75 (3 X 4) Prices indicate a one-time submission in the newsletter. If you have questions regarding appropriate software or design files for ads, contact the Editor at julieannedoyle@live.com Advance payment is appreciated. Make checks payable to CCFLT and send to: Kristen Boehm, CCFLT Executive Secretary P.O. Box 270065 Louisville, CO 800279998 If you would like to pay for your advertising using a credit card, use the following link and passcode http://www.regonline.com/ newsletteradvertfees Code: ccfltadvert For questions on advertising costs, email execsec@ccflt.org Greg Breitbarth Lisa Bloomer Amy Flynn Elisabetta Kaufman Diana Noonan Michael Verderaine Becky Loftus Katie Lorimer Post-Secondary Representative Courtney Fell Fawzia Ahmad At-Large Representatives Stefan Betley Grace Koda Holyoke High School Littleton Academy betleyst@hcosd.org gkoda@lps.k12.co.us CU Boulder USAFA Courtney.Fell@colorado.edu fawzia.ahmad@ccd.edu Littleton Academy Pine Creek High School Bear Creek High School South High Denver Public Schools Doherty High School Oberon Middle School Highline Academy greg_tegu@yahoo.com lisa.bloomer@asd20.org afynn@jeffco.k12.co.us Elisabetta.Kaufman@pueblocitycityschools.us diana_noonan@dpsk12.org verdema@d11.org rloftus@jefco.k12.co.us klorimer@highlineacademy.org

Non-Voting Appointed Members Kristen Boehm Julie Doyle Susan Murray-Carrico Executive Secretary Editor Web Master execsec.ccflt@yahoo.com julieannedoyle@live.com susan.murray@asd20.org

CCFLT Listserv E-mail Address:

Use this address to send a message to the Listserv after joining

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CCFLT Listserv Email Address Change Form

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It seems like when we finally figure out the latest and greatest movement in education and/or language teaching and are feeling confident about the direction our teaching is heading, something new comes out and throws a wrench in our newly found comfort. Times are changing for all teachers. Even though we are already in the second decade of the 21 century, we are still struggling to figure out how to incorporate activities that will give our students the skills needed for a successful future. Just when we had ACTFL s five Cs down, there are a bunch more Cs that we need to incorporate that go along with the 21 st century skills our students need in order to become globally competent.
st

Now that we have a handle on the three modes of communication and performance-based assessment and feel like we are doing a good job at preparing our students to use the languages we teach them, we now need to worry about how to incorporate the Common Core Standards, too. And speaking of assessment, we are also charged with understanding the new teacher evaluation system that has been put into place with S.B. 191. A successful evaluation of our teaching is directly related to us proving student growth in our classroom and schools With all these new initiatives, it can sometimes feel a little overwhelming. We have been talking about how we, CCFLT, can help our members learn more about these initiatives and feel more confident about the changes that are upon us. In order to better serve you, we need feedback from as many members as possible regarding what kind of training would be most useful. Please, take a few minutes to complete a quick survey at http:// tinyurl.com/CCFLTsurvey about possible trainings we can provide for you throughout the year. Forward it to your colleagues. The more feedback we can get about what your training interests are, the more we can work toward meeting them! Cristin Bleess CCFLT President-Elect bleessccflt@yahoo.com

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Register Online for the Fall Conference (Coming Soon)

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To the CCFLT 2012 - 2013 Board of Directors:


Fawzia Ahmad Courtney Fell Diana Noonan Stefan Betley Amy Flynn Michael Verderaime Cristin Bleess Elisabetta Kaufmann Lisa Bloomer Grace Koda Kristen Boehm Becky Loftus Greg Breitbarth Katie Lorimer

Thank you for your hard work, commitment, and dedication to CCFLT. THANK YOU FOR VOLUNTEERING YOUR TIME AND EFFORT.

Thank you for the support, collaboration, and just plain fun!
Sincerely, Debbie Cody and Anna Crocker CCFLT Co-Presidents

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It was quite an honor to receive the Genevieve Overman Service Award at the CCFLT Awards Luncheon. I must confess I was so overcome with emotions, I dont exactly recall what I said when I was giving my thanks. Maybe the following will be a little clearer. I would like to thank Mary Vogl who sent such a wonderful nomination letter, and thank, as well, my colleagues in the French Department at Colorado State University, and Joe Harris, my long time supervisor in the Poudre School District. The letters they wrote made me wonder if I was really the person about whom they were talking, and my thoughts were that, if a much more deserving and accomplished nominee than I would get this award, their letters were my prize! It is such a joy and honor to work with colleagues and supervisors who appreciate your efforts, do not hinder your growth, support you, and who are themselves so deserving of praise! CCFLT has a dear spot in my heart! I was introduced to this fine organization in 1976, my first year of teaching, and I have grown as a better and more efficient teacher because of all the creative ideas I gathered from outstanding teachers, at every conference throughout the years - ideas I then applied or adapted to my classes. Yearly Fall Conferences and Spring Conferences demand tremendous organization and selfless work, and we do commend all the Board Members for their tireless dedication in putting together conferences with valuable learning and teaching resources with the like of local, state, regional, and national presenters. Our students appreciate all these efforts as well; these conferences rejuvenate us, give us more stamina in trying new ideas, reaffirm and reinforce the reason why we are in this line of work, which is to open their eyes and their heart to the world, and making them Citizens of the World.

Thank you so very much to everyone for this very special award!!! May you all have as many wonderful years in this rewarding profession as I have had so far!
Marie-Jo Hofmann

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So, what does it mean to learn a language? When students enroll in language classes across America, what should they learn? What does a good language teacher teach? As a high school student I remember how dry and boring my language classes were. There were lists of vocabulary words, verb ending charts, and we rarely if ever read. Culture was never mentioned, and if it was, it was almost always about the life and customs of Spain. I am from Puerto Rico and it was difficult for me to relate to what was taught in class, even when it was about my first language. This was the mid 1970s. Things have changed a lot since then.

district curriculum into everything that I love about culture. I want my students to be able to use what they were learning in my class, I want it to be real, palpable, not memorized and systematic. I decided that since I learned English by immersion that my students would learn more if I used the target language almost exclusively at each level.

What I discovered is that while students feel that my classes are hard and rigorous, they appreciate how much they learn, that my classes are fun and interesting, When I became a language teacher 23 and when they have years ago, I spoke to my students about traveled to Spanish my life growing up in Puerto Rico. For Christmas, I speaking countries they understand, read and even was unaware that Santa came down a chimney speak with the local folk! They become excited there are no chimneys on an island! We celebrated and I become excited! Los 3 Reyes Magos, we left food and water for the Some 20 years after my teaching began it is only camels, and in the morning we would find presents recently that we are feeling accepted into the hall in their place under our beds. When my American of fame of core subjects. Our students are seeing friends came to my house I was confused when the results and are feeling competent and inspired they asked why my mother and I were always to continue learning culture and language. It has fighting. I later found that they interpreted our extaken a long time, but we have finally arrived and I pressive use of hands and loud voices as yelling am proud that I get to participate and advocate in and anger. We also ate rice and beans every night this adventure. We have only just begun. and it was not boring How many different types of beans can there be? My students laugh and en- Norma E. Arroyo joy hearing my anecdotes and I insure to wrap the

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Do you know a teacher who


is an excellent teacher of world language? is a leader in the teaching profession? advocates for world languages? is involved in the advancement of language learning? shares best practices with others?

If these qualities represent you or a colleague you know, please apply for or nominate someone for the Teacher of the Year. An application can be found on the Contests/Grants/Scholarships tab at www.ccflt.org Applications are due May 1, 2013.

UNC has been the proud sponsor of World Language Day for over 40 years. The continued goal is to provide high school students with a unique opportunity to experience world languages and cultures beyond a classroom setting in a fun and educational environment. Please browse the World Languages Day Website for information on this event. We look forward to another exciting event in 2013! Registration begins the week of January 14, 2013. Mark your calendars, UNC World Language Day, Wednesday, April 17, 2013!! For general information please email the faculty director, Melitta Wagner-Heaston

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2013 COLORADO FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER OF THE YEAR APPLICATION FORM


General Information/Signatures Nominee Name___________________________________________________________ Home Address____________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________( City State Zip Code )________________ Telephone

Date of Birth___________/________/_______ Electronic mail Address(es)_____________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ School Name________________________________________________________________ School Address_______________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________( City State Zip Code )_________________ Telephone

Language(s) Teaching___________________________________Levels_________________ Total Years of Teaching Experience______________ Years in Present Position____________

I hereby give my permission that any or all of the attached materials (other than home address, telephone and DOB) may be shared with persons interested in promoting the Colorado Teacher of the Year Program. I also acknowledge that if selected as the 2013 Colorado Teacher of the Year, I will be released from classroom responsibilities during the year of my recognition as needed in order to fulfill the obligations inherent in the honor.

Signature of Candidate_______________________________________Date_____________

School/Building Principal Name_______________________________________________Title____________________ School Name_________________________________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________( City State Zip Code )________________ Telephone

I acknowledge that the nominee submits this application with my approval. If the nominee is selected as the 2013 Colorado Teacher of the Year, he or she will be released from classroom responsibilities during the year of recognition as needed.

Signature of School Principal___________________________________________Date_______________

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Required Documents to be submitted with the application for TOY:

Application form A current curriculum vitae that contains an account of the candidates teaching experience; professionally relevant service to community and profession (e.g. language-related extracurricular activities and programs, posts held in professional organization); any post graduate education; workshops or other professional developmental activity; and other information considered relevant. Three letters that support the nomination, one from each of the following groups: students or parents, faculty colleagues, and school administrators. Referees should specify how long they have known the candidate and in what capacity. Support letters may be sent with the application, or referees may send letters individually. A 500-word statement in first person on the value of learning language and culture. A 20 minute video (DVD) of classroom instruction. Via a brief dossier, any other material should be submitted relevant to candidacy. For example, the dossier might include descriptions of programs the candidate has developed, newspaper coverage of sponsored events, certificates indicating participation in professional and developmental activities and other evidence of professional accomplishments. For CCFLT Board Use only: _________ Nomination received? Date___________________

_________

Letter sent to nominee?

Date__________________

_________

Is the nominees dossier/file complete?

Date__________________________

__________

CV

__________

Student Letter of Recommendation

__________

Administrator Letter of Recommendation

__________

Faculty Colleague Letter of Recommendation

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We are pleased to announce the winners of the CCFLT Grants, Scholarships and Awards:

Photo of the award winners taken at the Awards Luncheon

Friday February 22nd 2013

Janine Erickson Accepting on Behalf of State Senator Patrick Steadman Winner of the CCFLT Friend of Foreign Languages Award

Toni Theissen and Kendra Omlid Kendra is the Winner of the CCFLT Kris Wells Memorial Creativity Award

Kelley Parkhurst and Molly Sederberg Molly is the Winner of the CCFLT New Educator Award

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New Teacher Scholarship for the 2013 Spring Conference Matthew Webster, Mountain Ridge Middle School, Colorado Springs

Kris Wells Memorial Creativity Award Kendra Omlid, Loveland High School, Loveland

Genevieve Overman Memorial Service Award Marie-Jo Hofmann, Colorado State University, Colorado Springs

New Educator Award Molly Sederberg, Thompson Valley High School, Loveland

Colorado Teacher of the Year Norma Arroyo, Fossil Ridge High School, Fort Collins

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Are you interested in serving on the CCFLT Board of Directors? Do you know a colleague who might be? Serving on the Board provides great opportunities for networking, collegiality, giving back to your profession, and most of all, FUN. To express your interest in running in the next election, to nominate a colleague, or to get more information, please contact: Grace Koda: (gkoda@lps.k12.co.us) I look forward to hearing from you.

Why Serve on the CCFLT Board?


The Board of Directors positions, which last for two academic years, give members the opportunity to: Practice Communication skills in at least two languages Promote Connections at state, regional, and nations levels Make Friendships all over the state Gain Leadership and professional growth opportunities Share Teaching tips, experiences and concerns

The responsibilities include:


Serve for two academic years (beginning the May after you are elected) Attend monthly meetings from August to May Attend fall retreat in August (2 days, 1 overnight) Work at the Spring Conference Serve on a minimum of two committees; one Standing and one Spring Conference committee Chair a committee in your second year

Reimbursements and benefits include:


Up to twelve hours CDE recertification credit All phone calls Mileage at 25 cents per mile Spring Conference registration and two luncheon meals Fall Conference registration Certificates for volunteer hours Easy to nominate yourself Build statewide networking connections

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Diana Noonan President-Elect

Jian Lin At-Large Representative

Heather Witten Elementary/Secondary Representative

Kristy Swartwood Elementary/Secondary Representative

Kathleen Bizarro
Post-Secondary Deborah Ormsby Elementary/Secondary Representative Representative Jenny Beltman Elementary/Secondary Representative

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee


February 27, 2013

The Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers and the world languages teachers of Colorado fully support and are highly involved in the Colorado Department of Education initiatives, including the Colorado World Language Academic Standards, the Assessment Resource Banks, and the Sample Curriculum Units project, even though we do not have a World Languages Specialist at CDE. The U.S. State Department has identified learning a second, third and even a fourth language as critical for our national security. Students acquire language skills more easily at an early age and have the opportunity to become fluent (advanced proficiency) in a K-16 program. The Colorado colleges and universities have recommended that high school students complete two years of the same language for college entrance and readiness. The knowledge of Foreign Languages is included in the top five skills cited as very important by employers for high school graduates.

That the state establishes and funds a World Language Specialist position for the Colorado Department of Education. That funding be provided for schools across Colorado to begin and maintain second language study K 16. That two years of the same world language be a Colorado high school graduation requirement or test via a Standards-based measurement of proficiency at a minimum proficiency of Novice-High on the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) rating scale.

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee


February 27, 2013

tudents should be provided the opportunity to learn a second language as early as possible in school. Young learners have an edge in developing bilingual skills

An early language learning experience

helps to develop native-like pronunciation promotes higher levels of proficiency if the student continues in a well-articulated sequence of language learning.

Additional benefits include: strengthening of literacy in students first language raising standardized test scores in other subject areas developing comfort with cultural differences.

CCFLT recognizes that todays students will mature into a world that is more diverse and interconnected than at any time in our history.

These benefits accrue with instruction that is:


continuous throughout the school year connected grade to grade more frequent than twice per week, adding up to at least 90 minutes per week, at both the elementary and middle school levels.

In recent years Immersion schools and Dual Immersion programs have been opening in Denver, around the state and nation. Content-based foreign language instruction in these programs uses foreign languages as the vehicle for teaching subject content. I became involved in one such school, the Denver Language School (DLS), a K-8 charter in District 31. We teach the core content in a Mandarin Chinese program and Spanish program.
Contd...

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee


February 27, 2013

In my position at DLS I experienced firsthand proof of research showing that: young children immersed in a second language acquire reading, writing and speaking proficiency as if it were their native tongue. with their brains still developing, younger children are more able to think in the second language, rather than just through translation. brain development is enhanced because students in an immersion program utilize greater mental capacities when learning subject content in a new language, when that new language is not the commonly spoken language of the local environment.

CCFLT recognizes that todays students will mature into a world that is more diverse and interconnected than at any time in our history. They deserve the opportunity to further their mental, emotional and civic development with the additional benefits available through learning more than one language and their associated cultures. By combining those approaches, Colorado Foreign Language teachers will produce students who meet and exceed state and local district standards and the performance of their non-second language peers. Your colleague Sen. Pat Steadman our 2013 Friend of Foreign Languages had this to say: "I see so much value beyond what we typically say about the pride and pleasure of knowing another language. For children, there is the particular benefit of stretching their cognitive abilities. Foreign language study increases the overall capacity to learn and enhances all other academic skills. We really need to value and recognize that foreign language is best taught at the elementary school level. There is no question that early exposure and instruction should happen during the point in time when childrens brains are quite literally wired to learn. If it's true that everything we need to know we learn in kindergarten, then that is when we must start teaching world languages and cultures to our children. It's crucial for delivering the best possible education to our students.

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee


February 27, 2013

hen policy makers and education leaders talk about STEM, we expect to establish a shared understanding that this must also include the study of languages and cultures so that our future leaders are prepared to fully participate in our connected, global society and economy. According to the Committee for Economic Development (CED), To confront the twenty-first century challenges to our economy and national security, our education system must be strengthened to increase the foreign language skills and cultural awareness of our students. Americas continued global leadership will depend on our students abilities to interact with the world community both inside and outside our borders. Our future leaders will be bilingual and bicultural. When confronted with data showing that fewer than 20% of students are enrolled in World Languages classes, it is imperative that our schools ensure students have access to world language education. Learning important content through the lens of a different language develops critical thinking and analytical skills, the literacy of the Common Core State Standards. On a national level, the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) has collaborated with The Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21) to develop a 21st Century Skills Map. First and foremost on our Skills map is Communication. Language students are learning to COMMUNICATE by articulating thoughts and ideas effectively using oral, written and nonverbal communication skills in a variety of forms and contexts. We also focus on COLLABORATION. Students as collaborators use their native and acquired languages to learn from and work cooperatively across cultures with global team members, sharing responsibility and making necessary compromises while working toward a common goal. Students are able to articulate thoughts and ideas clearly and effectively through speaking and writing while demonstrating the ability to work effectively with diverse teams and to assume shared responsibility for collaborative work. In addition, World Language classes stress CRITICAL THINKING AND PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS. Our students are inquirers who frame,

analyze, and synthesize information as well as negotiate meaning across language and culture in order to explore problems and issues from their own and different perspectives. They are taught to make complex choices and decisions and understand the interconnections among systems. CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION is also an area of focus. Our students are creators and innovators who respond to new and diverse perspectives. They use language in imaginative and original ways. They are open and responsive to new and diverse perspectives and become proficient in acting on creative ideas to make a tangible and useful contribution to the domain in which the innovation occurs. Our 21st Century Skills Map also addresses Social and Cross-Curricular Skills. World Language classes instill the important skills of INFORMATION LITERACY, MEDIA LITERACY and TECHNOLOGY LITERACY. Students practice making presentations using 21st Century technologies. Our units go beyond the study of language. It is common for students to engage in target language investigation of environmental and political issues, immigration, health and history. These units require students to interpret graphs and synthesize data. Throughout, students learn to define, prioritize and complete tasks without direct oversight with our ultimate goal being to inspire creative and empathetic life-long learners. It is our firm belief that these are inherent in STEM skills and priorities, and that World Languages therefore need to be included in STEM planning and funding. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math are vital priorities but it is perilous to consider them exclusively in an English-language centric scope. This point is perhaps best illustrated by Nelson Mandela, who said, If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language that goes to his heart. These efforts are affordable, non-partisan, and cost-saving in the long run as it is far cheaper for our bilingual and bicultural leaders to make friends around the world than it is for them to fight our enemies. Noah Geisel

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee


February 27, 2013

We

need to speak another language if they want to compete, even with their neighboring states.

desperately need legislative support of comprehensive K-16 foreign language study and its necessity for a globally competent Mark Mathern, associate superintendent of the Natrona County School and competitive work force here in Colorado. District in Wyoming stated, "I think for states that want to be globally competitive, this is going to be an extremely important strategy that will The National Research Council says lack of knowledge about foreign lanhelp states move that way." guages and cultures threatens the security of the US and its ability to com- This is what our neighbors are up to--what about Colorado? pete in the global marketplace. "In order to thrive in a global economy America needs to prepare our children with skills and knowledge necesThe Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade in sary to compete and succeed." its International Division creates and retains jobs in the state by helping Colorado companies to expand and diversify their markets globally and by Almost any job can benefit from knowing another language. More and helping companies from abroad to learn the value of doing business here. more of Colorado's population speaks languages other than English, and jobs in social services, business, communications, and the government all Their report from February 8, 2013 states: Canada retains its position as use people with language skills. Language skills set you apart from other Colorados top export market, reaching $1.9 billion, up 29.5% over 2011. workers, making you a better candidate for hiring, promotion and work on Canada's official languages? new projects. French and English. Mexico retains its position as ColoraBeyond that, there are a huge number of jobs that dos second largest export absolutely require that you speak a second language. market with $847 million in ..there are a huge number of These include working in the Foreign Service, serving exports in 2012, up 12% over as a translator and/or interpreter for the Government 2011. Mexico's official lanjobs that absolutely require that or the private sector, working at international instituguage? Spanish. Mainland tions, teaching foreign languages, literatures, and you speak a second language. China remained third with cultures in schools or universities and working for $676 million in exports, a 6% transnational business corporations. increase. Official language? Chinese. Japan remained For the first time in almost 20 years, there are likely to fourth with $427 million in be more full-time jobs in 2012 2013 for foreign language educators than exports, followed by Germany, the Netherlands, the Republic of Korea for people with PhDs in English, according to the Modern Language Assoand Switzerland. I think you get the idea! ciation (MLA). The update projects that the number of academic jobs in foreign languages in 2012 2013 will rise going up 10.5% from the previous year. In English the number of positions is expected to drop 3.6%. Positions in English have leveled off after two years of increases, according to the update, while foreign language positions which had also increased in the previous two yearsare still growing. In Utah, one third of the workforce is already bilingual. As the economy becomes increasingly global, Wyoming educators know their kids will Just a quick Google search of "Foreign Language jobs available in Colorado" finds dozens of sites. One site--Language Jobs USA--lists over 500 job postings in Colorado dating from February 18, 2013 to present, seeking people with foreign language skills. It becomes more and more obvious that for Colorado to compete with other states and maintain a healthy role in the global economy, we must support learning languages for fluency throughout the K-16 continuum. Debbie Cody

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers Presentation to the Joint House and Senate Education Committee February 27, 2013

memory have been shown to correlate with extended forur U.S. State department has identified foreign laneign language study. With each additional year of foreign guage study as critical for our national security; colleges language instruction taken, a student's scores on college and universities require two years of study of the same for- and graduate school entrance exams such as the SATs, eign language for entrance; employers have indicated that ACTs, GREs, MCATs, and LSATs improve incrementally. knowledge of a foreign language is very important for workforce readiness---all valid reasons for having a two-year To sharpen cognitive and life skills: Children who have high school foreign language graduation requirement. Acstudied a language at the elementary level score higher on cording to the CIA World Fact book, only 5.6 percent of the tests in reading, language arts, and math. People who have world's population speaks English as a primary language. learned foreign languages show greater cognitive developThere are hundreds of thousands of people who don't know ment in areas such as mental flexibility, creativity, and highEnglish, making the ability to speak and write a different er order thinking skills, such as problem-solving, conceptulanguage a valuable commodity in many alizing, and reasoning. careers. However, there are also In addition to cognitive benecognitive reasons for requiring fits, language learners learn foreign language study in high to deal with unfamiliar culschool. tural ideas, effectively handle new situations and have To increase global understandtolerance of diverse lifestyles ing: As globalization and mobility and customs. It also improves and communications bring the world the learner's ability to understand ever closer together, there is a pressing need for global citi- and communicate with people from different walks of life. zens to be competent in other languages. The United States is the only industrialized country that routinely graduates To increase understanding of oneself and ones own culstudents from high school who lack any knowledge of a for- ture: Contact with other languages and cultures gives you eign language. Whereas 52.7% of Europeans are fluent in the unique opportunity to step outside your familiar scope both their native tongue and at least one other language, of existence and view your culture's customs, traditions, only 9.3% of Americans are fluent in both their native and norms as well as your own value system through the tongue and another language. This statistic does not bode eyes of others. Conversely, a monolingual, monocultural well for the future of America in a global society. view of the world severely limits your perspective. Intercultural experiences have a monumental influence on shaping To increase native language ability: Foreign language your identity, heightening your self-awareness, and giving learners have stronger vocabulary skills in English, a better you a full appreciation of your life situation. These things understanding of the language, and improved literacy in can happen only with knowledge of cultures and languages general. Moreover, higher reading achievement in the na- other than your own. tive language as well as enhanced listening skills and Anna Crocker

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At the Spring Conference I presented on Screen-casting in The Language Classroom. I shocked the group with the following statement, Do not incorporate technology if you do not have the content or pedagogy to go with the new technology! Pretty crazy for a technology guy at a technology conference to say wait on the technology. I explained to the class it was all about the new thing I had learned about called Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK). The value a school places on technology can be viewed in many different ways. Among the ways we see the value is to we assess technology needs. One way you or you school can assess needs is to administer a TPACK surveys. (Just do an Internet search for TPACK survey.) According to Mishra, Koehler, and Kereluik (2009), The TPACK framework emphasizes the role of teachers as decision makers who design their own educational technology environments as needed. By administering a TPACK survey to the staff, schools show they value technology and also that they value teachers individually working to integrate technology into instruction and management. As I worked on my TPACK survey, I saw places where I can improve my teaching and consequently improve my students learning. Incorporating technology is not about the latest and coolest toy. Sometimes you have to make sure you are ready to use it. It has been a pleasure writing these technology articles for the newsletter this year. I will miss serving on the CCFLT Board.

Mishra, P., Koehler, M., & Kereluik, K. (2009). The song remains the same: Looking back through the future of educational technology. TechTrends, 53(5), 48.

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ACTFL Edwin Cudecki Award for Support for Language Education ACTFL-MLJ Emma Marie Birkmaier Award for Doctoral Dissertation Research in Foreign Language Education ACTFL Award for Excellence in Foreign Language Instruction Using Technology with IALLT (K -12) ACTFL/Cengage Learning Faculty Development Programs Award for Excellence in Foreign Language Instruction Using Technology with IALLT (Postsecondary) ACTFL-NYSAFLT Anthony Papalia Award for Excellence in Teacher Education ACTFL-MLJ Paul Pimsleur Award for Research in Foreign Language Education ACTFL Florence Steiner Award for Leadership in Foreign Language Education (K-12) ACTFL Wilga Rivers Award for Leadership in Foreign Language Education (Postsecondary) ACTFL Melba D. Woodruff Award for Exemplary Elementary Foreign Language Program ACTFL Nelson Brooks Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Culture

SWCOLT is seeking nominations for Second Language Education Awards and Language Study Scholarships The nomination deadline for awards was January 15, 2013 The application deadline for scholarships is December 31, 2013

Awards - Excellence in Teaching - Honorary Lifetime Member - Friend of the Profession

Scholarships - SWCOLT 2013 Scholarships

SWCOLT Scholarship - Teacher of the Year*

The current SWCOLT TOY is Colorados own Noah Geisel!

Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

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Colorado Congress of Foreign Language Teachers

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April 2013

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