THE SARATOGIAN, Sunday, April 7, 2013 — 9A

SARATOGA SPRINGS CITY EMPLOYEE SALARIES
Rank

Employee Name

Position

Total
Employee
Gross

238
239
240
241
242
243
244
245
246
247
248
249
250
251
252
253
254
255
256
257
258
259
260
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
269
270
271
272
273
274
275
276
277
278
279
280
281
282
283
284
285
286
287
288
289
290
291
292
293
294
295
296
297
298
299
300
301
302
303
304
305
306
307
308
309
310
311
312
313
314
315
316
317
318
319
320
321
322
323
324
325
326
327

STEFANIE J RICHARDS
ANTHONY V LICATA
RAYMOND J GREEN
GERARD FARRINGTON
SHANE M RYALL
JASON P TOUSIGNANT
JAMES A CLARK
BRIAN J WAGER
WILLIAM D GAILOR
PETER HASSON
DANIEL A FARRINGTON
JOHNNIE V ROBERTS
KELLY L HAYES
JAMES HEENEY
DEBORAH D PRIOR
NICHOLAS A COLUCCI
CONSTANCE J BREWER
DAVID SAUNDERS
DANIEL R VANCOTT
MATTHEW J ZENO
RICARDO F FALCON-DIAZ
MARK BENSON
PATRICIA A BERRIGAN
ROSEMARIE A STEVENS
GREGORY M CHERRY
KELLY GLIOSCO-CLARK
JOETTE A DELANEY
LAWRENCE DELANEY
MARK BELLANTONI
JENNIFER MERRIMAN
BRIAN K KISSINGER
JORDAN E DAVIERO
DOUGLAS A JUNE
NICOLE R BORLA
CLAYTON D KANE
SHELLEY L DUMAS
SHARON A MCCORMICK
THOMAS M BROWN
DONNA A BUCKLEY
WILLIAM A SHREVE
THERESE M CONNOLLY
RYAN F VEITCH
STEPHEN HENDERER
PHILLIP TURCOTTE
JOHN K HOPKINS
JOHN R HIRLIMAN
PATRICK J MAHONEY
MICHAEL J HUGHES
MARY ZLOTNICK
ANTHONY A DIPASQUALE
KURT D NOLAN
THOMAS A MCKNIGHT
JUSTIN C DAINO
ANDREW J KRUPSKI
MATTHEW J RAIA
TYLER L MCINTOSH
EDWARD J ATTANASIO
STEPHEN R SHAW
JOSEPH M MCLAUGHLIN
FREDERICK J WARFIELD
JAMES OLIVER ALDRICH
JILL M RAMOS
MICHAEL TOMASO
BRYAN A MERTON
MARY A FITZGERALD
JOSHUA J GREEN
TODD A THOMAS
NANCY L WAGNER
MICHELE D CLARK-MADIGAN
ROBERT W HICKEY
ANTHONY J SCIROCCO
STEPHEN HENDERER
RACHEL A PETRYNA
JUSTIN R MORAN
CHRISTIAN E MATHIESEN
JOHN P FRANCK
SCOTT T JOHNSON
LOIS V SCARANGELLO
LINDA COCCO
LARRY D HAZEL
JAMES W HALEY
DIANE M BUZANOWSKI
ADDISON W SCHMIDT
COREY L HELWIG
THOMAS C ROBBINS
PAUL K MALE
JANICE STARTERI
DANIEL L MAYE
NATHAN D VOIGT
PAUL J OKOSKY

ACCOUNTS DEPT ASSISTANT
LABORER
LABORER
LABORER
LABORER
WATER TREAT PLANT OPERATOR
WATER TREAT PLANT OPERATOR
LABORER
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC II
LABORER
LABORER
PROG & VISITOR CENTER ASSISTANT
PARKING ENFORCEMENT OFFICER
LABORER
SENIOR ACCOUNT CLERK 35 HR
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
LABORER
LABORER
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
ENGINEERING TECHNICIAN
LABORER
LABORER
SECRETARY TO CIVIL SERVICE
SENIOR CLERK
LABORER
DPW COORDINATOR
SENIOR CLERK
LABORER
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
ADMINISTRATIVE AIDE
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
SENIOR ACCOUNT CLERK 35 HR
SENIOR ACCOUNT CLERK 35 HR
LABORER
LABORER
WATER METER SERVICE WORKER
LABORER
EXECUTIVE ASST TO COMM OF PW
WATER METER SERVICE WORKER
EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT TO MAYOR
LABORER
ASST BUILDING INSPECTOR PT COMM
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC II *
ADM DIRECTOR RECREATION
HELP DESK TECHNICIAN
AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE MANAGER *
REAL PROPERTY CLERK *
LABORER
POLICE OFFICER *
SR. BUILDING AND CODE INSPECTOR *
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
TRAFFIC CONTROL MAINTAINER I
LABORER
POLICE OFFICER
LABORER
ZONING & BUILDING INSPECTOR
PROGRAM COORDINATOR
POLICE OFFICER
PROGRAM COORDINATOR
SKATE GUARD SUPERVISOR
PARKING ENFORCEMENT *
LABORER*
CITY HISTORIAN (PART TIME)
PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHER
LABORER
SENIOR CLERK (PART TIME)
COMMISSIONER
ASST BUILDING INSPECTOR PT COMM *
COMMISSIONER
ASST BUILDING INSPECTOR PT COMM
COMMUNICATIONS CLERK
FIREFIGHTER (RESIGNED)
COMMISSIONER
COMMISSIONER
MAYOR
ACCOUNT CLERK (PART-TIME)
SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD
RECREATION LEADER
SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD
SEC'Y TO PLANNING, ZONING, DRC BOARDS
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
FIREFIGHTER AFTER 12/31/07
MAINTENANCE MECHANIC II *
PER-DIEM ENGINEERING WORK
SCHOOL CROSSING GUARD
CLEANER FOR POLICE DEPT
CLERK (PART TIME)
HEALTH OFFICER

$43,064.10
$42,792.06
$42,682.72
$42,501.35
$42,473.08
$42,261.40
$42,195.71
$42,164.92
$42,071.57
$42,031.72
$41,786.43
$41,557.18
$41,341.74
$41,337.46
$41,288.99
$41,134.46
$41,104.60
$40,827.50
$40,791.18
$40,645.64
$40,617.64
$40,296.19
$40,114.12
$39,769.05
$39,747.78
$39,717.81
$39,677.04
$39,355.60
$39,291.23
$39,053.13
$39,016.94
$38,985.04
$38,918.47
$38,876.05
$38,555.54
$37,724.07
$37,630.09
$37,589.78
$37,322.21
$36,830.13
$36,422.21
$35,572.22
$49,537.94
$34,034.93
$33,908.60
$32,213.26
$31,971.33
$31,213.20
$29,734.43
$29,282.78
$29,134.35
$27,766.47
$25,699.89
$25,642.26
$22,866.95
$22,345.23
$21,871.73
$21,687.84
$21,267.86
$20,839.57
$20,087.45
$19,856.85
$19,667.41
$19,625.66
$18,740.00
$18,048.53
$17,599.12
$16,320.00
$16,229.87
$15,210.00
$14,795.61
$14,670.00
$14,589.03
$14,537.15
$14,499.87
$14,499.87
$14,499.87
$13,531.92
$12,837.00
$12,724.71
$12,713.28
$12,699.00
$12,443.69
$12,399.94
$12,300.61
$12,226.05
$11,825.00
$10,332.00
$10,020.00
$10,000.17

2012
Hours
2,091.43
2,133.50
2,124.75
2,119.25
2,176.25
2,318.43
2,214.93
2,104.50
2,125.50
2,103.50
2,109.25
2,089.43
1,833.00
2,135.25
1,830.00
2,323.43
2,119.75
2,105.75
2,317.43
2,096.68
2,015.25
2,105.50
1,725.43
1,729.43
2,036.50
2,171.43
1,725.43
1,967.25
2,196.43
2,107.43
2,285.43
2,227.43
1,832.00
1,830.00
1,928.25
1,972.75
2,091.43
2,142.00
1,725.43
2,087.93
1,725.43
2,121.50
1,644.00
2,082.29
1,386.75
1,497.14
2,090.93
1,094.79
1,790.29
1,524.75
1,303.29
774.29
1,721.14
1,228.14
1,489.00
1,179.64
1,046.50
626.39
1,488.39
1,122.64
1,114.54
1,567.50
1,122.29
1,008.50
1,171.25
909.00
1,386.90
1,088.00
1,725.43
507.00
1,725.43
489.00
1,056.14
481.04
1,725.43
1,725.43
1,725.43
943.80
1,167.00
1,144.25
1,383.50
705.50
811.14
809.14
504.75
393.50
1,069.00
1,008.00
668.00
241.56

Comp
Hours
Cashed
9.5
22.5

18

16.5
44.25
0.5
147
10.5
120

122

79.25
1.5
2
1.5
80
12.5
16.5
68.5
14.25

71.25

21
9.5
0.25
252

15
Hired 7/12

3

12
2

6.25

Average
Hours
Weekly
40.2
41.0
40.9
40.8
41.9
44.6
42.6
40.5
40.9
40.5
40.6
40.2
35.3
41.1
35.2
44.7
40.8
40.5
44.6
40.3
38.8
40.5
33.2
33.3
39.2
41.8
33.2
37.8
42.2
40.5
44.0
42.8
35.2
35.2
37.1
37.9
40.2
41.2
33.2
40.2
33.2
40.8
31.6
40.0
-----28.8
40.2
----------29.3
----------33.1
23.6
28.6
49.2
20.1
12.0
28.6
21.6
21.4
30.1
----------22.5
17.5
26.7
20.9
33.2
-----33.2
9.4
20.3
9.3
33.2
33.2
33.2
18.2
22.4
22.0
26.6
13.6
15.6
15.6
-----7.6
20.6
19.4
12.8
4.6

STATE
NYC restaurant
reports Hep A case
NEW YORK — Health
officials are urging customers of a popular New
York City restaurant to get
precautionary vaccinations
after a food handler tested
positive for Hepatitis A.
The city’s Department of
Health says Friday any
patron of Alta in the city’s
West Village neighborhood
who ate dessert between
March 23 and April 2
should get a shot.
Officials estimate about
3,000 people may have visited Alta on the dates in
question, with about 15 percent eating dessert.
Hepatitis A is a liver disease caused by a virus that
is rarely fatal. It is spread
by traces of fecal matter
from an infected person.
No additional cases have
yet been reported.
Officials say the restaurant has been cooperating

fully with the investigation. tion of taking money from
An Alta manager Friday these people.”
He said he was reading
had no comment.
the Bible when agents
came to arrest him.
Investigators say they
have video recordings
of Stevenson accepting
NEW YORK — A New envelopes stuffed with cash.
York state assemblyman is
Stevenson wouldn’t disvowing to fight charges cuss those details of the
that he accepted $20,000 in case with the newspaper.
bribes.
Bronx Democrat Eric
Stevenson tells the New
York Daily News in an
interview published SaturROCHESTER — Three
day that he “unequivocally”
more New York gun show
denies he took the money.
Federal prosecutors operators have agreed to
charged Stevenson on rules designed to make sure
Thursday with taking cash weapons aren’t sold to profrom developers of adult hibited buyers, state Attorday care centers. They say ney General Eric Schneithat in exchange for the derman said Saturday.
The new agreements
money, the assemblyman
pushed through legislation bring the number of operaprotecting the centers tors that have signed on to
model gun show procefrom competition.
Stevenson denies it. He dures designed by Schneitold the newspaper he derman’s office to 26.
Schneiderman made the
“never got into any situa-

NY assemblyman
denies allegation

Gun show leaders
agree to new rules

announcement after touring the Rochester Gun
Show, operated by Empire
State Arms Collectors
Association.
“I am proud to stand
together with the organizers of today’s Rochester
gun show to highlight our
shared commitment to
keeping deadly firearms
out of the hands of felons,
terrorists and those who
are dangerously mentally
ill,” Schneiderman said.
The model procedures
involve putting tags on all
the guns brought to the
shows by private sellers.
Those tags are checked
later to determine whether
gun buyers underwent a
background check. Operators also must take steps to
prevent unregulated sales
outside of shows, including
notifying law enforcement
so they can patrol nearby.
“Responsible gun owners, gun show operators
and the attorney general
all want the same thing,”

said Empire State Arms
Collectors Association
President Bernie Lusk.
“We want to protect our
communities and families
by keeping firearms out of
the hands of dangerous
criminals, which is why we
applaud Attorney General
Schneiderman’s efforts to
work with us to adopt these
voluntary model protocols.”

Prom dresses given
to Sandy victims
NEW YORK — Girls
whose families were wiped
out by Superstorm Sandy
can still party in style,
thanks to a New York City
charity that has collected
more than 1,000 prom
dresses for the storm’s victims.
The nonprofit group
Where to Turn held a free
dress expo at a Staten
Island high school Saturday for teenagers whose
families lost homes and

cars in the massive storm.
People from all over the
country, as well as a Hollywood marketing firm and a
prom dress company in
New England, contributed
gowns to the event, held in
a neighborhood devastated
by flooding.
The group has held
smaller dress giveaways
in recent years to help
kids from down-and-out
families afford prom night,
but this year’s event took
on new significance after
the storm damaged or
destroyed tens of thousands of homes in New
York, New Jersey and
Connecticut.
“Right now, people are
rebuilding and they don’t
have enough money to
take care of the normal
day-to-day things ... things
that, you know, kids really
shouldn’t miss out on,”
said Where to Turn executive director Dennis McKeon.
— The Associated Press

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