www.smdailyjournal.

com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Thursday • April 11, 2013 • Vol XII, Edition 203
IMMIGRATION BILL
NATION PAGE 5
M-A TOPS
RIVAL SHP
SPORTS PAGE 11
DISHWASHER TIPS
TO KEEP IT CLEAN
SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17
SENATE PLAN TO STIFFEN BORDER SECURITY
President pitches budget plan
By Andrew Taylor
and Jim Kuhnhenn
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Mixing mod-
est curbs on spending with tax
increases reviled by Republicans,
President Barack Obama proposed a
$3.8 trillion budget on Wednesday
that would raise taxes on smokers
and wealthy Americans and trim
Social Security benefits for mil-
lions.
Obama’s 2014 blueprint com-
bines a $242 billion infusion of new
spending for road and rail projects,
early education and jobs initiatives
— all favored by
Democrats —
with longer-term
savings from
p r o g r a m s
i n c l u d i n g
Medicare and
the military. It
promises at least
a start in cutting
huge annual fed-
eral deficits.
The president pitched his plan as a
good-faith offer to his GOP rivals
since it incorporates a proposal he
made to Republicans in December
that wasn’t radically different from
a GOP plan drafted by House
Speaker John Boehner. But it fol-
lows January’s bitterly fought 10-
year, $600 billion-plus tax increase
that has stiffened GOP resolve
against further tax hikes.
“I have already met Republicans
more than halfway, so in the coming
days and weeks I hope that
Republicans will come forward and
demonstrate that they’re really as
serious about the deficit and debt as
they claim to be,” Obama said.
He was having a dozen Senate
Republicans to the White House for
dinner Wednesday evening in hopes
Obama’s blueprint targets smokers, wealthy
REUTERS
Barack Obama talks about the Fiscal Year 2014 Budget while standing next
to acting Jeffrey Zients, director of office of management and budget, in
the Rose Garden at the White House. See BUDGET, Page 18
John Boehner
MARK & TRACY PHOTOGRAPHY
‘Cats’ continues at the Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway, Redwood City, through April 21. For tickets and information
call 579-5565 or go to www.broadwaybythebay.org.
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
“Cats” has been prowling musical
theater stages across the nation and
world ever since it premiered in
London in 1981 and went on to
Broadway, where it won a slew of
awards. It first came to San
Francisco in 1986 and has returned
several times.
Now it’s at the Fox Theatre in
Redwood City, where Broadway By
‘Cats’ comes to Fox Theatre
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Mandatory sewer lateral inspec-
tions and repairs when property
owners decide to sell their homes
will not be required in Belmont, the
council decided Tuesday night.
The Public Works Department
proposed to have sewer laterals
inspected and repaired before the
sale of the home to not only protect
the city’s own aging sewer infra-
structure but to also protect the con-
sumer from any unforeseen prob-
lems with the underground pipes.
The point-of-sale mandate,
already in effect in several other
local cities due to a court decision,
was opposed by the San Mateo
County Association of Realtors,
who claimed the mandate could
“kill” the sale of the home.
Fixing a sewer lateral could cost
between $7,500 and $25,000.
The point-of-sale options the
Belmont drops
sewerfix,home
sale mandate
By Heather Murtagh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Seven home owners on Loma
Road are hoping to switch which
school their children would attend
from Redwood City to San Carlos
— a proposal elected officials will
start discussing this week.
A request from property owners
located at 60-90 Loma Road, which
includes both Redwood City and
San Carlos addresses, was made to
County Superintendent Anne
Campbell in a Feb. 15 letter. Home
owners are requesting a switch not-
ing the difficulty to access their
assigned district. On Thursday, the
Parents seek school district change
Request follows several others in the county
Council decides to allow sellers
to disclose any need for repairs
See CATS Page 20
See SEWER, Page 20
See CHANGE, Page 20
FOR THE RECORD 2 Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA 94402
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Singer Joss Stone
is 26.
This Day in History
Thought for the Day
1913
Postmaster General Albert S. Burleson,
during a meeting of President Woodrow
Wilson’s Cabinet, proposed gradually
segregating whites and blacks who
worked for the Railway Mail Service, a
policy which went into effect and
spread to other agencies.
“We think in generalities,
but we live in detail.”
— Alfred North Whitehead, British philosopher (1861-1947)
Rapper David
Banner is 39.
Actress Kaitlyn
Jenkins is 21.
In other news ...
Birthdays
REUTERS
A rescue worker stands on a derailed coach at the site of a train accident near Arakkonam in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu.
Thursday: Mostly cloudy in the morning
then becoming partly cloudy. Patchy fog in
the morning. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Thursday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the
mid 40s. Northwest winds 10 to 20 mph.
Friday: Sunny. Highs in the lower 60s.
Northwest winds 5 to 15 mph.
Friday night: Mostly clear. Lows in the upper 40s. Northwest
winds around 20 mph.
Saturday: Partly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s.
Saturday night through Tuesday: Partly cloudy. Breezy.
Lows in the mid 40s. Highs around 60.
Wednesday: Partly cloudy. Breezy. Lows in the mid 40s.
Highs around 60.
Local Weather Forecast
Lotto
(Answers tomorrow)
FETCH EXERT POLICY BEAUTY
Yesterday’s
Jumbles:
Answer: After his wife struck it big on a slot machine,
he was happy to have a — “BETTOR” HALF
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
ROJEK
ONTEK
TEBNIT
NEUVEA
©2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All Rights Reserved.
F
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u
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o
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A:
In 1689, William III and Mary II were crowned as joint sover-
eigns of Britain.
In 1713, the Treaty of Utrecht was signed, ending the War of
the Spanish Succession.
In 1814, Napoleon Bonaparte abdicated as Emperor of the
French and was banished to the island of Elba.
In 1921, Iowa became the first state to impose a cigarette tax,
at 2 cents a package.
In 1945, during World War II, American soldiers liberated the
notorious Nazi concentration camp Buchenwald in Germany.
In 1951, President Harry S. Truman relieved Gen. Douglas
MacArthur of his commands in the Far East.
In 1953, Oveta Culp Hobby became the first Secretary of
Health, Education and Welfare.
In 1963, Pope John XXIII issued his final encyclical, “Pacem
in Terris” — “Peace on Earth.”
In 1970, Apollo 13, with astronauts James A. Lovell, Fred W.
Haise and Jack Swigert, blasted off on its ill-fated mission to
the moon.
In 1979, Idi Amin was deposed as president of Uganda as
rebels and exiles backed by Tanzanian forces seized con-
trol.
In 1983, at the Academy Awards, “Gandhi” was named best
picture; its star, Ben Kingsley, won best actor while Meryl
Streep received the best actress Oscar for “Sophie’s Choice.”
In 1988, “The Last Emperor” won best picture at the Academy
Awards ceremony; Cher won best actress for “Moonstruck,”
Michael Douglas best actor for “Wall Street.”
Ten years ago: Ten of the main suspects in the 2000 bombing
of the USS Cole escaped from prison in Yemen. American
troops took the northern Iraqi city of Mosul without a fight.
Ethel Kennedy is 85. Actor Joel Grey is 81. Actress Louise Lasser
is 74. Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Ellen Goodman is 72.
Movie writer-director John Milius is 69. Actor Peter Riegert is 66.
Actor Meshach Taylor is 66. Movie director Carl Franklin is 64.
Actor Bill Irwin is 63. Country singer-songwriter Jim Lauderdale is
56. Songwriter-producer Daryl Simmons is 56. Rock musician
Nigel Pulsford is 52. Actor Lucky Vanous is 52. Country singer
Steve Azar is 49. Singer Lisa Stansfield is 47. Rock musician Dylan
Keefe (Marcy Playground) is 43. Actor Johnny Messner is 43. Actor
Vicellous Shannon is 42. Actress Tricia Helfer is 39. Rock musician
Chris Gaylor (The All-American Rejects) is 34.
Circus elephant shot in
drive-by shot in Mississippi
TUPELO, Miss. — A circus veterinar-
ian says the Asian elephant wounded in a
drive-by shooting in Mississippi should
be fully recovered within a few weeks.
Meanwhile, a reward for information
leading to an arrest has climbed to
$21,000.
Dr. Dennis Schmitt, a Ringling Bros.
and Barnum & Bailey Circus veterinari-
an, says the 39-year-old Asian elephant
named Carol will be taken home to
Springfield, Mo., to recuperate.
Schmitt says the bullet hit Carol in the
neck just above the shoulder, but it
missed any major blood vessels or
nerves.
Schmitt says the elephant has been
alert and active since the injury.
Police Chief Tony Carleton says a
vehicle drove past Tupelo BancorpSouth
Arena about 2 a.m. and fired into the
area. Police are investigating.
NBC renews Carson
Daly’s show for 13th season
LOS ANGELES — NBC is keeping
Carson Daly’s show in its late-night line-
up.
The network announced Wednesday
that it’s renewing “Last Call with Carson
Daly” for the show’s 13th season.
NBC lauded Daly for creating what the
network called “a unique late-night for-
mat.” His program
airs at 1:35 a.m.
Eastern time.
Daly says he’s
proud of “Last Call”
and grateful to con-
tinue with it. He also
hosts the NBC
singing contest “The
Voice.”
NBC previously
announced plans to shake up the
“Tonight Show,” replacing Jay Leno with
Jimmy Fallon next year. The network
hasn’t said who will take Fallon’s place
as host of “Late Night.”
Flavor Flav felony case
headed for trial in Vegas
LAS VEGAS — Entertainer Flavor
Flav is facing a trial on felony charges
that he threatened his longtime girl-
friend’s 17-year-old son with a butcher
knife during a family argument.
The 54-year-old former rap and reality
TV star, whose legal name is William
Jonathan Drayton Jr., didn’t testify dur-
ing a Wednesday evidence hearing in Las
Vegas Justice Court.
But the teen did. He pointed from the
witness stand toward Drayton at the
defendant’s table, identified him as the
man wearing a clock around his neck,
and told Justice of the Peace Melanie
Andress-Tobiasson that Drayton chased
him to a bedroom and stabbed the knife
through the door during the argument
early Oct. 17.
The teen quoted
the obscenity he says
Drayton used as the
rapper threatened to
kill him. Drayton
was standing 2 feet
away with the knife
still in his hand, the
boy said.
The Associated
Press is not reporting the boy’s name
because he is a juvenile.
The argument began when Drayton
woke the boy during a 3 a.m. argument
with the boy’s mother, Elizabeth Trujillo,
with whom he has lived for about eight
years. It escalated when the teen, a 6-
foot-3, 200-pound high school football
and basketball player, wrestled the 5-
foot-6 Drayton into a head lock in the
kitchen.
“I told him, ‘You’re not going to talk to
my mom like that,”’ he testified. “He
pushed me. ... I pushed him.”
Defense attorney Tony Abbatangelo
later told the judge he believed Drayton
may have been acting in self-defense
when he allegedly grabbed the butcher
knife, a steak knife and a pizza cutter
during the scuffle.
Abbatangelo noted that a police report
didn’t include the quote the teen recalled
Wednesday.
Andress-Tobiasson said the evidence
was enough to bind Drayton over to state
court for trial.
Carson Daly Flavor Flav
The Daily Derby race winners are No. 05
California Classic in first place; No. 07 Eureka in
second place; and No. 12 Lucky Charms in third
place.The race time was clocked at 1:42.09.
6 6 1
17 30 41 48 54 13
Mega number
April 9 Mega Millions
1 36 40 52 53 20
Powerball
April 10 Powerball
2 16 22 28 31
Fantasy Five
Daily three midday
8 5 8 8
Daily Four
4 0 4
Daily three evening
9 18 37 41 42 3
Mega number
April 10 Super Lotto Plus
3
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOOD CITY
Disturbance. A woman was yelled at by a
neighbor over a parking space on Sheffield
Lane before 6:44 p.m. on Monday, April 8.
Fraud. A person was arrested for being in pos-
session of and trying to use stolen checks on
4:58 p.m. on Monday, April 8.
Hit-and-run. A person was admittedly intoxi-
cated while they were involved in a hit-and-
run accident on Middlefield Road before 12:03
p.m. on Monday, April 8.
Strong-armed robbery. A pizza delivery per-
son was robbed by two men on Arch Street
before 8:36 p.m. on Sunday, April 7.
Grand theft. A vehicle was stolen on Whipple
Avenue before 8:33 p.m. on Sunday, April 7.
Vandalism. A window was broken by a base-
ball on Cirrus Court before 7:16 p.m. on
Sunday, April 7.
SAN BRUNO
Grand theft. Two laptops were stolen on the
1000 block of Bayhill Drive before 6:30 p.m.
Monday, April 8.
Robbery. Someone reported being robbed by
a man with a gun on the 1200 block of El
Camino Real before 3:36 p.m. Monday, April
8.
Grand theft. A Louis Vuitton purse contain-
ing $3,000 and credit cards was stolen when a
woman left it unattended on the 1100 block of
El Camino Real before 5:20 p.m. Sunday,
April 7.
Police reports
Clean up your act
A man was seen showering in a woman’s
rest room on the 1700 block of South
Amphlett Boulevard in San Mateo before
5:55 p.m. on Monday, April 8.
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo and two other counties are con-
stitutionally entitled to keep extra property
taxes grabbed by the state as part of an early
redevelopment cleanup bill, according to Sen.
Jerry Hill who is trying a second time to pass
legislation that would let them do so.
“The tax is generated locally so the basic
question is should [the counties] have to
donate it back to the state general fund,” said
Hill, D-San Mateo.
The state senator’s bill is a reintroduction of
a bill he submitted as an assemblyman. It was
vetoed by Gov. Jerry Brown in September out
of concern about the final fiscal implications.
In his veto, Brown wrote that signing last
year’s bill “would not be prudent” when the
cost is unclear.
But Hill and Connie Juarez-Diroll, San
Mateo County legislative coordinator, said the
new figures show the counties are entitled to
approximately $500,000 rather than the
Department of Finance’s previously estimate
of up to $17 million. Both also say the state’s
own counsel is of the opin-
ion making San Mateo,
Marin and Napa counties
forfeit the excess
Educational Revenue
Augmentation Funds is
unconstitutional. Taken
together along with the
state’s rosier financial situ-
ation, the bill should be
successful this time
around, Hill and Juarez-Diroll said.
Then again, “nothing is a slam dunk,”
Juarez-Diroll said.
However, she said the county, which is co-
sponsoring the bill with the Marin and Napa
counties, is “fairly confident” in its position.
The California State Association of
Counties is also urging passage of the bill,
writing in a letter to the head of the Senate
Governance and Finance Committee that it
will ensure “fairness and equity” while avoid-
ing any legal or constitutional challenges.
The money in question is the balance left
after local schools are funded with ERAF. The
redevelopment agency dissolution bill passed
last June called for withholding the funds to
repay local jurisdictions for the ongoing sales
tax and vehicle license fee revenue it previ-
ously diverted. It also promised to fund eco-
nomic revenue bonds issued in 2004. The rev-
enue and tax code entitles the counties to the
extra ERAF so the bill left the state taking
locally generated funds to pay its future debt
to the same counties.
Hill argues that the taking also violates
Proposition 1A, the prohibition on the state
reallocating property taxes that would cause
counties to lose revenue.
“This bill is a way to do the right thing,”
Hill said. “It’s a fairness issue.”
Juarez-Diroll agrees having the state abide
by the Constitution is a bigger driving force
than the actual dollars at stake.
“It’s not a large amount so it’s really more
about the principle,” she said.
The bill’s latest incarnation passed through
its first committee unanimously and is sched-
uled for consideration by the appropriations
committee on Monday, April 15.
michelle@smdailyjournal.com
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102.
Second try for excess ERAF bill
Jerry Hill
By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
San Mateo Mayor David Lim should be
able to add a second story onto his growing
family’s Sugarloaf Neighborhood home after
the city’s Planning Commission turned back a
neighbor’s appeal Tuesday night.
A city zoning administrator had previously
approved the Lim family’s request to con-
struct a 109-square-foot first-story addition
and a 640-square-feet second-story addition
onto their home but some neighbors appealed
the decision based on the fact their own home
would lose sweeping views of the Bay.
The neighbors, Terry Larson and Megan
Goggins, paid $515 to appeal the decision.
They can appeal the Planning Commission’s
decision as well if they choose and have until
April 19 to do so. The appeal has cost the Lim
family $4,400 so far, they told the Daily
Journal previously.
The Planning Commission approved the
zoning administrator’s
decision on a 4-1 vote with
Commissioner Kelly
Moran voting no.
Larson and Goggins esti-
mate their property will
lose up to 25 percent of its
value with the Lim family
adding on to their house,
according to a letter sub-
mitted to the commission.
The couple contends
they will lose their central view toward San
Francisco at least 40 percent and up to 80 per-
cent of their total panoramic view, according
to the letter.
Lim even scaled the project back to appease
the neighbors after conducting required neigh-
borhood meetings.
The potential for Larson and Goggins to
lose up to $200,000 in the value of their home
was a big concern for Moran who understands
that views add substantial value to homes.
She is concerned too that allowing the Lim
addition to obstruct their neighbor’s view will
negatively impact the “desirability of invest-
ing in the hills,” she told the Daily Journal.
Who would invest in a home, she said, that
could lose so much value because another
neighbor decides to add on to their home.
Mayor gets OK to remodel home
David Lim
4
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
ACS Courier | Home Care Assistance
Peninsula Executives Association
Retirement Administration, Inc.
Small Business Owners
Self-Employed Professionals
Join us for a free business resource event to help you thrive in 2013
ATTENTION:
Small Business
Resource Fair
Tuesday, April 30 •
9 am to 1 pm
Oshman Family JCC
3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto
SEMINAR TOPICS INCLUDE:
*Practical Social Media for the Small
Business, presented by Right Mix Marketing
*Guerrilla Marketing Strategies for the Small
Business, presented by the Growth Coach
*How Online Backup Can Save Your Business,
presented by Backblaze
*Increase Customer Loyalty through SMS /
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If you would like to be a presenter or vendor at this event,
please call 650-344-5200 x 121 or email info@smdailyjournal.com
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inars on various
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Continental breakfast will be provided
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Serving The Peninsula
for over 25years
Man charged with assaulting,
threatening girlfriend
A San Jose man facing trial for
assaulting his girlfriend and slashing her
car tires threatened
repeatedly to pub-
licly claim she was a
prostitute if she did
not drop the charges,
according to prose-
cutors.
Christopher Robin
Daily, 34, now faces
a misdemeanor
count of violating
the earlier case’s no-
contact order with the alleged litany of
phone calls begging her not to cooper-
ate.
The Redwood City woman reportedly
revealed to police the early March calls
during an interview to prepare for
Daily’s misdemeanor domestic violence
trial. Police checked Daily’s cellphone
and found evidence he made the calls in
violation of the order, according to the
District Attorney’s Office.
Daily is free from custody on a
$10,000 bail bond.
Speier, police to
hold gun buyback
U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
and nine police departments in north San
Mateo County will
hold a gun buyback
this Saturday in
South San Francisco.
Any individual liv-
ing in South San
Francisco, Daly City,
San Bruno, Pacifica,
Burlingame, Colma,
Millbrae, Brisbane
and Broadmoor can
surrender weapons, no questions asked,
and receive up to $100 cash for a hand-
gun, shotgun or rifle, and up to $200
cash for an assault weapon.
“Fewer guns mean fewer accidents
and fewer chances for guns to fall into
the wrong hands,” Speier wrote in a
statement.
Participants must transport firearms
unloaded and in the trunk of their vehi-
cles.
“I hope that citizens take advantage of
this opportunity to properly dispose of a
firearm they have in their home and no
longer feel that they should keep,” South
San Francisco Police Chief Michael
Massoni wrote in a statement.
The event starts at 9 a.m. and lasts
until noon at the South San Francisco
Courthouse, 1050 Mission Road, South
San Francisco.
Shots fired at
mobile home park again
A man fired a gun into the air while
standing in front of the mobile home
park on the 700 block of Barron Avenue
in unincorporated Redwood City
Tuesday at about 10:30 p.m.
It was the second time in 48 hours that
shots were fired at the location, accord-
ing to the San Mateo County Sheriff’s
Office.
The suspect, described as a Hispanic
male in his 20s, fled the scene and no
one was injured, according to the
Sheriff’s Office.
Anyone with information on the inci-
dent is encouraged to call the anony-
mous tip line at (800) 547-2700 or
Detective Mark Myers at 802-4238.
Local briefs
Christopher
Daily
Jackie Speier
COUNTY
GOVERNMENT
• The Board of
S u p e r v i s o r s
Tuesday named
nine people, plus
two alternates, to
a committee
redrawing the supervisorial district lines
for future elections. The county
switched from a countywide system to
one in which a supervisor is chosen only
by the voters within a specific district.
Voters changed the charter in November
but the county must still redraw its lines
as part of settling a lawsuit over its pre-
vious at-large system. The committee
includes supervisors Adrienne Tissier
and Warren Slocum, Daly City
Councilman Sal Torres and East Palo
Alto Councilwoman Laura Martinez
as the elected members. The public
members are William Nack of Menlo
Park for District Four, Barbara
Arietta of Pacifica for District Three,
Hayden Lee of Millbrae for District
One, Rebecca Ayson of Daly City for
District Five and Raymond Lee of San
Mateo for District Two.
The committee is expected to make a
recommendation by Sept. 13.
CITY GOVERNMENT
• The San Carlos City Council
unanimously voted to set a May 28
hearing on proposed sewer rate increas-
es. Last year, the city approved a 6 per-
cent increase. According to the new
proposal, residential charges beginning
in July would jump 25 percent, fol-
lowed by 20 percent then 10 over the
next three years. According to the
Public Works Department, the
increases are needed to fund ongoing
operations and maintenance of the
pipelines and replenish the city’s sewer
fund.
Official: Bay Bridge fix could take weeks
Finding a fix for bolts that snapped on the new eastern
span of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge could take
weeks or even months, which could delay its planned
Labor Day opening, a state transportation official said
Wednesday.
California Transportation Commission Chief Engineer
Stephen Maller made the comments at a meeting of the
Toll Bridge Program Oversight Committee, evoking con-
cerns from Oakland’s mayor about the delay’s effect on the
local economy.
Around the Bay
5
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
STATE/NATION
By Paul Larson
MILLBRAE – Our
country’s economic
roller-coaster ride
has been interesting
and historic for
sure, but also very
troubling for many
families who’ve not
been as financially stable as others.
Recently though I’ve been observing a
phenomenon with those we serve at the
CHAPEL OF THE HIGHLANDS. It may
be too early to confirm, but it appears that
there is a general state of confidence with
many families, along with the decisions and
choices they make during funeral
arrangements. Yes, I know you are thinking
that “confidence” is not a term you would
use to coincide with “funeral arrangements”,
but it appears to me that people I see are
tending to be more financially assured than
during the deepest years of “The Great
Recession”.
They say that the two things you can’t
avoid are “death and taxes”. With that in
mind, during the economic downturn I saw a
very noticeable sense of “thrift” and
“prudence” with a lot of families who
experienced a death during that period.
Still, those who tended to “cost shop” at
various funeral homes selected CHAPEL
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cremation arrangements. These families
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with our more economic cost structure.
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way before the recession hit. It’s not that
people are utilizing their funds differently,
spending more or spending less, but that
they are more assertive and confident when
using their wallet. Seeing this over and over
gives me a good indication that something in
the economic climate is changing compared
to not that long ago.
Even though many of our honorable
elected officials in Sacramento and
Washington D.C. appear to be as inflexible
with economic issues as always, the air of
confidence with the families I’ve been
dealing with means to me that these people
are feeling less pressured financially.
It is well known that when businesses do
well they hire more employees, and when
those employees are confident they will
spend their money on goods and services.
In turn, the companies that provide goods
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long period of U.S. manufacturing jobs
being sent over-seas there is news of a
growing number of companies bringing this
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state during the recession, but houses here
are now in demand more than ever.
“Encouraging” “Hopeful” and “Positive”
are words to describe the optimistic
vibrations that people are giving off. If the
community is becoming more comfortable
with spending, that indicates good health for
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let’s all keep our fingers crossed.
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Funeral Trends Indicate
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Senate plan to stiffen border security
By Erica Werner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Bipartisan immi-
gration legislation being written in the
Senate would require surveillance of 100
percent of the U.S. border with Mexico
and apprehension of 90 percent of people
trying to cross the border in certain high-
risk areas, a person familiar with the pro-
posals said Wednesday.
People living here illegally could begin
to get green cards in 10 years, but only if
a new southern border security plan is in
place, employers have adopted mandato-
ry electronic verification of their workers’
legal status and a new electronic exit sys-
tem is operating at airports and seaports.
The person provided the information
on condition of anonymity because the
deliberations were private.
The contours of the tough new border
security plans emerged as senators moved
closer to unveiling sweeping legislation
within days that would put some 11 mil-
lion immigrants living here illegally on a
path to citizenship and allow tens of thou-
sands of high- and low-skilled workers
into the country on new visa programs, in
addition to securing the border.
Lawmakers and aides said all the major
elements were complete, or close to. A
final deal was near on a new visa for agri-
culture workers. There were small details
to be dealt with on visas for high-tech
workers, but Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill.,
said it wasn’t enough to hold up the bill.
“We are closer now than we have been
in 25 years for serious immigration
reform,” Durbin told reporters
Wednesday after he and other Democrats
in the Senate negotiating group briefed
members of the Congressional Hispanic
Caucus. “This president is behind it, and
there is a strong, growing bipartisan effort
in the Senate to support it. We hope that
the House will do the same.”
Meanwhile tens of thousands of pro-
immigration activists massed outside the
Capitol and in cities around the country to
push Congress to act. They waved
American flags and carried signs reading,
“Reform immigration for America now!”
The border security piece of the legisla-
tion is critical to getting support from
Republicans, but some Democrats have
opposed making a path to citizenship
contingent on border security. Sen. Chuck
Schumer, D-N.Y., said that the new
requirements wouldn’t impede citizen-
ship.
“A lot of people here would not want to
put dollars into the border, but as a price
to get citizenship, as long as it’s not an
impediment to citizenship but rather
works alongside citizenship, it’s some-
thing we can all live with,” Schumer said,
after talking to the Hispanic House mem-
bers. “What we’ve said all along is trig-
gers have to be objective and attainable in
a way it doesn’t interfere or delay with
people becoming citizens, and that’s in
the bill.”
According to the person familiar with
the proposals, the new border security
requirements call for 100 percent surveil-
lance and a 90 percent apprehension rate
of border crossers or would-be crossers in
sectors where the majority of unautho-
rized entries take place.
The goals would be achieved by giving
the Department of Homeland Security six
months from the bill’s enactment to cre-
ate the new border security plan deploy-
ing the personnel, infrastructure and tech-
nology needed to achieve the 90 percent
effectiveness rate.
REUTERS
Latinos protest in favor of comprehensive immigration reform while on the West
side of Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.
By Terry Collins
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — Demonstrators marched through
San Francisco Wednesday in one of several rallies across
California trying to shape the national immigration debate
and press Congress to grant a path toward citizenship for
immigrants living here illegally.
The crowd estimated to be about 100 people at the start of
the march quickly grew to an estimated several hundred peo-
ple as additional demonstrators joined those walking down
the city’s Market Street on the way to Federal Building.
Members of the expanding crowd chanted in English and
Spanish and held signs and banners reading “Reunite
Families Now” and “The IRS Agrees My Taxes Are Not
Illegal.”
“We are here because of our ancestors, our future genera-
tions and those who are detained,” said the Rev. Deborah
Lee of the Interfaith Coalition for Immigrant Rights in
Northern California, one of groups taking part in the demon-
stration.
“We are here for all of our families,” she said.
Another demonstrator, Eva Seligman-Kennard, a board
member of the Jewish Community Relations Council, also
voiced her support for immigration reform.
“We are all immigrants and nobody is free until we all are
free,” she said.
About two dozen police officers monitored the crowd,
which was peaceful during the march.
When the demonstrators reached the Federal Building a
little before 5 p.m. the demonstrators milled outside holding
red and orange paper flowers representing the number of
people deported daily for immigration violations.
Immigration
activists rally
across state
6
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL/STATE/NATION
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DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
A judge yesterday sealed the criminal grand
jury transcript leading to its murder indictment
against a Pacifica man accused of fatally beating
and stabbing an acquaintance more than 50
times at his father’s home before trying to clean
up the bloody scene.
The defense request to keep the grand jury’s
transcript from the public and the judge’s agree-
ment to do so came at the same hearing Marc
Anthony Furlan, 24, pleaded not guilty to mur-
der by use of a deadly or dangerous weapon. A
jury trial was also scheduled for Nov. 12.
In March, the grand jury indicted Furlan for
the Oct. 17, 2012 death of 24-year-old Keith
Coffey. Furlan and Coffey were acquaintances
and reportedly argued before Coffey’s death.
Prosecutors say Furlan
killed Coffey in his father’s
Dell Road house and
dragged the body outside
before trying to clean the
scene. Two tenants fled the
scene and contacted police
who found Coffey in front
of the home just after 5 a.m.
Furlan was reportedly try-
ing to dispose of the body
when police arrived and
had left a wide swath of blood from the house to
outside. His father was not home at the time of
the incident.
Coffey’s death was the first murder in Pacifica
since 2000.
Furlan remains in custody without bail.
Indicted Pacifica murder
suspect pleads not guilty
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF REPORT
The county’s health system and local
response teams will hold a simulated large-
scale delivery of medicine and medical sup-
plies to residents as part of an emergency pre-
paredness drill next week.
Volunteers and agencies throughout the
county will participate to assess their readi-
ness for timely response and aid in the event
of a major health emergency like pandemic
influenza, a food or water-borne illness or the
release of a bio-agent.
The Silver Dragon VII Emergency Drill
includes Community Emergency Response
Teams distributing education information in
reusable shopping bags to simulate medicine
deliveries following an emergency.
Last year’s exercise tested how long it took
to visit 15,000 homes and the group will try
improving the time this year. To test its
mobile kitchen, San Mateo Medical Center’s
food service staff will prepare food for the
volunteers.
The drill will also test how quickly the
county receives the Center for Disease
Control and Prevention’s stockpile of medi-
cine and supplies. Once local and federal
authorities agree the stockpile is needed,
medicine can be delivered to any state in the
United States within 12 hours. In the mean-
time, the county will distribute medicine and
supplies from its own pharmaceutical stock-
pile.
The drill is from 9 a.m. to noon Thursday,
April 18.
County to hold emergency prep drill
Marc Furlan
Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
By Pauline Jelinek
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — The financially belea-
guered Postal Service backpedaled on its plan
to end Saturday mail delivery, conceding
Wednesday that its gamble to compel congres-
sional approval had failed.
With limited options for saving money, the
governing board said the agency should reopen
negotiations with unions to lower labor costs
and consider raising mail prices.
Yet the board also said it’s not possible for the
Postal Service to meet its goals for reduced
spending without altering the delivery schedule.
Delaying “responsible changes,” the board said,
only makes it more likely that the Postal
Service “may become a burden” to taxpayers.
Congressional reaction was mixed, mirroring
differences that have stalled a needed postal
overhaul for some time. Some lawmakers had
urged the agency to forge ahead with its plan,
while others had said it lacked the legal author-
ity to do so. The Postal Service said in February
that it planned to switch to five-day-a-week
deliveries beginning in August for everything
except packages as a way to hold down losses.
That announcement was risky. The agency
was asking Congress to drop from spending
legislation the longtime ban on five-day-only
delivery.
Congress did not do that when it passed a
spending measure last month.
“By including restrictive language ...
Congress has prohibited implementation of a
new national delivery schedule for mail and
package,” according to the board. Disappointed
but not wanting to disregard the law, the board
directed the Postal Service to delay putting in
place the new delivery schedule until Congress
passes legislation that gives the agency “the
authority to implement a financially appropriate
and responsible delivery schedule.”
The board made the decision in a closed
meeting Tuesday.
“This is good news for rural communities,
businesses, seniors, veterans and others who
depend on consistent and timely delivery of the
mail,” said Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.
But GOP Rep. Darrell Issa of California,
chairman of the House Oversight and
Government Reform Committee, bemoaned the
decision to back away from a “delivery sched-
ule that polling indicates the American people
understand and support.” Postal officials said
that to restore the service to long-term financial
stability, the agency must have the flexibility to
reduce costs and come up with new revenues.
“It is not possible for the Postal Service to
meet significant cost reduction goals without
changing its delivery schedule — any rational
analysis of our current financial condition and
business options leads to this conclusion,” the
board statement said.
Post office retreats on eliminating Saturday mail
By Lisa Leff
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — A bill aimed at pres-
suring the Boy Scouts of America to lift its
ban on gay members by making the organiza-
tion ineligible for nonprofit tax breaks cleared
its first vote on Wednesday in the California
Legislature.
The Senate Governance and Finance
Committee voted 5 to 2 to move the first-of-
its-kind bill to the Senate Appropriations
Committee for review.
The Youth Equality Act, sponsored by Sen.
Ricardo Lara, D-Long
Beach, would deny tax-
exempt status to youth
groups that discriminate
on the basis of gender
identity, race, sexual ori-
entation, nationality, reli-
gion or religious affilia-
tion.
That means those
groups would have to pay
corporate taxes on donations, membership
dues, camp fees and other sources of income,
as well as sales taxes on food, beverages and
homemade items sold at fundraisers.
Former Boy Scouts of America president
Rick Cronk appeared before the committee on
Wednesday, telling members that Scouting
has had a positive impact on the state and that
being taxed on fundraising sales would hurt
local troops.
The proposal was written with the Boy
Scouts and its exclusion of gay members and
troop leaders in mind, but its language also
would require other youth groups to revisit
membership policies for transgender and
atheist members.
If the Appropriations Committee passes the
bill, it would require two-thirds approval from
the full Senate before it could be sent to the
California Assembly for consideration.
Boy Scouts of America spokesman Deron
Smith declined to comment on Wednesday’s
vote. Conservative legal aid groups have said
they would sue if the bill gets enacted into law
because it penalizes groups based on their
beliefs.
The BSA is reviewing its membership poli-
cies. Later this month, Scouting’s executive
officers will present a resolution regarding the
policy to be considered in May by the voting
members of the National Council.
State bill aimed at Scouts’ gay ban passes hurdle
Ricardo Lara
“It is not possible for the Postal Service to meet significant
cost reduction goals without changing its delivery schedule.”
— Postal Service governing board
NATION 7
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Comeback: Weiner says he
may run for New York City mayor
NEW YORK — A bold comeback attempt or the height of
chutzpah?
In what could be the start of one of the
most intriguing second acts in American
politics, Anthony Weiner, the congress-
man who tweeted himself out of a job two
years ago with a photo of his bulging
underpants, is considering jumping into
the New York City mayor’s race.
The Brooklyn Democrat said in a New
York Times Magazine story posted online
Wednesday that he realizes he would be
an underdog, but he wants to “ask people
to give me a second chance.”
“I do recognize, to some degree, it’s now or maybe never
for me,” Weiner, 48, said in a long and highly personal pro-
file that he clearly hoped would be the start of his rehabilita-
tion.
But are voters ready to forgive? Will they at least stop gig-
gling long enough to hear what he has to say?
Political analysts say Weiner would face a steep climb to
get past his past, but his political skills, his rich reserve of
campaign money and the dynamics of a crowded Democratic
primary could make him a player, if not a clear winner, in the
contest this fall to succeed Michael Bloomberg as mayor of
the nation’s largest city.
Bin Laden raid member can be WikiLeaks witness
FORT MEADE, Md. — A military judge cleared the way
Wednesday for a member of the team that raided Osama bin
Laden’s compound to testify at the trial of an Army private
charged in a massive leak of U.S. secrets to the WikiLeaks
website.
Col. Denise Lind ruled for the prosecution during a court-
martial pretrial hearing for Pfc. Bradley Manning at Fort
Meade, near Baltimore.
Prosecutors say the witness, presumably a Navy SEAL,
collected digital evidence showing that the al-Qaida leader
requested and received from an associate some of the docu-
ments Manning has acknowledged sending to WikiLeaks.
Defense attorneys had argued that proof of receipt wasn’t
relevant to whether Manning aided the enemy, the most seri-
ous charge he faces, punishable by life imprisonment.
Around the nation
By Alan Fram
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — Conservative
senators from both parties announced
their support for expanding background
checks for gun buyers Wednesday, giv-
ing a burst of momentum to advocates
of stronger restrictions. But big ques-
tions remain about whether President
Barack Obama can push significant gun
controls through Congress.
The compromise between Sens. Joe
Manchin, D-W.Va., and Patrick
Toomey, R-Pa., boosted the chances
that the Senate will agree to broaden
required background checks, a step gun
control groups laud as an effective way
to keep weapons from criminals and the
mentally ill. The senators are among
the most conservative members of their
parties, both have received “A” ratings
from the National Rifle Association,
and their endorsements could make it
easier for hesitant colleagues to back
the effort.
Gun control advocates still face
opposition from many Republican sen-
ators and resistance from moderate
Democrats, including several facing re-
election next year in GOP-leaning
states. In the Republican-run House,
leaders have shown little enthusiasm
for Obama’s ideas, making that cham-
ber an even higher hurdle.
Under the agreement the two senators
announced at the Capitol, background
checks would be expanded to all for-
profit transactions including sales at
gun shows and online, with records
kept by licensed gun-dealers who
would handle the paperwork. Exempted
would be noncommercial transactions
such as between relatives. Currently,
the system applies only to sales by the
country’s 55,000 federally licensed
firearms dealers.
The agreement also contains provi-
sions expanding firearms rights, and
that concerns gun control supporters.
Some restrictions on transporting guns
across state lines would be eased, sell-
ers would be shielded from lawsuits if
the buyer passed a check but later used
a firearm in a crime and gun dealers
could conduct business in states where
they don’t live.
Boost for background checks for
gun buyers: Senators compromise
By Dan Elliott
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CENTENNIAL, Colo. — The judge
in the Colorado theater shootings
refused again Wednesday to make a
quick decision on whether to order a
Fox News reporter to reveal her confi-
dential sources for a story she wrote
last year.
In the article, New
York-based reporter
Jana Winter cited
anonymous law
enforcement sources
who said shooting
suspect James
Holmes sent a note-
book containing vio-
lent drawings to a
University of Colorado, Denver psychi-
atrist before the attack.
Holmes, who had been a student at
the university, is charged with fatally
shooting 12 people and injuring 70 at a
movie theater in the Denver suburb of
Aurora on July 20. A judge has entered
a not guilty plea on his behalf.
Prosecutors are seeking the death
penalty.
Colorado shootings notebook ruling delayed
REUTERS
Sen. Joe Manchin, left, meets with the relatives of the victims killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School tragedy.
Jana Winter
Anthony
Weiner
WORLD 8
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Ryan Lucas
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BEIRUT — Tensions emerged Wednesday
in a newly announced alliance between al-
Qaida’s franchise in Iraq and the most power-
ful Syrian rebel faction, which said it was not
consulted before the Iraqi group announced
their merger and only heard about it through
the media.
Al-Qaida in Iraq said Tuesday that it had
joined forces with Jabhat al-Nusra or the
Nusra Front — the most effective force
among the mosaic of rebel brigades fighting to
topple President Bashar Assad in Syria’s civil
war. It said they had formed a new alliance
called the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant.
The Syrian government seized upon the
purported merger to back its assertion that it is
not facing a true popular movement for
change but rather a foreign-backed terrorist
plot. The state news agency said Wednesday
that the union “proves that this opposition was
never anything other than a tool used by the
West and by terrorists to destroy the Syrian
people.”
Talk of an alliance between Jabhat al-Nusra
and al-Qaida in Iraq has raised fears in
Baghdad, where intelligence officials said
increased cooperation was already evident in a
number of deadly attacks.
And in Syria, a stronger Jabhat al-Nusra
would only further complicate the battlefield
where Western powers have been covertly try-
ing to funnel weapons, training and aid toward
more secular rebel groups and army defectors.
Washington has designated Jabhat al-Nusra
a terrorist organization over its links with al-
Qaida, and the Syrian group’s now public ties
with the terrorist network are unlikely to
prompt a shift in international support for the
broader Syrian opposition.
Earlier this year, the U.S. announced a $60
million non-lethal assistance package for
Syria that includes meals and medical sup-
plies for the armed opposition. It was greeted
unenthusiastically by some rebel leaders, who
said it does far too little.
Washington’s next step is expected to be a
broader package of non-lethal assistance,
expanding from food and medical supplies to
body armor and night-vision goggles.
However, President Barack Obama has not
given final approval on any new package and
an announcement is not imminent, a senior
administration official said.
Secretary of State John Kerry, who met with
Syrian opposition leaders in London on
Wednesday, hinted at the new non-lethal aid
package this week, saying the administration
had been holding intense talks on how to
boost assistance to the rebels.
The U.S. opposes directly arming Syrian
opposition fighters, in part out of fear that the
weapons could fall into the hands of Islamic
extremists such as Jabhat al-Nusra.
Tensions emerge in al-Qaida alliance in Syria
REUTERS
A member of the Free Syrian Army runs along with two men to take cover, past rubble and
curtains used as cover from snipers loyal to Syria’s President Bashar al-Assad, in Deir al-Zor.
By Jean H. Lee
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
PYONGYANG, North Korea — As the
world braced for a provocative missile launch
by North Korea, with newscasts worldwide
playing up tensions on the Korean Peninsula,
the center of the storm was strangely calm.
The focus in Pyongyang on Wednesday
was less on preparing for war and more on
beautifying the capital ahead of the nation’s
biggest holiday: the April 15 birthday of the
nation’s founder, Kim Il Sung. Soldiers put
down their rifles to blanket the barren ground
with sod and students picked up shovels to
help plant trees.
But the impoverished, tightly controlled
nation that has historically used major holi-
days to draw the world’s attention by showing
off its military power could well mark the
occasion by testing a missile designed to strike
U.S. military installations in Japan and Guam.
South Korea’s foreign minister said the
prospect of a medium-range missile launch is
“considerably high.”
North Korean officials have not announced
plans to launch a missile in defiance of U.N.
Security Council resolutions barring
Pyongyang from nuclear and missile activity.
But they have told foreign diplomats in
Pyongyang that they will not be able to guar-
antee their safety starting Wednesday and
urged tourists in South Korea to take cover,
warning that a nuclear war is imminent. Most
diplomats and foreign residents in both capi-
tals appeared to be staying put.
The European Union said there was no need
for member states to evacuate or relocate their
diplomatic missions, but it called on North
Korea to “refrain from further provocative dec-
larations or action.”
No panic in North Korea despite talk of missile test
Vladimir Putin on Finland’s
criminal blacklist by ‘mistake’
HELSINKI — Vladimir Putin, banned in
Finland?
Finnish police say the Russian president’s
name was mistakenly
placed on a secret crimi-
nal register that could
theoretically have gotten
him arrested at the bor-
der.
TV station MTV3
reported Wednesday that
Putin was placed there
for his contact with
Russian motorcycle gang
Night Wolves, though he wasn’t suspected
of a crime in Finland. But National Police
Board spokesman Robin Lardot told the AP
the listing was a mistake and that Putin’s
name was removed from the list.
“The National Police Board has investi-
gated the case and indeed found that such a
mistaken entry was in the register,” Lardot
told the Associated Press. “We have ordered
it to be removed and are investigating the
case very thoroughly. We don’t know how it
got there.” He declined further comment.
Putin’s inclusion would be a major source
of embarrassment in bilateral relations.
Under the radar, Cuba
and U.S. often work together
HAVANA — Cuba and the United States
may be longtime enemies with a bucket
overflowing with grievances, but the fast
return of a Florida couple who fled U.S.
authorities with their two kidnapped chil-
dren in tow shows the Cold War enemies are
capable of remarkable cooperation on many
issues.
Indeed, diplomats and observers on both
sides of the Florida Straits say American and
Cuban law enforcement officers, scientists,
disaster relief workers, Coast Guard officials
and other experts work together on a daily
basis, and invariably express professional
admiration for each other.
“I don’t think the story has been told, but
there is a real warmth in just the sort of day-
to-day relations between U.S. and Cuban
government officials,” said Dan Whittle,
who frequently brings scientific groups to
the island in his role as Cuba program direc-
tor for the Environmental Defense Fund.
Around the world
Vladimir Putin
OPINION 9
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Letters to the editor
Columbus (Ga.) Ledger-Enquirer
A
ny modern history that does not
include Margaret Hilda Roberts
Thatcher among the most important
world leaders of the 20th century instantly
sacrifices any claim to credibility.
Former British Prime Minister Thatcher,
who died Monday at 87, all but remade the
United Kingdom of the 1980s in her own
ladylike yet unyielding image, much as her
friend and ally Ronald Reagan remade the
United States in his.
In many ways, Reagan and Thatcher were
and are the bookends of late 20th century
Western conservatism. Although Thatcher
lacked Reagan’s seemingly effortless amia-
bility, she was every bit his match in resolve.
The “Iron Lady” label came courtesy of
Soviet journalists, and would soon become a
term of admiration and, to some, endearment.
Like Reagan, she came to power at a time
when Britain was suffering from crises of
both economics and national confidence, and
saw bloated government as the heart of the
problem.
Her administration’s privatizing of state-
run industries would hardly seem radical to
most Americans: Among the government-
operated institutions at the time were British
Airways, Rolls-Royce, the coal and steel
industries, a telecom company, gas, water
and electrical utilities.
Supporters credited her with an economic
revival; critics accused her of insensitivity to
the wretchedly poor and of further widening
England’s historically yawning social and
economic chasms. But her convictions were
unshakable.
Thatcher is said, by foes and admirers
alike, to have had an absolute confidence in
her own rightness. It was a trait that some-
times worked to her and her country’s advan-
tage, as when she astutely saw in Soviet
leader Mikhail Gorbachev a possible end to
the Cold War; and sometimes to her detri-
ment, as when she imposed a hugely unpopu-
lar tax in 1989 and was eventually ousted by
her own party.
Thatcher was described as “a very divisive
figure” by none other than Bernard Ingham,
her own loyal press secretary. He also
described her as “a patriot with a great love
for this country.”
A woman for history
Editor,
As Silicon Valley leader Sheryl Sandberg
spearheads efforts to integrate women into
the highest ranks of American power, it’s
interesting to look at the life of Britain’s
first female prime minister, Margaret
Thatcher. She came from humble origins
and won a scholarship to Oxford, but could
not join its debating society because she
was a woman. She became the leader of the
Tories but was excluded from the Carlton
Club, where party leaders strategized,
because she was a woman. After she
became prime minister, her alma mater
broke with tradition and declined to confer
her an honorary doctorate, because she was
a woman.
Ironically, the British were likely able to
elect a woman prime minister because of
the most anachronistic traditions of them all
— the Monarchy. Would there ever have
been a Prime Minister Margaret if there had
not first been a Queen Elizabeth II? Here in
America, for talented women to be accept-
ed in the corridors of power, we need more
role models at the top.
Kaia Eakin
Redwood City
Filibuster cover-up
Editor,
The Republicans claim they need to fili-
buster any up-and-down vote on tighter
background checks for gun and ammunition
sales to protect the Second Amendment
against “assault.” What nonsense! The ugly
truth is that those elected officials simply
cannot afford to let their true nature be
exposed through a vote on this issue. They
want it both ways — have the cake and eat
it, too. If they vote in favor of stricter gun
control, they will lose NRA’s blood money
and other support. If they vote against, they
can forget about being re-elected — except
for districts with very gullible, low-info
constituents.
So, in their own short-sighted and selfish
interest, they try their darndest to block any
kind of voting on gun issues. How heart-
less, calculating, cruel and selfish can you
be, especially in the aftermath of recent
massacres? Then again, what could we
expect from so-called lawmakers who have
resisted every single effort on the part of
our duly elected President Obama to fix
problems and get the economy going again
after eight disastrous years under George
W. Bush?
The only thing worse would be voters
who keep getting such unethical incompe-
tents into office, again and again, despite
their destructive and unpatriotic actions.
Jorg Aadahl
San Mateo
Future Crystal Springs
Uplands middle school
Editor,
In regards to the article “Will Belmont
welcome private school?” in the April 10
edition of the Daily Journal, it was quite a
surprise to pick up the Daily Journal this
Wednesday morning and see that
Councilwoman Coralin Feierbach may have
changed her mind about supporting Crystal
Springs Uplands School in its bid to build a
middle school in Belmont.
As a parent of a student at Crystal
Springs, I cannot say enough great things
about the school. It has strong academics
and teachers, excellent administration and a
diverse student body (diverse in many
respects, including range of interests and
ethnicity). Studies have shown it is one of
the very best in class nationally amongst
private schools in our nation. Any city
would be lucky to have Crystal Springs
Uplands amongst their community.
I was personally hoping the school would
find a spot in the city our family lives in,
San Mateo, as I believe the school will be a
tremendous asset to any community to
which it locates. I personally think Crystal
Springs Uplands should think very hard
about working with the city of Belmont
again, in light of the last try which was so
very disappointing. I think other cities on
the Peninsula should strongly consider a
way to bring this wonderful school into
their community.
Christine Stiles
San Mateo
Chuck McDougald’s
‘Party of opportunity’
Editor,
When I first read Chuck McDougald’s
guest perspective, “Party of Opportunity” in
the April 6 edition of the Daily Journal, I
thought his column was an April Fools’
joke. When I double checked the date, I
saw I was wrong. He certainly did roll out
every hyperbole and cliche about the
Democratic party. I could write a similar
guest perspective about how Republicans
only care about big business and the
wealthy. It makes me wonder if Chuck has
ever actually met a Democrat.
Roger Feigelson
Belmont
Margaret Thatcher’s legacy
Other voices
Postal (ad)dress
O
bviously, Saturday mail service is
not yet out of fashion. But what
about dressing like those who deliv-
er it?
The U.S. Postal Service announced
Wednesday it would not end Saturday serv-
ice as previously planned because of prohibi-
tive language in a congressional funding bill.
In other words, the
idea received no
stamp of approval
which proves not
snow nor rain nor
heat nor gloom of
night can stop the
mail. Apparently,
neither can a lack
of money and cus-
tomer base.
The recommen-
dation to put the
kibosh on six-day-
a-week service
shouldn’t have surprised anyone. With the
agency hemorrhaging money and customers
more often relying on the Internet and alter-
native delivery services, there weren’t many
other options to save or raise billions of dol-
lars annually. Not that the agency didn’t try.
It announced plans to close a number of post
offices, an idea that rallied some communi-
ties and fell on deaf ears in others.
But the most intriguing idea is the apparel
line. Back in February — about the same
time the pro-Saturday mail movement picked
up steam — the U.S. Postal Service
announced plans for a line of “all-weather
apparel and accessories.”
The all-weather apparel makes sense con-
sidering the source although chances are slim
the service can sell enough blue parkas and
long shorts to reach financial solvency. But
accessories? Do they mean mail bags and
handy waist-clipped bottles of mace? Pads of
those little notes they leave when a package
or certified letter needs a signature?
Actually, the line, which is still expected to
launch in 2014, reportedly also includes
headwear (because who hasn’t wanted a
jaunty mailman’s hat?) and footwear (if it’s
good enough for trudging around the neigh-
borhood, just imagine the kind of support it
can offer the casual wearer!).
Adding to the skepticism of the idea’s like-
lihood of success, the CEO of the clothing
company tapped to produce these goods said
at the launch that this will be an “image-con-
scious, first-class, high-end line” that repre-
sents the legacy and “romanticism” of the
postal service. Legacy, sure. Romanticism?
Somebody call Merchant and Ivory!
The closest thing the postal service gets to
romanticism is the heart on its ever-more-
expensive “forever” stamp and the valentines
cluttering the mailbox mid-February.
The line will initially only be offered for
men — giving new punch to puns about
“male men” — but will eventually move into
the female arena, too. Of course. Because
even more than men wanting to look like a
postal worker are the majority of women.
Despite the gentle mocking, the postal
service has to be given some kudos for try-
ing. Rather than simply whine about the fact
it is few people’s first choice for reasonably
priced and timely delivery, it is grasping at
anything to stay afloat and perhaps inadver-
tently giving current workers a little cache
for sporting their existing — or dare we say
“vintage” — uniforms before Jane and John
Public get the chance.
The unknown question is how this public
will buy and receive these wonder garments.
The designs will reportedly be on display at
a showroom in New York City but, with fash-
ion this cutting edge, chances are people
everywhere will be clamoring for the chance.
Sure customers can order online but if the
Postal Service is smart it will require them to
use only that agency for delivery. Doing so
can be considered a win-win for the mail
service or perhaps a package deal.
Michelle Durand’s column “Off the Beat”
runs every Tuesday and Thursday. She can be
reached by email:
michelle@smdailyjournal.com or by phone
(650) 344-5200 ext. 102. What do you think of
this column? Send a letter to the editor: let-
ters@smdailyjournal.com.
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BUSINESS 10
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Dow 14,802.24 +0.88% 10-Yr Bond 1.805 +3.32%
Nasdaq3,297.25 +1.83% Oil (per barrel) 94.49
S&P 500 1,587.73 +1.22% Gold 1,555.80
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Wednesday on the
New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market:
NYSE
JinkoSolar Holding Co. Ltd., down 40 cents at $5.40
The Chinese solar products maker said that it took a bigger loss during
its fourth quarter as prices remained weak.
MSC Industrial Direct Co. Inc., down $3.29 at $79.89
The distributor of industrial tools said that its second-quarter net income
fell 7 percent, and it posted a disappointing outlook.
CarMax Inc., up $1.63 at $43.31
The used car dealership chain’s fourth-quarter profit rose 13 percent as
improved inventory and financing offers drove up sales.
Nasdaq
Pacific Sunwear of California Inc., up 17 cents at $2.42
A Piper Jaffray analyst upgraded the retailer’s stock,saying its new lineup
is a hit with teenagers.
Titan Machinery Inc., down $3.67 at $22.45
The agricultural and construction equipment provider’s fourth-quarter
net income fell 12.5 percent as operating expenses rose.
Fastenal Co., down $1.76 at $49.12
The industrial and construction supply company said its first-quarter net
income rose 9 percent, but revenue missed Wall Street estimates.
SeaChange International Inc., down 46 cents at $10.95
The Acton, Mass.-based video software company posted a fiscal first-
quarter forecast that didn’t meet Wall Street expectations.
Littelfuse Inc., up $2.86 at $66
Because of higher sales across its business,the circuit protection products
provider boosted its first-quarter revenue forecast.
Big movers
By Steve Rothwell
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Technology stocks
roared back Wednesday, driving the
Standard & Poor’s 500 and Dow Jones
industrial average to record highs.
The industry has lagged the broader
market this year, but surged after network
communications company Adtran reported
earnings that were double what Wall Street
analysts expected. That boosted optimism
that businesses will increase spending on
technology equipment.
Chipmakers Micron and Intel jumped,
as did other network equipment makers
like Cisco and JDS Uniphase. Stocks were
also up on an optimistic reading of the
Federal Reserve’s latest minutes.
Technology stocks rose 1.8 percent, the
most of the 10 industry groups in the S&P.
That’s a big change from tech’s weak per-
formance this year. The group is up just 4.7
percent, trailing the S&P’s gain of 11.3
percent.
“Tech has performed so poorly, it’s over-
sold and warrants some interest here,” said
Scott Wren, a senior equity strategist at
Wells Fargo Advisors. “If the economy
continues to improve there is going to be
some capital spending.”
The stock market has reversed course
this week, rising three straight days. Last
week, investors’ confidence fell because of
an unexpectedly poor report on the U.S.
job market and other signs that the econo-
my slowed in March.
The Dow Jones industrial average
jumped 128.78 points Wednesday, or 0.9
percent, to 14,802.24. It was the biggest
one-day rise in a month. The Dow is up 13
percent in 2013.
The Nasdaq composite, which is heavi-
ly weighted with technology stocks, had
the biggest percentage gain of the three
main indexes Wednesday, rising 59.39
points, or 1.8 percent, to 3,297.25. The
S&P rose 19.12 points, or 1.2 percent, to
1,587.73.
Investors viewed positively the minutes
from the Federal Reserve’s latest meeting,
which were released before the market
opened. The minutes revealed that policy
makers are becoming more confident that
the U.S. economy can grow without stim-
ulus from the Fed, said Brian Gendreau, a
market strategist at Cetera Financial
Group.
The Fed released the minutes at 9 a.m.
Eastern, five hours ahead of schedule, after
the document was inadvertently distrib-
uted to congressional staff and trade group
officials. The market rose steadily in the
morning and stayed high through the after-
noon.
A majority of the Fed’s 12 policymakers
want to continue the stimulus. Still, many
members indicated they want to slow and
eventually end the program before the end
of the year, as long as the job market and
economy show sustained improvement.
The Fed didn’t disclose how many of its
policymakers held those views.
That suggests that a number of Fed offi-
cials think the economy may be doing well
enough to stand on its own. The Fed has
been buying $85 billion worth of bonds
each month to keep interest rates extreme-
ly low, encourage borrowing and spending
and drive money into riskier assets like
stocks.
“The idea that the Fed thinks that we are
closer to the restoration of normality might
be positive for the market,” said Gendreau.
While the Dow and S&P have been set-
ting record highs frequently over the past
month, the Nasdaq remains 35 percent
below its record of 5,048 set March 10,
2000. The index surged the during the
technology bubble of the late 1990s. The
Nasdaq is at its highest level in more than
12 years.
Among stocks making big moves,
Facebook rose 98 cents, or 3.7 percent, to
$27.57 after General Motors said it would
start running ads on the social network
site. Adtran rose $2.75, or 14 percent, to
$22.46, and JDS Uniphase rose 64 cents,
or 4.8 percent, to $13.98.
Hospital stocks fell heavily after
Deutsche Bank lowered its recommenda-
tion on the companies because their prices
have risen so much that they no longer
offer good value. Private hospitals have
surged over the past year in anticipation
that health care spending will increase
after President Barack Obama’s health
care plan starts.
Gains in technology pull stocks higher
By Peter Svensson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Microsoft’s Windows 8
software appears to be driving buyers away
from PCs and toward smartphones and
tablets, research firm IDC said Wednesday.
That’s leading to the fastest drop in PC sales
the firm has ever seen.
Global shipments of PCs fell 14 percent in
the first three months this year, IDC said.
That’s the sharpest plunge since the firm
started tracking the industry in 1994.
The report comes after a year of bad news
for the PC. Consumers, especially in
wealthy countries like the U.S., are steering
their dollars toward tablets and smartphones
rather than upgrading their home PCs. It’s
the biggest challenge to the personal com-
puter since the IBM PC was released in
1981.
In an attempt to keep the PC relevant,
Microsoft released a radical new version of
Windows on Oct. 26. Windows 8 has a com-
pletely new look and forces users to learn
new ways to control their machines.
“Unfortunately, it seems clear that the
Windows 8 launch not only didn’t provide a
positive boost to the PC market, but appears
to have slowed the market,” IDC Vice
President Bob O’Donnell said.
The newest version of Windows is
designed to work well with touch-sensitive
screens, but the displays add to the cost of a
PC. Together, the changes and higher prices
“have made PCs a less attractive alternative
to dedicated tablets and other competitive
devices,” O’Donnell said.
Representatives of Microsoft Corp. were
not immediately available for comment.
In its tally, IDC excludes tablets, even if
they run PC-style software. It also excludes
any device that has a detachable keyboard.
With the release of Windows 8, PC makers
have been reviving their experiments with
tablet-laptop hybrids, some of which have
detachable keyboards. Consumers are likely
to have shifted some of their buying away
from traditional laptops and toward these
new devices, which means that the total
sales decline of Windows-based devices
may not be quite as drastic as IDC’s num-
bers suggest.
Another research firm, Gartner Inc.,
counts any devices running PC-style soft-
ware, including some tablets, as PCs. It
reported an 11 percent decline in PC ship-
ments in the quarter. That, too, is the
sharpest decline it’s seen since it started
tracking the market in 2001.
Research firm: PC sales plunge as Windows 8 flops
Broadcasters display
mobile TV dongles at NAB Show
LAS VEGAS — The key weapon in TV broadcasters’
fight with Internet video upstart Aereo is something inele-
gantly known as a dongle.
The miniature TV antenna picks up free, mobile broadcast
signals. It attaches to iPhone and iPad power ports and
extends about 7 inches, allowing users to view live local TV
channels at not-quite-high-definition quality.
The device scans the airwaves for signals with the help of
an app. The antenna doesn’t sap a user’s data plan or rely on
Wi-Fi signals, but it does need to be recharged.
“If you’re at a ball game or a Starbucks and everyone’s try-
ing to access the news, you’re not going to get (video stop-
pages),” says Karen McCall, a marketing representative with
Dyle Mobile TV, the venture backing the devices.
The dongles are on display at the annual gathering of
broadcasters, the NAB Show, taking place this week at the
Las Vegas Convention Center. Dyle says it plans to release
units for Android devices soon.
Dyle is actually a coalition of 12 major broadcasters
including Fox and NBC. Those networks, along with ABC
and CBS, are waging a legal fight against Aereo, a service
that pulls down broadcast station signals with thousands of
tiny antennas and sends the signal to mobile devices or com-
puters over the Internet.
Unemployment rates for West mostly down
Unemployment rates fell in more than 80 percent of large
U.S. cities in February from January, suggesting that strong
hiring that month benefited the vast majority of the country.
The Labor Department says rates fell in 311 of the nation’s
372 largest metro areas. They rose in 45 and were unchanged
in 16.
Nationwide, employers added 268,000 jobs in February,
the most in a year. That pushed down the unemployment rate
to 7.7 percent from 7.9 percent. But hiring slowed sharply
last month, when employers added only 88,000 jobs.
Business briefs
<< MLB new committee to focus on diversity, page 13
• Ernie Els back at Augusta, page 14
Thursday, April 11, 2013
HILLSDALE HAMMERS CAP: KNIGHTS CRUISE TO A 10-3 WIN OVER VISITING CAPUCHINO >>> PAGE 12
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL
Sacred Heart Prep’s Alex Castro, left, absorbs a check from Menlo-Atherton’s Duncan McGinnis during the Bears’ 12-10 win over the Gators
in a SCVAL De Anza Division showdown. M-A remains undefeated in league play, while the Gators fall two games behind.
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Despite finishing the first half of the Santa
Clara Valley Athletic League De Anza
Division lacrosse schedule with an unbeaten
mark, Menlo-Atherton boys’ lacrosse coach
Steve Kryger was concerned with his team’s
play, having dropped three straight non-league
decisions.
Wednesday marked the start of the second
half of the De Anza Division season and there
was no easing into it by the Bears: on the
schedule? Rival Sacred Heart Prep. The Gators
battled to a two-goal lead in the first two quar-
ters and led by a goal at halftime.
M-A scored four goals in the third period,
however, to take a 10-8 lead on its way to a 12-
10 decision.
“Playing Prep first game back (to start the
second half) is the best thing that could have
happened to us,” said M-A coach Steven
Kryger. “This was exactly what we needed. If
you can’t get up for this game, you can’t get up
for any game.”
There are always bragging rights going on in
Atherton what with Sacred Heart Prep, Menlo
School and M-A all sharing the town. So it was
not lost on the Bears that they are now 3-0
against SHP and Menlo in lacrosse.
“I think beating Prep (is better than being
undefeated in league),” said M-A’s Nick
Schlein, who scored four goals in the victory
and whose brother goes to SHP.
“It’s always fun.”
Kryger was having a much better time as he
saw his offense finally get on track. Despite
getting four goals from Schlein as well as a
goal and three assists from Duncan McGinnis,
Kryger was pleased to see the offensive output
come from several different sources.
“We don’t really dictate who goes where (in
the offense). We feel confident in all our guys,”
said Kryger, whose team had eight different
scorers. “Because our offense is scripted so it
doesn’t focus on one player, it makes it a lot
harder for defenses.
“To have eight guys score on 12 goals?
That’s unheard of.”
While M-A seems to have shaken its dol-
drums, SHP coach Joe Thompson is wonder-
ing when his players will kick theirs.
“What we’re struggling with is the execu-
tion. In the first half, they [M-A] didn’t execute
much better. But in the second half, they exe-
cuted much better and we still weren’t execut-
ing. We’re not going to win this thing without
execution,” Thompson said. “My biggest task
right now, we need to keep getting better. We
have to start turning the corner.”
It appeared the Gators were poised to do just
that in the first half. SHP scored on its first two
shots of the game — the second being a Sean
Mayle 60-yard dash from his own defensive
M-A records big win
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN FRANCISCO — For most of his out-
ing, Barry Zito had a large lead that would
make most pitchers plenty comfortable.
Zito never allows himself to think that way.
Not with all the ups and downs of his Giants
tenure.
“I think the mindset that it’s easier because
you have a lead will tie the game up quickly,”
he said.
Buster Posey drove in three runs while
NBA star Kevin Durant cheered him from the
stands, Zito pitched another gem and con-
tributed with his bat, and the San Francisco
Giants beat the Colorado Rockies 10-0 on
Wednesday to complete a three-game sweep.
Staked to a quick lead, Zito (2-0) won his
11th straight decision,
including last year’s post-
season. San Francisco
earned its 16th consecutive
victory in games he has
started, the longest such
run by a Giants pitcher
since 16 in a row by Carl
Hubbell for New York in
1936, STATS said.
“It’s hard to speak about
a stretch or a run or the past, really,” Zito said.
“Today the boys came out swinging. They
were starting to click on all cylinders offen-
sively, which was great because a lot of peo-
ple underestimate our offense. And days like
today really show what we can offer.”
Zito has thrown 14 scoreless innings so far,
the deepest the lefty has gone without giving
up a run to start a season in his 14-year career.
Posey hit an RBI triple in the first, a run-
scoring double in the second and an RBI sin-
gle in the fifth. He scored twice.
Durant and Oklahoma City Thunder team-
mate Nick Collison attended the game on the
team’s off day ahead of Thursday’s matchup
at Golden State. Durant was eager to see the
NL MVP, saying: “My man, Buster. I just like
his intensity.”
“It’s humbling,” Posey said. “You don’t
even know if they know who you are to begin
with.”
The Giants won their ninth in a row overall
Giants complete sweep of Rockies
By Julio Lara
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
If it’s been said once, it’s been said a thou-
sand times: if you have any real aspiration to
be a champion, you must first beat the cham-
pion.
So when the Carlmont High School baseball
team took the field Wednesday, the Scots knew
a big opportunity was in front of them with the
reigning Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division champion Burlingame Panthers in
the visitors dugout.
And it was an opportunity the Scots seized.
Behind a big, four-run second inning and the
gutsy pitching of Greg Hubbell, Carlmont
landed the division’s first major blow of year,
handing the Panthers their second league loss
with a 5-4 decision.
The Scots’ victory means that, at 5-0, they
now have a two-game lead on the defending
champions.
It was a game low-lighted by Burlingame’s
ability to run themselves out of innings —
three times in the latter part of the game
Burlingame had the potential tying run at third
and could not get the run home.
“Too many mistakes,” said Burlingame
manager Shawn Scott when asked about the
difference in the ball game. “Too many errors.
Base running errors. My mistake holding up
the runner (in the second). It would have given
us the fifth run and we’d still be playing base-
ball right now. And just mental breakdowns
offensively and defensively today.”
“We’re humble,” said Carlmont manager
Rich Vallero. “We know that Burlingame is a
great program and we know that we can’t give
Carlmont
beats the
Panthers
M
enlo-Atherton boys’ lacrosse
coach Steven Kryger was only
half joking when he said he and
his team had a terrible time during a road
trip to the East Coast
to face a couple of
Baltimore high
school teams during
spring break.
The two days spent
touring the capital as
well as access to the
Johns Hopkins
University lacrosse
facilities were not
enough to dull the
frustration and disap-
pointment from drop-
ping games to John
Carroll School and Gerstell Academy.
Just can’t seem to compartmentalize can
you coach?
“Absolutely (not),” Kryger said.
Like a lot of his coaching brethren,
Giants 10, Rockies 0
Barry Zito
See GIANTS, Page 13
See SCOTS, Page 14
See LAX, Page 16
Trip won’t
be marred
by losses
See LOUNGE, Page 16
SPORTS 12
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUSTIN, Texas — Disgraced cyclist Lance
Armstrong has sold his Austin estate to an oil-
and-gas rights agent.
The Austin American-
S t a t e s m a n
(ht t p: / / bi t . l y/ 14d3Ri c)
reports a deed of trust filed
with Travis County last
week showed Al Koehler
obtained a $3.1 million
loan to buy the property,
which had been
Armstrong’s home since
2004.
Although county tax rolls listed the 1.7-acre
property’s value at $3.9 million, local real
estate agents say the house was listed at $10
million. However, in an email to the
American-Statesman, Koehler says he paid
nothing close to the listed value.
Koehler is a founder of Royalty
Clearinghouse, which buys oil and gas royal-
ties and mineral rights on behalf of clients.
Armstrong spokesman Mark Higgins con-
firmed the sale and says Armstrong plans to
remain an Austin resident.
Armstong has admitted to using perform-
ance-enhancing drugs. He was stripped of his
seven Tour de France titles in August and is
banned for life from sports.
Armstrong sells his Austin estate
L:ance
Armstrong
Hillsdale routs Capuchino
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT
When Hillsdale wins, it wins big.
For the fifth time this season the Knights
scored in double-digits, as they triumphed at
home over Capuchino yesterday, 10-3.
Michael Camel and Conner Wallace fueled
the Hillsdale offense with two hits apiece.
Both are key contributions, as the tandem has
gotten off to a slow start this season. They are
the only two players of Hillsdale’s starting
nine that entered into play yesterday hitting
below .300 — a glaring discrepancy for an
offense hitting .345 as a team.
Yet Hillsdale manager Neal Donohoe has
kept anchoring his lineup with Camel and
Wallace in the No. 5 and No. 6 spots in the
batting order. And the move paid off yester-
day. The Knights scored three in the first
inning and six more in the fourth, with both
rallies fueled by Camel and Wallace.
“[Camel has] had a lot of great swings that
really haven’t shown up in the stats yet,”
Donohoe said. “Wallace was one of our best
hitters last year. … He got off to a little slow
start this year, but he’s seeming to get back to
himself lately. He’s been swinging the bat well
lately.”
Knights go large
Hillsdale (3-2 in PAL Bay, 10-7 overall) got
on the board in the first inning against Cap
starter Eddie Cecchi, with some help from the
Mustangs’ defense. With two on and two out,
Camel hit a towering fly ball to deep left. Cap
right fielder Davaughn Foster-Lorenzini drift-
ed back, but the ball kept carrying until it land-
ed on the warning track just out of his reach.
The resulting triple drove home two to get
Hillsdale on the board.
“Definitely (that’s a ball that) should be
caught,” Capuchino manager Matt Wilson
said. “He drifted to the ball. We teach guys to
run to the spot, then come in on baseballs. He
drifted to the spot and let the ball play him.”
For Camel, it was the first triple of his var-
sity career. But Hillsdale did not stop there, as
Wallace followed with a line-drive single to
right to plate Camel, giving the Knights a 3-0
lead.
Cecchi settled in through the next two
innings, setting down seven of the next eight
batters he faced. The senior right-hander went
3 1/3 innings to take the loss.
Hillsdale starter Brandon Butcher, on the
other hand, worked in and out of trouble
through the first three innings. However, the
junior right-hander escaped three Capuchino
rallies unscathed. The Mustangs advanced
four base runners into scoring position in the
first three innings, but could not push a run
across. Butcher ultimately went four shutout
innings to earn the win, upping his record to 3-
0. He currently boasts a miniscule 0.29 ERA
through 21 innings pitched.
“[Butcher] even said he didn’t feel like he
had his best stuff today,” Donohoe said. “And
that’s when you pitch, when you actually go
out there and you battle. You gut up. And
that’s when we’re really proud of kids. They
go out there and they battle when they don’t
feel a hundred percent. That was huge.”
In the fourth, Hillsdale broke it open.
Beginning with a leadoff single by Wallace,
the Knights sent 10 batters to the plate. Luis
Barrantes later scalded a two-run double to
knock Cecchi out of the game. With Cap sen-
ior Trevor Fisher on in relief, Kellen Tsuruoka
and Chandler Viera walked before Armando
Fajardo lined an RBI single to right. Tsuruoka
then scored on a wild pitch, before Camel pro-
duced a two-out, two-run single to right to
score Viera and Fajardo.
“The coach was telling us to find our pitch
and just drive it, and that’s exactly what we
did,” Camel said. “We all found our pitch to
hit to drive the ball somewhere hard and drive
runs in.”
Capuchino surrendered two walks, two wild
pitches, and two passed balls in the inning. In
the fifth, Hillsdale scratched out another run
on a bases-loaded walk to Fajardo. The senior
shortstop paces the Knights with 19 RBIs.
In the seventh, Capuchino (1-4, 7-9) got on
the board on an RBI double by Kyle Patterson
to score JeanPaul Aberouette. Pinch-hitter
Antieny Orcholsk then singled home Tony
Pellegreni, with Patterson also scoring on the
play due to an outfield error. The Mustangs
sent four pitch hitters to the plate in the inning.
“It was good for the guys that usually are on
the bench to come in and get a chance to do
something,” Wilson said. “They showed me
they want to play. And who knows? Maybe I
will have to shuffle the lineup … if these guys
have the hunger to come in and swing the bat
in big pressure situations.”
Back from injury
Camel’s resurgence in recent days has come
after a long road back from injury. On April 3,
he accounted for the only run in Hillsdale’s 3-
1 loss to El Camino, with his first home run of
the year. The day prior, in a 9-2 loss to Lowell,
he hit three fly-ball outs to the warning track.
After going 2 for 4 with four RBIs yesterday,
Camel upped his batting average to .257, and
now ranks third on the team with 11 RBIs.
As a junior last season, Camel broke his
ankle on a freak injury. The day after a big win
over Carlmont — in which he hit the first
home run of his varsity career — Camel was
taking some hacks in the batting cages at
Hillsdale.
During the swing that ended his season, he
caught a cleat on the turf, and broke his ankle
as he fell to the ground.
SPORTS 13
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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Oakland powers
past the Angels
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANAHEIM — Brandon Moss tied a career high with five
RBIs, including his second homer in two games, and the
Oakland Athletics extended their winning streak to seven
games with an 11-5 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on
Wednesday night.
Moss finished with four hits. His other five-RBI game was
on Sept. 29 against Seattle, when he hit a game-ending, three-
run homer in the 10th inning to give Oakland a 7-4 victory. It
came during a season-ending six-game winning streak that
propelled the A’s to their first AL West title since 2006.
Tommy Milone (2-0) threw 106 pitches over five innings,
allowing four runs, seven hits and three walks while striking
out five.
Joe Blanton (0-2) was charged with six runs and 10 hits in
five-plus innings and did not record a strikeout in his second
outing with his new club. The 32-year-old right-hander had
made 118 consecutive starts with at least one strikeout since
May 31, 2008, when he pitched six innings for the Athletics
without one in an 8-4 loss at Texas.
The A’s were the only major league team Blanton had never
faced. He made his first 118 career starts with them between
2005 and 2008, winning a career-high 16 games in 2007.
Moss hit a two-run triple in the third, then extended
Oakland’s lead to 5-2 in the fifth with a two-out solo homer
to right-center. It was the fourth allowed by Blanton, who
gave up three in his season debut at Cincinnati after allowing
a combined 29 home runs last season with the Phillies and
Dodgers.
Moss, who had career highs last season with 21 homers
and 52 RBIs in just 84 games, got his fourth RBI on a bases-
loaded walk during a five-run sixth. He capped his big night
with a broken-bat single in the seventh after Angels third
baseman Alberto Callaspo dropped a two-out popup by
Yoenis Cespedes, allowing Coco Crisp to advance from first
to third.
The Angels cut Oakland’s margin to 5-4 in the fifth with a
two-run single by Howie Kendrick after Milone struck out
sluggers Josh Hamilton and Mark Trumbo.
The A’s grabbed a 4-1 lead with three runs in the third after
Eric Sogard led off with a single to right and continued to
second on Hamilton’s error. John Jaso, who hit a go-ahead,
three-run homer as a pinch-hitter in Oakland’s series-opening
9-5 win on Tuesday night, singled home Sogard with the go-
ahead run and Moss’ triple delivered two more.
The Angels got a run back in the bottom half when Albert
Pujols singled, Hamilton doubled him to third and Trumbo
followed with a run-scoring groundout.
Crisp opened the game with a single, stole second and
scored on Jed Lowrie’s groundout. The Angels tied it in the
bottom half on Hamilton’s sacrifice fly, which came after a
single by Callaspo and a double by Pujols. The three-time NL
MVP hit another double in the fifth for his 1,000th extra-base
hit and finished the night 4 for 4.
This is only the second time in 22 years that the A’s have
won their first five road games. They also did it in 2008.
against Colorado. They also have beaten
the Rockies nine straight times at AT&T
Park.
Andres Torres hit a two-run single,
Joaquin Arias singled home a run in a
rare start and Marco Scutaro hit a sacri-
fice fly as the Giants went ahead 7-0.
They chased Jeff Francis (1-1) in the
second inning for the shortest start of his
career.
“I’d miss a pitch and they’d whack it.
I’d make a pitch and they’d whack it,”
Francis said.
The Giants had a season-high 16 hits a
day after getting 14.
Zito had an RBI single in the fifth. He
singled the next inning for his first career
multihit game, prompting a standing
ovation from the sellout crowd of 41,606
and chants of “Barry! Barry!” He has a
four-start hitting streak dating to the
2012 postseason.
“He’s going to have a shift soon, prob-
ably,” Posey cracked.
Zito allowed seven hits in seven
innings, struck out four and walked one.
Javier Lopez and Chad Gaudin complet-
ed the seven-hitter.
Zito was part of his second shutout
already this season, and he hasn’t lost
since Aug. 2 against the Mets.
“You can’t have more confidence out
there than what Barry has right now,”
Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “It’s
fun to watch when a pitcher’s on and hit-
ting his spots. It’s a thing of beauty. He’s
as tough a competitor as I’ve ever been
around.”
The Rockies arrived in San Francisco
riding a five-game winning streak and
left with a three-game skid. Colorado
had homered in each of its first eight
games before being shut out for the first
time in 2013.
“I was expecting to come in here and
win a series,” rookie manager Walt
Weiss said. “The Giants played well.
This one today got away from us early.
We look at it as three games of 162.”
NOTES: Giants slugger Pablo
Sandoval had the day off to give his
body a break. Sandoval missed 13 games
late in spring training with an inflamed
nerve in his right elbow. “We’re being
cautious with him,” Bochy said. ...
Hunter Pence had his seven-game hitting
streak snapped for the Giants. ... Zito
improved to 41-3 when receiving four or
more runs of support in 56 starts since
joining the Giants. He is 8-2 with a 2.47
ERA in 21 career outings vs. Colorado
— the third-lowest ERA among active
pitchers behind Cardinals RHP Chris
Carpenter (1.41) and Giants teammate
Madison Bumgarner (2.45). ... Francis’
previous shortest start was three innings,
done five times. ... Weiss rested 1B Todd
Helton for the day game after a night
game and with a lefty starter on the
mound. ... Posey’s triple was the fourth
of his career. ... Colorado CF Dexter
Fowler, who has a hit in seven of his
team’s first eight games, had his first day
off until a pinch-hit grounder in the
eighth. ... If the weather cooperates in
Chicago, RHP Ryan Vogelsong (0-1)
will start Thursday afternoon. “Pack
your heavy jackets,” the clubhouse dry-
erase board said.
Continued from page 11
GIANTS
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
NEW YORK — Major League
Baseball has created a task force that
will study how to increase diversity in
the game, especially among black play-
ers.
Commissioner Bud Selig announced
the committee Wednesday.
In less than a week, baseball will cel-
ebrate the 66th anniversary of Jackie
Robinson breaking the color barrier. A
new movie titled “42” focuses on the
Hall of Famer.
The 18-member committee includes
representatives from club ownership,
the players’ union, minor league and
college baseball, the MLB scouting
bureau and other areas. Hall of Famer
Frank Robinson and former major
league manager Jerry Manuel are
among the members.
MLB says about 8.5 percent of players
on this year’s opening day rosters identi-
fied themselves as African-American or
black. That’s around half the number
from the mid-1970s through the mid-
1990s.
“As a social institution, Major League
Baseball has an enormous social respon-
sibility to provide equal opportunities
for all people, both on and off the field,”
Selig said in a statement.
Tampa Bay Rays owner Stuart
Sternberg and Detroit Tigers president
Dave Dombrowski will help run the
committee. Southern University head
coach Roger Cador, Chicago White Sox
Executive Vice President Ken Williams,
MLB Senior Vice President of Baseball
Operations Kim Ng, union official and
former big leaguer Tony Clark and
Arizona Diamondbacks president
Derrick Hall are among the other mem-
bers.
MLB runs the Reviving Baseball in
Inner Cities (RBI) program and has
seven Urban Youth Academies that are
either running or are in development.
“I am proud of the work we have done
thus far with the RBI program and the
MLB Urban Youth Academies, but there
is more that we must accomplish,” Selig
said.
“We have seen a number of successful
efforts with existing MLB task forces,
and I believe we have selected the right
people to effectively address the many
factors associated with diversity in base-
ball,” he said.
Diversity, black players, focus of
newly formed MLB committee
SPORTS 14
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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them extra outs and that we have to pound the zone. We didn’t
give up. We just kept clawing, scraping, fighting and that’s kind
of the mentality of this team. We don’t really get too far ahead
of ourselves and we just try to compete inning by inning. It’s
not hard to get focused when you have a team coming in like
[Burlingame]. They’re the reigning PAL champs and we have a
lot of respect for them. We just want to go out and prove who
we are.”
On Wednesday, the Scots were the cleaner team. In a game
where Hubbell struggled with his command (to the tune of nine
walks), Carlmont’s ability to play solid defense behind No. 21
was the key. Burlingame, however, was not as disciplined
behind Tommy Caulfield, who was solid in a complete game
effort.
The Panthers jumped out to a 2-0 lead in the first inning
thanks to an RBI fielder’s choice by Andrew Brunicardi that
plated Phil Caulfield, and a Jian Lee single to center.
But in a sign of things to come, Burlingame made two outs on
the base path — both times on failed steal attempts.
Carlmont responded by scoring once in its half of the first on
a double by Jason Marley.
The Panthers got that run right back in the second after
Hubbell walked the bases loaded with one out. Phil Caulfield
cashed in with a single to left field to make it 4-1, but once
again, Burligame did not capitalize further thanks to a base run-
ning mistake that led to a third out at third base.
The Scots then went to work in the second, aided largely by
a pair of errors at shortstop on routine ground balls — one a
potentially inning-ending double play — and another at first
base that would have been the third out of the frame. Instead,
Carlmont scored four times on just one hit against Tommy
Caulfield and when the dust settled, the Scots were up 5-4.
“A couple of bad hops went our way but the whole thing is,
we put ourselves in that situation,” Vallero said. “With two
strikes, we gave ourselves up a bit and put the ball in play. And
when you put the ball in play, you see things happen. You take
a big, long swing with two strikes and you don’t even have the
opportunity for a bad hop. I think it’s a compliment to our guys
for understanding the game and situation.”
After a clean third and fourth, Hubbell ran into trouble in the
fifth by walking three Panther hitters. His ninth walk marked
the end of his day and in came Keaton Eichman to pitch.
Eichman got out of a first-and-third jam thanks to a failed
double steal attempt to end the inning.
“He’s a fierce competitor,” Vallero said of Hubbell. “Pressure
isn’t something that he folds to. And we don’t really get caught
up in our opponent. We just try to play the game and take
what’s give to us. Obviously, he didn’t have his good command
today and he was out there trying to put his heart on the line
trying to make his pitches and get outs. What a compliment to
our team for responding on a day when your ace has the rock
and he doesn’t have his command.”
“He did a great job,” Scott said of Tommy Caulfield’s effort
on the mound. “It’s the first thing I told them when we talked.
I’ll take that every Wednesday and nine times out of 10 we’re
going to win a ball game, so I’ll take that every time. I’m happy
with what Tommy did today.”
Aragon 7, Half Moon Bay 3
A four-run fifth inning was the difference for the Aragon
baseball team as they took down Half Moon Bay 7-3.
Aldo Severson threw six strong innings to earn the win and
the Dons won the game despite being out-hit 6-5.
Continued from page 11
SCOTS
By Nancy Armour
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
AUGUSTA, Ga. — For almost 20 years, Ernie
Els had a standing invite to the Masters.
Last year, his name wasn’t on the guest list.
This year, he’s back after a surprise victory at
the 2012 British Open gave him a get-in-free
card for the next five years.
“That’s all you can ask for at my age,” the 43-
year-old said Wednesday. “To be able to play
with the top players in the world at this level for
the next five years means the world.”
From the first time he played here, there’s been
something about Augusta National that agrees
with Els. He tied for eighth in his debut in 1994.
He’s been runner-up twice, in 2000 and 2004,
and never finished lower
than sixth in the years in
between.
He’s missed only four
cuts in the 18 times he’s
played, and failed to crack
the top 25 another four
years.
“I feel when I’m on my
game, this place is perfect
for me because it really tests
your everything,” he said. “Your mental strength,
your patience. And then, physically, you’ve got to
drive the ball, irons as well, chip and putt — all
of that stuff. You can’t fluke winning it.”
As difficult as it is to win, it’s almost as tough
to get in.
For 18 straight years, that wasn’t a problem for
Els. His major championships — he won the
1994 and ‘97 U.S. Opens as well as the 2002
British Open — earned him five-year exemp-
tions, and it was a rare year when he wasn’t in the
top 20 on the PGA Tour.
But after winning twice in 2010, his career
began a downward spiral. He was winless in
2011, and missed the cut at the U.S. Open,
British Open and PGA Championship. His only
top-10 finish was a fourth at the Frys.com Open,
a Fall Series event when most of the golf world
has already wound down for the season.
He fell to 93rd on the PGA Tour money list,
the first time he’d been out of the 50 since his
second season.
Els knew he’d have to scramble early in the
2012 season to reclaim his spot at the Masters,
and he was in the top five at the Transitions
Championship and Bay Hill. Needing a win at
the Houston Open to get to Augusta National, he
finished in a tie for 12th.
Though there was talk of giving Els a special
exemption, that’s all it was — talk.
So for the first time since 1993, he spent
Masters week at home.
“Obviously, I missed not being here,” he said.
“I had a good run in March last year and I knew
what I needed to do. I just kind of fell short. It
was fine, really. It was almost better they didn’t
invite me because I felt I could play myself back
in here. And that’s the way it should be.”
Two weeks after the Masters, Els had a 6-foot
putt to win on the first hole of a playoff with
Jason Dufner. It never had a chance, but it was a
sign that the big South African still had plenty of
game.
After missing last year, Els returns to Masters
Ernie Els
NCAA clears Tulsa in AD gambling case
TULSA, Okla. — The University of Tulsa said Wednesday
it faces no punishment from the NCAA for sports betting
violations allegedly committed by the school’s now-fired
athletic director.
Tulsa said the collegiate governing body’s investigation
into how the school handled the case involving Ross Parmley
yielded a secondary violation.
The NCAA defines secondary violations as “isolated or
inadvertent” events that “occur frequently and are usually
resolved administratively.” An NCAA spokeswoman
declined to comment on Tulsa’s secondary violation
Wednesday, instead referring questions to the school.
Tulsa said the NCAA determined that its swift firing of
Parmley and enhancement of its in-house education policies
regarding sports wagering was enough, said Don Tomkalski,
an athletic department spokesman.
Sports brief
SPORTS 15
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
@Dallas
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Detroit
4:30 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
vs. Sharks
7 p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/23
vs. Wild
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/18
vs.Columbus
5p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@Portland
7:30 p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/17
PlayoffsTBD
vs. OKC
7:30 p.m.
TNT
4/11
@Lakers
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Spurs
7:30p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/15
@Phoenix
7p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
vs. Kings
7:30 p.m
CSN-CAL
4/16
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/11
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
4/17
@Angels
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/10
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/16
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/14
vs. Astros
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/15
@Cubs
10:05a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/13
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/14
@Brewers
5:10p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/16
vs. Rockies
12:45p.m.
CSN-BAY
4/10
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/11
@Cubs
11:20a.m.
CSN-BAY
4/12
vs. Tigers
7:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/12
vs. Tigers
1:05p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/13
@Portland
7:30p.m.
NBCSPORTS
4/14
vs. Portland
8p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/21
@ChivasUSA
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
4/27
vs. Montreal
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/4
vs. Toronto
7:30p.m.
CSN-CAL
5/8
@Seattle
1p.m.
CSN-CAL
vs. Colorado
7:30p.m.
CSN-PLUS
5/18
THURSDAY
BASEBALL
El Camino at Mills,Westmoor at San Mateo,Wood-
side at Jefferson, South City at Sequoia, 4 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Terra Nova at Burlingame, Capuchino at Hillsdale,
Half Moon Bay at Carlmont, Sequoia at Aragon, 4
p.m.
BOYS’TENNIS
Riordan vs. Serra at CSM, 3 p.m.; Sacred Heart Prep
at Priory,Menlo School at Crystal Springs,3:30 p.m.;
San Mateo at Menlo-Atherton,El Camino at Wood-
side, Burlingame at Carlmont, Mills at Aragon,
Hillsdaleat Capuchino,Half MoonBayat SouthCity,
Westmoor at Sequoia, 4 p.m.
TRACKANDFIELD
Sequoia at Westmoor, Aragon at Menlo-Atherton,
Carlmont at Terra Nova, Burlingame/Woodside at
Hillsdale, Jefferson/South City at Capuchino, El
Camino/Half Moon Bay at Mills, 3 p.m.
SWIMMING
Serra at Mitty, 3 p.m.; Terra Nova at Aragon,
Burlingame at Carlmont, Mills at Sequoia, West-
moor at Jefferson, Capuchino at South City, Half
Moon Bay at El Camino, Woodside at Hillsdale, 4
p.m.
BADMINTON
Mills at Menlo-Atherton, Aragon at Westmoor,
South City at Carlmont,Sequoia at El Camino,Hills-
dale at Crystal Springs, Terra Nova at Burlingame,
San Mateo at Woodside, Jefferson at Capuchino, 4
p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE
Castilleja at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m.
BOYS’VOLLEYBALL
Eastside College Prep at Sacred Heart Prep, 6:45
p.m.
FRIDAY
BASEBALL
Menlo School at King’s Academy, Priory at Sacred
Heart Prep, Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra, Terra
Nova at Menlo-Atherton,Aragon at Half Moon Bay,
Hillsdale at Capuchino, 4 p.m.; Carlmont at
Burlingame, 7 p.m.
SOFTBALL
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont,3:30 p.m.;
Crystal Springsat ICA,El CaminoatWoodside,South
City at Jefferson, Menlo School at Alma Heights,
King’s Academy at Mercy-Burlingame, 4 p.m.
BOYS’ TENNIS
Sacred Heart Prep at Cupertino, 3:30 p.m.
BASEBALL
Carlmont 5, Burlingame4
Burlingame2200000— 452
Carlmont 140000x— 571
WP— Hubbell (2-0,4-1).S— McClain(2).LP— T.
Caulfield. 2B — Marley (C). Multiple hits — P.
Caulfield 2 (B);Haake 2,Albaum 2,Marley 2 (C).Mul-
tiple RBIs — Albaum 2, Marley 2 (C). Records —
Carlmont 5-0 PAL Bay, 14-2 overall; Burlingame 3-
2.
Aragon7, Half MoonBay3
Aragon2100410— 750
Half MoonBay1200000— 361
WP — Severson. S — Cheng. LP — Howell. 2B —
Berghammer (HMB). Multiple hits — Cheng 2 (A);
Berghammer 2 (HMB). Multiple RBIs — none.
Records — Aragon 2-3 PAL Bay, 9-6 overall.
BOYS’TENNIS
MenloSchool 7, Priory0
SINGLES — Pham (MS) d. Cambell 6-0, 6-0; A. Ball
(MS) d.Surber 6-0,6-0; D.Ball (MS) d.Christensen 6-
0, 6-0; Chari (MS) d. Ragavan 6-0, 6-0. DOUBLES —
Boyd-Miller (MS) d.Senmeg-Houtan6-0,6-2;Matta-
Safran (MS) d. Kootz-Rappaport 6-0, 6-0;
Morgan-Lam (MS) d. Smith-Lutz 6-1, 6-1. Records
— Menlo School 9-0 WBAL, 16-1 overall.
TUESDAY
BOYS’ BASEBALL
SacredHeart Prep11, Pinewood0
SacredHeart Prep3800000—1182
Pinewood0000000— 053
WP — VauDell (1-0, 3-1). LP — Bell. HR — March
2 (SHP). 2B — Nahmens (SHP); Lewis (P). Multiple
hits — March 3,Covell 3 (SHP);Lewis 2 (P).Multiple
RBIs — March 5, Gritsch 2 (SHP). Records — Sa-
cred Heart Prep 1-0 WBAL, 9-7 overall; Pinewood
0-1, 5-4.
BOYS’TENNIS
SacredHeart Prep6, Pinewood1
SINGLES — Owen (P) d. Foster 6-2, 7-6(4); Boggs
(SHP) d. Kurkve 6-4, 6-0;Walecka (SHP) d. Endersby
6-3,2-6,(10-5); Sarwal (SHP) d.Brown 6-0,6-1.DOU-
BLES— Matterman-Duane(SHP) d.Snellgrove-Yal
6-0,7-5; MacWilliams-Harrison (SHP) d.Kung-Shi 6-
3, 6-2;Thomson-Cho (SHP) d. Kuo-Wallace 7-5, 6-0.
BOYS’ GOLF
SacredHeart Prep194, Crystal Springs 236
At BurlingameC.C., par 36
SHP — Knox 37; Oliver, Keller 38; Ackerman 39;
Lamb 42; Barnum 52.
CS — Jaymes 39; Madding 40; Schulz 49; Park 52;
Lego 56; Rothbard 58.
Records — Sacred Heart Prep 5-1 WBAL, 7-1 over-
all.
BOYS’VOLLEYBALL
Cupertinodef.SacredHeartPrep25-16, 25-11,
25-20 (Highlights: SHP — Bennett 11 kills, 25 as-
sists;Hao 25 assists).Records — Sacred Heart Prep
1-5, 3-9.
WHAT’S ON TAP
East Division
W L Pct GB
Boston 5 3 .625 —
Baltimore 4 4 .500 1
New York 4 4 .500 1
Tampa Bay 4 5 .444 1 1/2
Toronto 3 5 .375 2
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Kansas City 6 3 .667 —
Chicago 4 4 .500 1 1/2
Detroit 4 4 .500 1 1/2
Minnesota 4 5 .444 2
Cleveland 3 5 .375 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Oakland 7 2 .778 —
Texas 6 3 .667 1
Seattle 4 5 .444 3
Houston 2 6 .250 4 1/2
Los Angeles 2 6 .250 4 1/2
Wednesday’sGames
Toronto 8, Detroit 6
Tampa Bay 2,Texas 0
Washington 5, Chicago White Sox 2
N.Y.Yankees at Cleveland, ppd., rain
Baltimore 8, Boston 5
Kansas City 3, Minnesota 0
Oakland 11, L.A. Angels 5
Houston at Seattle, late
Thursday’sGames
Toronto(Jo.Johnson0-0) at Detroit (Fister 1-0),10:05
a.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-0) at Washington
(Haren 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 0-1) at Cleveland (McAllis-
ter 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
Baltimore (Tillman 0-0) at Boston (Aceves 0-0),4:10
p.m.
Oakland (Griffin 1-0) at L.A.Angels (Vargas 0-0),7:05
p.m.
Texas (Grimm 0-0) at Seattle (F.Hernandez 1-1),7:10
p.m.
Friday’sGames
Baltimore at N.Y.Yankees, 4:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox at Cleveland, 4:05 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Toronto at Kansas City, 5:10 p.m.
Detroit at Oakland, 7:05 p.m.
Houston at L.A. Angels, 7:05 p.m.
Texas at Seattle, 7:10 p.m.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct GB
Atlanta 8 1 .889 —
Washington 6 2 .750 1 1/2
New York 5 4 .556 3
Philadelphia 4 5 .444 4
Miami 1 8 .111 7
Central Division
W L Pct GB
Cincinnati 5 4 .556 —
St. Louis 5 4 .556 —
Chicago 3 5 .375 1 1/2
Pittsburgh 3 6 .333 2
Milwaukee 2 6 .250 2 1/2
West Division
W L Pct GB
Arizona 6 3 .667 —
San Francisco 6 3 .667 —
Los Angeles 5 3 .625 1/2
Colorado 5 4 .556 1
San Diego 2 6 .250 3 1/2
———
Wednesday’s Games
St. Louis 10, Cincinnati 0
Arizona 10, Pittsburgh 2
San Francisco 10, Colorado 0
Washington 5, Chicago White Sox 2
Philadelphia 7, N.Y. Mets 3
Atlanta 8, Miami 0
Milwaukee at Chicago, ppd., rain
L.A. Dodgers 4, San Diego 3
Thursday’s Games
San Francisco (Vogelsong 0-1) at Chicago Cubs
(Feldman 0-1), 11:20 a.m.
Chicago White Sox (Axelrod 0-0) at Washington
(Haren 0-1), 4:05 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 1-0) at San Diego (Marquis
0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Friday’s Games
San Francisco at Chicago Cubs, 11:20 a.m.
Atlanta at Washington, 4:05 p.m.
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at Miami, 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets at Minnesota, 5:10 p.m.
Milwaukee at St. Louis, 5:15 p.m.
L.A. Dodgers at Arizona, 6:40 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 7:10 p.m.
NATIONAL LEAGUE LOCAL SCOREBOARD
16
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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end before burying his shot at the opposite
end.
M-A, however, responded both times. Trent
Benedick was filling the lane and took a feed
from Drew Uphoff before finding the back of
the net and Duncan McGinnis tied the game
off an assist from Kihira Kotaro.
But back-to-back goals from Noah
Kawasaki and Andrew Daschbach gave SHP a
4-2 lead after the first quarter.
The two teams traded goals for much of the
second period, with the Gators maintaining
their two-goal lead much of the time.
But two M-A goals less than a minute apart
pulled the Bears even. The most impressive
was M-A defenseman Nicholas Mullen’s, who
scooped up a loose ball deep in the Bears’
defensive end and then lumbered into the
attack. He was met by a SHP defender about
25 yards from goal, but Mullen simply
bounced off him. He spun past the dazed
defender, stumbled as he entered the crease,
but held it together long enough to fire a shot
past the Gators’ goaltender.
SHP appeared to take some of the momen-
tum back when Mayle scored his third goal of
the half with 22 seconds remaining until half-
time.
In the third quarter, M-A outscored the
Gators 4-1 to take control of the match. Uphoff
tied the match at 7 moments after the second-
half faceoff. Uphoff controlled the faceoff and
ran right at the SHP defense. His initial shot
was blocked, but he stuck with the play, forced
a turnover and then deposited the ball in the
back of the net. Schlein’s goal at 8:18 gave the
Bears an 8-7 lead, but SHP came back to tie it
on a Kawasaki strike.
M-A, however, took the lead for good and
then extended it going into final 12 minutes
with a pair of goals from Jordan Zuk.
The Bears extended their lead to three, 11-8,
scoring the first goal of the final period. SHP
got a goal back, but Schlein’s fourth strike of
the match with 5:41 left gave the Bears some
breathing room, 12-9. The Gators scored in the
final minute, but the Bears then ran out the
clock.
“The big difference was, we fought harder
than we have in the last three weeks,” Kryger
said.
Continued from page 11
LAX
Kryger based the trip on the results on the
game. In the end, however, Kryger knows the
trip was about more than just lacrosse.
“We did it for a lot of reasons,” Kryger
said. “(It was) a once in a lifetime experi-
ence.”
The memories of the scores from those
games — a 10-5 loss to John Carroll School
and a 8-4 defeat at the hands of Gerstell
Academy — will eventually fade. What will
remain is the time the Bears were let loose in
our nation’s capital. Kryger said about 40
members of the Bears lacrosse program —
players, coaches and chaperones — flew out
on a red-eye Tuesday night and arrived in
Washington, D.C., Wednesday morning.
They were given a private tour of the capital
and then had the opportunity to throw the
ball around on the National Mall in
Washington, D.C. Surrounded by the
Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial
and the Potomac River, the Bears had per-
mission to hold a light practice.
“It’s just a big, open polo field,” Kryger
said. “There was a cop who came by (to
check on us) and we had our permit with us.”
Day 2 was spent at Johns Hopkins
University where M-A got to hold a full, for-
mal practice at the school’s lacrosse facili-
ties. Johns Hopkins is a NCAA Division I
lacrosse power and Kryger had to be hoping
some of the program’s ambiance would rub
off on his Bears. Kryger said his team was
given a tour of the university’s facilities, the
lacrosse hall of fame and then spent time
with the Blue Jays’ coach, one of their play-
ers and the school’s athletic director.
The third day was time to get down to
business with matches. Kryger said John
Carroll School and Gerstell Academy were
not the cream of the East Coast crop, but
they were pretty darn good. He compared
them to some of the top teams in the Bay
Area.
“Bellarmine is the best team we’ve faced.
Then Monte Vista-Danville, then Sacred
Heart and then the East Coast schools,”
Kryger said.
In other words, teams the Bears were capa-
ble of beating them — but didn’t — leaving
Kryger frustrated with the results.
“I don’t know if we felt we belong (on the
field with them),” Kryger said. “We were at
our ‘C’ game.”
Kryger said the East Coast players were no
more skilled with the stick than his Bears,
they just had a better sense of the game than
their West Coast counterparts, something he
attributes to the game being ingrained on the
East Coast.
“I think the biggest difference between us
and those two (Baltimore) teams is, they
were in the right spot every single time,”
Kryger said. “We just could not get out of
our own way.”
This is the second long road trip the Bears
have taken the last two years. Last year, they
went to Southern California for some relax-
ation and competition. He approached the
teams’ parents last summer to set up the
Baltimore trip. Kryger said he plans to go on
these type of trips every other year.
Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:
nathan@smdailyjournal.com or by phone: 344-
5200 ext. 117. He can also be followed on Twitter
@CheckkThissOutt.
Continued from page 11
LOUNGE
SUBURBAN LIVING 17
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Amy Lorentzen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your dishwasher, sink drain and garbage
disposal do the major dirty work in your
kitchen, and you can keep them smelling
fresh and running efficiently with a few easy
steps.
If there are spots or stuck-on grime on the
dishes when they come out of the washer, or
if the sink has an unpleasant odor even after
you clean it and run the disposal, it means
these hard-working appliances may need
extra attention.
“Dishwashers and drains battle kitchen
waste and activity daily, which can take a toll
on the appearance and performance if not
cleaned correctly,” said Chris Salatino with
Kenmore Major Appliances.
DISHWASHERS
Electric dishwashers have a filtration sys-
tem that requires regular cleaning, especially
if you don’t scrape or pre-rinse dishes.
“The maintenance on a dishwasher depends
on how you treat it,” says John DeSilvia, host
of DIY Network’s “Rescue My Renovation.”
If you’re not a pre-rinser, he recommends
cleaning the filter once a month. Just look at
the bottom of your dishwasher, find and
remove your filter, then scrub away debris
with a soft brush. Rinse and reinstall.
“Don’t be scared, it’s really easy,” says
DeSilvia.
If in doubt, check your owner’s manual on
how to find and remove the filter. Can’t find
the instructions? Log on to your manufactur-
er’s website. Or online tutorials at sites such
as DIYNetwork.com and YouTube.com can
help you through the process.
The interior of your dishwasher may also
appear filmy at times. To get rid of that
buildup, Salatino advises waiting until the
washer has finished a cycle and cooled. Then
make a paste with powdered detergent or use
liquid detergent on a damp sponge to wipe
away mineral deposits. Follow up by running
a normal cycle.
If you’re in a hard water area and wiping
with detergent doesn’t remove all the film, run
Tips for making a dishwasher, drain work better
If you’re not a pre-rinser, it’s recommend that you clean your dishwasher filter once a month.
Just look at the bottom of your dishwasher,find and remove your filter,then scrub away debris
with a soft brush. Rinse and reinstall. See TIPS, Page 18
18
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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a normal cycle with two cups of white vinegar
in an upright glass on the lower rack. Salatino
advises turning off the “heated dry” option
during the cycle.
There also are commercial cleaners market-
ed especially for mineral buildup in dishwash-
ers.
Consumer Reports recommends replacing
worn or rusted dish racks, and using care
when loading dishes and silverware so you
don’t damage spray arms. Inspect the arms to
make sure they aren’t clogged with debris,
which could affect water pressure. Use pipe
cleaners to dislodge blockages.
For cleaning the outside of your dishwasher,
Salatino says all you need is a soft, damp cloth
or sponge and mild detergent. If you’ve got a
stainless steel cover, you’ll need a special
cleanser.
SUPER SUDS
Phosphates, which help control water hard-
ness, were eliminated from dishwater deter-
gents a few years ago over pollution concerns.
Since then, some consumers have complained
that dishes don’t seem as clean.
Lucinda Ottusch, with Whirlpool’s Institute
of Kitchen Science, says one mistake people
make is buying cheap detergent. She says the
all-in-one packets by name-brand companies
really do help your dishwasher perform best.
She also recommends a rinse aid, which
promotes drying by allowing the water to
sheet off dishes.
Loading your dishwasher properly also can
aid cleaning. Find tips at http://www.institute-
ofkitchenscience.com/kitchen-101/dishwash-
ers
And, you don’t have to wait until the dish-
washer is full to run a cycle. Ottusch says
many newer models sense the size of a load
and how dirty the dishes are, and work accord-
ingly.
“Running the dishwasher takes very little
water and energy, and waiting until it is
packed full of dishes can compromise clean-
ing performance,” she says.
DIRTY DRAINING
If you’ve got a smelly drain, there’s proba-
bly bacteria growing in it.
To eliminate the problem, start by mixing a
cup of baking soda and a cup of vinegar. Pour
the mixture down the drain, let it sit for 15
minutes or more, then run the disposal and
rinse with hot water.
To clean disposal blades, freeze white vine-
gar in ice cube trays and let the disposal grind
away at them. The ice will help dislodge
stuck-on debris, and the vinegar freshens the
unit.
If there’s still an odor, try pouring in half a
cup of bleach, but not if you have a septic sys-
tem. You may need to go buy a live enzyme
product that eats away bacteria, or a corrosive
cleaner meant to unclog drains.
If your sink’s drain plug has moldy buildup,
soak it in a vinegar or bleach solution, then
wipe away any remaining grime. If mold
builds up again quickly, replace the plug.
Home improvement stores should offer styles
that fit your sink, and some even stock scent-
ed versions.
If unpleasant odors continue, consider
whether you might have a backed-up disposal
or clogged plumbing.
THE GRIND
The crunching and gnashing of your dispos-
al may make you leery of touching it, but there
are ways you can keep it running well without
calling a professional.
DeSilvia says to always run cold water
before, during and after using the disposal.
“Never use hot water with your garbage dis-
posal,” he says. “It breaks down food, causing
it to liquify and accumulate around your
pipes.”
It’s best to scrape large pieces of food into
the trash can, then let the disposal take care of
smaller scraps. Don’t put potato peels, shell-
fish, coffee grounds or other fibrous foods into
the disposal. They’re clog-makers.
DeSilvia reminds homeowners never to put
their hand in the disposal. If it won’t grind, use
the reset button, usually a black or red button
on the bottom of the unit. Make sure the out-
let the disposal is plugged into is working.
Continued from page 17
TIPS
of building a dialogue on the budget and other
topics.
After four years of trillion-dollar-plus deficits
in his first term, Obama’s plan projects a $973
billion deficit for the current budget year and red
ink of $744 billion for the 2014 fiscal year start-
ing in October. By 2016, the deficit is seen as
dropping below 3 percent of the size of the
economy, a level that many economists say is
manageable.
Obama cast his budget as a compromise offer
that would bridge differences between
Republicans and their desire for reducing gov-
ernment spending and Democrats who want
more revenue from taxpayers. But it’s difficult
to overstate the gulf between Obama and the
conservatives who are in the GOP driver’s seat
in Congress.
While the budget proposal will not prompt
any immediate congressional action, it will
probably surface this summer when
Republicans are expected to demand additional
reductions in the deficit in exchange for increas-
ing the nation’s borrowing authority.
Obama claims $1.8 trillion in deficit savings
over the coming decade, but the budget tables
show the savings are actually $1.4 trillion. And
$1.2 trillion of that is devoted to reversing auto-
matic, across-the-board spending cuts required
because of Washington’s inability to follow up a
2011 budget pact with further deficit action.
“This is worse than a status quo budget,” said
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan,
R-Wis. He said it has about $1 trillion in new
taxes, $1 trillion in new spending with deficit
reduction of only $119 billion over 10 years
under GOP math that sorts through questionable
interpretations employed by the White House.
For instance, Obama claims $167 billion in
lower war costs — money the administration
never intended to spend — and uses that “sav-
ings” for road projects and other undertakings it
bills as jobs initiatives.
The real cuts include $400 billion scrubbed
from health care programs like Medicare over
the coming decade, including cuts in payments
to drug companies and higher Medicare premi-
ums for people who are better off.
The administration would modestly cut the
annual operating budgets for both the Pentagon
and domestic agencies while reprising ideas like
higher Transportation Security Administration
fees on airline tickets, the end of Saturday mail
delivery and higher pension contributions for
federal workers.
“He does deserve some credit for some incre-
mental entitlement reforms,” said Boehner, R-
Ohio. “But I would hope that he would not hold
hostage these modest reforms for his demand
for bigger tax hikes. Listen, why don’t we do
what we can agree to do?”
That’s not the way it works, countered Gene
Sperling, the director of Obama’s National
Economic Council. “The offer that is there for
Speaker Boehner is not an a la carte menu.”
And Rep. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., said he
had reservations about the White House making
concessions without getting anything in return.
He said, “The president will have to remain firm
in his insistence that this is a package deal.”
The White House budget claims $580 billion
in tax increases on the wealthy over 10 years,
including a 28 percent cap on itemized deduc-
tions that’s never gotten anywhere on Capitol
Hill.
The total climbs closer to $1 trillion in tax
increases after adding in ideas like a 94 cents-
per-pack increase in taxes on cigarettes, changes
for corporate foreign earnings, slower inflation
adjustments to income tax brackets, elimination
of oil and gas production subsidies, an increase
in the estate tax, a new “financial crisis respon-
sibility” fee on banks and new taxes on trading
of exotic financial instruments known as deriva-
tives.
Republicans predictably slammed Obama’s
plan for its tax increases, while his Democratic
allies generally held their tongues over cuts to
Social Security benefits.
“It’s not the budget I would write on my own,
and it includes several policies that I don’t think
are the best ways to tackle the deficit and debt,”
said Senate Budget Committee Chairman Patty
Murray, D-Wash.
Reacting more strongly, the senior citizens
advocacy group AARP said it was “deeply dis-
mayed that President Obama would propose
cutting the benefits of current and future Social
Security recipients, including children, widows,
veterans and people with disabilities, to reduce
the deficit.” And AFL-CIO President Richard
Trumka, whose organization spent tens of mil-
lions of dollars helping re-elect Obama, called
the cuts “wrong and indefensible.”
The Social Security cuts would come from a
slightly stingier inflation adjustment known as
“chained CPI” that would reduce annual cost-
of-living increases for a variety of programs by
about 0.3 percentage points a year. It would
reduce federal spending on government pro-
grams over 10 years by $130 billion and prom-
ises to save far more in subsequent decades.
Once the change was fully phased in, Social
Security benefits for a typical middle-income
65-year-old would be about $136 less a year,
according to an analysis of Social Security data.
At age 75, annual benefits under the new index
would be $560 less. But after age 75, Social
Security recipients would receive larger-than-
scheduled benefit increases by 0.5 percentage
points a year through age 85.
Obama promises to ease the burden of the
proposal on the poor and the very elderly by not
applying it to programs meant for low-income
Americans. That means annual increases in
assistance programs such as Social Security
Supplemental Security Income and Pell Grants
for student aid would not be calculated by using
the lower inflation formula.
Continued from page 1
BUDGET
SUBURBAN LIVING 19
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
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By Sean Conway
TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES
If April showers bring May flowers, what
do April flurries bring?
Luckily, the same thing: flowers. Plus a lit-
tle extra time to finish garden tasks while your
plants are dormant.
Spring’s chilly start has almost everyone I
know grumbling. Many plants in my garden
seem just as disgruntled. Most of my perenni-
als are only now beginning to wake up, sever-
al weeks later than normal. I have a feeling
that when the weather breaks, there will be an
explosion of growth.
Not every plant gets the doldrums from an
extended winter. Most spring bulbs don’t the
below-average temperatures. Mine popped up
out of the ground right on time and have stuck
around much longer than usual.
Some of my earlier bulbs to bloom were
naturalized patches of a species of wild crocus
called C. tommasinianus. This diminutive
bulb with pale purple flowers is much smaller
in stature and much less showy than its larger
hybrid cousins, but it has the advantage of
being very prolific. It will self-sow readily
when conditions are right, and within a few
years it will produce swaths of early spring
flowers.
The show is beautiful but all too brief, last-
ing just long enough for the flowers to
become pollinated. After the flowers fade, the
plant’s grassy green foliage will remain in
place until the heat of early summer sends the
bulbs back into dormancy until the following
spring.
Appearing right alongside the crocus are
patches of Galanthus nivalis. True to their
common name, my snowdrops begin pushing
up through the snow in our front garden long
before the rest of my spring bulbs begin to
appear. Once the snow recedes, they explode
into bloom in a matter of days.
In cool springs like this one, snowdrops will
remain in bloom for a very long time. In fact,
they relish the cold. Snowdrops are very
tough plants and, like Crocus tommasinianus,
steadily increase their numbers every year
when planted in average garden soil and plen-
ty of sun.
Over time large clumps will form. The
clumps are easily divided and can either be
relocated to other parts of the garden or given
away to friends. I divide and move clumps
while they are in bloom with no adverse
affects.
There are advantages to a late breaking
spring. Cool temperatures help keep many
plants dormant and provide the perfect oppor-
tunity for transplanting.
Each spring, while temperatures are still
cool and there is adequate moisture in the soil,
I reassess my garden and decide whether any
plants need to be relocated to other areas.
Plants that have grown too close, or that are
not receiving adequate amounts of light (or,
for that matter, too much light) are dug up and
moved to more appropriate parts of the gar-
den. Sometimes I just change my mind about
which plants should be neighbors based on
color, bloom time, leaf texture or size.
Most plants are very forgiving about being
relocated, providing they are moved while
they are still dormant and, equally important,
provided they are moved with an adequately
sized root ball for the size of the plant.
Over the years I have relocated everything
from trees to diminutive rock garden plants in
my garden. The key to successful transplanti-
ng is timing. In general most plants prefer to
be moved after winter is over and before their
spring growth begins.
Even large trees can be relocated. Some
trees move easily, while others take some
planning. Professionals who know how to
prepare the correct sized root ball should dig
and move large specimens.
If winter isn’t ready to loosen its grip in
your area just yet, don’t despair. Take advan-
tage of the cool temperatures to get your gar-
den in order.
A cooler spring has its advantages for gardens
Snowdrops are one flower that benefit from extended cold in early spring.
DATEBOOK 20
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
THURSDAY, APRIL11
Free Workshop — Weigh less, live
more. Noon. 981 Industrial Road, Suite
C, San Carlos. There will be a lecture
on weight loss problems in America,
why diets don’t work, healthy recipes,
quick tips and more.There will be also
be snacks. Free. For more information
call 224-7021.
Student debt. Noon. San Mateo
County Law Library, 710 Hamilton St.,
Redwood City. Attorney Jonathan
Larsen will discuss ways to deal with
student debt, including what legal
steps may be taken to reduce or
eliminate the debt all together. For
more information call 363-4913.
Film Noir Movie Series: Sunset
Boulevard. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. City of San
Mateo Senior Center, 2645 Alameda
de las Pulgas, San Mateo. Free. For
more information call 522-7490.
Music and dance of Bali: CSM Dance
Department Fundraiser. 7 p.m.
College of San Mateo Theater,
Building 3, 1700 W. Hillsdale Blvd., San
Mateo.The event will feature Gamelan
Anak Swarasanti from Santa Cruz and
a documentary by Sasha Friedlander.
Suggested donation of $10. $5 for
students. For more information go to
smccd.edu.
Scholarships, Fellowships and
Loans Search. 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. San
Bruno Public Library, Children’s Room,
701 W. Angus Ave., San Bruno. Free.
Learn how to search and quickly
locate scholarships, fellowships and
student loans at all levels of study,
using the Gale’s Scholarships,
Fellowships and Loans online
database. The class is ideal for
students, parents and education
professionals. For more information
call 616-7078.
FRIDAY, APRIL 12
Passenger Arrival and
Naturalization Workshop. 9 a.m. to 1
p.m. The National Archives at San
Francisco, 1000 Commodore Drive,
San Bruno. Genealogical workshop on
how to locate passenger arrival and
naturalization records. $15 payable in
advance. For more information or to
reserve a space call 238-3488.
Variety Show with Emcee Raoul
Epling & a Baked Lunch. 10:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m.The San Bruno Senior Center,
1555 Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Tickets available. For more
information call 616-7150.
Reservation Deadline for Meet the
Artists Evening Reception at Filoli.
4 p.m. Filoli, 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Free. Reservations are
required for this event, which will take
place on April 18 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
For more information call 364-8300.
Tennis Clinics for Juniors and
Adults. 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Highlands Park, 2600 Melendy Drive,
San Carlos. Free.The clinic takes place
every Monday and Friday in April.You
must call 752-8061 to reserve a spot in
the clinic. For more information
contact
adminsupervisor@kimgrattennis.com.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Sign up for a
20 minute appointment with a
member of the San Mateo County
Library Association. Lawyers’ speciality
will be small claims and civil litigation.
For more information email
figard@smcl.org.
Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. 7:30
p.m. Notre Dame de Namur University,
NDNU Theatre, 1500 Ralston Ave.,
Belmont. $10. For more information
or for tickets call 508-3456.
‘Opera Rocks!’ 7:30 p.m. Taube
Center, Notre Dame de Namur
University, 1500 Ralston Ave., Belmont.
The Department of Music and Vocal
Arts at Notre Dame de Namur
University invites you to explore the
unique world of ‘Opera Rocks!’ Draws
from 400-year tradition of operatic
repertoire and mixes up familiar
stories with their contemporary
musical theatre counterparts. General
admission $10. Tickets can be
purchased online at
brownpapertickets.com.
Broadway By the Bay Presents
‘Cats.’ 8 p.m. Fox Theatre, 2215
Broadway, Redwood City. Starting
ticket price $35. Tickets will be
available for purchase at the Fox
Theatre Box Office, 2219 Broadway St.,
Redwood City. Tickets may also be
ordered by phone at 369-7770. For
more information go to
www.broadwaybythebay.org.
Diablo Ballet performs at Hillbarn
Theatre. 8 p.m. Hillbarn Theatre, 1285
E. Hillsdale Blvd., Foster City. Diablo
Ballet presents classical and
contemporary dance works including
the Web Ballet, the world’s first ballet
created online. For more information
call 349-6411 or go to
www.hillbarntheatre.org.
SATURDAY, APRIL 13
Foster City Multi-Family Garage
Sale. 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 299 Beach Park
Blvd., Foster City. Bowditch Middle
School students will be holding the
sale to fund their trip this summer to
the nation’s capital. For more
information call 468-6483.
2013 Tomato and Pepper Sale
Hosted by the UCCE Master
Gardeners of San Mateo and San
Francisco counties. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Redwood High School, 1968 Old
County Road, Redwood City.There will
be more than 35 varieties of tomatoes
and more than 15 varieties of
peppers, herbs and more. For more
information go to
http://ucanr.org/sites/MGsSMSF/Spec
ial_events/Tomato_sale/.
Skills Development and
Application Class. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30
p.m. Skyline College, 3300 College
Drive, San Bruno. Free. Please wear
comfortable shoes and clothing. For
more information call 616-7096.
Non-violent Parade for Peace and
Justice. 10 a.m. Our Lady of the Pillar
Catholic Church, 400 Church St., Half
Moon Bay. Pablo Paredes, immigration
reformer, peace activist and Oakland-
based youth organizer, will give the
keynote speech. The event will begin
at Our Lady of the Pillar Catholic
Church and the parade will continue
down Main Street, cross Cabrillo
Highway and to the Coastside
Lutheran Church for a tamale lunch.
Registration is $40. For more
information go to www.kacw.org.
Author Patricia Schultz. 10 a.m. to
noon. 1501 Trousdale Drive,
Burlingame. $35. This special event
features author Patricia Schultz, who
wrote ‘1000 Places to See Before You
Die.’ For more information contact
www.braunercompany.com.
Buckeye and Owl Canyon Hike.10
a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 44 Visitacion Ave.,
Suite 206, Brisbane. Free. Dress for
varied weather and wear long pants.
For more information contact
sanbruno@mountainwatch.org.
City of San Carlos’ Second Annual
Volunteer Expo. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. San
Carlos Adult Community Center, 601
Chestnut St., San Carlos. More than 30
local nonprofit organizations will be
present to showcase volunteer
opportunities within the community.
All ages welcome. Free. For more
information call 802-4218.
Book Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Encore
Books on the Square, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Half off sale. All sales
benefit the programs of the San
Mateo County History Museum. For
more information call 299-0104 ext.
234.
FML Outdoor Bargain Book/Media
Sale. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Millbrae Library,
1 Library Ave., Millbrae. All adult books
will be 50 cents and children’s books
will be 25 cents (including foreign
language books and media). Bag of
Books will be $5 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information call 697-7607.
An Evening with Deborah Tannen.
Noon to 2 p.m. UU Fellowship of
Redwood City, 2124 Brewster Ave.,
Redwood City. $20. All proceeds go
toward CORA (Community
Overcoming Relationship Abuse.) For
more information call 367-9183.
Affordable Books at the Book
Nook. Noon to 4 p.m. 1 Cottage Lane,
Twin Pines Park, Belmont. $1
paperbacks, $2 and up hardbacks and
25 cents for children’s books. All
proceeds benefit the Belmont Library.
For more information call 593-5650.
There Was Something About
Agnes. 1 p.m. 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City.The lecture is free with
admission to the museum, $5 for
adults and $3 for seniors and
students. Joanne Garrison will present
a talk about the life of Agnes Poett.
For more information call 299-0104.
Seabird and SongbirdWorkshop. 1
p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Sea Crest School, 901
Arnold Way, Half Moon Bay. Presenter
Alvaro Jaramillo will lead workshop
suitable for the beginner and
advanced birder. Light refreshments
served. Suggested donation of $15 for
adults, $5 for seniors, kids and
students free. Bird walk from 3 p.m. to
5 p.m. See below for more
information. For more information go
to http://coastsidelandtrust.org.
Assistance League of San Mateo
County Celebrates Its 60th
Anniversary. 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Assistance League Chapter
Headquarters, 528 N. San Mateo Drive,
San Mateo. Honoring Mr. Les Williams,
Tuskegee Airman, Congressional Gold
Medal recipient, former Dance Studio
owner and instructor and
distinguished resident of San Mateo
County. Building Plaque Unveiling to
celebrate the historical significance
of the site as the former dance studio
Mr. Williams owned and operated for
22 years. Book signing of ‘Victory:Tales
of a Tuskegee Airman’ following
comments by Mr. Williams. Public
invited to attend. For more
information go to
sanmateocoutny.assistanceleague.or
g.
Calendar
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.
San Carlos Elementary School District
Board of Trustees will discuss the peti-
tion. Officials in the Redwood City
Elementary School District will discuss
the petition later this month.
Moving forward, both districts will be
given the opportunity to weigh in on the
petition.
Public hearings will be held in both
districts next month, said Nancy Magee,
county Office of Education spokes-
woman. Each school district will also
have the opportunity to object. If no one
objects, the San Mateo County
Committee on School District
Organization can make a decision. The
committee will weigh in on the merits of
the petition either way, said Magee. An
objection, on the other hand, could spark
a vote by property owners.
“When the seven houses at 60-90
Loma Road were made part of the
Redwood City School District, they
were connected via Loma Road. Then a
few decades ago, a landslide divided
Loma Road in half, and cut off access
for 60-90 Loma Road to the Redwood
City schools. Since then there has only
been one way in and out, through the
San Carlos neighborhood that is part of
the San Carlos District,” according to the
petition submitted by Loma Road home
owners Jeffrey Brown and Robert
Meyer.
A fence now blocks the unpaved por-
tion of the road wiped out during the
landslide. The petition goes on to say 80
and 90 Loma Road have since been
annexed to the city of San Carlos and
several city services are provided to the
area by San Carlos. It also claims that
children in the homes have historically
attended San Carlos schools. Of those
living in the area, one has a child cur-
rently enrolled at Heather Elementary
School and three other children are in
preschool, according to the petition.
In recent years, a number of boundary
requests have been made in the county.
In 2011, Mark Bendick submitted a
neighborhood petition to change the
school assignments for the homes on
Fairmont Drive. At the time, students
were zoned to attend Belmont-Redwood
Shores Elementary and Sequoia Union
High school districts. Under the propos-
al, students would instead attend the San
Mateo-Foster City Elementary and San
Mateo Union High school districts. In
October, the San Mateo County
Committee on School District
Organization gave a preliminary OK to
the plans but only one of the four dis-
tricts involved supported the plan. As
such, a special election was held in May
2012 among the 77 voters who ultimate-
ly decided to allow the property transfer.
An ongoing boundary battle remains
between the South San Francisco
Unified and San Bruno Park School dis-
tricts. In August, 58 families living in 70
homes on a nine-acre parcel once used
for a San Bruno elementary schools —
now known as the Merimont subdivision
— submitted a petition requesting the
boundaries be changed from the South
San Francisco Unified School District.
Along with the fact that the land previ-
ously housed a school in the San Bruno
Park Elementary School District, the
petitioners also note most of the neigh-
borhood children attend school in San
Bruno. As such, they would like to con-
tinue with friends through high school
into the San Mateo Union High School
District, according to the petition. The
issue is still working its way through the
process.
The board meets 7 p.m. Thursday,
April 11 at the Central Middle School
library, 828 Chestnut St.
Continued from page 1
CHANGE
the Bay is staging an exuberant produc-
tion.
The show is based on “Old Possum’s
Book of Practical Cats,” a series of
whimsical poems by T.S. Eliot. All of
the characters are cats, each a distinct
individual introduced through songs by
Andrew Lloyd Webber.
The best-known song is “Memory,”
poignantly sung by Heather Orth as
Grizabella, a once-glamorous cat now
long past her prime and shunned by the
other cats.
The biggest crowd-pleasers are
“Jellicle Songs for Jellicle Cat” and
“The Song of the Jellicles and the
Jellicle Ball,” along with “The Old
Gumbie Cat.” All three feature terrific
solo and ensemble dancing by the ener-
getic cast, while “Gumbie” adds a fun
tap scene to the enjoyment.
The show is directed and choreo-
graphed by Robyn Tribuzi, who has
honed the dancers into a precision
ensemble. The only misstep in her direc-
tion comes from Jack Mosbacher, who
sings well and struts like Mick Jagger
but overdoes the pelvic thrusts in “The
Rum Tum Tugger.”
Musical direction is by Sean Kana,
who conducts the orchestra from the
keyboards. Even with only eight musi-
cians, including Kana, the orchestral
sound is full.
Likewise, the vocal ensemble is well
balanced even though a few singers
seem less accomplished in their solos.
Diction is sometimes a problem.
The cat-like costumes and junk yard
set come from FCLO Music Theatre. A
few glitches were evident in Michael
Ramsaur’s lighting design opening
night.
As for the show itself, the plot is thin,
while Lloyd Webber’s music becomes
repetitious, especially in the second act.
Still, there is much to admire in both the
show and this production, which runs
about 135 minutes with intermission.
“Cats” continues at the Fox Theatre,
2215 Broadway, Redwood City, through
April 21. For tickets and information
call 579-5565 or go to www.broadway-
bythebay.org.
Continued from page 1
CATS
council considered Tuesday night were:
• No requirement at point of sale;
• Seller disclosure without an inspec-
tion required;
• Seller disclosure with inspection
and repair (if needed) completed by
buyer within 180 days of close of
escrow;
• Inspection before close of escrow
and repair (if needed) completed by
buyer within 180 days of close of
escrow; and
• Inspection and repair (if needed)
completed before the close of
escrow.
The council went with the “seller dis-
closure without an inspection required”
option that was essentially proposed by
Councilman Warren Lieberman back in
January.
The council also raised the limit for
when sewer lateral inspections will be
required on home remodels from
$50,000 to $200,000.
The city’s goal is to reduce the inflow
and infiltration from private sewer lat-
erals that can lead to sewage overflows
and potential fines for the city.
The city has undertaken a series of
measures to reduce inflow and infiltra-
tion including a smoke-testing program
and FOG program where restaurants
and other businesses are made aware of
the fats, oils and grease that harm the
sewer system.
Some cities in the county already
have the mandate but that is due to a
court order after pollution watchdog
San Francisco Baykeeper sued several
cities after excessive sewage waste
flowed into freshwater creeks and the
Bay. Pacifica, South San Francisco,
Millbrae and Burlingame already
require the inspections at the point of
sale but Belmont is not required to.
The ordinance will come back to the
council for a second reading at a future
date.
Continued from page 1
SEWER
COMICS/GAMES
4-11-13
Wednesday’s PUZZLe sOLVed
PreViOUs
sUdOkU
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Want More Fun
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Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifeds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifeds
kids across/Parents down Puzzle Family Resource Guide


Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.

The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.

Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.
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5 Home for Hadrian
10 Shove off
12 Wild West shows
13 Reluctant
14 Kudu cousins
15 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. --
16 Slippery fsh
18 Cave, maybe
19 Well-to-do
23 Source of metal
26 -- de Janeiro
27 Sporty wheels
30 Woman’s shoe (var.)
32 Breadwinner
34 Deckhand
35 17th-century dance
36 Finalized agreement
37 Petroleum
38 NNW opposite
39 Goalie’s job
42 Baron -- Richthofen
45 Prior to
46 Sphagnum moss
50 Appear
53 Honey source
55 Ugly cuts
56 Like some smiles
57 Fire chief’s suspicion
58 RR depots
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1 Flock
2 Parroted
3 Seraglio
4 Almost-grads
5 Encyclopedia bk.
6 NW state
7 What banks do
8 Prospector’s quest
9 Org.
10 Dit companion
11 Even smaller
12 Be certain of, with “on”
17 Help-wanted abbr.
20 Bright songbird
21 AOL notes
22 Mend socks
23 Startled cries
24 Follow the newspapers
25 McClurg or Brickell
28 Wildebeests
29 Dates regularly
31 Tall fower
32 Renowned
33 I-90, for ex.
37 Above, to Tennyson
40 Membership dues
41 Orlando attraction
42 Former Chevy model
43 FitzGerald’s poet
44 Monster’s loch
47 Soul singer James
48 Long sighs
49 Make an effort
51 Letter after pi
52 Army off.
54 Dawn goddess
diLBerT® CrOssWOrd PUZZLe
fUTUre sHOCk®
PearLs BefOre sWine®
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THUrsday, aPriL 11, 2013
aries (March 21-April 19) -- If you’re thinking of
teaming up with others in something that requires
an investment, test the waters before plunging in.
That pond might not hold everybody.
TaUrUs (April 20-May 20) -- Independence is a
wonderful quality, but you can carry it too far when
it’s necessary to play nice with others. Be a team
player when conditions ask it of you.
GeMini (May 21-June 20) -- Guard against a
tendency to treat your duties indifferently. Serious
matters should never be treated in a cavalier
fashion.
CanCer (June 21-July 22) -- Accept your friends for
who and what they are, faults and all. If you display
intolerance, rest assured others will call attention to
your imperfections.
LeO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- The best way to get a
message across to your family is to lead by example.
If your attitude is “Do as I say, not as I do,” you
could get into trouble.
VirGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Unless associates
believe that you know what you’re talking about,
they aren’t likely to put much credence in your
words. If you want to sway an audience, you must
be factual.
LiBra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- Even though you are
presently in a good fnancial cycle, things could still
get rocky. In fact, chances are this could be one of
those uncertain days.
sCOrPiO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Usually, you are
a strong and decisive person who isn’t prone
to wavering. However, today you could make
associates nervous because of an inability to make
up your mind.
saGiTTariUs (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Under most
conditions, you’re not averse to helping others.
Today, though, you might lack your usual
compassion and miss a chance to assist one who
really needs support.
CaPriCOrn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- Be extremely
selective regarding with whom you associate. If you
get mixed up with the wrong people, the results
could be disastrous.
aQUariUs (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- Be particularly
mindful of your behavior when in public, because
your image is currently fragile. Try not to do anything
that could provide fodder for your detractors.
PisCes (Feb. 20-March 20) -- Your associates will
have a strong infuence on your thinking. If you link
up with a negative individual, you’re likely to see the
world from a dark perspective.
COPYRIGHT 2013 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 21
THE DAILY JOURNAL
22
Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
104 Training
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fieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its lia-
bility shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be sub-
mitted within 30 days. For full advertis-
ing conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.
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Ofrecer esto y mucho mas!
Bi-linque. Por favor llamar al
(650) 837-9788
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. #320
San Mateo, CA 94402
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM
The Daily Journal is looking for in-
terns to do entry level reporting, re-
search, updates of our ongoing fea-
tures and interviews. Photo interns al-
so welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented in-
terns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time re-
porters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not neces-
sarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you ap-
ply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by reg-
ular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.
PROCESS SERVER - Swing shift, car &
insurance, immediate opening,
(650)697-9431
SERVERS/HOST WANTED. Apply in
person at 1201 San Carlos Ave.
San Carlos.
TECHNOLOGY
INFORMATICA Corporation has the fol-
lowing job opportunities available in Red-
wood City, CA :
Professional Services Senior Consultant
(RC20MRO) - Work independently or
with a team of Informatica and/or Busi-
ness Partner consultants to analyze, ad-
vise, design, build, and deploy data
warehouses. Position may require travel
to various, unanticipated locations.
Professional Services Senior Consultant
(RC21SSA) - Ensure customers are suc-
cessful in deploying Informatica data in-
tegration and analytic platforms. Position
may require travel to various, unantici-
pated locations.
Professional Services Senior Consultant
(RC22CCH) - Work either independently
or with a team of Informatica and/or Busi-
ness Partner consultants, and senior
consultants. Position may require travel
to various, unanticipated locations.
Principal Software Engineer (RC23UGU)
- Lead and drive the delivery and archi-
tecture for significantly large functional
areas in the product.
Principal Software Engineer (RC24UDH)
- Provide technical leadership for product
development of Informatica Connectivity
Products that integrate Informatica prod-
ucts with third party social media technol-
ogies such as Facebook, LinkedIn, and
Twitter.
Submit resume by mail to: Attn: M/S
110 Employment
KM024, Informatica Corporation, 100
Cardinal Way, Redwood City, CA 94063.
Must reference job title and job code.
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520182
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Kenneth Martin Palter
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Kenneth Martin Palter filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Kenneth Martin Palter,
aka Kenneth M. Palter
Proposed name: Kemneth Edward Ta-
foya
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 21,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/04/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 03/27/13
(Published, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 4/25/13,
05/02/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255187
The following person is doing business
as: Royal Prestige of Silicon Valley, 139
Mitchell Ave., Ste. 322, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Isaul Pena,
2085 Scott Blvd., Santa Clara, CA
95050. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
10/01/2012.
/s/ Isaul Pena /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
203 Public Notices
CASE# CIV 520229
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
David Garcia
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, David Garcia filed a petition
with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: David Garcia
Proposed name: David Garcia-Solorzano
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on May 23,
2013 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 03/29/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 3/27/13
(Published, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 4/18/13,
04/25/13)
CASE# CIV 520340
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Laurel Narvios Palileo
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner, Laurel Narvios Palileo filed a
petition with this court for a decree
changing name as follows:
Present name: Laurel Narvios Palileo
Proposed name: Juan Laurel Narvios
Palileo
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear be-
fore this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the pe-
tition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the rea-
sons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the peti-
tion without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on June 7, 2013
at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2J , at 400
County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks pri-
or to the date set for hearing on the peti-
tion in the following newspaper of gener-
al circulation: Daily Journal
Filed: 04/09/ 2013
/s/Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 04/09/13
(Published, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 4/25/13,
05/02/13)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254991
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Jab Two, 2007 Birch Ave., SAN
CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby registered
by the following owners: Steven Blau &
Stephanie Blau, same address. The
business is conducted by a Married Cou-
ple. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Steven D. Blau /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/18/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/13, 03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254934
The following person is doing business
as: Realty World - Success, 851 Burlway
Rd., Ste. 503, BURLINGAME, CA 94010
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Success Plans, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Jeffrey Tung /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/13, 03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13)).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254874
The following person is doing business
as: Autoworldnet, 1552 Westmoore Rd.,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Cristinel
V. Neculai, same address. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on 10/24/2008
/s/ Cristinel Neculai /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/13/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/13, 03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254942
The following person is doing business
as: Trip Stop Sidewalk Repair, 1424 E.
3rd Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Trip Stop Sidewalk Repair, Inc., CA. The
business is conducted by a Corporation.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/ Nahid Bolghand /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/13, 03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255001
The following person is doing business
as: Kidzjet, 1418 Cherrywood Dr., SAN
MATEO, CA 94403 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Pratibha India,
Inc, CA. The business is conducted by a
Corporation. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Benazir Shaikh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/19/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/21/13, 03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13)).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255129
The following person is doing business
as: Bambu Desserts & Drinks, 2223 Gel-
lert Blvd., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Shwe Dinga Corp., CA.
The business is conducted by a Corpora-
tion. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/ Erica Sun /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/25/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254656
The following person is doing business
as: Digifore, 328 Holly Avenue, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Raul
Lopez, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/ Raul Lopez /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 02/27/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254936
The following person is doing business
as: Le Orchidee, One Plaza View Ln.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Jamila
Jackson, 1014 Monterey Ave., FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Jamila Jackson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254835
The following person is doing business
as: Core Values Pilates, 1197-B Laurel
St., SAN CARLOS, CA 94070 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Megan
N. Binkley, 1353 Oakhurst Ave., San Lor-
enzo, CA 94580. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/07/2013
/s/ Megan Binkley /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/11/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254947
The following person is doing business
as: Cause Change-Design and Creative,
1049 Montgomery St., SAN CARLOS,
CA 94070 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Ari Ross, same adress.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on
/s/ Ari Ross /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
23 Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Tundra Tundra Tundra
Over the Hedge Over the Hedge Over the Hedge
EVENT MARKETING SALES
Join the Daily Journal Event marketing
team as a Sales and Business Development
Specialist. Duties include sales and
customer service of event sponsorships,
partners, exhibitors and more. Interface
and interact with local businesses to
enlist participants at the Daily Journal’s
ever expanding inventory of community
events such as the Senior Showcase,
Family Resource Fair, Job Fairs, and
more. You will also be part of the project
management process. But first and
foremost, we will rely on you for sales
and business development.
This is one of the fastest areas of the
Daily Journal, and we are looking to grow
the team.
Must have a successful track record of
sales and business development.
TELEMARKETING/INSIDE SALES
We are looking for a telemarketing whiz,
who can cold call without hesitation and
close sales over the phone. Experience
preferred. Must have superior verbal,
phone and written communication skills.
Computer proficiency is also required.
Self-management and strong business
intelligence also a must.
To apply for either position,
please send info to
jerry@smdailyjournal.com or call
650-344-5200.
The Daily Journal seeks
two sales professionals
for the following positions:
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
HELP WANTED
SALES
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254953
The following person is doing business
as: Lumpia Ala Fonso, 13 Tunitas Ln.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Alfonso Allensworth, same adress. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 3-18-13
/s/ Alfonso Allensworth /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/15/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255166
The following person is doing business
as: EG Company, 139 Mitchell Ave., Ste.
232, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080 is hereby registered by the follow-
ing owner: Diego Echevarria, 8 Arlington
Dr. SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Diego Echevarria /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/26/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254931
The following person is doing business
as: Tortillas Mexican Grill, 360 Adrian
Rd., MILLBRAE, CA 94030 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Tortil-
las Mexican Grill, LLC, CA. The business
is conducted by a Limited Liability Com-
pany. The registrants commenced to
transact business under the FBN on .
/s/ Jonathan Tong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
03/28/13, 04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254738
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Eden Restored 4 U, 247 Do-
lores St., EL GRANADA, CA 94018 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Pamela L. Fastabend, same address
and Edgardo Diaz, 1328 Carlton Ave.,
Menlo Park, CA 94025. The business is
conducted by a Joint Venture. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Pamela L. Fastabend /
/s/ Edgardo Diaz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255223
The following person is doing business
as: Smart Sports Massage and Rehabili-
tation Therapy, 629 Prospect Row, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Mary Anne Pat-
ton, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on
/s/ Mary Anne Patton /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254755
The following person is doing business
as: Small Boat Seafood, 563 Isabella,
HALF MOON BAY, CA 94019 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Re-
becca Barger, same address. The busi-
ness is conducted by an Individual. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on 01/23/2013.
/s/ Rebecca Barger /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/06/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255233
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Cafe On Primrose, 321 Prim-
rose Rd., BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is
hereby registered by the following own-
ers: Joseph Eadeh and Jacqueline Ea-
deh, 1669 Old Bayshore Hwy., Burlin-
game, CA 94010. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Joseph Eadeh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255226
The following person is doing business
as: Seecom, 834 Rigel Ln., FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sustainable Enviro-
mental Engineering Consulting & Man-
agement, Inc., CA The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 03/18/2013.
/s/ Nicholas Haddad /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254806
The following person is doing business
as: Pacifica Martial Arts Club, 830 Rosita
Rd., #11B, PACIFICA, CA 94044 is here-
by registered by the following owner:
Robert Stuckey, 788 Oddstad Blvd., PA-
CIFICA, CA 94044 The business is con-
ducted by an Unincorporated Associates.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/03/2013.
/s/ Robert Stuckey /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255260
The following person is doing business
as: Max Management Group, 969G
Edgewater Blvd., #168, FOSTER CITY,
CA is hereby registered by the following
owner: Arthur C. Wu, 1 Williams Ln.,
FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Arthur Wu /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/01/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255308
The following person is doing business
as: Mr. C. Towing, 1850 Industrial Way,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Cos-
tantin J. Swies, 434 Florence St., Sunny-
vale, CA 94086. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 01959633
/s/ Costantin Swies /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255303
The following person is doing business
as: Andrews Disaster Recovery, 1161
Tamarind St., MONTARA, CA 94037 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Isbjorn, Inc., CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Dave C. Andrews /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255304
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Handyman Hauler, 11971 San
Mateo Rd., Ste. 3A, HALF MOON BAY,
CA 94019 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owners: Douglas Adams, 11971
San Mateo Rd., Ste. 3A, HALF MOON
BAY, CA 94019 and Dave C. Andrews,
PO Box 1027, El Granada, CA 94018.
The business is conducted by a General
Partnership. The registrants commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A.
/s/ Douglas Adams /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254821
The following person is doing business
as: ACS Courier, 460 Miller Ave.,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Jose Antonio Maciel, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrants commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 03/01/2013.
/s/ Jose Antonio Maciel /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255219
The following person is doing business
as: Student Career Coaching, 310 Vir-
gina Ave., SAN MATEO, CA 94402 is
hereby registered by the following owner:
Deborah Charlip Briant, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individ-
ual. The registrants commenced to trans-
act business under the FBN on .
/s/ Deborah Charlip Briant /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/29/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/04/13, 04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255357
The following person is doing business
as: Quantisci, 1011 Muir Way, BEL-
MONT, CA 94002 is hereby registered
by the following owner: Paul Beroza,
same address. The business is conduct-
ed by an Individual. The registrants com-
menced to transact business under the
FBN on 04/08/2013.
/s/ Paul Beroza /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255354
The following persons are doing busi-
ness as: Mynerals, 3773 Jefferson Ave.,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062 is hereby
registered by the following owners: Gigi
Carunungan, same address and Kevin
Acken, 679 Rustic Ln., Mountain View,
CA 94040. The business is conducted by
a General Partnership. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Kevin Acken /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255368
The following person is doing business
as: College Shell Auto Care, 1400 W.
Hillsdale Blvd., SAN MATEO, CA 94403
is hereby registered by the following
owner: Cano Alfredo, 525 Fiesta Dr., San
Mateo, CA 94403. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Cano Alfredo /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/08/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #254918
The following person is doing business
as: Luna’s Cafe, 1720 El Camino Real,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010 is hereby reg-
istered by the following owner: Platters
Catering, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Samer Kiresh /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 03/14/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255345
The following person is doing business
as: Coldwell Banker Optima Realty, 1435
Huntington Ave., #300, SOUTH SAN
FRANCISCO, CA 94080 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: BEZ Finan-
cial Group, Inc, CA. The business is con-
ducted by a Corporation. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on.
/s/ Edward C. Wong /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/05/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255297
The following person is doing business
as: Pen and Ink Calligraphy, 700 Prom-
ontory Point Lane Unit 1307, FOSTER
CITY, CA 94404 is hereby registered by
the following owner: Sophia Victoria Hut-
son, same address. The business is con-
ducted by an Individual. The registrants
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Sophia Victoria Hutson /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/03/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255409
The following person is doing business
as: Room to Be, 348 N. El Camino Real,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby regis-
tered by the following owner: Allyssa
Glatt, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A.
/s/ Allyssa Glatt /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/09/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255321
The following person is doing business
as: Juan Godoy Toba, 11-50 E. Santa In-
ez, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 is hereby
registered by the following owner: Juan
Godoy Tobar, 337 Grand Blvd., Apt #4,
San Mateo CA 94401. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Juan Godoy Tobar /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/04/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255275
The following person is doing business
as: Color Me Mine of Daly City, 445
Westlake Shopping Center, DALY CITY,
CA 94015 is hereby registered by the fol-
lowing owner: Michael Berkowitz and
Joey Cardenas, 940 Magnolia Dr., Ala-
meda, CA 94502. The business is con-
ducted by a Married Couple. The regis-
trants commenced to transact business
under the FBN on.
/s/ Michael Berkowitz /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/02/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #255414
The following person is doing business
as: Z.O.Y. Fitness Studio, 415 Grand
Ave 3rd Flr., SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080 is hereby registered by the
following owner: Oneyda Torrez Mantilla,
855 Commercial Ave., #3 South San
Francisco, CA 94080 and Marlene Palo-
mino Chaffo, 332 Second Ln., South San
Francisco, CA 94080. The business is
conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrants commenced to transact busi-
ness under the FBN on.
/s/ Oneyda Mantilla /
This statement was filed with the Asses-
sor-County Clerk on 04/10/2013. (Pub-
lished in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
04/11/13, 04/18/13, 04/25/13, 05/02/13).
210 Lost & Found
LOST - Small Love Bird, birght green
with orange breast. Adeline Dr. & Bernal
Ave., Burlingame. Escaped Labor Day
weekend. REWARD! (650)343-6922
LOST AFRICAN GRAY PARROT -
(415)377-0859 REWARD!
LOST DOG-SMALL TERRIER-$5000
REWARD Norfolk Terrier missing from
Woodside Rd near High Rd on Dec 13.
Violet is 11mths, 7lbs, tan, female, no
collar, microchipped. Please help bring
her home! (650)568-9642
LOST ON Sunday 03/10/13, a Bin of
Documents on Catalpa Ave., in
San Mateo. REWARD, (650)450-3107
LOST: SMALL diamond cross, silver
necklace with VERY sentimental
meaning. Lost in San Mateo 2/6/12
(650)578-0323.
REWARD!! LOST DOG - 15LB All White
Dog, needs meds, in the area of Oaknoll
RWC on 3/23/13, (650)400-1175
RING FOUND Tue. Oct 23 2012 in Mill-
brae call (650)464-9359
294 Baby Stuff
BABY CAR SEAT AND CARRIER $20
(650)458-8280
NURSERY SET - 6 piece nursery set -
$25., (650)341-1861
SOLID OAK CRIB - Excellent condition
with Simmons mattress, $90.,
(650)610-9765
296 Appliances
5’ AMERICAN STANDARD JACUZZI
TUB - drop-in, $100., (650)270-8113
COIN-OP GAS DRYER - $100.,
(650)948-4895
ELECTRIC LG WASHER & DRYER -
white, used once, front load, 1 year old,
$1000.obo, (650)851-0878
GE PROFILE WASHER & DRYER -
New, originally $1600., moving, must
sell, $850., (650)697-2883
HAIR DRYER, Salon Master, $10.
(650)854-4109
HUNTER OSCILLATING FAN, excellent
condition. 3 speed. $35. (650)854-4109
JENN-AIR 30” downdraft slide-in range.
JES9800AAS, $875., never used, still in
the crate. Cost $2200 new.
(650)207-4664
KENMORE ELECTRIC OVEN & MICRO
COMBO - built in, $100., (650)270-8113
KENMORE MICROWAVE Oven: Table
top, white, good condition, $40 obo
(650) 355-8464
KRUPS COFFEE maker $20,
(650)796-2326
LEAN MEAN Fat Grilling Machine by
George Foreman. $15 (650)832-1392
LG WASHER/ DRYER in one. Excellent
condition, new hoses, ultracapacity,
7 cycle, fron load, $600, (650)290-0954
MIROMATIC PRESSURE cooker flash
canner 4qt. $25. 415 333-8540
PORTABLE HEATER - one year old,
FREE, SOLD!
RADIATOR HEATER, oil filled, electric,
1500 watts $25. (650)504-3621
REFRIGERATOR - Whirlpool, side-by-
side, free, needs compressor, (650)726-
1641
296 Appliances
ROTISSERIE GE, US Made, IN-door or
out door, Holds large turkey 24” wide,
Like new, $80, OBO (650)344-8549
SHOP VACUUM rigid brand 3.5 horse
power 9 gal wet/dry $40. (650)591-2393
SLICING MACHINE Stainless steel,
electric, almost new, excellent condition,
$50 (650)341-1628
SMALL REFRIGERATOR w/freezer
great for college dorm, $25 obo
(650)315-5902
SUNBEAM TOASTER -Automatic, ex-
cellent condition, $30., (415)346-6038
TABLE TOP refrigerator 1.8 cubic feet
brown in color, $45, call (650)591-3313
VACUUM CLEANER excellent condition
$45. (650)878-9542
297 Bicycles
BIKE RACK Roof mounted, holds up to
4 bikes, $65 (650)594-1494
298 Collectibles
15 HARDCOVERS WWII - new condi-
tion, $80.obo, (650)345-5502
16 OLD glass telephone line insulators.
$60 San Mateo (650)341-8342
1940 VINTAGE telephone guaranty
bench Salem hardrock maple excellent
condition $75 (650)755-9833
1982 PRINT 'A Tune Off The Top Of My
Head' 82/125 $80 (650) 204-0587
2 FIGURINES - 1 dancing couple, 1
clown face. both $15. (650)364-0902
2000 GIANTS Baseball cards $99,
SOLD!
67 USED United States (50) and Europe-
an (17) Postage Stamps. Most issued
before World War II. All different and de-
tached from envelopes. All for $4.00,
(650)787-8600
ARMY SHIRT, long sleeves, with pock-
ets. XL $15 each (408)249-3858
BAY MEADOW plate 9/27/61 Native Div-
er horse #7 $60 OBO (650)349-6059
BAY MEADOWS bag - $30.each,
(650)345-1111
BEAUTIFUL RUSTIE doll Winter Bliss w/
stole & muffs, 23”, $90. OBO, (650)754-
3597
BRASS TROPHY Cup, Mounted on wal-
nut base. SOLD!
CASINO CHIP Collection Original Chips
from various casinos $99 obo
(650)315-3240
COLORIZED TERRITORIAL Quarters
uncirculated with Holder $15/all,
(408)249-3858
JOE MONTANA signed authentic retire-
ment book, $39., (650)692-3260
MICHAEL JORDAN POSTER - 1994,
World Cup, $10., (650)365-3987
NASCAR DIE CAST COLLECTIBLE
CARS. Total 23, Including #3 Dale Earn-
hardt’s car.Good condition. $150 for the
lot. Or willing to sell separately. Call for
details, (650)619-8182.
NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE – unop-
ened 20 boxes of famous hockey stars
sealed boxes, $5.00 per box, great gift,
(650)578-9208
ORIGINAL SMURF FIGURES - 1979-
1981, 18+ mushroom hut, SOLD!
PRISMS 9 in a box $99 obo
(650)363-0360
TRIPOD - Professional Quality used in
1930’s Hollywood, $99, obo
(650)363-0360
VINTAGE HOLLIE HOBBIE LUNCH-
BOX with Thermos, 1980s, $25., Call
Maria 650-873-8167
VINTAGE TEEN BEAT MAGAZINES
(20) 1980s $2 each, Call Maria 650-873-
8167
299 Computers
HP PRINTER Deskjet 970c color printer.
Excellent condition. Software & accesso-
ries included. $30. 650-574-3865
300 Toys
PINK BARBIE 57 Chevy Convertable
28" long (sells on E-Bay for $250) in box
$99 (650)591-9769
24
Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
ACROSS
1 Gives pieces to
5 Space-saving
abbr.
9 Academy teacher
14 Leak slowly
15 Prep, as apples
for applesauce
16 Didn’t despair
17 Support girder
18 Teatro alla Scala
highlight
19 From days gone
by
20 Post-marathon
sounds?
23 Salon supply
24 Scottie’s relative
27 ID theft target
30 Wined and dined
34 Messenger __
35 Bygone depilatory
37 Golfer’s outdated
set of clubs?
39 Egyptian leader
between Gamal
and Hosni
41 MIV ÷ II
42 Pester, puppy-
style
43 Casualty of an all-
night poker
game?
46 “__ be young
again!”
47 SFO posting
48 Welcome sight for
early explorers
50 Poetic dusk
51 “Thy Neighbor’s
Wife” author
53 Ill-fated fruit picker
55 Problem for
Sherlock when
he’s out of
tobacco?
62 Eastern adders?
64 Smart
65 Corp. money
mgrs.
66 Sax range
67 Rolling rock
68 Berlusconi’s bone
69 Is without
70 One bounce, in
baseball
71 Kids
DOWN
1 “A likely story!”
2 Country’s
McEntire
3 Crux
4 Bit of mistletoe
5 Dress uniform
decoration
6 Empty-truck
weight
7 Desertlike
8 Route to an
illogical
conclusion
9 Expressed an
opinion on “The
Dan Patrick
Show,” say
10 Many converted
apartments
11 Sign of omission
12 __ Aviv
13 Like some socks
after laundry day
21 Whence BMWs
22 Floored
25 Hard-wired
26 Crayola Factory’s
Pennsylvania
home
27 Get testy with
28 Madrid madam
29 City whose
average
elevation is
below sea level
31 Dizzy with delight
32 Prospero’s spirit
servant
33 High-end camera
36 Borrow money
from
38 __ Grande
40 Prophetic attire
worn by most
doomed
characters on the
original “Star
Trek” TV show
44 De Matteo of “The
Sopranos”
45 Patella
49 Netflix rental
52 Sentence
finisher?
54 Florida attraction
56 Kareem’s coll.
team
57 Deposed ruler
58 Modern recorder
59 “Given that ...”
60 Chime in at a blog
61 Those, in Tijuana
62 Olympics entrant:
Abbr.
63 Actress Arthur
By Marti DuGuay-Carpenter
(c)2013 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
04/11/13
04/11/13
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
xwordeditor@aol.com
302 Antiques
1912 COFFEE Percolator Urn. perfect
condition includes electric cord $85.
(415)565-6719
1920 MAYTAG wringer washer - electric,
gray color, $100., (650)851-0878
ANTIQUE BEVEL MIRROR - framed,
14” x 21”, carved top, $45.,
(650)341-7890
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
ANTIQUE STOVE, Brown brand, 30",
perfect condition, $75, (650)834-6075
ANTIQUE WASHING machine, some
rust on legs, rust free drum and ringer.
$45/obo, (650)574-4439
BREADBOX, METAL with shelf and cut-
ting board, $30 (650)365-3987
FISHING POLES (4)- Antiques, $80.
obo, SOLD!
TWO WORLD Globes, Replogle Plati-
num Classic Legend, USA Made. $34 ea
obo (650)349-6059
VINTAGE THOMASVILLE wingback
chair $50 firm, SSF (650)583-8069
VINTAGE UPHOLSTERED wooden
chairs, $20 each or both for $35 nice set.
SSF (650)583-8069
303 Electronics
2 RECTILINEAR speakers $99 good
condition. (650)368-5538
3 SHELF SPEAKERS - 8 OM, $15.
each, (650)364-0902
46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.
BIG SONY TV 37" - Excellent Condition
Worth $2300 will Sacrifice for only $95.,
(650)878-9542
FLIP CAMCORDER $50. (650)583-2767
HOME THEATRE SYSTEM - 3 speak-
ers, woofer, DVD player, USB connec-
tion, $80., (714)818-8782
HP PRINTER - Model DJ1000, new, in
box, $38. obo, (650)995-0012
303 Electronics
LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
LSI SCSI Ultra320 Controller + (2) 10k
RPM 36GB SCSI II hard drives $40
(650)204-0587
PIONEER STEREO Receiver 1 SX 626
excellent condition $99 (650)368-5538
PS3 BLACK wireless headset $20
(650)771-0351
SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with re-
mote good condition $99 (650)345-1111
WESTINGHOUSE 32" Flat Screen TV
$90 (650)283-0396
304 Furniture
1940’S MAPLE dressing table with Mir-
ror & Stool. Needs loving and refinishing
to be beautiful again. Best Offer.
Burlingame (650)697-1160
2 END Tables solid maple '60's era
$40/both. (650)670-7545
2 SOLID wood Antique mirrors 511/2" tall
by 221/2" wide $50 for both
(650)561-3149
3" QUEEN size memory foam mattress
topper (NEW) , SOLD!
8 DRAWER wooden dresser $99
(650)759-4862
ALASKAN SEEN painting 40" high 53"
wide includes matching frame $99 firm
(650)592-2648
ARMOIRE CABINET - $90., Call
(415)375-1617
BASE CABINET for TV or Books, etc;
mahogany, double doors, divided
storage, excellent condition, 24"D,
14"Hx36"W, on casters $20
(650)342-7933
BEAUTIFUL WOOD PATIO TABLE with
glass inset and 6 matching chairs with
arms. Excellent condition. Kahoka
wood. $500.00 cash, Call leave mes-
sage and phone number, (650)851-1045
BLUE & WHITE SOFA - $300; Loveseat
$250., good condition, (650)508-0156
304 Furniture
CABINET BLOND Wood, 6 drawers, 31”
Tall, 61” wide, 18” deep, $45
(650)592-2648
CHAIR MODERN light wood made in Ita-
ly $99 (415)334-1980
COPENHAGEN TEAK dining table with
dual 20" Dutch leaves extensions. 48/88"
long x 32" wide x 30" high. $95.00
(650)637-0930
COUCH-FREE. OLD world pattern, soft
fabric. Some cat scratch damage-not too
noticeable. 650-303-6002
DINETTE TABLE walnut with chrome
legs. 36”x58” with one leaf 11 1/2”. $50,
San Mateo (650)341-5347
DINING ROOM SET - table, four chairs,
lighted hutch, $500. all, (650)296-3189
DRESSER & CABINET - Good condi-
tion, clean, 7 drawers, horizontal, 3 lay-
ers, FREE! (650)312-8188
DRESSER, FOR SALE all wood excel-
lent condition $50 obo (650)589-8348
DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condi-
tion, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES (2) - One for $5. hand
carved, other table is antique white mar-
ble top with drawer $40., (650)308-6381
FOLDING PICNIC table - 8’ x 30”, 7 fold-
ing, padded chairs, $80. (650)364-0902
FOLDING TABLE- 5’x2’ $10
(650)341-2397
GRANDMA ROCKING chair beautiful
white with gold trim $100 (650)755-9833
HAND MADE portable jewelry display
case wood and see through lid $45. 25 x
20 x 4 inches. (650)592-2648.
INDOOR OR OUTSIDE ROUND TABLE
- off white, 40”, $20.obo, (650)571-5790
KING PLATFORM BED WITH TWO
BOX SPRINGS - no mattresses, like
new, Foster City, $100., (954)907-0100
LIGHT WOOD Rocking Chair & Has-
sock, gold cushions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
304 Furniture
LOUNGE CHAIRS - 2 new, with cover &
plastic carring case & headrest, $35.
each, (650)592-7483
MODULAR DESK/BOOKCASE/STOR-
AGE unit - Cherry veneer, white lami-
nate, $75., (650)888-0039
OAK ENTERTAINMENT Cabinet/lighted,
mirrored,glass Curio Top. 72" high x 21"
deep x 35" wide. $95.00 (650)637-0930
OFFICE LAMP, small. Black & white with
pen holder and paper holder. Brand new,
in the box. $10 (650)867-2720
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
PEDESTAL DINETTE 36” Square Table
- $65., (650)347-8061
RECTANGULAR MIRROR with gold
trim, 42”H, 27” W, $30., (650)593-0893
ROCKING CHAIR - Beautiful light wood
rocking chair, very good condition, $65.,
OBO, (650)952-3063
ROCKING CHAIR - excellent condition,
oak, with pads, $85.obo, (650)369-9762
ROCKING CHAIR - Traditional, full size
Rocking chair. Excellent condition $100.,
(650)504-3621
SHELVING UNIT interior metal and
glass nice condition $70 obo
(650)589-8348
STEREO CABINET walnut w/3 black
shelves 16x 22x42. $30, 650-341-5347
STORAGE TABLE light brown lots of
storage good cond. $45. (650)867-2720
TEAK TV stand, wheels, rotational, glass
doors, drawer, 5 shelves. 31" wide x 26"
high X 18" deep. $75.00 (650)637-0930
TRUNDLE BED - Single with wheels,
$40., (650)347-8061
306 Housewares
"PRINCESS HOUSE” decorator urn
"Vase" cream with blue flower 13 inch H
$25., (650)868-0436
28" by 15" by 1/4" thick glass shelves,
cost $35 each sell at $15 ea. Five availa-
ble, Call (650)345-5502
8 PLACE setting 40 piece Stoneware
Heartland pattern never used microwave
and oven proof $50 (650)755-9833
BATTERY CHARGER, holds 4 AA/AAA,
Panasonic, $5, (650)595-3933
CANDLEHOLDER - Gold, angel on it,
tall, purchased from Brueners, originally
$100., selling for $30.,(650)867-2720
DRIVE MEDICAL design locking elevat-
ed toilet seat. New. $45. (650)343-4461
GEVALIA COFFEEMAKER -10-cup,
many features, Exel, $9., (650)595-3933
PERSIAN TEA set for 8. Including
spoon, candy dish, and tray. Gold Plated.
$100. (650) 867-2720
PUSH LAWN mower $25 (650)580-3316
SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
VINTAGE LAZY susan collectable excel-
lent condition $25 (650)755-9833
307 Jewelry & Clothing
BRACELET - Ladies authentic Murano
glass from Italy, vibrant colors, like new,
$100., (650)991-2353 Daly City
GALLON SIZE bag of costume jewelry -
various sizes, colors, $100. for bag,
(650)589-2893
LADIES GOLD Lame' elbow length-
gloves sz 7.5 $15 New. (650)868-0436
308 Tools
BLACK & Decker Electric hedge trimmer
$39 (650)342-6345
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
CIRCULAR SAW, Craftsman-brand, 10”,
4 long x 20” wide. Comes w/ stand - $70.
(650)678-1018
CRAFTMAN JIG Saw 3.9 amp. with vari-
able speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045
CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373
CRAFTSMAN 6 Gal. Wet/Dry Shop Vac,
$25 (650)341-2397
CRAFTSMAN ARC-WELDER - 30-250
amp, and accessories, $275., (650)341-
0282
CRAFTSMAN HEAVY DUTY JIGSAW -
extra blades, $35., (650)521-3542
DAYTON ELECTRIC 1 1/2 horse power
1,725 RPM $60 (650)347-5373
ESSIC CEMENT Mixer, gas motor, $850,
(650)333-6275
FMC TIRE changer Machine, $650
(650)333-4400
LAWN MOWER reel type push with
height adjustments. Just sharpened $45
650-591-2144 San Carlos
308 Tools
LOG CHAIN (HEAVY DUTY) 14' $75
(650)948-0912
ROLLING STEEL Ladder10 steps, Like
New. $475 obo, (650)333-4400
TABLE SAW 10", very good condition
$85. (650) 787-8219
VINTAGE BLOW torch-turner brass
work $65 (650)341-8342
309 Office Equipment
DESK - 7 drawer wood desk, 5X2X2.5'
$25., (650)726-9658
ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER Smith Corona
$60. SOLD!
310 Misc. For Sale
1 PAIR of matching outdoor planting pots
$20., (650)871-7200
14 PLAYBOY magazines all for $80
(650)592-4529
2 FLOWER pots with Gardenia's both for
$20 (650)369-9762
300 HOME LIBRARY BOOKS - $3. or
$5. each obo, World & US History and
American Novel Classic, must see to ap-
preciate, (650)345-5502
4 IN 1 STERO UNIT. CD player broken.
$20., (650)834-4926
40 ADULT VHS Tapes - $100.,
(650)361-1148
6 BASKETS assorted sizes and different
shapes very good condition $13 for all
(650)347-5104
7 UNDERBED STORAGE BINS - Vinyl
with metal frame, 42” X 18” X 6”, zipper
closure, $5. ea., (650)364-0902
71/2' ARTIFICIAL CHRISTMAS TREE
with 700 lights used twice $99 firm,
(650)343-4461
8’ BY 11’ CARPET, 100% Wool, Hand-
made, in India. Beige with border in pas-
tel blue & pink cosy, SOLD!
ADULT VIDEOS - (3) DVDs classics fea-
turing older women, $20. each or, 3 for
$50 (650)212-7020
ADULT VIDEOS variety 8 for $50
(650)871-7200
Alkaline GRAVITY WATER SYSTEM - ,
PH Balance water, with anti-oxident
properties, good for home or office, new,
$100., (650)619-9203.
ALUMINUM WINDOWS - (10)double
pane, different sizes, $10. each,
(415)819-3835
ARTIFICIAL FICUS Tree 6 ft. life like, full
branches. in basket $55. (650)269-3712
ARTS & CRAFTS variety, $50
(650)368-3037
BABY BJORN potty & toilet trainer, in
perfect cond., $15 each (650)595-3933
BARBIE BEACH vacation & Barbie prin-
cess bride computer games $15 each,
(650)367-8949
BLUETOOTH WITH CHARGER - like
new, $20., (415)410-5937
BODY BY Jake AB Scissor Exercise Ma-
chine w/instructions. $50.00
(650)637-0930
BOOK "LIFETIME" WW1 $12.,
(408)249-3858
BOOK “NATIONAL Geographic” Nation-
al Air Museums, $15 (408)249-3858
CAMEL BACK antique trunk, wooden
liner $100 (650)580-3316
CARRY ON suitcase, wheels, many
compartments, exel,Only $20,
(650)595-3933
CLEAN CAR SYSTEM - unopened
sealed box, interior/exterior/chrome solu-
tions, cloths, chamois, great gift, $20.,
(650)578-9208
DISPLAY CART (new) great for patios &
kitchens wood and metal $30 SOLD!
DOOM (3) computer games $15/each 2
total, (650)367-8949
DVD'S TV programs 24 4 seasons $20
ea. (650)952-3466
ELECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., SOLD!
EVERY DAY'S A PARTY - up-opened,
Emeril Lagasse book of party ideas, cel-
ebrations, recipes, great gift, $10.,
(650)578-9208
EXOTIC EROTIC Ball SF & Mardi gras 2
dvd's $25 ea. (415)971-7555
EXTENDED BATH BENCH - never
used, $45. obo, (650)832-1392
FOLDING LEG table 6' by 21/2' $25
(415)346-6038
FOLDING MAHJHONG table with medal
chrome plated frame $40 (650)375-1550
FULL SIZE quilted Flowerly print green &
print $25 (650)871-7200
GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
GEORGE Magazines, 30, all intact
$50/all OBO. (650)574-3229, Foster City
310 Misc. For Sale
HARDCOVER MYSTERY BOOKS -
Current authors, $2. each (10),
(650)364-7777
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, per-
fect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
ICE CHEST $15 (650)347-8061
INFLATED 4'6" in diameter swimming
pool float $12 (415)346-6038
JAMES PATTERSON books 2 Hard
backs at $3 ea. (650)341-1861
JAMES PATTERSON books 5 paper
backs at $1 ea. (650)341-1861
JONATHAN KELLERMAN - Hardback
books, (5) $3. each, (650)341-1861
K9 ADVANTIX 55, repels and kills fleas
and ticks. 9 months worth, $60
(650)343-4461
KIRBY COMBO Shampooer/ Vacuum/
attachments. "Ultimate G Diamond
Model", $250., (650)637-0930
LED MOTION security light (brand new
still in box) $40 (650)871-7200
MEDICINE CABINET - 18” X 24”, almost
new, mirror, $20., (650)515-2605
MODERN ART Pictures: 36"X26", $90
for all obo Call (650)345-5502
NELSON DE MILLE -Hardback books 5
@ $3 each, (650)341-1861
NEW LIVING Yoga Tape for Beginners
$8. 650-578-8306
OBLONG SECURITY mirror 24" by 15"
$75 (650)341-7079
PET COVERS- Protect your car seat
from your dog. 2, new $15 ea.
(650)343-4461
PRINCESS CRYSTAL galsswear set
$50 (650)342-8436
PRINCESS PLANT 6' tall in bloom pot-
ted $15 (415)346-6038
PUNCH BOWL SET- 10 cup plus one
extra nice white color Motif, $25.,
(650)873-8167
RED DEVIL VACUUM CLEANER - $25.,
(650)593-0893
RICARDO LUGGAGE $35
(650)796-2326
ROLLER SKATES - Barely used, mens
size 13, boots attached to 8 wheels,
$100. obo, (650)223-7187
SET OF Blue stemwear glasses $25
(650)342-8436
SF GREETING CARDS -(300 with enve-
lopes), factory sealed, $10.
(650)365-3987
SHOWER DOOR custom made 48” x 69”
$70 (650)692-3260
SINGER SEWING machine 1952 cabinet
style with black/gold motor. White Rotary
sewing machine similar age, cabinet
style. $85 both. (650)574-4439
SONY EREADER - Model #PRS-500, 6”,
$60., (650)294-9652
STEP 2 sandbox Large with cover $25
(650)343-4329
TRIPLE X videos - and accessories,
$99., (650)589-8097
TYPEWRITER IBM Selectric II with 15”
Carrige. $99 obo (650)363-0360
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VIDEO CENTER 38 inches H 21 inches
W still in box $45., (408)249-3858
VOLVO STATION Wagon car cover $50
650 888-9624
WAHL HAIR trimmer cutting shears
(heavy duty) $25., (650)871-7200
WALKER - brand new, $20., SSF,
(415)410-5937
WALKER - never used, $85.,
(415)239-9063
WEATHER STATION, temp., barometer
and humidity, only $10 (650)595-3933
WOOD PLANTATION SHUTTERS -
Like new, (6) 31” x 70” and (1) 29” x 69”,
$25. each, (650)347-7436
WORLD WAR II US Army Combat field
backpack from 1944 $99 (650)341-8342
311 Musical Instruments
2 ORGANS, antique tramp, $100 each.
(650)376-3762
BELL COLLECTION 50 plus asking $50
for entire collection (650)574-4439
FREE PIANO up-right" good practice
piano " - GONE!
GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO -
Appraised @$5450., want $3500 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. pri-
vate owner, (650)349-1172
HOHNER CUE stick guitar HW 300 G
Handcrafted $75 650 771-8513
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
PIANO ORGAN, good condition. $110.
(650)376-3762
315 Wanted to Buy
GO GREEN!
We Buy GOLD
You Get The
$ Green $
Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae
650-697-2685
25 Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
316 Clothes
1 MENS golf shirt XX large red $18
(650)871-7200
2. WOMEN'S Pink & White Motocycle
Helmet KBC $50 (415)375-1617
A BAG of Summer ties $15 OBO
(650)245-3661
BLACK Leather pants Mrs. size made in
France size 40 $99. (650)558-1975
BLACK LEATHER tap shoes 9M great
condition $99. (650)558-1975
BLOUSES SWEATERS and tops. Many
different styles & colors, med. to lrg., ex-
cellent condition $5 ea., have 20,
(650)592-2648
DINGO WESTERN BOOTS - (like new)
$60., (408)764-6142
EUROPEAN STYLE nubek leather la-
dies winter coat - tan colored with green
lapel & hoodie, $100., (650)888-0129
FOX FUR Scarf 3 Piece $99 obo
(650)363-0360
HOODED ALL-WEATHER JACKET:
reversible. Outer: weatherproof tan color.
Iner: Navy plush, elastic cuffs. $15
(650)375-8044
LADIES BOOTS, thigh high, fold down
brown, leather, and beige suede leather
pair, tassels on back excellent, Condition
$40 ea. (650)592-2648
LADIES COAT Medium, dark lavender
$25 (650)368-3037
LADIES DONEGAL design 100% wool
cap from Wicklow, Ireland, $20. Call
(650)341-8342
LADIES FAUX FUR COAT - Satin lining,
size M/L, $100. obo, (650)525-1990
LADIES FUR Jacket (fake) size 12 good
condition $30 (650)692-3260
LADIES JACKET size 3x 70% wool 30%
nylon never worn $50. (650)592-2648
LADIES WINTER coat 3/4 length, rust
color, with fur collar, $30 obo
(650)515-2605
LADIES WOOL BLAZER: Classic, size
12, brass buttons. Sag Harbor. Excellent
condition. $18.00 (650)375-8044
LEATHER JACKET, mans XL, black, 5
pockets, storm flap, $39 (650)595-3933
LEATHER JACKETS (5) - used but not
abused. Like New, $100 each.
(650)670-2888
MENS JEANS (8) Brand names verious
sizes 32,33,34 waist 30,32 length $99 for
all (650)347-5104
MENS WRANGLER jeans waist 31
length 36 five pairs $20 each plus bonus
Leonard (650)504-3621
NEW BROWN LEATHER JACKET- XL
$25., 650-364-0902
NIKE PULLOVER mens heavy jacket
Navy Blue & Red (tag on) Reg. price
$200 selling for $59 (650)692-3260
PROM PARTY Dress, Long sleeveless
size 6, beauitful color, megenta, with
shawl like new $40 obo (650)349-6059
TUXEDOS, FORMAL, 3, Black, White,
Maroon Silk brocade, Like new. Size 36,
$100 All OBO (650)344-8549
VICTORIA SECRET 2 piece nightgown,
off white, silk lace. tags attached. paid
$120, selling for $55 (650)345-1111
317 Building Materials
(1) 2" FAUX WOOD WINDOW BLIND,
with 50" and 71" height, still in box, $50
obo (650)345-5502
(2) 50 lb. bags Ultra Flex/RS, new, rapid
setting tile mortar with polymer, $30.
each, (808)271-3183
10 BOTTLES of Dutch Boy interior paint.
Flat white (current stock) $5.00 SOLD!
30 FLUORESCENT Lamps 48" (brand
new in box) $75 for all (650)369-9762
DRAIN PIPE - flexible, 3” & 4”, approx.
20’ of 3”, 40 ft. of 4”, $25.all, (650)851-
0878
PVC - 1”, 100 feet, 20 ft. lengths, $25.,
(650)851-0878
318 Sports Equipment
"EVERLAST FOR HER" Machine to
help lose weight $30., (650)368-3037
2 BASKETBALLS Spalding NBA, Hardly
used, $30 all (650)341-5347
2 SOCCER balls hardly used, $30 all
San Mateo, (650)341-5347
4 TENNIS RACKETS- and 2 racketball
rackets(head).$25.(650)368-0748.
CROSMAN PELLET/BB rifle - 2100
Classic, .177 caliber, excellent condition,
rare, $50.obo, SOLD!
DARTBOARD - New, regulation 18” di-
meter, “Halex” brand w/mounting hard-
ware, 6 brass darts, $16., (650)681-7358
DELUXE TABLE tennis with net and
post in box (Martin Kalpatrick) $30 OBO
(650)349-6059
DL1000 BOAT Winch Rope & More,
$50., (650)726-9658
EXERCISE MAT used once, lavender
$12, (650)368-3037
GIRLS BIKE, Princess 16” wheels with
helmet, $50 San Mateo (650)341-5347
GOLF CLUB Cleveland Launcher Gold,
22 degrees good condition $19
(650)365-1797
GOLF CLUBS -2 woods, 9 irons, a put-
ter, and a bag with pull cart, $50.,
(650)952-0620
PING CRAZ-E Putter w/ cover. 35in.
Like New $75 call(650)208-5758
ROWING MACHINE. $30.00
(650)637-0930
TENNIS RACKETS $20 (650)796-2326
THULE BIKE RACK - Fits rectangular
load bars. Holds bike upright. $100.
(650)594-1494
VOLKI SNOW SKIS - $40., (408)764-
6142
319 Firewood
MIXED FIREWOOD, ALL FIREPLACE
SIZE- 5’ high by 10’ long . $25.,
(650)368-0748.
322 Garage Sales
ESTATE & MOVING
SALE
BURLINGAME
18-20 Clarendon Rd.
(x-st. Peninsula)
Sat. & Sun.
April 13 & 14
8 am - 4 pm
No Early Birds!
Furniture, clothing,
housewares, music
equipment, handmade
china pieces & much
more!
GARAGE &
BAKE SALE
Fundraiser for local
baseball team!
Belmont
1250 Avon St.
(off Ralston, just east of Barrett Park)
Sat., April 13th
9am-3pm
Sports equipment, furniture,
electronics, toys, dishes, books,
DVDs, costume jewelry and
more!
322 Garage Sales
GARAGE
SALE
Furniture,
Dishes, Art,
Tools, Books,
& More
no kids stuff
April 13th & 14th
9am-3pm
At the corner of
Carmellita
&
Armsby
in Hillsborough
GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!
List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
340 Camera & Photo Equip.
SONY CYBERSHOT DSC-T-50 - 7.2 MP
digital camera (black) with case, $175.,
(650)208-5598
YASAHICA 108 model 35mm SLR Cam-
era with flash and 2 zoom lenses $99
(415)971-7555
345 Medical Equipment
MEDICAL EQUIPMENT - Brand new
port-a-potty, never used, $40., Walker,
$30., (650)832-1392
379 Open Houses
OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS
List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.
Call (650)344-5200
380 Real Estate Services
HOMES & PROPERTIES
The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
weekly Real Estate Section.
Look for it
every Friday and Weekend
to find information on fine homes
and properties throughout
the local area.
381 Homes for Sale
HOMEBUYER READINESS
Ready to own a home but need
help with credit, debt or money
management?
Habitat for Humanity provides
FREE wkshps at the Fair Oaks
Community Center,
April 3, 10, 17 from 6-7:30pm.
415-625-1012
SUPER PARKSIDE
SAN MATEO
Coming Soon!
3 bedroom, 1 bath
All remodeled with large dining room
addition. Home in beautiful condition.
Enclosed front yard. Clean in and out.
Under $600K. (650)888-9906
440 Apartments
BELMONT - prime, quiet location, view,
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom, New carpets,
new granite counters, dishwasher, balco-
ny, covered carports, storage, pool, no
pets. (650) 592-1271 or (650)344-8418
470 Rooms
HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660
MILLBRAE - Room for Rent, newly re-
modeled, $800, Pre month, Near Shop-
ing center, (650)697-4758
ROOM FOR RENT in sunny San Mateo
duplex. Rent is $940 plus utilities. Lots of
patio space, garage space for storage
and bonus office room. Close to down-
town and easy access to Highway 101
for quick trip to San Francisco or Silicon
Valley. Share with one other professional
middle-aged male. One cat lives in
house now and a second will be wel-
comed. RENTED!
Rooms For Rent
Travel Inn, San Carlos
$49-59 daily + tax
$294-$322 weekly + tax
Clean Quiet Convenient
Cable TV, WiFi & Private Bathroom
Microwave and Refrigerator & A/C
950 El Camino Real San Carlos
(650) 593-3136
Mention Daily Journal
620 Automobiles
1963 THUNDERBIRD Hardtop, 390 en-
gine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$2,500 Bid (650)364-1374
1998 CHEV. Monte Carlo 59,000 Miles
$5,000, Call Glen @ (650) 583-1242
Ext. # 2
‘93 FLEETWOOD $ 2,000
Good Condition (650)481-5296
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
MERCEDES ‘06 C230 - 6 cylinder, navy
blue, 60K miles, 2 year warranty,
$18,000, (650)455-7461
620 Automobiles
GMC '99 DENALI Low miles. This is
loaded with clean leather interior, nice
stereo too. Just turned 100k miles, new
exhaust and tires. Well taken care of. No
low ballers or trades please. Pink in hand
and ready to go to next owner.
(650)759-3222 $8500 Price is firm.
630 Trucks & SUV’s
1989 CHEVY L10 Tahoe - 4w/d, Pick-Up
$2500., (650)341-7069
DODGE ‘06 DAKOTA SLT model, Quad
Cab, V-8, 63K miles, Excellent Condtion.
$8500, OBO, Daly City. (650)755-5018
635 Vans
‘67 INTERNATIONAL Step Van 1500,
need some brake work. $2500, OBO,
(650)364-1374
640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘01 - Softail Blue
and Cream, low mileage, extras, $6,800.,
Call Greg @ (650)574-2012
HARLEY DAVIDSON ‘83 Shovelhead
special construction, 1340 cc’s,
Awesome! $5,950/obo
Rob (415)602-4535.
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAG with
brackets $35., (650)670-2888
645 Boats
BANSHEE SAILBOAT - 13 ft. with ex-
tras, $750., (650)343-6563
650 RVs
‘73 Chevy Model 30 Van, Runs
good, Rebuilt Transmission, Fiber-
glass Bubble Top $1,795. Owner
financing.
Call for appointments. (650)364-1374.
655 Trailers
SMALL UTILITY TRAILER - 4’ wide, 6
1/2 ‘ long & 2 1/2’ deep, $500.obo,
(650)302-0407
670 Auto Service
GRAND OPENING!
Sincere Affordable Motors
All makes and models
Over 20 years experience
1940 Leslie St, San Mateo
(650)722-8007
samautoservices@gmail.com
ON TRACK
AUTOMOTIVE
Complete Auto Repair
foreign & domestic
www.ontrackautomotive.com
1129 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)343-4594
SAN CARLOS AUTO
SERVICE & TUNE UP
A Full Service Auto Repair
Facility
760 El Camino Real
San Carlos
(650)593-8085
670 Auto Parts
'91 TOYOTA COROLLA RADIATOR.
Original equipment. Excellent cond. Cop-
per fins. $60. San Bruno, (415)999-4947
2 1976 Nova rims with tires 2057514
leave message $80 for both
(650)588-7005
670 Auto Parts
5 HUBCAPS for 1966 Alfa Romeo $50.,
(650)580-3316
CAR TOWchain 9' $35 (650)948-0912
MAZDA 3 2010 CAR COVER - Cover-
kraft multibond inside & outside cover,
like new, $50., (650)678-3557
SHOP MANUALS 2 1955 Pontiac
manual, 4 1984 Ford/Lincoln manuals, &
1 gray marine diesel manual $40 or B/O
(650)583-5208
SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912
TIRE CHAIN cables $23. (650)766-4858
TIRES (2) - 33 x 12.5 x 15, $99.,
(650)589-8097
TRUCK RADIATOR - fits older Ford,
never used, $100., (650)504-3621
672 Auto Stereos
MONNEY
CAR AUDIO
We Sell, Install and
Repair All Brands of
Car Stereos
iPod & iPhone Wired
to Any Car for Music
Quieter Car Ride
Sound Proof Your Car
35 Years Experience
2001 Middlefield Road
Redwood City
(650)299-9991
680 Autos Wanted
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.
Just $3 per day.
Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com
DONATE YOUR CAR
Tax Deduction, We do the Paperwork,
Free Pickup, Running or Not - in most
cases. Help yourself and the Polly Klaas
Foundation. Call (800)380-5257.
Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483
Cabinetry
Cleaning Concrete
POLY-AM
CONSTRUCTION
General Contractor
Free Estimate
Specializing in
Concrete • Brickwork • Stonewall
Interlocking Pavers • Landscaping
Tile • Retaining Wall
Bonded & Insured Lic. #685214
Ben: (650)375-1573
Cell: (650) 280-8617
Construction
BURICH CONSTRUCTION CO.
Carpentry • Drywall • Tile
Painting • Exterior/Interior
Small Jobs Welcome
Free Estimates
(650)701-6072
All Work Guaranteed
Lic. # B979435
26
Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Construction
650 868 - 8492
PATRICK BRADY PATRICK BRADY
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
ADDITIONS • WALL REMOVAL
BATHS • KITCHENS AND MORE!
PATBRADY1957@SBCGLOBAL.NET
License # 479385
Frame
Structural
Foundation
Roots & ALL
I make your
life better!
LARGE OR SMALL
– I do them all!
Decks & Fences
MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500
Doors
Electricians
ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE
650-322-9288
for all your electrical needs
ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP
ELECTRICIAN
For all your
electrical needs
Residential, Commercial,
Troubleshooting,
Wiring & Repairing
Call Ben (650)685-6617
Lic # 427952
Housecleaning
HOUSE KEEPER
15 Years Experience,
Good references
Reasonable Rates / Free Estimates
Houses / Apartments
Move in's & Out's
Call Reyna
(650) 458-1302
Gutters
O.K.’S RAINGUTTER
New Rain Gutters
Down Spouts
Gutter Cleaning & Screening,
Roof & Gutter Repairs
Friendly Service
10% Senior Discount
CA Lic# 794353/Bonded
(650)556-9780
Handy Help
AL’S HOME
SERVICES
Build it, Fix it, Paint it
Projects, Bathrooms,
Remodels, Repairs
(408)515-8907
CONTRERAS
HANDYMAN
• Fences • Decks • Patios •
Power Washes • Concrete
Work • Maintenance •
Clean Ups • Arbors
Free Est.! $25. Hour
Call us Today!
(650)350-9968
(650)389-3053
contreras1270@yahoo.com
DISCOUNT HANDYMAN
& PLUMBING
• Carpentry • Plumbing • Drain
Cleaning • Kitchens • Bathrooms
• Dry Rot • Decks
Priced for You! Call John
(650)296-0568
Free Estimates
Lic.#834170
FLORES HANDYMAN
Serving you is a privilege.
Painting-Interior & Exterior• Roof Re-
pair • Base Boards New Fence •
Hardwood Floors • Plumbing • Tile •
Mirrors • Chain Link Fence • Windows
Bus Lic# 41942
Call today for free estimate.
(650)274-6133
HONEST HANDYMAN
Remodeling, Plumbing.
Electrical, Carpentry,
General Home Repair,
Maintenance,
New Construction
No Job Too Small
Lic.# 891766
(650)740-8602
Hardwood Floors
KO-AM
HARDWOOD FLOORING
•Hardwood & Laminate
Installation & Repair
•Refinish
•High Quality @ Low Prices
Call 24/7 for Free Estimate
800-300-3218
408-979-9665
Lic. #794899
Hauling
CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo
Starting at $40& Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592
JUNK HAULING
AND DEMOLITION
Clean up and Haul away all Junk
We also do Demolition
Call George
(650)518-1173
Hauling
CHEAP
HAULING!
Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700
HAULING
Low Rates
Residential and Commercial
Free Estimates,
General Clean-Ups, Garage
Clean-Outs, Construction Clean-Ups
& Gardening Services
Call (650)630-0116
or (650)636-6016
INDEPENDENT HAULERS
$40& UP HAUL
Since 1988 • Licensed/Insured
Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating
(650)341-7482
Landscaping
ASP LANDSCAPING
• All kinds of Concrete • Stamp
• Retaining Wall • Tree Service
• Brick • Roofing • Fencing
• New Lawns
Free Estimates
(650)544-1435
(650)834-4495
Moving
Bay Area
Relocation Services
Specializing in:
Homes, Apts., Storages
Professional, friendly, careful.
Peninsula’s Personal Mover
Commercial/Residential
Fully Lic. & Bonded CAL -T190632
Call Armando (650) 630-0424
Painting
BEST RATES
10% OFF
PRO PAINTING
Interior/Exterior
Pressure Washing
Professional/Courteous/Punctual
FREE ESTIMATES
Sean (415)707-9127
seanmcvey@mcveypaint.com
CSL# 752943
JON LA MOTTE
PAINTING
Interior & Exterior
Pressure Washing
Free Estimates
(650)368-8861
Lic #514269
MTP
Painting/Waterproofing
Drywall Repair/Tape/Texture
Power Washing-Decks, Fences
No Job Too Big or Small
Lic.# 896174
Call Mike the Painter
(650)271-1320
NICK MEJIA PAINTING
A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Stain-
ing, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!
(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564
Plaster/Stucco
PLASTERING & STUCCO
Interior & Exterior,
Dry Rot Repair
Free Estimates
Lic.# 632990
Call Ray (650)994-7451
(415)740-5570
Plumbing
DRAIN & SEWER
CLEANING
PLUMBING/ RE-PIPING
VIDEO SEWER
INSPECTIONS
TRENCHLESS PIPE
INSTALLATIONS
EMERGENCY HELP
15% SENIOR DISCOUNT
Free estimates
(408)347-0000
Lic #933572
Remodeling
CORNERSTONE HOME DESIGN
Complete Kitchen & Bath Resource
Showroom: Countertops Cabinets
Plumbing Fixtures Fine Tile
Open M-F 8:30-5:30 SAT 10-4
168 Marco Way
South San Francisco, 94080
(650)866-3222
www.cornerstoneHD.com
CA License #94260
Home Improvement
CINNABAR HOME
Making Peninsula homes
more beautiful since 1996
* Home furnishings & accessories
* Drapery & window treatments:
blinds & shades
* Free in-home consultation
853 Industrial Rd. Ste E San Carlos
Wed – Sat 12:00- 5:30pm, or by appt.
650-388-8836
www.cinnabarhome.com
Solar Power
GO SOLAR
with
SOLLEENIC
• $0 Down
• Excellent Financing
• Free LED Lighting retrofit for your
bedrooms/bathrooms
Call us for free estimates
(415)601-8454
www.solleenic.com
Licensed and Bonded Lic. #964006
Tree Service
Hillside Tree
Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming Pruning
• Shaping
• Large Removal
• Stump Grinding
Free
Estimates
Mention
The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
• Entryways • Kitchens
• Decks • Bathrooms
• Tile Repair • Floors
• Grout Repair • Fireplaces
Call Mario Cubias for Free Estimates
(650)784-3079
Lic.# 955492
Attorneys
Law Office of
Jason Honaker
BANKRUPTCY
Chapter 7 &13
Call us for a consultation
650-259-9200
www.honakerlegal.com
Beauty
KAY’S
HEALTH & BEAUTY
Facials, Waxing, Fitness
Body Fat Reduction
Pure Organic Facial $48.
1 Hillcrest Blvd, Millbrae
(650)697-6868
Dental Services
DR. SAMIR NANJAPA DDS
DR INSIYA SABOOWALA DDS
Family Dentistry &
Smile Restoration
UCSF Dentistry Faculty
Cantonese, Mandarin & Hindi Spoken
650-477-6920
320 N. San Mateo Dr. Ste 2
San Mateo
Dental Services
MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER
Valerie de Leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken
(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA
Food
BROADWAY GRILL
Express Lunch
Special $8.00
1400 Broadway
Burlingame
(650)343-9733
www.bwgrill.com
Food
GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com
27 Thursday • Apr. 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Food
NEW ENGLAND
LOBSTER CO.
Market & Eatery
Now Open in Burlingame
824 Cowan Road
newenglandlobster.net
LIve Lobster ,Lobster Tail,
Lobster meat & Dungeness Crab
PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com
TACO DEL MAR
NOW OPEN
856 N. Delaware St.
San Mateo, CA 94401
(650)348-3680
VEGETARIAN
BAMBOO GARDEN
Lunch & Dinner
Only Vegetarian Chinese
Restaurant in Millbrae!
309 Broadway, Millbrae
(650)697-6768
Financial
RELATIONSHIP BANKING
Partnership. Service. Trust.
UNITED AMERICAN BANK
Half Moon Bay, Redwood City,
Sunnyvale
unitedamericanbank.com
San Mateo
(650)579-1500
Furniture
Bedroom Express
Where Dreams Begin
2833 El Camino Real
San Mateo - (650)458-8881
184 El Camino Real
So. S. Francisco -(650)583-2221
www.bedroomexpress.com
WALLBEDS
AND MORE!
$400 off Any Wallbed
www.wallbedsnmore.com
248 Primrose Rd.,
BURLINGAME
(650)888-8131
Health & Medical
General Dentistry
for Adults & Children
DR. JENNIFER LEE, DDS
DR. ANNA P. LIVIZ, DDS
324 N. San Mateo Drive, #2
San Mateo 94401
(650)343-5555
Le Juin Day Spa & Clinic
Special Combination Pricing:
Facials, Microdermabrasion,
Waxing , Body Scrubs, Acu-
puncture , Foot & Body Massage
155 E. 5th Avenue
Downtown San Mateo
www.LeJuinDaySpa.com
(650) 347-6668
SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening
650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
STUBBORN FAT has met its match.
FREEZE Your Fat Away with
COOLSCULPTING
Bruce Maltz, M.D.
Carie Chui, M.D.
Allura Skin & Laser Center, Inc.
280 Baldwin Ave., San Mateo
(650) 344-1121
AlluraSkin.com
Home Care
CALIFORNIA HOARDING
REMEDIATION
Free Estimates
Whole House & Office
Cleanup Too!
Serving SF Bay Area
(650)762-8183
Call Karen Now!
Insurance
AANTHEM BLUE
CROSS
www.ericbarrettinsurance.com
Eric L. Barrett,
CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226
Insurance
AUTO • HOME • LIFE
Brian Fornesi
Insurance Agency
Tel: (650)343-6521
bfornesi@farmersagent.com
Lic: 0B78218
INSURANCE BY AN ITALIAN
Have a Policy you can’t
“Refuse”!
DOMINICE INSURANCE
AGENCY
Contractor & Truckers
Commercial Business Specialist
Personal Auto - AARP rep.
401K & IRA, Rollovers & Life
(650)871-6511
Joe Dominice
Since 1964
CA Lic.# 0276301
Jewelers
KUPFER JEWELRY
est. 1979
We Buy
Coins, Jewelry,
Watches, Platinum,
& Diamonds.
Expert fine watch
& jewelry repair.
Deal with experts.
1211 Burlingame Ave.
Burlingame
www.kupferjewelry.com
(650) 347-7007
Legal Services
LEGAL
DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded
(650)574-2087
legaldocumentsplus.com
"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."
Loans
REVERSE MORTGAGE
Are you age 62+ & own your
home?
Call for a free, easy to read
brochure or quote
650-453-3244
Carol Bertocchini, CPA
Marketing
GROW
YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com
Sign up for the free newsletter
Massage Therapy
AMAZING MASSAGE
Foot Massage $25/hr
Foot/Body $40/hr
Open 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM
703 Woodside Rd. Suite 5
Redwood City
(650)261-9200
ASIAN MASSAGE
$48 per Hour
New Customers Only
For First 20 Visits
Open 7 days, 10 am -10 pm
633 Veterans Blvd., #C
Redwood City
(650)556-9888
ENJOY THE BEST
ASIAN MASSAGE
$40 for 1/2 hour
Angel Spa
667 El Camino Real, Redwood City
(650)363-8806
7 days a week, 9:30am-9:30pm
GRAND OPENING
$45 ONE HOUR
HEALING MASSAGE
2305-A Carlos Street
Moss Beach
(On Hwy 1 next to Post office)
(650)563-9771
Massage Therapy
GRAND OPENING
for Aurora Spa
Full Body Massage
10-9:30, 7 days a week
(650)365-1668
1685 Broadway Street
Redwood City
GREAT FULL BODY
MASSAGE
Tranquil Massage
951 Old County Rd. Suite 1,
Belmont
10:00 to 9:30 everyday
(650) 654-2829
RELAX
REJUVENATE
RECHARGE
in our luxury bath house
Water Lounge Day Spa
2500 S. El Camino
San Mateo
(650)389-7090
Needlework
LUV2
STITCH.COM
Needlepoint!
Fiesta Shopping Center
747 Bermuda Dr., San Mateo
(650)571-9999
Real Estate Loans
REAL ESTATE LOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
Direct Private Lender
Homes • Multi-family •
Mixed-Use • Commercial
WE BUY TRUST DEED NOTES
FICO Credit Score Not a Factor
PURCHASE, REFINANCE,
CASH OUT
Investors welcome
Loan servicing since 1979
650-348-7191
Wachter Investments, Inc.
Real Estate Broker #746683
Nationwide Mortgage
Licensing System ID #348268
CA Dept. of Real Estate
Real Estate Services
O’DOWD ESTATES
Representing Buyers
& Sellers
Commission Negotiable
odowdestates.com
(650)794-9858
VIP can help you with all of your
real estate needs:
SALES * LEASING * MANAGEMENT
Consultation and advice are free
Where every client is a VIP
864 Laurel St #200 San Carlos
650-595-4565
www.vilmont.com
DRE LIC# 1254368
Seniors
AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living
Care located in
Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
&
Burlingame Villa
- Short Term Stays
- Dementia & Alzheimers
Care
- Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633
LASTING IMPRESSIONS
ARE OUR FIRST PRIORITY
Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
STERLING COURT
ACTIVE INDEPENDENT
SENIOR LIVING
Tours 10AM-4PM
2 BR,1BR & Studio
Luxury Rental
650-344-8200
850 N. El Camino Real San Mateo
sterlingcourt.com
28
Thursday • April 11, 2013 THEDAILYJOURNAL
Coins ª Dental ª Jewelry ª Silver ª Watches ª Diamonds
1Z11 80fll0¶8M0 ß90 ª ëâ0·J4¡·¡00¡
Expert Fine Watch
& Jewelry Repair
Not affiliated with any watch company.
Only Authentic ROLEX Factory Parts Are Used
t%FBMWJUI&YQFSUTt2VJDL4FSWJDF
t6OFRVBM$VTUPNFS$BSF
XXX#FTU3BUFE(PME#VZFSTDPN
Tuesday - Saturday
11:00am to 4:00pm
www.BestRatedGoldBuyers.com
KUPFER JEWELRYsBURLINGAME
(650) 347-7007
SERVICE
OR REPAIR
MUST PRESENT COUPON.
EXPIRES 4/30/13
WEBUY
$â0 $â0
OFF
Established 1979

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