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Lesson #1

Writing

ED 507 Levels of Support I


By Cindy Henrichs
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Lesson Plan Info: #1

Title: Writing
Created By: Cindy Henrichs
Date Created: / /09
Subject: Writing
Topic of Study: Writing
Type of Lesson Plan: Explicit Instruction
Class Submitted For: 507 Levels of Support I

Standards
Standard Met: #2 Students write and speak using conventional grammar, usage, sentence
structure, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling.

Benchmark/Grade Level Expectancy:


GRADES 1-5
• Plan, draft, revise, proofread, and edit written communications;
• Organize written and oral presentations using strategies such as lists, outlining,
cause/effect relationships, comparison/contrast, problem/solution, and narration.
Overview
Objective: The students will be able to read a story and make a summary of the story by
making a topic sentence, list facts in outline form, and writing the summary.

Assessment Plan: After guided practicing, and visual reminders, the student will be able
to produce a summary of a story.
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Learning Context: In this presentation teachers will learn the basic concepts and skills
needed to teach their children how to use Primary Step Up to Writing, Section 3:
Paragraphs with a Special Purpose; Summary Paragraphs

Time Allotment: 30 minutes

Instructional Materials:

Teacher Materials: Primary Step Up to Writing Book, Reproducible booklet,


handouts, story, power point presentation,

Student Materials: pencils

Differentiation of Instruction: I will use a variety of strategies to meet the many needs of
diverse learners in this lesson. I will use oral instruction, questioning and discussions for
the auditory learners. I will use hand outs for visual and hand on learners. I will use the
technique of paper folding for visual reminders of the 3 parts of a sentence. We will work
as a group for a safe environment and to give support for each other.

The Lesson
Sequence of Procedures
Opening:
1. Gaining Attention: I will introduce the lesson by asking the student “Do you
remember writing a summary outline and using the Fact Outline, with the topic sentence,
stars and dashes from Primary Step Up to Writing?” I will then show him the outline.

2. Prior knowledge: This lesson should be a summary of what he has already been using
and expected to know. By showing the student the outline, it should spark their memory
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and the student should respond with some kind of knowledge of the use of this format in
the past.

3. Purpose (objective) of Lesson: The purpose of this lesson is to teach the students
about one of the writing strategies offered within the Primary Step Up to Writing, Section
3; Summary Paragraph. This strategy supports stronger writing processes for struggling
writers and is taught within our district so no matter what school the student comes from,
they should have some prior knowledge.

Body of Lesson: Presenting & Structuring New Content:


Teacher Input:
I will introduce the lesson by talking about the burrito fold, which is writing the topic
sentence.
a. Step I: Hand out a piece of paper and have them produce a burrito fold
and use it to write the three parts to a sentence: identify, verb, finish the
thought. (I will use a story or writing on subjects that they are provided in
class, since I am there to provide support to the child on lessons taught
within the classroom.)
b. Step II: In this step, just copy the words from the three-part Burrito Fold
to make them look like a real sentence.
c. Step III: Requires the most work. List the facts of the article or story by
using dashes.
d. Step IV: Write the summary by rewriting the topic sentence, add transition
to the fact for a better flowing paper and write good, clear sentences.

Assessment Implementation: Carry out your assessment here


I will be working one on one with my student so I will have a good idea if he is getting
the concept or not.

Assessment Interpretation:
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Closure:
Remind and reinforce that this concept can be adapted to any writing project and the
same procedures can be used for writing at any level as he goes through middle school
and high school.

Re-teaching Activities:

Research / Resources:

Auman, M. A (2003). Step Up to Writing, 2nd Edition. Longmont, CO 80504: Sopris


West Educational Services.

Auman, M. A, Karas, G. K. & Sage, P. S. (2003). Primary Steps Reproducibles.


Longmont: Sopris West Educational Services.
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Lesson Plan Info: #2

Title: Action Sentences, Who/What /When/Where/How


Created By: Cindy Henrichs
Date Created: 11/4/08
Taught:11/5/08
Grade: 3rd Grade
Subject: Literacy
Topic of Study: Writing
Type of Lesson Plan: Direct Instruction
Class Submitted For: 508 Levels of Support

Standards
Standard Met: #2 Students write and speak for variety of purposes and audiences.

Benchmark/Grade Level Expectancy:


GRADES 3: plan, draft, revise, proofread, and edit written communications.

Overview
Objective: This lesson will help with writing and give practice for more complete
sentences that have meaning, are expressive, informative and analytical.

Assessment Plan: Use the graphic organizers that have been completed for each
assignment to show growth by reading the improved sentences produced from the lesson
and practice. A collection of student samples from the general education classroom can
help to show growth and progress from the lessons.
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Learning Context: Using a graphic organizer the child will be able to write an action
sentences using who/what /when/where/how in different combinations.

Time Allotment: 30 minutes

Instructional Materials:

Teacher Materials:

Student Materials: pencil,

Differentiation of Instruction: I will use a variety of strategies to meet the many needs of
diverse learners in this lesson. I will use oral instruction, questioning and discussions for
the auditory learners. Ask student to practice orally together, and then provide
opportunities to practice with the visual organizer in class, before I ask them to produce
any work to turn in. I will give time for partners to work together to check each others
work together for extra support and a safe environment to work in giving support for each
other.

The Lesson
Sequence of Procedures
Opening:
1. Gaining Attention: I will introduce the lesson by reading an example of a well
written paragraph with examples of excellent who/what/when/where/how sentences. I
will then explain how the action sentence make the reader more interested in reading the
paragraph by rereading the same paper with poorly written sentences to prove without a
strong catching, interesting sentence the reader may not be excited about reading the
paper or article.
2. Prior knowledge: This lesson will be taught after the students have learned how to
write summary paragraphs and use the Primary Step Up to Writing outline. This lesson
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will then continue to build on the summary paragraph and give practice to better the
who/what/when/where/how and action sentences.
3. Purpose (objective) of Lesson: Building on writing better, more meaningful sentences
by using graphic organizers and practice sheets for improve writing, without
fragments and run-ons. It allow for the students to ask themselves the questions who/
what/where/when/how and actions that they want to put into their sentences. Or they
need to ask what 4 w’s am I going to include in my sentence.

Body of Lesson: Presenting & Structuring New Content:


Teacher Input:
4. Examples are given of who/what/when/where/how and action sentences. Refer to
page 6-19, 95 of the Primary Step Up to Writing sheet. Go over these orally.
5. Then, proceed to the practice sheet 18, which uses three combinations of the w’s to
complete a sentence. If time allows, move to page 20, which uses a combination of 4
w’s, How and Action words to complete a sentence. There is also page 96 which
allow the child to create their own combinations and place them where they want to
in the sentences. This also gives them the opportunity create six different practice
sentences. Prompts should be given to help stimulate ideas of what to write about.
These may be written on the board. Examples: dolphins (based on a story the student
read), favorite holiday, interesting animals, family, sports game, most interesting
vacation destination, friends, food, etc.

Assessment: Carry out your assessment here


Throughout the lesson I will randomly walk around to make sure students are following
along and getting the concept. I will frequently check the sentences and have students
share them with me so I know they understand. I will collect their practice sheets at the
end of the lesson and use it to compare how he is building on skills as further practice is
done.

Closure:
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Reinforce what the students have learned about the importance of good strong action
sentences. Rereading a few of the best sentences done in our session that day and talk
about how they would get someone ready and excited about reading more.

Re-teaching Activities:

Extension Activities:

Sample Student Products: attached

Teaching Materials: attached

Resources:

Auman, M. A (2003). Step Up to Writing, 2nd Edition. Longmont, CO 80504: Sopris


West Educational Services.

Auman, M. A, Karas, G. K. & Sage, P. S. (2003). Primary Steps Reproducibles.


Longmont: Sopris West Educational Services.
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Analysis of Student Learning, effectiveness of the approach and of my teaching:

I am teaching this concept to a third grade student with a physical disability because of
his ADHD. He has many characteristics of a child with Autism, which account for his
high functioning and thinking, yet at the same time he struggles with lack of social skills
and uncontrollable talking, often getting off task or carried away with his own direction
of thoughts. There is a writing goal on the IEP which I help him on once a week. This
student is very interesting to work with if he is on task and not arguing with the teacher
about his own agenda and direction of the conversation.

11/04/08:
I asked student to read a chapter of a book about Dolphins. He read the story with no
difficulty with the text. Then I presented the burrito fold to the student. He had previous
exposure to this concept and easily did my request, in which his sentence was a very
good sentence. I then presented him with the writing summary sheet. His sentence did
not reflect the topic sentence that he wrote on the burrito fold. The facts were good fact,
yet poorly written and from there on I could not get back on task to finish the outline.

11/05/08: Cody will work well when he is in control of the subjects that he is writing
about. When given the w/w/w/h sentences and he could choose the subject to write
about, he did very well. This can be seen in the examples dated 11/5. These were
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sentence that he came up with the topic, during which we were in the nurse’s office
because he had a bloody nose and while he held the compress on the pressure point, I
wrote the sentences for him. (I have limited opportunity to work with this student and
did not to waste any time set aside with him.) He was able to finish the last sentence.
Then, when asked to produce a sentence based on a summary from a paragraph he read
previously, he has difficulty. In the outline he produced from the dolphin story which I
asked him to read, his sentence was “Dolphins do tricks”. When asked to produce a
w/w/w/h sentence to better his sentence he argued about facts of dolphins and it was
almost impossible to get back on task to the writing of the sentence, therefore he did not
accomplish much more that 30 minute session. I have very good luck in working with
this student as long as I can keep his interest in the subject. He is very interested in
leggos, droids and inventing machines, beyond that I have found it difficult to keep his
attention on the task at hand.

11/12/08: I allowed the student to select the subject to write about and asked him to write
a simple sentence. Then I asked him to write a more meaningful sentence he explained
what a droid was. So I continued to prompt him on the 4 w’s and how and action, asking
to make sure he included these in his sentence. His last sentence is his meaningful
sentence. On the back of this sentence I asked him to use the 4 w’s and how and action to
again write about the dolphin story he read in the first lesson. He did so without to much
resistance as long as I allowed him to make the sentence fictional.
The true effect will not be noted until I check his classroom work and can see if he
carries the strategies into his daily work. I typically only get the opportunity to work
with him for 30 minutes in one week, but will ask the classroom teacher to show me
sample of his work so that I can see if he is using this strategy. I will also continue to
work with his throughout the year.

Teacher Input on collaboration:


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