You are on page 1of 2

RYERSON UNIVERSITY LEARNING SUPPORT SERVICES

Forming Sentences Containing Transitions You can use transitions (joining words and phrases) to show the connections between ideas in a piece of writing. Different kinds of transitions require different sentence structures. The following information explains how to form and punctuate two kinds of sentences: compound and complex. An independent clause is a construction that expresses a complete thought. You can join two or more independent clauses with a transition to form a COMPOUND SENTENCE. How you punctuate the sentence depends on the transition. Independent clause, , , , , , , and but or nor for yet so independent clause. NOTE: With these transitions, use a comma between the clauses.

The wind roared in the chimney, and the sleet beat against the window panes. I mailed my rent cheque, but the landlord never received it. Independent clause; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; furthermore, independent clause. in addition, as a result, consequently, NOTE: With these transitions and therefore, others like them, use a semicolon between however, the clauses. Use a comma after instead, the transition. nevertheless, on the other hand, meanwhile, for instance,

The most qualified candidate has a graduate degree; in addition, she has twenty years’ experience. The letter lay in plain view on the desk; however, no one in the room noticed it. We waited for James at the airport; meanwhile, James was caught in traffic on the QEW.

A dependent clause contains a subject and verb but does not express a complete thought.] . Jobs were scarce during the Great Depression. [This sentence gives equal emphasis to both ideas. as a result. One type of dependent clause begins with a transition such as after although as soon as before INDEPENDENT CLAUSE: DEPENDENT CLAUSE: even though if since unless until when while Trevor slammed on the brakes. When Trevor slammed on the brakes . many men left their homes and travelled across the country searching for work. many men left their homes and travelled across the country searching for work. NOTE: Use a COMPOUND sentence when you want to join ideas of equal importance. When Trevor slammed on the brakes You can join ideas by expressing one in a dependent clause and one in an independent clause. Because jobs were scarce during the Great Depression. Such a sentence is COMPLEX. Use a comma between the clauses if the dependent clause comes first. Do not use a comma if the independent clause comes first.] Use a COMPLEX sentence when you want to emphasize one idea and de-emphasize another. The car slid into the ditch when Trevor slammed on the brakes. Put the idea you want to emphasize in the independent clause and the one you want to de-emphasize in the dependent clause. [This sentence emphasizes the idea that men left their homes and travelled in search of work. the car slid into the ditch.