You are on page 1of 1

Rhetorical Move1 

Step 

Text from Sample RA (Campbell et al., 2007) 

Move 1 

Establishing a  territory 

Move 1 

Establishing a  territory 

Move 2 

Establishing a  niche 

Move 2 

Establishing a  niche 

Move 3 

Occupying the  niche 

Because of their organizational role, managers must sometimes act in ways that  negatively affect their subordinates (e.g., denying a subordinate’s request for  promotion, discussing negative feedback about the subordinate’s performance,  Claiming centrality  reprimanding a subordinate about tardiness). Molinsky and Margolis (2005)  Step 1  of manager actions  called these acts “necessary evils” and defined them more specifically as “those  in the world  work‐related tasks in which an individual must, as part of his or her job, perform  an act that causes emotional or physical harm to another human being in the  service of achieving some perceived greater good or purpose” (p. 247).    These tasks, although unpleasant, are necessary because they are important  components of being a manager. For instance, a manager who ignores  unsatisfactory performance by communicating satisfactory performance ratings  Presenting  will not only reinforce the wrong behavior but will confuse the employee if  background  disciplinary action is eventually taken. On the other hand, a manager must  Step 3  information on  approach such interpersonal communication tasks cautiously so as to inflict  minimal emotional harm to the subordinate and to maintain a productive  managers’  working relationship with the subordinate. Not surprisingly, prior work in the  dilemma  area of organizational justice clearly documents the importance of a manager’s  interpersonal sensitivity in performing such necessary evils.     Unfortunately, managers’ lack of success in managing that subjective experience  Indicating a gap in  is well documented. Incivility is still a common perception in the workplace  Step 1B  the world of  (Andersson & Pearson, 1999). In many cases, subordinates’ subjective response  management  to their managers’ interpersonal actions is anger and a sense of injustice.     According to Folger and Cropanzano’s (2001) fairness theory, individuals use a  referent standard to gauge justice. That is, individual employees compare their  own treatment with the treatment of other employees in the organization and  then form perceptions about the fairness of the treatment (i.e., the equal  Continuing a  application of standards; Liu & Buzzanell, 2004). Because the selection of a  Step 1D  tradition of justice  referent standard is determined by the employee and the resulting justice  research  perceptions are controlled by the employee, organizational justice theory has  primarily studied the effects of various levels of perceived injustice to determine  how these perceptions impact employee attitudes and behaviors.     We seek to contribute to an understanding of the interpretative schema  underlying such standards, particularly the effects of violation of implicit  Outlining purposes  interpersonal rules involving managers’ interactions with subordinates. Our goal  Step 1A  of the present  in this article is to determine if rapport management theory may provide a useful  research  tool for understanding and managing employee perceptions of justice.  To this end, we provide an overview of (in)justice in the workplace, emphasizing  the role that managers play. We then explore the usefulness of the  sociolinguistic theory of rapport management (Spencer‐Oatey, 2000) for  explaining perceptions of justice and emotional responses of anger to the  interpersonal communication behavior of organizational leaders, building from  K. S. Campbell, White, and Johnson’s (2003) model.     We ground our discussion of theory in the analysis of narratives written by  subordinates to recount incidents in which they felt angry with their manager.   In this way, we respond to Molinsky and Margolis’s (2005) general suggestion  that research should explore various relationship maintenance behaviors that  can help managers perform necessary evils with minimal harm to their  relationships with subordinates. Furthermore, we respond to Rahim, Magner,  and Shapiro’s (2000) more specific suggestion that sociolinguistic theory may  explain why perceptions regarding the social sensitivity of interpersonal  treatment relate to justice judgments.   

Move 3 

Occupying the  niche 

Step 3 

Indicating RA  structure 

Move 3 

Occupying the  niche  Occupying the  niche 

Step 1B 

Move 3 

Step 1A 

Announcing data  in present  research  Outlining purposes  of the present  research  Continuing a  tradition 

Move 2 

Establishing a  niche 

Step 1D 

                                                            
1

 This table appears in a discussion of Introduction sections in research articles on ProsWrite.com.