THE PLAN

230 Park avenue
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The conference rooms are located strategically to allow visitors the opportunity to envision a potential layout. “We wanted a tenant to understand spatially how you lay out a space and create a cluster of conference rooms near common areas like restrooms, reception and pantries,” Mr. Berger said. The space, as laid out, would be a particularly good fit for law firms or traditional service firms, thanks to its center-core design. “It’s a law firm floor plan—law firms would lay out well,” Mr. Berger said. “It’s rare for law firms to go to one single, big floor, but a law firm could lay out here, and we’ve done that layout,—we have a lot of windows.” Views of Park Avenue from the lower floors are unique. “The only building in New York City that has that view from the lower floors is us,” Mr. Berger said. “From the middle of the seventh floor, you’re literally standing in the middle of Park Avenue straight up.”

Built in 1929 by the same architects hired by the Vanderbilt family to construct Grand Central Terminal, 230 Park Avenue has been updated for modern tenancy. LEED Gold rated and awarded an EPA Energy Star in 2008, the 1.4-million-square-foot property, owned by Monday Properties and Ivesco and co-brokered by Jones Lang LaSalle, has been on the forefront of real estate sustainability practices and is the first prewar building in New York to receive those distinctions. The 71,000-square-foot seventh floor, previously occupied by JPMorgan Chase and its predecessor Bear Stearns, has been redeployed as a marketing center to allow chief executives and other decision-makers the opportunity to see facilities in a predominantly raw space. Jordan Berger of Monday Properties spoke with The Commercial Observer about the space.
The northwest wing of the space includes open-plan office seating for 24 people, allowing users to see what a potential build-out could include. “I think it really helps with larger users who don’t have the vision to see a truly staged floor with real offices and furniture,” Mr. Berger said. “They can sit in one of the offices and understand it a lot easier than looking at raw space in a floor plan.” The unique H-shaped floorplate is being sold as a positive to potential tenants, primarily highlighting the number of windows the design allows. “[There are no] portions of the floors that are very deep and far from the window,” Mr. Berger noted. “But I think the tenants have a hard time envisioning how they’d lay out that floor.”

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34 | APRIL 9, 2013  | THE COMMERCIAL OBSERVER

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